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  • 1. Axelsson, Robert
    et al.
    Ljung, Magnus
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Frisk, Michael
    Henningsson, Marianne
    Mikusinski, Grzegorz
    School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Folkeson, Lennart
    Göransson, Görgen
    Jönsson-Ekström, Sofia
    Sjölund, Anders
    Skoog, Jan
    Törnblom, Johan
    Angelstam, Per
    School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    The challenge of transdisciplinary research:: A case study of learning by evaluation for sustainable transport infrastructures2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 17, article id 6995Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While transdisciplinary (TD) research is desired in order to solve real world sustainability issues, this may be challenging for both academic and non-academic participants. Supporting learning through evaluation, we analyzed a project aiming at sustainable transport infrastructures. After developing a TD research framework as a benchmark, two external independent evaluators interviewed all project researchers, representatives for end-users, and donors. The evaluators compared results with the framework, and evaluators and participants critically reflected on the results together. There were three inconsistencies relative to the framework: (1) limited understanding of TD research among project management, end-users, and most of the researchers; (2) no structured learning process among end-users; instead, they expressed very diverse opinions about what they expected from the project; (3) project leaders had limited understanding of the special challenges of TD research, did not fully understand the status of the project's social system, and thus did not act as facilitators of the required collaborative learning process. Non-academic participants saw themselves as customers and not as partners in the knowledge production process. We conclude that TD problem-solving research requires much time and needs facilitation and training. A preparatory phase with a lower level of funding would be helpful in preparing for TD processes.

  • 2. Berry, Pam
    et al.
    Fabok, Veronika
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7050, 750 07, Uppsala, Sweden.;Swedish Biodiversity Centre, 7016, 750 07, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bredin, Yennie
    Garcia-Llorente, Marina
    Kovacs, Eszter
    Gaemana, Nicoleta
    Stanciu, Adina
    Termansen, Mette
    Jääskeläinen, Tiina
    Haslett, John R.
    Harrison, Paula A.
    Why conserve biodiversity? A multi-national exploration of stakeholders views on the arguments for biodiversity conservation2018In: Biodiversity and Conservation, ISSN 0960-3115, E-ISSN 1572-9710, Vol. 27, p. 1741-1762Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Björkvik, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Blyth, Samuel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Danley, Brian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Rönnbäck, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Informing obligations: Best practice information for catch‐and‐release in Swedish local recreational fisheries management2023In: Fisheries Management and Ecology, ISSN 0969-997X, E-ISSN 1365-2400, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 310-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Catch-and-release (C&R) is a popular management tool that can support sustainable development of recreational fisheries, if anglers adopt scientifically informed “best practices.” However, although the role of best practices is widely established in the academic literature, this knowledge is not always disseminated to anglers. In this paper, we investigated if and to what extent local management organizations provided best practice information to anglers. Based on a sample of 331 Swedish organizations, we reviewed the websites through which these organizations sold fishing licenses. Our review demonstrated widespread use of C&R as a management tool yet a general lack of best practice information. Among the small fraction of organizations that mentioned best practices, most mentioned only a single practice, with little consistency among practices that received attention. In addition, best practice information was particularly lacking for pike (Esox Lucius) and perch (Perca fluviatilis), which are by far the most landed and released species nationally. We discovered major knowledge deficiencies that provide insights about where and how to focus efforts for improving best practice information, in the context of local recreational fisheries management.

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  • 4.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Scale of global road map is impractical2013In: Nature, Vol. 496, no 7445, p. 300-300Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Swedish Biodivers Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Andersson, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Zool, Box 50007, SE-10405 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bjelke, Ulf
    Swedish Species Informat Ctr, Box 7007, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hilding-Rydevik, Tuija
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Swedish Biodivers Ctr, Box 7016, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Johansson, Frank
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Effects of management intensity, function and vegetation on the biodiversity in urban ponds2016In: Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, ISSN 1618-8667, E-ISSN 1610-8167, Vol. 20, p. 103-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ponds are important elements of green areas in cities that help counteract the negative consequences of urbanization, by providing important habitats for biodiversity in cities and being essential nodes in the overall landscape-scale habitat network. However, there is relatively little knowledge about the impacts of pond management intensity, function and environmental variables on urban pond biodiversity. In this study we addressed this gap by investigating which factors were correlated with the level of biodiversity in urban ponds, indicated by species richness of aquatic insects, in Stockholm, Sweden. Our study did not confirm any direct link between the perceived intensity of management or function of ponds and overall biodiversity. However, it seems that management can influence particular groups of species indirectly, since we found that Trichoptera richness (Caddisflies) was highest at intermediate management intensity. We suggest that this is caused by management of vegetation, as the amount of floating and emergent vegetation was significantly correlated with both the overall species richness and the richness of Trichoptera (Caddisflies). This relationship was non-linear, since ponds with an intermediate coverage of vegetation had the highest richness. Interestingly, the amount of vegetation in the pond was significantly affected by pond function and pond management. The overall species richness and richness of Trichoptera were also positively correlated with pond size. Since we found that the pattern of relations between species richness and environmental variables differed between the insect groups we suggest that it will be difficult to provide overall design and management recommendations for ponds in urban green areas. Therefore, it is recommended that to provide high aquatic diversity of species in urban areas one should aim at promoting high diversity of different types of ponds with differing management and environmental factors that shape them.

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  • 6.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Swedish Biodivers Ctr, Box 7016, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Andersson, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Zool, Box 50007, SE-10405 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bjelke, Ulf
    Swedish Species Informat Ctr, Box 7007, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hilding-Rydevik, Tuija
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Swedish Biodivers Ctr, Box 7016, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Thomsson, Michaela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Östh, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Johansson, Frank
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Is there a relationship between socio-economic factors and biodiversity in urban ponds?: A study in the city of Stockholm2017In: Urban Ecosystems, ISSN 1083-8155, E-ISSN 1573-1642, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 1209-1220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban small water bodies, such as ponds, are essential elements of human socio-economic landscapes. Ponds also provide important habitats for species that would otherwise not survive in the urban environment. Knowledge on the biodiversity of urban ponds and the relationship between their ecological value and factors linked to urbanization and socio-economic status is crucial for decisions on where and how to establish and manage ponds in cities to deliver maximum biodiversity benefits. Our study investigates if the pattern of urban-pond biodiversity can be related to different socio-economic factors, such as level of wealth, education or percentage of buildings of different types. Because of lack of previous studies investigating that, our study is of exploratory character and many different variables are used. We found that the biodiversity of aquatic insects was significantly negatively associated with urbanisation variables such as amount of buildings and number of residents living around ponds. This relationship did not differ depending on the spatial scale of our investigation. In contrast, we did not find a significant relationship with variables representing socio-economic status, such as education level and wealth of people. This latter result suggests that the socio-economic status of residents does not lead to any particular effect in terms of the management and function of ponds that would affect biodiversity. However, there is a need for a finer-scale investigation of the different potential mechanism in which residents in areas with differing socio-economic status could indirectly influence ponds.

