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  • 1. Bakardjieva Engelbrekt, Antonina
    et al.
    Mårtensson, Moa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Persson, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    EU kan fastna i negativ spiral2012In: Svenska DagbladetArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Bakardjieva Engelbrekt, Antonina
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Mårtensson, Moa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Oxelheim, Lars
    Lunds universitet.
    Persson, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    The EU and Global Imbalances2015In: The EU’s Role in Fighting Global Imbalances / [ed] Bakrdjieva Engelbrekt, A., Mårtensson, M., Oxelheim, L. och Persson, T., Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, p. 1-15Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3. Bakardjieva Engelbrekt, Antonina
    et al.
    Mårtensson, MoaUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.Oxelheim, LarsPersson, ThomasUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    The EU's Role in Fighting Global Imbalances2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The EU’s Role in Fighting Global Imbalances looks at the role of the European Union in addressing some of the greatest challenges of our time: poverty, protectionism, climate change, and human trafficking. Contributions from ten leading scholars in the fields of economics, law, and political science provide in-depth analyses of three key dimensions of EU foreign policy, namely: the internal challenges facing the EU, as its 28 member countries struggle to coordinate their actions; the external challenges facing the EU on the global arena, in areas where global imbalances are particularly pervasive, and where measures taken by the Union can have an important impact; and the EU´s performance on the global arena, in the eyes of other key actors. Based on a broad and interdisciplinary understanding of the concept of global imbalances, this book argues that these challenges follow from pervasive global imbalances, which at root are economic, political, and legal in character.

    Contributions from ten leading scholars in the fields of economics, law, and political science provide in-depth analyses of three key dimensions of EU foreign policy, namely: the internal challenges facing the EU, as its 28 member countries struggle to coordinate their actions; the external challenges facing the EU on the global arena, in areas where global imbalances are particularly pervasive, and where measures taken by the Union can have an important impact; and the EU´s performance on the global arena, in the eyes of other key actors.

    This policy-oriented, interdisciplinary volume offers real insight into the European Union and its role in global affairs and will appeal to academics and policy-makers alike.

  • 4.
    Bernitz, Ulf
    et al.
    Stockholm university, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Moa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Oxelheim, Lars
    University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Persson, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Analysing the Prosperity Gap: The Economic, Legal, and Political Challenges Facing the EU2018In: Bridging the Prosperity Gap in the EU: the Social Challenge Ahead / [ed] Ulf Bernitz, Moa Mårtensson, Lars Oxelheim, Thomas Persson, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Bernitz, Ulf
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, MoaUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.Oxelheim, LarsPersson, ThomasUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Bridging the Prosperity Gap in the EU: The Social Challenge Ahead2018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Bridging the Prosperity Gap in the EU addresses the great social challenge currently facing the European Union. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, the authors invaluably pinpoint both overarching problems and possibilities associated with the social dimension of European integration. 

    Prominent researchers of economics, law and political science tackle this complex issue, providing new solutions within their respective fields of expertise. The chapters cover crucial policy challenges and analyse fundamental mechanisms that limit, or otherwise affect, the evolution of a European social dimension. These insights clarify the far-reaching measures that will be needed to gradually restore the balance between market integration and social protection across the European Union. 

    Illustrating the importance of cohesion, this book is vital for those interested in comparative European studies, from backgrounds in public and social policy, law and economics. 

