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  • 1.
    Birchall, Joshua
    et al.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, NL-6525 ED Nijmegen, Netherlands; Museu Paraense Emilio Goeldi, Belem, Para, Brazil.
    Dunn, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology. Max Planck Inst Psycholinguist, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Greenhill, Simon
    Australian Natl Univ, ARC Ctr Excellence Dynam Language, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia; Max Planck Inst Sci Human Hist, Jena, Germany.
    A combined comparative and phylogenetic analysis of the Chapacuran language family2016In: International Journal of American Linguistics, ISSN 0020-7071, E-ISSN 1545-7001, Vol. 82, no 3, p. 255-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Chapacuran language family, with three extant members and nine historically attested lects, has yet to be classified following modern standards in historical linguistics. This paper presents an internal classification of these languages by combining both the traditional comparative method (CM) and Bayesian phylogenetic inference (BPI). We identify multiple systematic sound correspondences and 285 cognate sets of basic vocabulary using the available documentation. These allow us to reconstruct a large portion of the Proto-Chapacuran phonemic inventory and identify tentative major subgroupings. The cognate sets form the input for the BPI analysis, which uses a stochastic Continuous-Time Markov Chain to model the change of these cognate sets over time. We test various models of lexical substitution and evolutionary clocks, and use ethnohistorical information and data collection dates to calibrate the resulting trees. The CM and BPI analyses produce largely congruent results, suggesting a division of the family into three different clades.

  • 2. Bouckaert, Remco
    et al.
    Lemey, Philippe
    Dunn, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Greenhill, Simon J.
    Alekseyenko, Alexander V.
    Drummond, Alexei J.
    Gray, Russell D.
    Suchard, Marc A.
    Atkinson, Quentin D.
    Mapping the Origins and Expansion of the Indo-European Language Family2012In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, 1095-9203, Vol. 337, no 6097, p. 957-960Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are two competing hypotheses for the origin of the Indo-European language family. The conventional view places the homeland in the Pontic steppes about 6000 years ago. An alternative hypothesis claims that the languages spread from Anatolia with the expansion of farming 8000 to 9500 years ago. We used Bayesian phylogeographic approaches, together with basic vocabulary data from 103 ancient and contemporary Indo-European languages, to explicitly model the expansion of the family and test these hypotheses. We found decisive support for an Anatolian origin over a steppe origin. Both the inferred timing and root location of the Indo-European language trees fit with an agricultural expansion from Anatolia beginning 8000 to 9500 years ago. These results highlight the critical role that phylogeographic inference can play in resolving debates about human prehistory.

  • 3. Burenhult, Niclas
    et al.
    Kruspe, Nicole
    Dunn, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Language history and culture groups among Austroasiatic-speaking foragers of the Malay Peninsula2011In: Dynamics of Human Diversity / [ed] Enfield, N. J., Pacific Linguistics , 2011, p. 257-275Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4. Danielsen, S.
    et al.
    Dunn, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Muysken, P. C. \textbar068033397
    The Spread of the Arawakan Languages: A View from Structural Phylogenetics2011In: Ethnicity in ancient Amazonia: Reconstructing past identities from archaeology, linguistics, and ethnohistory / [ed] Hornborg, A.; Hill, J. D., University of Colorado Press , 2011, p. 173-196Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Dunn, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Anthropological papers of the University of Alaska: The Dene-Yeniseian connection (review)2012In: Language, ISSN 0097-8507, E-ISSN 1535-0665, Vol. 88, no 2, p. 429-432Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Dunn, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Contact and phylogeny in Island Melanesia2009In: Lingua, Vol. 119, no 11, p. 1664-1678Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Dunn, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Gender determined dialect variation2014In: The expression of gender / [ed] Corbett, Greville G., Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2014, p. 39-68Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Dunn, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Gender determined dialect variation2014In: The expression of gender / [ed] Corbett, Greville G., Mouton de Gruyter, 2014, p. 39-68Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Dunn, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Language phylogenies2015In: The Routledge Handbook of Historical Linguistics / [ed] Bowern, Claire and Evans, Bethwyn, Routledge, 2015, p. 190-211Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Dunn, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Review of Evolutionary Linguistics by April McMahon and Robert McMahon2014In: American Anthropologist, ISSN 0002-7294, E-ISSN 1548-1433, Vol. 116, no 3, p. 690-691Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Dunn, Michael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Foley, R.