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  • 7.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Angelstam, P.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Fac Forest Sci, Sch Forest Management, POB 43, SE-73921 Skinnskatteberg, Sweden..
    Giessen, L.
    European Forest Inst, Bonn, Germany..
    Hilszczanski, J.
    Forest Res Inst, Dept Forest Protect, Sekocin Stary, Poland..
    Hermanowicz, E.
    European Forest Inst, Bonn, Germany..
    Holeksa, J.
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Fac Biol, Dept Plant Ecol & Protect Environm, Poznan, Poland..
    Jacobsen, J. B.
    Univ Copenhagen, Ctr Macroecol Evolut & Climate, Dept Food & Resource Econ, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Jaroszewicz, B.
    Univ Warsaw, Fac Biol, Bia Owie Geobot Stn, Bialowieza, Poland..
    Konczal, A.
    European Forest Inst, Bonn, Germany..
    Konieczny, A.
    Univ Live Sci Lublin, Fac Agrobioengn, Lublin, Poland..
    Mikusinski, G.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Fac Forest Sci, Sch Forest Management, POB 43, SE-73921 Skinnskatteberg, Sweden.;Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Ecol, Grimso Wildlife Res Stn, S-73091 Riddarhyttan, Sweden..
    Mirek, Z.
    Polish Acad Sci, W Szafer Inst Bot, Krakow, Poland..
    Mohren, F.
    Wageningen Univ & Res, Forest Ecol & Forest Management Grp, Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Muys, B.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Div Forest Nat & Landscape Res, Dept Earth & Environm Sci, Leuven, Belgium..
    Niedzialkowski, K.
    Polish Acad Sci, Inst Philosophy & Sociol, Warsaw, Poland..
    Sotirov, M.
    Univ Freiburg, Fac Environm & Nat Resources, Chair Forest & Environm Policy, Freiburg, Germany..
    Sterenczak, K.
    Forest Res Inst, Dept Geomat, Sekocin Stary, Poland..
    Szwagrzyk, J.
    Univ Agr, Fac Forestry, Dept Forest Biodivers, Krakow, Poland..
    Winder, G. M.
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Dept Geog, Econ Geog & Tourism Res, Munich, Germany..
    Witkowski, Z.
    State Council Nat Conservat, Warsaw, Poland..
    Zaplata, R.
    Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski Univ Warsaw, Fac Math & Nat Sci, Sch Exact Sci, Warsaw, Poland..
    Winkel, G.
    European Forest Inst, Bonn, Germany..
    Between biodiversity conservation and sustainable forest management - A multidisciplinary assessment of the emblematic Bialowieza Forest case2020In: Biological Conservation, ISSN 0006-3207, E-ISSN 1873-2917, Vol. 248, article id 108614Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tension between biodiversity conservation and multipurpose forest management may lead to conflicts. An internationally prominent example is the Bialowieza Forest Massif (BFM), an extensive forest complex with high levels of naturalness. We apply a systematic, multidisciplinary assessment process to review empirical evidence on different dimensions of the BFM conflict. While there is broad consensus that this forest massif is an exceptional place worth conserving and that a way forward is a zonation system combining conservation with management, exactly how this should be done has yet to be agreed upon. Our assessment shows that the key reasons for the BFM controversy go beyond the availability of knowledge on the ecological status of the BFM and include: 1) evidence stemming from different sources, which is often contradictory and prone to different interpretations; 2) knowledge gaps, particularly with regard to socio-economic drivers and beneficiaries as well as uncertainties about future trends; 3) fundamentally different values and priorities among stakeholder groups, resulting in power struggles, and an overall lack of trust. We conclude that evidence-based knowledge alone is insufficient to cope with complex conservation conflicts. While more evidence may help assess the consequences of decisions, the actual management decisions depend on different actors' worldviews, which are rooted in their professional identities and power, and their political and legal realities. This calls for conflict management through a well-organized participatory process organized and supervised by a body deemed legitimate by the groups involved.

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  • 8.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Angelstam, Per
    School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Conservation at risk: conflict analysis in the Białowieża Forest, a European biodiversity hotspot2010In: International Journal of Biodiversity Science, Ecosystem Services & Management, ISSN 2151-3732, E-ISSN 2151-3740, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 68-74Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Angelstam, Per
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sch Forest Management, Fac Forest Sci, Skinnskatteberg, Sweden.
    Antonson, Hans
    VTI Swedish Natl Rd & Transport Res Inst, SE-58195 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Elbakidze, Marine
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sch Forest Management, Fac Forest Sci, Skinnskatteberg, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Robert
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sch Forest Management, Fac Forest Sci, Skinnskatteberg, Sweden.
    Road, forestry and regional planners’ work for biodiversity conservation and public participation: a case study in Poland’s hotspots regions2011In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 54, no 10, p. 1373-1395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied how regional, road and forestry planning sectors work to implement policies about biodiversity conservation and public participation. Evaluations were based on a normative model for planning derived from the existing international policies and relevant literature. Key planning actors were then interviewed with regard to their understanding of biodiversity and participation policies as well as ability to act and willingness to implement them. The results indicate several gaps in planning processes, for example, insufficient knowledge about biodiversity conservation and participation, limited resources and tools for planning of functional habitat networks and collaboration, poor connections between local and regional planning, and weakly developed public participation. The main problem for effective policy implementation seems to be related to planners' ability to act, which indicates that relatively low priority was given to provide resources for biodiversity conservation and public participation by the relevant units. We discuss our findings in relation to the implementation of environmental policies in the new EU countries of Eastern and Central Europe.