  • 6. Bernitz, Ulf
    et al.
    Mårtensson, Moa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Oxelheim, Lars
    Persson, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    EU har inte råd att blunda för klyftorna2017In: Svenska DagbladetArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Bernitz, Ulf
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet .
    Mårtensson, Moa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Oxelheim, Lars
    Lunds universitet.;Institutet för Näringslivsforskning (IFN).
    Persson, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Stolta söndagsförkunnelser räcker inte för att minska välfärdsgapet inom EU2017In: Hufvudstadsbladet, no 24/11, p. 26-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Karlsson, Christer
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Mårtensson, Moa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Persson, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government. 7504238200.
    Hur mycket opposition finns det i svensk EU-politik?2018Report (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Karlsson, Christer
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Mårtensson, Moa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Persson, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Hur mycket opposition finns det i svensk EU-politik?2019In: EU i riksdagen / [ed] Anna Wetter Ryde och Göran von Sydow, Stockholm: Svenska institutet för europapolitiska studier, Sieps 2019:1op , 2019, p. 37-60Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Mårtensson, Moa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Coming together or drifting apart? Citizen attitudes in the EU’s area of free movement (Reminder Project blog, 22 May 2018)2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Mårtensson, Moa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    How are the EU’s Three Channels of Representation Coordinated?: Evidence from a Crucial CaseManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Mårtensson, Moa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Linkage in the EU’s Mixed System of Representation: Bottom-Up or Top-Down?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Mårtensson, Moa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Mixed Representation and Legitimacy in the European Union2007In: Journal of European Integration, ISSN 0703-6337, E-ISSN 1477-2280, Vol. 29, p. 285-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A central critique against the European Union's (EU's) system of representation is that it strikes an uneven balance between the three traditional channels of representation. Directly elected representatives are said to be uniquely powerless in relation to territorial representatives and representatives of organized interests. In the article, this argument is scrutinized within a comparative framework, using a selection of existing data on democratic systems from around the world. The study confirms that the EU's system of representation attributes great importance to territorial representation. However, the main finding is that it is not unique in this regard. Moreover, organized interests at the European level do not seem exceptionally powerful, in terms of their capacity to act collectively to influence policy. These findings are interpreted in the light of current research on the EU's legitimacy, resulting in two additional conclusions. While the EU's formal legitimacy would be enhanced by a push towards electoral politics at the European level, its social legitimacy hinges on a continued existence of territorial representation. Striking the proper balance between channels of representation at the European level stands out as a future challenge to researchers and political actors.

  • 14.
    Mårtensson, Moa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Political Representation in the European Union: A Multi-Channel Approach2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Union (EU) is the most far-reaching attempt yet undertaken to institutionalize democratic policy-making beyond the nation-state. To what extent, and in what ways, do various channels of representation contribute towards the realization of this aim? This dissertation takes stock of current research on the EU’s system of representation, and seeks to expand its agenda so that this central question can be properly addressed. In contrast to prior empirical work in the field, the dissertation employs research designs that incorporate several forms of representation into a unified evaluative framework. This multi-channel approach to political representation paves the way for a systematic comparison of how different forms of representation (electoral, territorial and corporate) perform in the EU context. It also makes possible an empirical assessment of a key proposition in current representation theory: that elections, in large and heterogeneous political systems, are outperformed by other forms of representation.

    The three articles in the dissertation draw on existing cross-country data, interviews with policy-makers and a new dataset collected by the author. They scrutinize representation in three principal channels: electoral representation in the European Parliament, government representation in the preparatory bodies of the Council of Ministers, and representation through organized interests that seek to influence EU policy. The first article examines the balance of power that has emerged between these three channels of representation in the EU’s legislative process, and how the current balance is likely to affect the Union’s legitimacy. The second article investigates how different channels of representation perform in terms of providing linkage between Brussels-based representatives and their domestic principals. The third article examines the extent to which different channels of representation contribute to the coordination of EU policy-making domestically, at the European level, and across the two levels of government.

    Finally, this dissertation makes a methodological contribution by applying social network analysis (SNA) to classic problems of representation within and across different channels of representation. This approach is novel to the field. Researchers should be able to exploit SNA and relational data fruitfully in the future, in the study of representational relationships in the EU and numerous other contexts.