    Levinson, S. C
    Reesink, G.
    Terrill, A.
    Statistical reasoning in the evaluation of typological diversity in Island Melanesia2007In: Oceanic Linguistics, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 388-403Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Dunn, Michael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Greenhill, Simon J.
    Levinson, Stephen C.
    Gray, Russell D.
    Evolved structure of language shows lineage-specific trends in word-order universals2011In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, 1476-4687, Vol. 473, p. 79-82Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Dunn, Michael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Kruspe, Nicole
    Burenhult, Niclas
    Time and place in the prehistory of the Aslian languages2013In: Human Biology, Vol. 85, p. 383-400Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Dunn, Michael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Levinson, S. C
    Lindstr\textbackslashöm, E.
    Reesink, G.
    Terrill, A.
    Structural phylogeny in historical linguistics: methodological explorations applied in Island Melanesia2008In: Language, Vol. 84, no 4, p. 710-759Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15. Dunn, Michael
    et al.
    Margetts, Anna
    Meira, Sergio
    Terrill, Angela
    Four languages from the lower end of the typology of locative predication2007In: Linguistics, ISSN 0024-3949, E-ISSN 1613-396X, Vol. 45, no 5part6, p. 873-892Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Dunn, Michael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Ross, M.
    Is Kazukuru really non-Austronesian?2007In: Oceanic Linguistics, Vol. 46Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Dunn, Michael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Terrill, Angela
    Assessing the lexical evidence for a Central Solomons Papuan family using the Oswalt Monte Carlo Test2012In: Diachronica, ISSN 0176-4225, E-ISSN 1569-9714, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 1-27Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18. Gavin, Michael C.
    et al.
    Botero, Carlos A.
    Bowern, Claire
    Colwell, Robert K.
    Dunn, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Dunn, Robert R.
    Gray, Russell D.
    Kirby, Kathryn R.
    McCarter, Joe
    Powell, Adam
    Rangel, Thiago F.
    Stepp, John R.
    Trautwein, Michelle
    Verdolin, Jennifer L.
    Yanega, Gregor
    Toward a Mechanistic Understanding of Linguistic Diversity2013In: BioScience, ISSN 0006-3568, 1525-3244, Vol. 63, no 7, p. 524-535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our species displays remarkable linguistic diversity. Although the uneven distribution of this diversity demands explanation, the drivers of these patterns have not been conclusively determined. We address this issue in two steps: First, we review previous empirical studies whose authors have suggested environmental, geographical, and sociocultural drivers of linguistic diversification. However, contradictory results and methodological variation make it difficult to draw general conclusions. Second, we outline a program for future research. We suggest that future analyses should account for interactions among causal factors, the lack of spatial and phylogenetic independence of the data, and transitory patterns. Recent analytical advances in biogeography and evolutionary biology, such as simulation modeling of diversity patterns, hold promise for testing four key mechanisms of language diversification proposed here: neutral change, population movement, contact, and selection. Future modeling approaches should also evaluate how the outcomes of these processes are influenced by demography, environmental heterogeneity, and time.

  • 19.
    Gavin, Michael C.
    et al.
    Colorado State Univ, Dept Human Dimens Nat Resources, Ft Collins, CO 80523 USA.;Max Planck Inst Sci Human Hist, Jena, Germany..
    Rangel, Thiago F.
    Univ Fed Goias, Dept Ecol, Goiania, Go, Brazil..
    Bowern, Claire
    Yale Univ, Dept Linguist, New Haven, CT USA..
    Colwell, Robert K.
    Univ Connecticut, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, Storrs, CT USA.;Univ Colorado, Museum Nat Hist, Boulder, CO 80309 USA..
    Kirby, Kathryn R.
    Univ Toronto, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, Toronto, ON, Canada.;Univ Toronto, Dept Geog & Planning, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Botero, Carlos A.
    Washington Univ, Dept Biol, Campus Box 1137, St Louis, MO 63130 USA..
    Dunn, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Dunn, Robert R.
    North Carolina State Univ, Dept Appl Ecol, Raleigh, NC USA..
    McCarter, Joe
    Amer Museum Nat Hist, Ctr Biodivers & Conservat, New York, NY 10024 USA..
    Coelho, Marco Tulio Pacheco
    Univ Fed Goias, Dept Ecol, Goiania, Go, Brazil..
    Gray, Russell D.