  • 10.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Angelstam, Per
    School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Elbakidze, Marine
    School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Axelsson, Robert
    School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Skorupski, Maciej
    Poznan University of Life Sciences, Faculty of Forestry.
    Wegiel, Andrzej
    Poznan University of Life Sciences, Faculty of Forestry.
    The Polish Promotional Forest Complex: objectives, implementation and outcomes towards sustainable forest management?2012In: Forest Policy and Economics, ISSN 1389-9341, E-ISSN 1872-7050, Vol. 23, p. 28-39Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Baxter, Peter
    Mikusinski, Grzegorz
    School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Practical implementation of species’ recovery plans – lessons from the White-backed Woodpecker Action Plan in Sweden.2014In: Ornis Fennica, ISSN 0030-5685, Vol. 91, p. 108-128Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Swedish Biodiversity Centre.
    Grandin, Ulf
    Why protect biodiversity? Perspectives of conservation professionals in Poland.2015In: International Journal of Biodiversity Science, Ecosystem Services & Management, ISSN 2151-3732, E-ISSN 2151-3740, Vol. 11, p. 349-362Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Hedblom, Marcus
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Ecol, Uppsala, Sweden.;Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Urban & Rural Dev, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Josefsson, Jonas
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Ecol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Widenfalk, Olof
    Greensway AB, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Ranius, Thomas
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Ecol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Ockinger, Erik
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Ecol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Widenfalk, Lina A.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Ecol, Uppsala, Sweden.;Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Urban & Rural Dev, Uppsala, Sweden.;Greensway AB, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Operationalisation of ecological compensation: Obstacles and ways forward2022In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 304, article id 114277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecological compensation (EC) has been proposed as an important tool for stopping the loss of biodiversity and natural values. However, there are few studies on its actual operationalisation and there is high uncertainty about how it should be designed and implemented to be an effective way of performing nature conservation. In this study we focus on ecological compensation in Sweden, a country where it is in the process of being implemented more broadly. Using interviews and a workshop we investigate how the work with the implementation is carried out and what challenges exist. The results show that implementation of EC is at an early stage of development and there are many practical obstacles, linked to both legislation and routines in the planning processes. There is a lack of holistic perspective and large-scale thinking, a quite strong focus on a small number of individual species, and an overall attitude that anything is better than nothing, all of which can have negative consequences for biodiversity conservation overall. Based on the results we discuss the need for better integration of EC into the entire decision-making process and for a holistic approach to preservation of biodiversity and ecosystem services, by increasing the focus on landscape perspective and considering delays in compensation outcomes. There is also a need for a national level standard for EC, making good and worse examples of compensation measures available and systematic monitoring of EC projects. Finally, a spatially explicit database to document all EC areas should be introduced both to ensure consistency in protection from future development plans and to enable long-term monitoring of EC outcomes.

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  • 14.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development. Swedish Biodiversity Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hilding-Rydevik, Tuija
    Swedish Biodiversity Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    “A Thousand flowers are flowering just now” – towards integration of ecosystem services concept into decision making2018In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 30, p. 181-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the integration of the ecosystem services (ES) concept in decision making.

    We use the three dimensions of learning to investigate the use of the ES concept.

    ES concept seems to meet several positive expectations put forward in science and policy.

    A main contribution from the concept may potentially be its function as a “boundary object”.

    Implementing ES into practice is a complex process and a multifaceted task.

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  • 15.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Isaksson, Karolina
    Swedish Natl Rd & Transport Res Inst, SE-58195 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Richardson, Tim
    Univ Aalborg, Dept Dev & Planning, DK-9220 Aalborg, Denmark.
    Wu, Chia-Jung
    Natl Taiwan Univ, Dept Geog, Taipei 10617, Taiwan.
    Context dependency and stakeholder involvement in EIA: the decisive role of practitioners2011In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 54, no 3, p. 337-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The outcomes of frameworks and practices for stakeholder involvement in environmental impact assessment (EIA) for road planning, under the umbrella of a common EU legal framework, are investigated here in specific national contexts. Data for the two empirical cases examined - Poland and Sweden - are related to the recent ongoing discussion on context dependency for Environmental Assessments (EA). The analysis, informed by practitioner interviews and documentary review, comprises a historical review of the evolution of EIA and stakeholder involvement, and examines more closely the legal frameworks, formal and informal arenas for stakeholder involvement, and norms of stakeholder involvement held by professionals involved in the planning process in the two countries. The results challenge existing assumptions about the relative depth of institutionalisation of stakeholder involvement and environmental concern in a Scandinavian and Central-Eastern European context, and highlight the decisive role of practitioners in the application of EA frameworks in planning practice.

  • 16.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Swedish Biodiversity Centre, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Johansson, Frank
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Urban ponds for people and by people2016In: Urban Landscape Ecology: Science, Policy and Practice / [ed] Robert A. Francis , James D.A. Millington, Michael A. Chadwick, Routledge, 2016, p. 164-180Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Swedish Biodiversity Centre.
    Mikusinski, Grzegorz
    School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Developing world: use mentoring to fix science inequality.2015In: Nature, Vol. 517, p. 271-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Swedish Biodiversity Centre.
    Mikusinski, Grzegorz
    School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Incorporating social and cultural significance of large old trees in conservation policy.2014In: Conservation Biology, ISSN 0888-8892, E-ISSN 1523-1739, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 1558-1567Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Department of Auqatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Mikusinski, Grzegorz
    School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Metrics: a long-term threat to society2012In: Nature, Vol. 490, no 7420, p. 343-343Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Department of Auqatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Mikusinski, Grzegorz
    School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Old trees: cultural value.2013In: Science, Vol. 339, p. 904-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Mikusinski, Grzegorz
    School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Think bigger for conservation2011In: Nature, Vol. 470, no 7332, p. 39-39Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Mikusinski, Grzegorz
    School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Godbole, Archana
    Safeguarding biodiversity and ecosystem services of sacred groves – experiences from northern Western Ghats.2013In: International Journal of Biodiversity Science, Ecosystem Services & Management, ISSN 2151-3732, E-ISSN 2151-3740, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 339-346Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Orlikowska, Ewa
    Jean-Michel, Roberge
    Grodzinska-Jurczak, Malgorzata
    Contribution of social science to large scale biodiversity conservation: a review of research about the Natura 2000 network2016In: Biological Conservation, ISSN 0006-3207, E-ISSN 1873-2917, Vol. 199, p. 110-122Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Successful conservation needs to be informed by social science because it is closely linked to socio-economic processes and human behaviour. Limited knowledge about ecosystems' interactions with these processes currently undermines conservation efforts. This review provides a comprehensive synthesis of social science concerning the world's largest multinationally-coordinated conservation infrastructure: the European Ecological Network - ‘Natura 2000’. Based on a review of 149 publications, we analyse and discuss the main findings and outline key social-science research gaps with regard to the Natura 2000 network. The review shows that human dimension of the Natura 2000 network is complex and varies among EU Member States. In general, low level and quality of public participation in implementation of the Natura 2000 network and its management, negative public perceptions of the network, lack of flexibility of responsible authorities and insufficient consideration of the local context pose the greatest challenges to the network's functioning. Important but hitherto little studied research topics include: evaluation of participation; effects of education on potential to raise public awareness; effects of potential financing mechanisms for compensating private land-owners; economic studies on cost-effectiveness; and benefits from conservation and ecosystem services. These knowledge gaps will need to be filled for the Natura 2000 network to reach its goals.