    List of papers
    1. Mixed Representation and Legitimacy in the European Union
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mixed Representation and Legitimacy in the European Union
    2007 (English)In: Journal of European Integration, ISSN 0703-6337, E-ISSN 1477-2280, Vol. 29, p. 285-302Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A central critique against the European Union's (EU's) system of representation is that it strikes an uneven balance between the three traditional channels of representation. Directly elected representatives are said to be uniquely powerless in relation to territorial representatives and representatives of organized interests. In the article, this argument is scrutinized within a comparative framework, using a selection of existing data on democratic systems from around the world. The study confirms that the EU's system of representation attributes great importance to territorial representation. However, the main finding is that it is not unique in this regard. Moreover, organized interests at the European level do not seem exceptionally powerful, in terms of their capacity to act collectively to influence policy. These findings are interpreted in the light of current research on the EU's legitimacy, resulting in two additional conclusions. While the EU's formal legitimacy would be enhanced by a push towards electoral politics at the European level, its social legitimacy hinges on a continued existence of territorial representation. Striking the proper balance between channels of representation at the European level stands out as a future challenge to researchers and political actors.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2007
    Keywords
    mixed representation; European Union; electoral politics; bicameralism; organized interests; legitimacy
    National Category
    Political Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-26723 (URN)10.1080/07036330701442281 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-10-17 Created: 2008-10-17 Last updated: 2018-01-17
    2. Linkage in the EU’s Mixed System of Representation: Bottom-Up or Top-Down?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Linkage in the EU’s Mixed System of Representation: Bottom-Up or Top-Down?
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
    Research subject
    Political Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-267104 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-11-18 Created: 2015-11-18 Last updated: 2018-01-10
    3. How are the EU’s Three Channels of Representation Coordinated?: Evidence from a Crucial Case
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>How are the EU’s Three Channels of Representation Coordinated?: Evidence from a Crucial Case
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
    Research subject
    Political Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-267105 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-11-18 Created: 2015-11-18 Last updated: 2018-01-10
  • 15.
    Mårtensson, Moa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Palme, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Ruhs, Martin
    European University Institute.
    Reciprocity in welfare institutions and normative attitudes in EU Member States2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses how national welfare institutions and normative attitudes to welfarevary across EU/EFTA countries, and how national welfare institutions are linked to welfareattitudes, a long-standing question of comparative welfare state research. Our focus in thispaper is on the concept of ‘reciprocity’ in welfare institutions and welfare attitudes, animportant, and, we argue, under-researched issue that has been at the heart of recentdebates about common EU policy-making, especially about whether and how to reform thecurrent rules for free movement of workers in the EU. More specifically, the paper uses datafrom the European Social Survey (ESS) and a newly-constructed dataset of thecharacteristics of welfare institutions in 24 EU countries to address three questions: How dosocial protection programmes in EU member states differ with regard to reciprocity? Howdo normative attitudes to reciprocity in welfare programmes vary across EU memberstates? And finally, how are these normative attitudes linked to the actual design of welfarestate programmes? We find substantial cross-country differences in social protectionprogrammes in relation to the concept of reciprocity, considerable variation in normativeattitudes to reciprocity, and that there is a clear correlation between the two. That nationalinstitutions matter for normative attitudes around core welfare state programmes mayhave significant consequences for views about free movement among Europeanpopulations, with potentially important repercussions for the politics around freemovement in the EU.

  • 16.
    Mårtensson, Moa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Palme, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Österman, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Ruhs, Martin
    European University Institute.
    Reciprocity in welfare institutions and attitudes to free movement in EU receiving countries2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the determinants of public attitudes to the “free movement” of workers

    in the European Union. We add to the small but growing research literature on this issue by

    focusing on how the characteristics of national welfare institutions affect public attitudes to

    intra-EU labour mobility. More specifically, we explore the role of what we see as the

    degree of “institutional reciprocity” in national systems of social protection in explaining

    variations of attitudes to free movement across 12 EU Member States. We do not find

    evidence of a direct effect of institutional reciprocity on attitudes to free movement.

    However, we identify an interaction effect which suggests that higher degrees of

    institutional reciprocity in national social protection systems in general, and in

    unemployment insurance systems in particular, are associated with lower levels of

    opposition to free movement among unemployed people.

  • 17.
    Mårtensson, Moa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Uba, Katrin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Indicators of Normative Attitudes in Europe: Welfare, the European Union, Immigration and Free Movement, forthcoming2018Report (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Persson, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Mårtensson, Moa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Karlsson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Eurosceptic Challenger Parties and Political Opposition in European Union Politics: Part of the Problem or Part of the Solution?2019In: Scandinavian Political Studies, ISSN 0080-6757, E-ISSN 1467-9477, Vol. 42, no 3-4, p. 245-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite extensive research on Eurosceptic challenger parties, our knowledge of their influence on political opposition has so far been sparse. In this article we make an in-depth assessment of parliamentary EU opposition, based on 4,264 statements made by national parliamentarians in the European Affairs Committees (EACs) of Denmark and Sweden. Our analysis shows that the presence of Eurosceptic challenger parties in the national parliamentary arena impacts patterns and practices of EU opposition significantly. A greater presence of ‘hard’ Eurosceptic parties in parliament is associated with more opposition in EU politics. These parties deliver a vast majority of the polity-oriented opposition towards the EU and present more policy alter- natives than mainstream parties. The findings presented have implications for our understand- ing of national parliamentary EU opposition as well as for the assessment of the impact of Eurosceptic challenger parties on the process of European integration. 

1 - 18 of 18
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