    Univ Auckland, Sch Psychol, Auckland, Australia.;Australian Natl Univ, Res Sch Social Sci, Canberra, ACT, Australia.;Max Planck Inst Sci Human Hist, Jena, Germany..
    Process-based modelling shows how climate and demography shape language diversity2017In: Global Ecology and Biogeography, ISSN 1466-822X, E-ISSN 1466-8238, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 584-591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimTwo fundamental questions about human language demand answers: why are so many languages spoken today and why is their geographical distribution so uneven? Although hypotheses have been proposed for centuries, the processes that determine patterns of linguistic and cultural diversity remain poorly understood. Previous studies, which relied on correlative, curve-fitting approaches, have produced contradictory results. Here we present the first application of process-based simulation modelling, derived from macroecology, to examine the distribution of human groups and their languages. LocationThe Australian continent is used as a case study to demonstrate the power of simulation modelling for identifying processes shaping the diversity and distribution of human languages. MethodsProcess-based simulation models allow investigators to hold certain factors constant in order to isolate and assess the impact of modelled processes. We tested the extent to which a minimal set of processes determines the number and spatial distribution of languages on the Australian continent. Our model made three basic assumptions based on previously proposed, but untested, hypotheses: groups fill unoccupied spaces, rainfall limits population density and groups divide after reaching a maximum population. ResultsRemarkably, this simple model accurately predicted the total number of languages (average estimate 406, observed 407), and explained 56% of spatial variation in language richness on the Australian continent. Main conclusionsOur results present strong evidence that current climatic conditions and limits to group size are important processes shaping language diversity patterns in Australia. Our study also demonstrates how simulation models from macroecology can be used to understand the processes that have shaped human cultural diversity across the globe.

  • 20.
    Greenhill, Simon J.
    et al.
    Australian Natl Univ, ARC Ctr Excellence Dynam Language, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia.;Max Planck Inst Sci Human Hist, Dept Linguist & Cultural Evolut, D-07745 Jena, Germany..
    Wu, Chieh-Hsi
    Univ Oxford, Dept Stat, Oxford OX1 3LB, England..
    Hua, Xia
    Australian Natl Univ, Res Sch Biol, Div Ecol Evolut & Genet, Macroevolut & Macroecol, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia..
    Dunn, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Levinson, Stephen C.
    Max Planck Inst Psycholinguist, NL-6525 XD Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Comparat Linguist, NL-6525 HP Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Gray, Russell D.
    Max Planck Inst Sci Human Hist, Dept Linguist & Cultural Evolut, D-07745 Jena, Germany.;Univ Auckland, Sch Psychol, Auckland, New Zealand..
    Evolutionary dynamics of language systems2017In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 114, no 42, p. E8822-E8829Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding how and why language subsystems differ in their evolutionary dynamics is a fundamental question for historical and comparative linguistics. One key dynamic is the rate of language change. While it is commonly thought that the rapid rate of change hampers the reconstruction of deep language relationships beyond 6,000-10,000 y, there are suggestions that grammatical structures might retainmore signal over time than other subsystems, such as basic vocabulary. In this study, we use a Dirichlet process mixture model to infer the rates of change in lexical and grammatical data from 81 Austronesian languages. We show that, on average, most grammatical features actually change faster than items of basic vocabulary. The grammatical data show less schismogenesis, higher rates of homoplasy, and more bursts of contact-induced change than the basic vocabulary data. However, there is a core of grammatical and lexical features that are highly stable. These findings suggest that different subsystems of language have differing dynamics and that careful, nuanced models of language change will be needed to extract deeper signal from the noise of parallel evolution, areal readaptation, and contact.

  • 21.
    Günther, Torsten
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Valdiosera, Cristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology. La Trobe Univ, Dept Archaeol & Hist, Melbourne, Vic 3086, Australia.;Univ Complutense Madrid, Inst Salud Carlos Evoluc & Comportamiento Human 3, Ctr Mixto, Madrid 28029, Spain..
    Malmström, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Urena, Irene
    Univ Complutense Madrid, Inst Salud Carlos Evoluc & Comportamiento Human 3, Ctr Mixto, Madrid 28029, Spain.;Univ Complutense Madrid, Fac Ciencias Geol, Dept Paleontol, E-28040 Madrid, Spain..
