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  • 1.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Designing for Transformative Play2017In: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, ISSN 1073-0516, E-ISSN 1557-7325, Vol. 24, no 3, article id 18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous studies have foregrounded how play is only partially shaped by the artifacts that their designers design. The play activity can change the structures framing it, turning players into co-designers through the mere act of playing. This article contributes to our understanding of how we can design for play taking into account that play has this transformative power. We describe four ways that players can engage with framing structures, which we classify in terms of whether players conform to explore, transgress, or (re)create them. Through the examples of three case studies, we illustrate how this model has been useful in design: as an analytical tool for deconstructing player behavior, to articulate design goals and support specific design choices, and for shaping the design process.

  • 2.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Playing with Structure: An Analytic Model of Transformative PlayManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3. Gomes, Paulo F.
    et al.
    Sardinha, Alberto
    Márquez, Elena Segura
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Cramer, Henriette
    Paiva, Ana
    Migration Between Two Embodiments of an Artificial Pet2014In: International Journal of Humanoid Robotics, ISSN 0219-8436, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 1450001-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Characters that cross dimensions have elicited an avid interest in literature and cinema. In analogy to these characters, we explore the concept of migration: Process by which an agent moves between embodiments, being active in only one at a time. We developed an autonomous artificial pet with two embodiments: A virtual within a smartphone and a physical robotic embodiment. Considering that owners' interactions with real pets lead to emotional attachment and potentially related health benefits, we conducted a user study with elementary school students to assess their attachment to the prototype and how natural they felt the interaction was. By the end of the experiment children felt closer to the artificial pet and 43.3% considered the two embodiments to correspond to the same entity, although migration was never explained to them. As a result, this paper presents a novel generic methodology that allows the evaluation of other implemented prototypes that support migration. Furthermore, we created a set of design guidelines for migrating agents.

  • 4. Katherine, Isbister
    et al.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Kirkpatrick, Suzanne
    Chen, Xiaofeng
    Salahuddin, Syed
    Cao, Gang
    Tang, Raybit
    YAMOVE! A Movement Synchrony Game that Choreographs Social Interaction.In: Human Technology, ISSN 1795-6889, E-ISSN 1795-6889, Human-Technology Choreographies: Body, Movement and Space [Special Issue].Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Co-creating Embodied Sketches. Playing as a method to design with children.2015In: Proceedings Of The 12Th International Conference On Advances In Computer Entertainment Technology, Iskandar, Malaysia, Nov 16-19, 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing body games, games in which the main source of enjoyment comes from bodily engagement, is not an easy task. This article reports on a holistic design approach that considers the social and physical setting of the activity as design resources, together with the technology. We introduce the concept of embodied sketching as a method to gauge how different configurations of resources make for a good design. We report on the experience of using embodied sketching in exploratory workshops with children, as a way to co-create design ideas. The explorations were based on simple games implemented in a technological prototype, which allowed organizers and children to collectively explore game variations by changing the rules of the game, the physical configurations, and the roles of players. We report on our takeaways from four workshops at four different schools in three different countries

  • 6.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Embodied Core Mechanics: Designing for movement-based co-located play2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Movement-based interactive systems for play came into the spotlight over a decade ago, and were met with enthusiasm by the general public as well as the Human-Computer Interaction research community. Yet a decade of research and practice has not fully addressed the challenge of designing for the moving body and play. This thesis argues that often, the role of the technology to sustain the play activity, and to drive the design process, has been over-emphasized, and has resulted in limited design possibilities. This thesis explores an alternative design approach to address the problem through combining the design of the technology with designing aspects of the social and spatial context where the play activity takes place. The work is grounded in an embodied perspective of experience, action, and design. Methodologically, it belongs to the Research through Design tradition (RtD).

    A core concept and a characterization of design practices are presented as key contributions. The concept of embodied core mechanics is introduced to frame desirable and repeatable movement-based play actions, paying attention to the way these are supported by design resources including rules, physical and digital artifacts, and the physical and spatial arrangement of players and artifacts. The concept was developed during the two main design cases: the Oriboo case, targeting dance games for children, and the PhySeEar case, targeting rehabilitative therapy for the elderly. It was further substantiated in subsequent external design collaborations. To support the design process, this thesis presents embodied sketching: a set of ideation design practices that leverage the embodied experience and enable designers to scrutinize the desired embodied experience early in the design process. Three forms of embodied sketching are presented: embodied sketching for bodystorming, co-designing with users, and sensitizing designers.