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  • 24.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Rönnbäck, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Recreational fishing for sea trout – Resource for whom and to what value?2018In: Fisheries Research, ISSN 0165-7836, E-ISSN 1872-6763, Vol. 204, p. 380-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recreational fishing is an important activity that delivers substantial social and economic values. Proper management of recreational fisheries relies on information about resource use and associated values by different fishers, but such information is rare, particularly for open access fisheries. In this study a survey of 471 fishers on the Swedish island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea, assessed catches, proportion of catch-and-release (C&R), and economic value (expenditures and willingness to pay, WTP) of sea trout fishing in 2015-2016. Data was analysed in relation to gear used (fly and spin angling, nets and mixed fishery) and fisher connection to fishing site (permanent and temporary residents, Swedish and international tourists). There were marginal differences in daily catch rates, but significant differences in effort and annual catches between different fishers, with resident fishers having the highest catches. Anglers had 86% C&R rates, and fly fishers (> 95%) differed significantly from other anglers. Anglers, particularly fly fishers and fishing tourists, had much higher expenditures per year, fish caught and fish kept compared to net fishers. WTP before refraining from fishing, for doubling of fish supply and for potential fishing license was also highest among anglers. Our findings are discussed in terms of distinguishing characteristics for different types of recreational fishers. Fishing efforts, economic values and the need for further studies are also outlined in the context of fisheries and tourism management.

  • 25.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Rönnbäck, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    What factors enable or hinder engagement of civil society in ecosystem management? The case of “pike factories” and wetland restoration in Sweden.In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Rönnbäck, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    What factors enable or hinder engagement of civil society in ecosystem management?: The case of "pike factories' and wetland restoration in Sweden2018In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 61, no 5-6, p. 950-969Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engaging civil society in conservation activities is an important complementary strategy to counteract ongoing biodiversity decline and loss of ecosystem services. Since 2011, the Swedish Anglers Association (SAA) has cooperated with landowners to restore wetlands nationwide. We investigated factors that enabled or hindered civil society-led wetland restoration in Sweden through interviews and surveys with the SAA's project leaders and landowners. Principal internal and external factors contributing to the project's implementation included: flexibility and adaptive management of its leadership; support from authorities and policies; the good reputation of the SAA team; and landowners' willingness to cooperate. The latter was linked to their feelings of environmental responsibility, the low investment required by them, and expectations of some benefits. We discuss the need to enable adaptive management in environmental management projects, adjust existing policies to their needs, and re-think funding strategies to consider the long-term nature of such projects.

  • 27.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Smithers, Richard J.
    Ricardo Energy & Environm, Didcot OX11 0QR, Oxon, England..
    Bialowieza Forest: Political stands2018In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 359, no 6376, p. 646-646Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Swedish Biodivers Ctr, Box 7016, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Smithers, Richard J.
    Ricardo Energy & Environm, Gemini Bldg,Fermi Ave, Didcot OX11 0QR, Oxon, England.
    Hedblom, Marcus
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Forest Resources Management, S-90183 Umea, Sweden; Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Ecol, Box 7044, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hedenås, Henrik
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Forest Resources Management, S-90183 Umea, Sweden.
    Mikusinski, Grzegorz
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Ecol, Grimso Wildlife Res Stn, S-73091 Riddarhyttan, Sweden; Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sch Forest Management, Box 43, S-73921 Skinnskatteberg, Sweden.
    Pedersen, Eja
    Lund Univ, Dept Architecture & Built Environm, Environm Psychol, Box 118, SE-22100 Lund, Sweden.
    Sandström, Per
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Forest Resources Management, S-90183 Umea, Sweden.
    Svensson, Johan
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Wildlife Fish & Environm Studies, S-90183 Umea, Sweden.
    Shades of grey challenge practical application of the Cultural Ecosystem Services concept2017In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 23, p. 55-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite rapid advances in development of the ecosystem services (ES) concept, challenges remain for its use in decision making. Cultural ES (CES) have proven particularly difficult to pin down and resultant “shades of grey” impede their consideration by decision-makers. This study undertakes a literature review of CES to highlight the shades of grey, briefly illustrates findings by reference to the Swedish mountain landscape, then addresses potential implications for practical decision making. The concept of CES is complex and difficult to operationalize. The root of confusion appears to be a lack of rigour in identifying CES, hindering identification of proper methods for determining: the ecosystem elements that underpin CES; the beneficiaries of CES and how they value benefits delivered; and how CES may vary in space and time. We conclude by proposing a framework of questions, which we relate to the ES cascade model, that is intended to help researchers and decision-makers to reflect when considering CES. Answers to the questions should enable decision-makers to prioritise policy development or implementation in relation to the differing needs of potentially competing beneficiaries and what needs to be done or not done to the ecosystem, where, when and by whom.

  • 29.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development. Swedish Biodiversity Centre.
    Smithers, Richard J.
    Kuchler, Magdalena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Agrawal, Ganesh K.
    Gutiérrez, José M.
    Hassanali, Ahmed
    Huq, Saleemul
    Koller, Silvia H.
    Marjit, Sugata
    Mshinda, Hassan M.
    Masjuki, Hj Hassan
    Solomons, Noel W.
    Van Staden, Johannes
    Mikusinski, Grzegorz
    School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Steps to overcome the North-South divide in research relevant to climate-change policy and practice2017In: Nature Climate Change, ISSN 1758-678X, E-ISSN 1758-6798, Vol. 7, p. 21-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A global North-South divide in research, and its negative consequences, has been highlighted in various scientific disciplines. Northern domination of science relevant to climate change policy and practice, and limited research led by Southern researchers in Southern countries, may hinder further development and implementation of global climate change agreements and nationally appropriate actions. Despite efforts to address the North-South divide, progress has been slow. In this Perspective, we illustrate the extent of the divide, review underlying issues and analyse their consequences for climate change policy development and implementation. We propose a set of practical steps in both Northern and Southern countries that a wide range of actors should take at global, regional and national scales to span the North-South divide, with examples of some actions already being implemented.

  • 30.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Smithers, Richard J.
    Ricardo Energy & Environment, Ricardo plc, Gemini Building, Didcot, UK.
    Kuchler, Magdalena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Munaretto, Stefania
    KWR Water Research Institute, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands.
    van den Heuvel, Lotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Teutschbein, Claudia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    The water–energy–food–land–climate nexus: Policy coherence for sustainable resource management in Sweden2023In: Environmental Policy and Governance, ISSN 1756-932X, E-ISSN 1756-9338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of a ‘nexus’ across issues regarding the management of natural resources has gained increasing academic attention in recent years, but there is still relatively limited research on the application of the nexus approach for evaluating policies. This study analyses coherence among the main goals of five policy areas (water, energy, food, land, and climate) in Sweden, drawing upon a desk review, expert assessment, and interaction with stakeholders. The main objective is to enhance understanding of opportunities and challenges posed by such a nexus, understand policy interactions in Sweden, and provide insights into the use of policy coherence analysis as an integral part of resource nexus assessments. The analysis reveals synergies and conflicts between policy goals. For example, Sweden's environmental quality objectives (EQOs) regarding land and all the goals regarding water are either synergistic or neutral. Likewise, climate policy goals are well aligned with the goals regarding energy and ground water quality. On the other hand, the key goal for agriculture, which is food production, is the least coherent with those of the other policy areas. There are conflicts between the EQOs and goals regarding agricultural and forestry production. Stakeholders also indicate that climate goals are treated with higher priority than the goals of other policy areas. Notably, some interactions between policy goals are synergistic or conflicting depending on the context or their interpretation. Implementation of existing goals depends on relevant stakeholders' interests, priorities and interpretations, and on existing prevailing discourses in society, often supported by higher level policies.