    Rodriguez-Varela, Ricardo
    Univ Complutense Madrid, Inst Salud Carlos Evoluc & Comportamiento Human 3, Ctr Mixto, Madrid 28029, Spain.;Univ Complutense Madrid, Fac Ciencias Geol, Dept Paleontol, E-28040 Madrid, Spain..
    Sverrisdóttir, Oddný Ósk
    Uppsala University, University Administration, Student Affairs and Academic Registry Division.
    Daskalaki, Evangelia A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology. Stockholm Univ, Dept Archaeol & Class Studies, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Skoglund, Pontus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology. Stockholm Univ, Dept Archaeol & Class Studies, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Dept Genet, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Naidoo, Thijessen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Svensson, Emma M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Maria Bermudez de Castro, Jose
    Ctr Nacl Invest Evoluc Humana, Burgos 09002, Spain..
    Carbonell, Eudald
    Inst Catala Paleoecol Humana & Evolucio Social, CEIP Marcelli Domingo, Tarragona 43007, Spain..
    Dunn, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Archaeol & Class Studies, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Iriarte, Eneko
    Univ Burgos, Dept Ciencias Hist & Geog, Burgos 09001, Spain..
    Arsuaga, Juan Luis
    Univ Complutense Madrid, Inst Salud Carlos Evoluc & Comportamiento Human 3, Ctr Mixto, Madrid 28029, Spain.;Univ Complutense Madrid, Fac Ciencias Geol, Dept Paleontol, E-28040 Madrid, Spain..
    Carretero, Jose-Miguel
    Univ Complutense Madrid, Inst Salud Carlos Evoluc & Comportamiento Human 3, Ctr Mixto, Madrid 28029, Spain.;Univ Burgos, Dept Ciencias Hist & Geog, Burgos 09001, Spain..
    Gotherstrom, Anders
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Archaeol & Class Studies, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ancient genomes link early farmers from Atapuerca in Spain to modern-day Basques2015In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 112, no 38, p. 11917-11922Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The consequences of the Neolithic transition in Europe-one of the most important cultural changes in human prehistory-is a subject of great interest. However, its effect on prehistoric and modern-day people in Iberia, the westernmost frontier of the European continent, remains unresolved. We present, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide sequence data from eight human remains, dated to between 5,500 and 3,500 years before present, excavated in the El Portalon cave at Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain. We show that these individuals emerged from the same ancestral gene pool as early farmers in other parts of Europe, suggesting that migration was the dominant mode of transferring farming practices throughout western Eurasia. In contrast to central and northern early European farmers, the Chalcolithic El Portalon individuals additionally mixed with local southwestern hunter-gatherers. The proportion of hunter-gatherer-related admixture into early farmers also increased over the course of two millennia. The Chalcolithic El Portalon individuals showed greatest genetic affinity to modern-day Basques, who have long been considered linguistic and genetic isolates linked to the Mesolithic whereas all other European early farmers show greater genetic similarity to modern-day Sardinians. These genetic links suggest that Basques and their language may be linked with the spread of agriculture during the Neolithic. Furthermore, all modern-day Iberian groups except the Basques display distinct admixture with Caucasus/Central Asian and North African groups, possibly related to historical migration events. The El Portalon genomes uncover important pieces of the demographic history of Iberia and Europe and reveal how prehistoric groups relate to modern-day people.

  • 22. Hunley, Keith
    et al.
    Dunn, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Lindström, Eva
    Reesink, Ger
    Terrill, Angela
    Healy, Meghan E.
    Koki, George
    Friedlaender, Françoise R.
    Friedlaender, Jonathan S.