    Through reframing the design task as one of designing and studying embodied core mechanics, this thesis establishes an alternative approach to design for movement-based play in which significant aspects of the embodied play experience, lead, drive, and shape the design process and the design of the technology.

    List of papers
    1. The Design Space of Body Games: Technological, Physical, and Social Design
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Design Space of Body Games: Technological, Physical, and Social Design
    2013 (English)In: CHI 2013 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York, USA: ACM Digital Library, 2013, p. 3365-3374Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The past decade has seen an increased focus on body movement in computer games. We take a step further to look at body games: games in which the main source of enjoyment comes from bodily engagement. We argue that for these games, the physical and social settings become just as important design resources as the technology. Although all body games benefit from an integrated design approach, the social and physical setting become particularly useful as design resources when the technology has limited sensing capabilities. We develop our understanding of body games through a literature study and a concrete design experiment with designing multiplayer games for the BodyBug, a mobile device with limited sensing capabilities. Although the device was designed for free and natural movements, previous games fell short in realizing this design ideal. By designing the technology function together with its physical and social context, we were able to overcome device limitations. One of the games was subsequently incorporated in its commercial release.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    New York, USA: ACM Digital Library, 2013
    Keywords
    Body Game, Exertion Game, Gesture, Movement, Design, Sensing, Game, Dance, Children, Play, Interactive Toy, BodyBug, Oriboo, Social Play
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-282335 (URN)10.1145/2470654.2466461 (DOI)978-1-4503-1899-0 (ISBN)
    Conference
    CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
    Available from: 2016-04-05 Created: 2016-04-05 Last updated: 2016-05-23
    2. Embodied Sketching
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Embodied Sketching
    2016 (English)In: 34th Annual Chi Conference On Human Factors In Computing Systems, Chi 2016, New York, USA: ACM Digital Library, 2016, p. 6014-6027Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing bodily experiences is challenging. In this paper, we propose embodied sketching as a way of practicing design that involves understanding and designing for bodily experiences early in the design process. Embodied sketching encompasses ideation methods that are grounded in, and inspired by, the lived experience and includes the social and spatial settings as design resources in the sketching. Embodied sketching is also based on harnessing play and playfulness as the principal way to elicit creative physical engagement. We present three different ways to implement and use embodied sketching in the application domain of co-located social play. These include bodystorming of ideas, co-designing with users, and sensitizing designers. The latter helps to uncover and articulate significant, as well as novel embodied experiences, whilst the first two are useful for developing a better understanding of possible design resources. 

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    New York, USA: ACM Digital Library, 2016
    Keywords
    Ideation, Bodystorming, Embodied Sketching, Embodied Interaction, Design Methods, Sensitizing, Somaesthetics
    National Category
    Interaction Technologies
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-284600 (URN)10.1145/2858036.2858486 (DOI)000380532905088 ()9781450333627 (ISBN)
    Conference
    34th Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI4GOOD), MAY 07-12, 2016, San Jose, CA, USA
    Funder
    VINNOVA
    Available from: 2016-04-19 Created: 2016-04-19 Last updated: 2018-01-09Bibliographically approved
    3. Co-creating Embodied Sketches. Playing as a method to design with children.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Co-creating Embodied Sketches. Playing as a method to design with children.
    2015 (English)In: Proceedings Of The 12Th International Conference On Advances In Computer Entertainment Technology, Iskandar, Malaysia, Nov 16-19, 2015, 2015Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing body games, games in which the main source of enjoyment comes from bodily engagement, is not an easy task. This article reports on a holistic design approach that considers the social and physical setting of the activity as design resources, together with the technology. We introduce the concept of embodied sketching as a method to gauge how different configurations of resources make for a good design. We report on the experience of using embodied sketching in exploratory workshops with children, as a way to co-create design ideas. The explorations were based on simple games implemented in a technological prototype, which allowed organizers and children to collectively explore game variations by changing the rules of the game, the physical configurations, and the roles of players. We report on our takeaways from four workshops at four different schools in three different countries