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  • 31.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Smithers, Richard J.
    Ricardo Energy & Environment, Didcot, UK.
    Mikusinski, Grzegorz
    Grimsö Wildlife Research Station, Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Riddarhyttan, Sweden.
    Rönnbäck, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Harrison, Paula A.
    Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster, UK.
    Nilsson, Måns
    Stockholm Environment Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sutherland, William J.
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
    Biodiversity’s contributions to sustainable development2019In: Nature Sustainability, E-ISSN 2398-9629, Vol. 2, p. 1083-1093Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    International concern to develop sustainably challenges us to act upon the inherent links between our economy, society and environment, and is leading to increasing acknowledgement of biodiversity's importance. This Review discusses the breadth of ways in which biodiversity can support sustainable development. It uses the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as a basis for exploring scientific evidence of the benefits delivered by biodiversity. It focuses on papers that provide examples of how biodiversity components (that is, ecosystems, species and genes) directly deliver benefits that may contribute to the achievement of individual SDGs. It also considers how biodiversity's direct contributions to fulfilling some SDGs may indirectly support the achievement of other SDGs to which biodiversity does not contribute directly. How the attributes (for example, diversity, abundance or composition) of biodiversity components influence the benefits delivered is also presented, where described by the papers reviewed. While acknowledging potential negative impacts and trade-offs between different benefits, the study concludes that biodiversity may contribute to fulfilment of all SDGs.

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  • 32.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Teutschbein, Claudia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Ctr Nat Hazards & Disaster Sci, CNDS.
    Environmental Conservation Challenges in a multi-sector system2018In: Biodiverse, ISSN 1401-5064, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 16-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Many sectors in society are involved in nature conservation issues, like agriculture, forestry and land-use planning. Coherence on a political level between these sectors is getting more and more important, not only to avoid conflict, but also to discover and develop synergies between the sectors. In our study, we see that nature conservation could be a tool for strengthening other sectors.

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  • 33.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Teutschbein, Claudia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Smithers, Richard J.
    Ricardo Energy & Environment, University of Sheffield.
    SDG partnerships may perpetuate the global North–South divide2021In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 22092Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development gives equal emphasis to developed (“Northern”) countries and developing (“Southern”) countries. Thus, implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) demands coherent collaboration to transform society across all countries. Yet, there has been little research published on SDG partnerships and this is the first study to explore the extent to which partners from Northern and Southern countries are involved in them and their focus. It identifies that involvement is unequally distributed and may perpetuate the North–South divide in countries’ resources, including access to data and scientific capacities. Most notably, partners from low-income countries are involved in far fewer partnerships than partners from countries in all other World Bank income categories, although the former are least able to develop sustainably. As such, all those promoting sustainable development from governmental, private and third-sector organisations need to address global inequalities in establishing and implementing SDG partnerships if, collectively, they are to facilitate delivery of Agenda 2030.

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  • 34.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Swedish Biodiversity Centre.
    Van Herzele, Ann
    What a forest? Whose forest? Struggles over concepts and meanings in the debate about the conservation of the Białowieża Forest in Poland.2015In: Forest Policy and Economics, ISSN 1389-9341, E-ISSN 1872-7050, Vol. 57, p. 22-30Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Blyth, Samuel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    van den Heuvel, Lotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Bergström, Ulf
    Ovegård, Marie
    Rönnbäck, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Sundblad, Göran
    Beyond asking the right questions: Accounting for biases in a recreational fishery surveyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Cuenca-Cambronero, M.
    et al.
    Univ Vic, Cent Univ Catalonia, Aquat Ecol Grp, Vic 08500, Spain..
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Perrin, J. -a.
    ISARA, Dept Agroecol & Environm, Lyon, France..
    Davidson, T. A.
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Ecosci, Silkeborg, Denmark..
    Oertli, B.
    Univ Appl Sci & Arts Western Switzerland, HEPIA, HES SO, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Lago, M.
    Ecol Inst, Berlin, Germany..
    Beklioglu, M.
    Middle East Tech Univ, Biol Dept, Limnol Lab, Dumlupinar Bulvari 1, TR-06800 Cankaya, Ankara, Turkiye..
    Meerhoff, M.
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Ecosci, Silkeborg, Denmark.;Univ Republ, Ctr Univ Reg Este CURE, Dept Ecol & Gest Ambiental, Maldonado, Uruguay..
    Arim, M.
    Univ Republ, Ctr Univ Reg Este CURE, Dept Ecol & Gest Ambiental, Maldonado, Uruguay..
    Teixeira, J.
    Univ Porto, Interdisciplinary Ctr Marine & Environm Res, CIIMAR, Matosinhos, Portugal..
    De Meester, L.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Aquat Ecol Evolut & Conservat, Louvain, Belgium.;Leibniz Inst Freshwater Ecol & Inland Fisheries, Berlin, Germany.;Free Univ Berlin, Inst Biol, Berlin, Germany..
    Biggs, J.
    Freshwater Habitats Trust, Bury Knowle House, Headington, England..
    Robin, J.
    ISARA, Dept Agroecol & Environm, Lyon, France..
    Martin, B.
    Randbee Consultants, Malaga, Spain..
    Greaves, H. M.
    UCL, Environm Change Res Ctr, Dept Geog, Pond Restorat Res Grp, London, England..
    Sayer, C. D.
    UCL, Environm Change Res Ctr, Dept Geog, Pond Restorat Res Grp, London, England..
    Lemmens, P.
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Aquat Ecol Evolut & Conservat, Louvain, Belgium.;Leibniz Inst Freshwater Ecol & Inland Fisheries, Berlin, Germany..
    Boix, D.
    Univ Girona, Inst Aquat Ecol, GRECO, Girona, Spain..
    Mehner, T.
    Leibniz Inst Freshwater Ecol & Inland Fisheries, Berlin, Germany..
    Bartrons, M.
    Univ Vic, Cent Univ Catalonia, Aquat Ecol Grp, Vic 08500, Spain..
    Brucet, S.
    Univ Vic, Cent Univ Catalonia, Aquat Ecol Grp, Vic 08500, Spain.;Catalan Inst Res, Adv Studies, ICREA, Barcelona, Spain..
    Challenges and opportunities in the use of ponds and pondscapes as Nature-based Solutions2023In: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 850, no 15, p. 3257-3271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ponds and "pondscapes" (networks of ponds) are crucial habitats for biodiversity and for delivering multiple benefits to humans, so-called "Nature's Contribution to People", such as climate mitigation and adaptation to climate change, creation, and maintenance of habitat for biodiversity, water purification, flood mitigation and cultural benefits (e.g., recreational possibilities). However, ponds are not often considered as Nature-based Solutions to provide all these benefits. In addition, there is insufficient knowledge on how to manage and restore ponds to maximise their role to increase the resilience of ecosystems and society to climate change. To facilitate improved implementation of ponds as Nature-based Solutions for the delivery of a wide range of Nature Contributions to People, it is important to generate and integrate biodiversity, ecosystems, societal, economic and policy knowledge. Hence, there is a need for evidence-based guidance to support the broader use of ponds. Here, we review the role of ponds and pondscapes in delivering Nature's Contributions to People and provide an overview of the challenges and opportunities for their broader implementation as Nature-based Solutions. Finally, we propose a conceptual framework that can help the implementation of pond Nature-based Solutions, and that outlines future research needs.