    Genetic and Linguistic Coevolution in Northern Island Melanesia2008In: PLoS Genetics, ISSN 1553-7390, E-ISSN 1553-7404, Vol. 4, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies have detailed a remarkable degree of genetic and linguistic diversity in Northern Island Melanesia. Here we utilize that diversity to examine two models of genetic and linguistic coevolution. The first model predicts that genetic and linguistic correspondences formed following population splits and isolation at the time of early range expansions into the region. The second is analogous to the genetic model of isolation by distance, and it predicts that genetic and linguistic correspondences formed through continuing genetic and linguistic exchange between neighboring populations. We tested the predictions of the two models by comparing observed and simulated patterns of genetic variation, genetic and linguistic trees, and matrices of genetic, linguistic, and geographic distances. The data consist of 751 autosomal microsatellites and 108 structural linguistic features collected from 33 Northern Island Melanesian populations. The results of the tests indicate that linguistic and genetic exchange have erased any evidence of a splitting and isolation process that might have occurred early in the settlement history of the region. The correlation patterns are also inconsistent with the predictions of the isolation by distance coevolutionary process in the larger Northern Island Melanesian region, but there is strong evidence for the process in the rugged interior of the largest island in the region (New Britain). There we found some of the strongest recorded correlations between genetic, linguistic, and geographic distances. We also found that, throughout the region, linguistic features have generally been less likely to diffuse across population boundaries than genes. The results from our study, based on exceptionally fine-grained data, show that local genetic and linguistic exchange are likely to obscure evidence of the early history of a region, and that language barriers do not particularly hinder genetic exchange. In contrast, global patterns may emphasize more ancient demographic events, including population splits associated with the early colonization of major world regions. The coevolution of genes and languages has been a subject of enduring interest among geneticists and linguists. Progress has been limited by the available data and by the methods employed to compare patterns of genetic and linguistic variation. Here, we use high-quality data and novel methods to test two models of genetic and linguistic coevolution in Northern Island Melanesia, a region known for its complex history and remarkable biological and linguistic diversity. The first model predicts that congruent genetic and linguistic trees formed following serial population splits and isolation that occurred early in the settlement history of the region. The second model emphasizes the role of post-settlement exchange among neighboring groups in determining genetic and linguistic affinities. We rejected both models for the larger region, but found strong evidence for the post-settlement exchange model in the rugged interior of its largest island, where people have maintained close ties to their ancestral lands. The exchange (particularly genetic exchange) has obscured but not completely erased signals of early migrations into Island Melanesia, and such exchange has probably obscured early prehistory within other regions. In contrast, local exchange is less likely to have obscured evidence of population history at larger geographic scales.

  • 23. Hunley, Keith
    et al.
    Dunn, Michael
    Lindström, Eva
    Reesink, Ger
    Terrill, Angela
    Norton, Heather
    Scheinfeldt, Laura
    Friedlaender, Françoise R.
    Merriwether, D. Andrew
    Koki, George
    Friedlaender, Jonathan S.
    Inferring Prehistory from Genetic, Linguistic, and Geographic Variation2007In: Population Genetics, Linguistics, and Culture History in the Southwest Pacific, Oxford University Press, 2007, Vol. 1, p. 141-155Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter investigates the fit of genetic, phenotypic, and linguistic data to two well-known models of population history. The first of these models, termed the population fissions model, emphasizes population splitting, isolation, and independent evolution. It predicts that genetic and linguistic data will be perfectly tree-like. The second model, termed isolation by distance, emphasizes genetic exchange among geographically proximate populations. It predicts a monotonic decline in genetic similarity with increasing geographic distance. While these models are overly simplistic, deviations from them were expected to provide important insights into the population history of northern Island Melanesia. The chapter finds scant support for either model because the prehistory of the region has been so complex. Nonetheless, the genetic and linguistic data are consistent with an early radiation of proto-Papuan speakers into the region followed by a much later migration of Austronesian speaking peoples. While these groups subsequently experienced substantial genetic and cultural exchange, this exchange has been insufficient to erase this history of separate migrations.

  • 24. Jordan, Fiona M.
    et al.
    Dunn, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Kin Term Diversity Is the Result of Multilevel, Historical Processes2010In: Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Vol. 33, no 05Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Kolipakam, Vishnupriya
    et al.
    Wildlife Inst India, Post Box 18, Dehra Dun 248001, Uttar Pradesh, India.;Max Planck Inst Psycholinguist, Evolutionary Proc Language & Culture, Wundtlaan 1, NL-6525 XD Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Jordan, Fiona M.
    Max Planck Inst Psycholinguist, Evolutionary Proc Language & Culture, Wundtlaan 1, NL-6525 XD Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Univ Bristol, Dept Anthropol & Archaeol, 43 Woodland Rd, Bristol BS8 1UU, Avon, England.;Max Planck Inst Sci Human Hist, Dept Linguist & Cultural Evolut, Kahlaische Str 10, D-07745 Jena, Germany..
    Dunn, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology. Max Planck Inst Psycholinguist, Evolutionary Proc Language & Culture, Wundtlaan 1, NL-6525 XD Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Greenhill, Simon J.