    Keywords
    Play; technology-supported; play engagement; co-located; social; movement-based; interactive toy; Oriboo; sociospatial; embodied sketching; exertion game; body-game.
    National Category
    Interaction Technologies
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-271291 (URN)10.1145/2832932.2832975 (DOI)000382173300018 ()
    Conference
    Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology (ACE)
    Available from: 2016-01-07 Created: 2016-01-07 Last updated: 2016-10-26Bibliographically approved
    4. YAMOVE! A Movement Synchrony Game that Choreographs Social Interaction.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>YAMOVE! A Movement Synchrony Game that Choreographs Social Interaction.
    Show others...
    (English)In: Human Technology, ISSN 1795-6889, E-ISSN 1795-6889, Human-Technology Choreographies: Body, Movement and Space [Special Issue].Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    National Category
    Interaction Technologies
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-284598 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-04-19 Created: 2016-04-19 Last updated: 2017-11-30
    5. Playification: The PhyseEar case
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Playification: The PhyseEar case
    2016 (English)In: Chi Play 2016: Proceedings Of The 2016 Annual Symposium On Computer-Human Interaction In Play, 2016, p. 376-388Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of playification has recently been proposed as an extension of, or alternative to, gamification. We present a playification design project targeting the re-design of physiotherapist rehabilitative therapy for elderly inpatients. The menial and repetitive nature of the physical exercises targeted for design might seem ideal for shallow widespread gamification approaches that add external rewards to entice usage. In our project, we introduced a “third agent” instead, a NAO robot that would take over some of the work typically carried out by the physiotherapist.  This technological intervention triggered the emergence of playfulness, when inpatients and the therapist re-signified the ongoing activity by engaging in playful role-taking, such as blaming the robot for mistakes, or for sensitivity to the inpatient’s inaccurate movements. Based on the experiences from this project, we discuss some of the major differences between playification and gamification.

    Keywords
    Gamification, Playification, Physiotherapy, Physical training, Rehabilitative therapy, NAO, Robot, Technology-supported design
    National Category
    Interaction Technologies
    Research subject
    Human-Computer Interaction
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-284599 (URN)10.1145/2967934.2968099 (DOI)000387871100037 ()9781450344562 (ISBN)
    Conference
    Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play, Austin, TX, OCT 16-19, 2016
    Available from: 2016-04-19 Created: 2016-04-19 Last updated: 2017-05-08
  • 7.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    PhySeEar: technological interventions for engagement and motivation in rehabilitative therapy for the elderly2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Motivation and engagement in physical rehabilitative therapy is very important for its impact in the improvement of the physical condition of the inpatients. However, the rather repetitive nature of rehabilitative exercises make for activities that are not intrinsically motivating, hence hindering engagement. This is aggravated in geriatric rehabilitation, where meaningful extrinsic rewards in the form of physical improvement are not apparent, given some elderly’s deteriorated physical condition and low proprioceptive skills.

    This has fueled incursions into other realms (e.g. video gaming, social networking) for inspiration, methods, and tools that can alleviate the situation. We have in particular witnessed the proliferation of solutions that inspired in serious games and gamification.

    In the PhySeEar project, we have designed and implemented technological interventions to help the physiotherapist of an assisted living facility to make the rehabilitative sessions more motivating and meaningful. Using a Research through Design approach, we have engaged in an iterative design process, coming up with four prototypes.

    In this talk, I will present interesting observations from a design prototype that included the NAO robot from Aldebaran, a virtual version of this robot, and a Kinect sensor. I will cover general aspects of the behavior of the inpatients and the physiotherapist; In particular when they show engagement, interest, focus, control, and fun. With this talk, I hope to contribute to the ongoing discussion about the use of playfulness and gameful design to design for rich and engaging experiences.

  • 8.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Isbister, Katherine
    Enabling Co-Located Physical Social Play: A Framework for Design and Evaluation2015In: Game User Experience Evaluation / [ed] Regina Bernhaupt, Springer, 2015, p. 209-238Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade, we have witnessed an increased interest in social play in digital games. With this comes an urge to understand better how to design and evaluate for this new form of play. In this chapter, we encapsulate best practices for game design and evaluation, grounded in other game researchers’ work, as well as our own research and practice. We focus on a sub-area of social games that has experienced great growth and has attracted general interest in research and in practice. It is also the area that has driven our own research: co-located, physical, and social play that is technology supported. In this overview, we provide a sense of the challenges and opportunities involved when designing for this particular area, using good empirical grounding and presenting a framework in the form of lenses through which to think about the design of co-located physical social games.