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  • 37.
    Eriksson, Björn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Johansson, Frank
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Socio-economic impacts of marine conservation efforts in three Indonesian fishing communities2019In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 103, p. 59-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous conservation initiatives have been undertaken to protect large marine animals by legal protection and implementing marine protected areas (MPAs). Despite these efforts, many marine animals are still threatened, partly due to lack of compliance with conservation regulations. Meanwhile, research suggests that conservation efforts which also take socio-economic factors such as fishermen's livelihoods into account during planning and implementation are more likely to succeed. This study examined the compliance and socio-economic situation of local fishing communities at three sites in Indonesia (Nusa Penida, Tanjung Luar and Komodo National Park) where shark and manta ray conservation efforts have been implemented. 59 local residents were interviewed. The results showed that 49% of those residents had experienced a deterioration and 37% an improvement in their economic situation since conservation efforts in the form of species protection or MPAs were implemented in their area. The economic situation of the residents was associated with their access to alternative livelihoods, access to information on conservation rules, and relationship with conservation authorities. Particularly, interviewees with easier access to alternative income and a positive relationship with conservation authorities also experienced an increase in their economy. In addition, compliance with conservation efforts was positively related to improved economic situation, access to alternative livelihoods and information on conservation rules. These factors all differed among the three study sites, leading to different compliance levels between sites. The results of this study indicate the importance of considering socio-economic factors and of involving local communities when planning and implementing conservation efforts.

  • 38.
    Filho, Walter Leal
    et al.
    Hamburg Univ Appl Sci, European Sch Sustainabil Sci & Res, Ulmenliet 20, D-21033 Hamburg, Germany.;Manchester Metropolitan Univ, Dept Nat Sci, Chester St, Manchester M1 5GD, Lancs, England..
    Coronado-Marin, Alfonso
    Univ Nacl Educ Distancia, UNESCO Chair Environm Educ & Sustainable Dev, Madrid 28015, Spain..
    Lange Salvia, Amanda
    Univ Passo Fundo, Grad Program Civil & Environm Engn, Campus 1,BR 285, BR-99052900 Passo Fundo, RS, Brazil..
    Silva, Fernanda Frankenberger
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Parana, Business Sch PUCPR, BR-80215901 Curitiba, Parana, Brazil.;Posit Univ, Brazil Business Sch, BR-81280330 Curitiba, Parana, Brazil..
    Wolf, Franziska
    Hamburg Univ Appl Sci, European Sch Sustainabil Sci & Res, Ulmenliet 20, D-21033 Hamburg, Germany..
    LeVasseur, Todd
    Coll Charleston, Sustainabil Literacy Inst, Charleston, SC 29424 USA..
    Kirrane, Maria J.
    Univ Coll Cork, Environm Res Inst ERI, Cork T23 XE10, Ireland..
    Doni, Federica
    Univ Milano Bicocca, Dept Business & Law, I-20126 Milan, Italy..
    Paco, Arminda
    Univ Beira Interior, NECE UBI Res Ctr Business Sci, Rua Marques DAvila & Bolama, P-6201001 Covilha, Portugal..
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Schmitz, Marina
    IEDC Bled Sch Management, Coca Cola Chair Sustainable Dev, Bled 4260, Slovenia..
    Grahl, Anselm T.
    Students Organizing Sustainabil Int, DK-1608 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Moggi, Sara
    Univ Verona, Dept Business Adm, I-37129 Verona, Italy..
    International Trends and Practices on Sustainability Reporting in Higher Education Institutions2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 19, article id 12238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability reports are regarded as important tools in offering information about the environmental, social, economic, and institutional performance of an institution, and in demonstrating a commitment to matters related to sustainable development. But even though sustainability reporting has been used by a variety of higher education institutions to date, it is not as widely practiced as it should be. To further investigate this topic, a twofold approach was used: a study focusing on sustainability reporting approaches deployed in a sample of 30 universities across a set of countries; and a survey with a sample of 72 universities from different global regions to assess the extent to which they are deploying sustainability reporting as part of their activities. The scientific value of the paper resides in the fact that it offers a comprehensive overview of the subject matter of sustainability reporting, and how higher education institutions handle it. It also outlines the efforts in developing these documents which may catalyse further progress in this key area.

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  • 39.
    Gustafsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Sch Forest Management, Box 43, SE-73921 Skinnskatteberg, Sweden; Orebro Cty Adm Board, Environm & Nat Resources, SE-70186 Orebro, Sweden.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development. Swedish Biodivers Ctr, Box 7016, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mikusinski, Grzegorz
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Sch Forest Management, Box 43, SE-73921 Skinnskatteberg, Sweden; Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Ecol, Grimso Wildlife Res Stn, SE-73091 Riddarhyttan, Sweden.
    When development and amphibians meet – a case study of a translocation of great crested newts (Triturus cristatus) in Sweden2016In: Herpetological Conservation and Biology, ISSN 2151-0733, E-ISSN 1931-7603, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 552-562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    The Great Crested Newt (Triturus cristatus) is considered threatened throughout Europe; consequently, the species and its breeding habitat are protected in many countries. Translocation of a population is a conservation tool used when habitat occupied by a species is scheduled to be destroyed by human development. The outcome of these translocations is rarely monitored. This study describes and discusses a translocation of T. cristatus in south-central Sweden (Orebro), which occurred because of planned destruction of breeding habitat associated with development of a shopping and industrial area. We provide quantitative data concerning numbers of relocated amphibians and subsequent monitoring in both the pond being destroyed, which is serving as the source of newts to be translocated, and the pond that received the translocated newts. The translocation exemplifies how difficult it is to determine size and conservation value of a population without thorough initial investigations. A large part of the translocated population seemed to disappear at the receiving area, which initially indicated that the translocation was ineffective. Nevertheless, longer term monitoring indicated that a population was established and reproduced in the new habitat. We argue that translocation should never be a first choice to make human development possible but one should always strive for preservation of an existing habitat. However, if a translocation is unavoidable, an appriopriate assessment of the affected population should be performed and a detailed analysis of habitats in the potential receiving areas should be carried out to select an area best fitted for the species in question.