    Max Planck Inst Sci Human Hist, Dept Linguist & Cultural Evolut, Kahlaische Str 10, D-07745 Jena, Germany.;Australian Natl Univ, ARC Ctr Excellence Dynam Language, Bldg 9,HC Coombs Bld, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia..
    Bouckaert, Remco
    Max Planck Inst Sci Human Hist, Dept Linguist & Cultural Evolut, Kahlaische Str 10, D-07745 Jena, Germany.;Univ Auckland, Dept Comp Sci, 303-38 Princes St, Auckland 1010, New Zealand..
    Gray, Russell D.
    Max Planck Inst Sci Human Hist, Dept Linguist & Cultural Evolut, Kahlaische Str 10, D-07745 Jena, Germany..
    Verkerk, Annemarie
    Max Planck Inst Psycholinguist, Evolutionary Proc Language & Culture, Wundtlaan 1, NL-6525 XD Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Max Planck Inst Sci Human Hist, Dept Linguist & Cultural Evolut, Kahlaische Str 10, D-07745 Jena, Germany..
    A Bayesian phylogenetic study of the Dravidian language family2018In: Royal Society Open Science, E-ISSN 2054-5703, Vol. 5, no 3, article id 171504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Dravidian language family consists of about 80 varieties (Hammarstrom H. 2016 Glottolog 2.7) spoken by 220 million people across southern and central India and surrounding countries (Steever SB. 1998 Tn The Dravidian languages (ed. SB Steever), pp. 1-39: 1). Neither the geographical origin of the Dravidian language homeland nor its exact dispersal through time are known. The history of these languages is crucial for understanding prehistory in Eurasia, because despite their current restricted range, these languages played a significant role in influencing other language groups including IndoAryan (Indo-European) and Munda (Austroasiatic) speakers. Here, we report the results of a Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of cognate -coded lexical data, elicited first hand from native speakers, to investigate the subgrouping of the Dravidian language family, and provide dates for the major points of diversification. Our results indicate that the Dravidian language family is approximately 4500 years old, a finding that corresponds well with earlier linguistic and archaeological studies. The main branches of the Dravidian language family (North, Central, South I, South II) are recovered, although the placement of languages within these main branches diverges from previous classifications. We find considerable uncertainty with regard to the relationships between the main branches.

  • 26. Levinson, Stephen C.
    et al.
    Greenhill, Simon J.
    Gray, Russell D.
    Dunn, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Universal typological dependencies should be detectable in the history of language families2011In: Linguistic Typology, ISSN 1430-0532, 1613-415X, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 509-534Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27. Lindström, E.
    et al.
    Terrill, A.
    Reesink, G.
    Dunn, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    The Languages of Island Melanesia2007In: Genes, Language and Culture History in the Southwest Pacific, Oxford University Press, 2007, Vol. 1, no 9, p. 118-141Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Majid, Asifa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Dunn, Michael
    Jordan, Fiona
    Tufvesson, Sylvia
    Becker, Neele
    Spatial relations in closely related languages2015In: Cognitive Processing, ISSN 1612-4782, E-ISSN 1612-4790, Vol. 16, p. S38-S38Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29. Majid, Asifa
    et al.
    Jordan, Fiona
    Dunn, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Semantic systems in closely related languages2015In: Language sciences (Oxford), ISSN 0388-0001, E-ISSN 1873-5746, Vol. 49, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30. Reesink, Ger
    et al.
    Dunn, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Systematic typological comparison as a tool for investigating language history2012In: Language Documentation & Conservation, ISSN 1934-5275, E-ISSN 1934-5275, no 5, p. 34-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Similarities between languages can be due to 1) homoplasies because of a limited design space, 2) common ancestry, and 3) contact-induced convergence. Typological or structural features cannot prove genealogy, but they can provide historical signals that are due to common ancestry or contact (or both). Following a brief summary of results obtained from the comparison of 160 structural features from 121 languages (Reesink, Singer & Dunn 2009), we discuss some issues related to the relative dependencies of such features: logical entailment, chance resemblance, typological dependency, phylogeny and contact. This discussion focusses on the clustering of languages found in a small sample of 11 Austronesian and 8 Papuan languages of eastern Indonesia, an area known for its high degree of admixture.

  • 31. Reesink, Ger
    et al.
    Singer, Ruth
    Dunn, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Explaining the Linguistic Diversity of Sahul Using Population Models2009In: PLoS biology, ISSN 1544-9173, E-ISSN 1545-7885, Vol. 7, no 11Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 31 of 31
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