  • 40. Hambäck, P.A.
    et al.
    Dawson, Lucas
    Geranmayeh, Pia
    Jarsjö, J.
    Peacock, M.
    Collentine, D.
    Destouni, G.
    Futter, M.
    Hedman, S.
    Jonsson, S.
    Kačergyté, I.
    Klatt, B.K.
    Lindström, A.
    Nilsson, J.E.
    Pärt, T.
    Schneider, L.
    Strand, J.
    Urrutia Cordero, P.
    Åhlén, D.
    Åhlén, I.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Trade-offs and synergies in the design of multifunctional wetlands: A scaling issue2023In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 862, article id 160746Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wetland area in agricultural landscapes has been heavily reduced to gain land for crop production, but in recent years there is increased societal recognition of the negative consequences from wetland loss on nutrient retention, biodiversity and a range of other benefits to humans. The current trend is therefore to re-establish wetlands, often with an aim to achieve the simultaneous delivery of multiple ecosystem services, i.e., multifunctionality. Here we review the literature on key objectives used to motivate wetland re-establishment in temperate agricultural landscapes (provision of flow regulation, nutrient retention, climate mitigation, biodiversity conservation and cultural ecosystem services), and their relationships to environmental properties, in order to identify potential for tradeoffs and synergies concerning the development of multifunctional wetlands. Through this process, we find that there is a need for a change in scale from a focus on single wetlands to wetlandscapes (multiple neighboring wetlands including their catchments and surrounding landscape features) if multiple societal and environmental goals are to be achieved. Finally, we discuss the key factors to be considered when planning for re-establishment of wetlands that can support achievement of a wide range of objectives at the landscape scale.

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  • 41. Harrison, Paula
    et al.
    Berry, Pam
    Simpson, G
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Brandweiner, U
    et, al.
    Linkages between biodiversity attributes and ecosystem services: a systematic review2014In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 9, p. 191-203Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42. Hedblom, Marcus
    et al.
    Hedenås, Henrik
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Swedish Biodivers Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Adler, Sven
    Knez, I.
    Mikusiński, Grzegorz
    Svensson, Johan
    Sandström, Stefan
    Sandström, Per
    Wardle, David
    Landscape perception: linking physical monitoring data to perceived landscape properties2020In: Landscape research, ISSN 0142-6397, E-ISSN 1469-9710, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 179-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Changes in the landscape affect not only people's well-being but also how people perceive and use the landscape. An increasing number of policies have highlighted the importance of conserving a landscape's recreational and aesthetical values. This study develops and evaluates a model that links people's perceptions of a mountain landscape to physical monitoring data. Using a questionnaire, we revealed how respondents working with the Swedish mountains characterise the Magnificent Mountain landscape (as defined by Swedish policy objectives) and translated these characteristics into data from the National Inventory of Landscapes in Sweden (NILS). We found 14 potential indicators that could be derived from the existing NILS physical monitoring data and which could be used to monitor changes in the landscape values as perceived by people. Based on the results, we suggest how to simultaneously utilise field sampling of physical data and field photos to provide temporal information about landscape perception.

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  • 43. Henningsson, Marianne
    et al.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    Swedish Biodiversity Centre.
    Antonson, Hans
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute.
    Mikusinski, Grzegorz
    School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Göransson, Görgen
    Folkeson, Lennart
    et, al.
    Public participation in road planning process and perceived landscape values – a case study from Sweden2015In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 58, no 4, p. 631-653Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Iwinska, Katarzyna
    et al.
    Coll Civitas, PKIN, Pl Defilad 1, Warsaw, Poland.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Pierotti, Livia
    Imperial Coll London, Ctr Environm Policy, London, England.
    Tainio, Marko
    Polish Acad Sci, Syst Res Inst, Warsaw, Poland; Univ Cambridge, Sch Clin Med, MRC Epidemiol Unit, UKCRC Ctr Diet & Act Res CEDAR, Cambridge, England.
    de Nazelle, Audrey
    Imperial Coll London, Ctr Environm Policy, London, England.
    Cycling in Warsaw, Poland - Perceived enablers and barriers according to cyclists and non-cyclists2018In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 113, p. 291-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cycling in urban environments provides many benefits to people. However, planning of cycling infrastructures in large cities faces numerous challenges and requires better understanding of both the factors enabling cycling as well as barriers to it, determined by particular local context. While there is a growing body of research that tackle the bike transport related questions in Western Europe and the USA, there is relatively little research on that in Central Eastern Europe (CEE), in post-communist countries. In this study we used qualitative and quantitative methods to explore urban cyclists and non-cyclists opinions about the cycling, the perceived problems and obstacles, and perception of the on-going changes in bicycle transportation system in Warsaw, Poland. Although many people see potential advantages of cycling, it is mostly perceived as a leisure time activity. Those who do utilitarian cycling are more acutely aware of the benefits, such as rapidity and flexibility of this mean of transport. The main perceived barriers are linked to lack of good cycling infrastructure in the city, the feeling of insecurity linked to the behaviour of drivers, and to maintenance during winter. In conclusion, our research highlights both the opportunities and challenges linked to the development of improved cycle transportation system, suggesting the need for a range of policies, from the infrastructure improvements and comprehensive planning of the whole transportation system, to improving the driving culture that would support feeling of security of the cyclists.

  • 45.
    Josefsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Ecol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Widenfalk, Lina Ahlback
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Ecol, Uppsala, Sweden.;Greensway AB, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Hedblom, Marcus
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Ecol, Uppsala, Sweden.;Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Urban & Rural Dev, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Part, Tomas
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Ecol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Ranius, Thomas
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Ecol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Ockinger, Erik
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Ecol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Compensating for lost nature values through biodiversity offsetting-Where is the evidence?2021In: Biological Conservation, ISSN 0006-3207, E-ISSN 1873-2917, Vol. 257, article id 109117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biodiversity offsetting is becoming a principal instrument for managing biodiversity and ecosystem services in society. Still, it is unclear whether biodiversity offsetting can fully mitigate losses to natural values. When reviewing published studies on offsetting, we found only 40 evaluations with primary outcome data on biodiversity or ecosystem services. Among these, we found no evidence that biodiversity gains from offsets actually compensate for development-associated losses, because losses were never estimated. The failure to quantify losses is troubling from a conservation perspective, as applying offsets that do not match up losses and gains will result in continued net loss of biodiversity. Instead, most studies (76%) included only reference habitats as comparator and evaluated singular taxa of biodiversity (66%), and rarely ecosystem services (ES). The overall meta-analysed effect size from reference habitat comparisons suggests that offsets perform poorly when contrasted to these habitats. There was a strong bias towards North American freshwater biomes, with only six published evaluations from terrestrial habitats. The bias and small number of studies precluded any detailed meta-analytical enquiries, such as identification of main drivers of outcomes. For biodiversity offsetting to be an important instrument for halting biodiversity losses, all actions must build on solid scientific evidence, and our review show that this evidence base is yet not in place. We conclude that there is a strong need for rigorous evaluation of offsetting projects, and to this end governments could request long-term monitoring programmes as an integral part of offsetting actions and make data openly available for assessment.

  • 46.
    Mikusinski, Grzegorz
    et al.
    School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Possingham, Hugh
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Biodiversity important areas and religions – a global analysis of spatial overlap.2014In: Oryx, ISSN 0030-6053, E-ISSN 1365-3008, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 17-22Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47. Niedzialkowski, Krzysztof
    et al.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Mikusinski, Grzegorz
    School for Forest Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Jedrzejewska, Bogumila
    Why is it difficult to enlarge a protected area? Ecosystem services perspective on the conflict around the extension of the Białowieża National Park.2014In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 38, p. 314-329Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Orlikowska, Ewa H.
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Sch Forest Management, Box 43, S-73921 Skinnskatteberg, Sweden..
    Svensson, Johan
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Wildlife Fish & Environm Studies, S-90183 Umea, Sweden..
    Roberge, Jean-Michel
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Wildlife Fish & Environm Studies, S-90183 Umea, Sweden.;Swedish Forest Agcy, Box 284, S-90106 Umea, Sweden..
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Mikusinski, Grzegorz
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Sch Forest Management, Box 43, S-73921 Skinnskatteberg, Sweden.;Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Ecol, Grimso Wildlife Res Stn, S-73091 Riddarhyttan, Sweden..
    Hit or miss?: Evaluating the effectiveness of Natura 2000 for conservation of forest bird habitat in Sweden2020In: Global Ecology and Conservation, ISSN 2351-9894, Vol. 22, article id e00939Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biodiversity conservation often requires a landscape perspective. When establishing the Natura 2000 (N2k) network, the effectiveness of the sites and the influence of the surrounding landscapes for species of interest was often disregarded. We analyzed the effectiveness of N2k sites in Sweden for three forest bird species of conservation interest in the European boreal landscapes: lesser spotted woodpecker (LSW), Siberian jay (SJ) and hazel grouse (HG). Our objectives were to: 1) quantify effective suitable habitat area in N2k sites with and without consideration of the adjoining landscapes; 2) examine effective habitat area within N2k sites along the north-south vegetation gradient 3) analyze functionality of N2k sites and assess how forests outside the sites affect habitat suitability inside N2k. GISbased habitat suitability index models were applied to calculate the amount of effective habitat within and outside N2k sites. N2k sites contributed with 10% (HG), 13% (SJ) and 51% (LSW) suitable habitat identified in Sweden. Functionality of forest environments as habitat was higher inside N2k sites for LSW within all vegetation zones, and for SJ in the Alpine and Middle Boreal zones; for HG habitat outside the sites was more functional in all zones accept Alpine and Middle Boreal. The majority of N2k sites were of quite small size (<500 ha) and the size influenced their functionality for LSW and HG, with larger N2k sites being more functional. For SJ, however, average functionality of N2k sites was not influenced by their size. The largest average habitat increase linked to considering the contribution of areas outside N2k sites for their functionality as habitat was for the N2k sites of smaller size (1-500 ha). Therefore, the presence and quality of forests outside of N2k sites are of a greater importance for smaller sites, and as such these should be carefully managed. To improve conservation efficiency of the N2k sites in Sweden, we call for incorporating them into the development and implementation of the regional Green Infrastructure plans. (C) 2020 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

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  • 49.
    Orlikowska, Ewa
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Sch Forest Management, Box 43, S-73921 Skinnskatteberg, Sweden.
    Roberge, Jean-Michel
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Wildlife Fish & Environm Studies, S-90183 Umea, Sweden; Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Forest Resource Management, NILS, S-90183 Umea, Sweden.
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development. wedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Swedish Biodivers Ctr, Box 7016, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mikusinski, Grzegorz
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Sch Forest Management, Box 43, S-73921 Skinnskatteberg, Sweden; Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Ecol, Grimso Wildlife Res Stn, S-73091 Riddarhyttan, Sweden.
    Gaps in ecological research on the world's largest internationally coordinated network of protected areas: A review of Natura 20002016In: Biological Conservation, ISSN 0006-3207, E-ISSN 1873-2917, Vol. 200, p. 216-227Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natura 2000 (N2k) is a multinational and" coordinated conservation network designated to support the long-term survival of Europe's most valuable species and habitats. It is the key conservation tool in the European Union. We reviewed 510 peer-reviewed publications (period 1998-2014) focusing on ecological aspects of N2k, with the aims of identifying key research gaps and proposing future research priorities for improved conservation success. We categorized the articles by spatial scale, biogeographical regions, taxonomic groups, habitat types, and the analytical methods used. The majority of studies were performed in single N2k sites or at the regional level within countries. The Mediterranean region had the greatest number of publications and the terrestrial Black Sea, Macaronesia, Pannonian and Steppic regions were overrepresented in relation to their total area and to the area of N2k sites that they comprised. Grasslands, freshwater and wetland habitats were overrepresented in comparison to their area within N2k. Plants were the most commonly studied taxonomic group and quantitative empirical studies dominated. Future N2k research should address knowledge gaps by directing more efforts towards: 1) the Boreal region, 2) alpine, agricultural, forest and marine habitats, and 3) under represented taxonomic groups such as reptiles, amphibians, lichens and fungi. For enhanced evaluation and realization of the conservation potential of N2k, more studies will need to encompass large spatial scales and utilize modelling approaches to effectively address future climate and land-use changes.

  • 50. Primmer, Eeva
    et al.
    Jokinen, Pekka
    Blicharska, Malgorzata
    Swedish Biodiversity Centre.
    Barton, D.N.
    Bugter, Rob
    Potschin, Marion
    Governance of ecosystem services: a framework for empirical analysis.2015In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 16, p. 159-166Article in journal (Refereed)
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