  • 9.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    et al.
    Department of Computational Media University of California, Santa Cruz, USA.
    Isbister, Katherine
    Department of Computational Media University of California, Santa Cruz, USA.
    Back, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Design, Appropriation, and Use of Technology in Larps2017In: Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games (FDG'17), 2017, article id 53Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade, there has been an increasing interest in supporting social play through the design of collocated digital games, alongside efforts to better understand social-physical modes of play. In this paper, we present relevant insights from a well-established gaming community, the larp (Live Action Role Play) community. This community has a longstanding tradition of making use of costumes, physical environments, and objects to shape player experience. We conducted a survey completed by 39 larpers concerning how they use digital technology in larp, and the way technology is designed and appropriated to augment the larp experience. Here, we present early results in the form of a preliminary taxonomy of technologies in larps, as well as key trends for design, use, and appropriation of technology to impact in-game social and emotional experience.

  • 10.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Márquez Segura, Luis
    Fonserrana S.C.A de interés social.
    López Torres, Clara
    PhySeEar: Moving Yourself to Shine and Sound in Geriatric Physiotherapy Interventions2012In: 6th International Conference on Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare (PervasiveHealth), San Diego, CA, USA: IEEE conference proceedings, 2012, p. 179-182Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For useful feedback in physiotherapy interventions for geriatric rehabilitation, we have designed and tested two prototypes, based on commercially available radio frequency tags. The prototypes were designed to be suitable for a population with limited proprioceptive skills, high dependency rate, and limited cognitive skills. Focus for design was on designing feedback that would allow the inpatients to self-monitor their rehabilitation process, and would make for increasing their proprioceptive skills. The system is also intended to mean a source of motivation for rehabilitation practice. We have performed a first explorative study in a real setting. In this paper we will be commenting on initial observations of the use of one of the prototypes. 

  • 11.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Rostami, Asreen
    Stockholm Univ, Mobile Life Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Embodied Sketching2016In: 34th Annual Chi Conference On Human Factors In Computing Systems, Chi 2016, New York, USA: ACM Digital Library, 2016, p. 6014-6027Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing bodily experiences is challenging. In this paper, we propose embodied sketching as a way of practicing design that involves understanding and designing for bodily experiences early in the design process. Embodied sketching encompasses ideation methods that are grounded in, and inspired by, the lived experience and includes the social and spatial settings as design resources in the sketching. Embodied sketching is also based on harnessing play and playfulness as the principal way to elicit creative physical engagement. We present three different ways to implement and use embodied sketching in the application domain of co-located social play. These include bodystorming of ideas, co-designing with users, and sensitizing designers. The latter helps to uncover and articulate significant, as well as novel embodied experiences, whilst the first two are useful for developing a better understanding of possible design resources. 

  • 12.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Moen, Jin
    Movinto Fun.
    Johansson, Carolina
    The Design Space of Body Games: Technological, Physical, and Social Design2013In: CHI 2013 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York, USA: ACM Digital Library, 2013, p. 3365-3374Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The past decade has seen an increased focus on body movement in computer games. We take a step further to look at body games: games in which the main source of enjoyment comes from bodily engagement. We argue that for these games, the physical and social settings become just as important design resources as the technology. Although all body games benefit from an integrated design approach, the social and physical setting become particularly useful as design resources when the technology has limited sensing capabilities. We develop our understanding of body games through a literature study and a concrete design experiment with designing multiplayer games for the BodyBug, a mobile device with limited sensing capabilities. Although the device was designed for free and natural movements, previous games fell short in realizing this design ideal. By designing the technology function together with its physical and social context, we were able to overcome device limitations. One of the games was subsequently incorporated in its commercial release.

  • 13.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Márquez Segura, Luis
    Fonserrana SCA Interes Social, Tocina, Sevilla, Spain.
    López Recio, David
    Royal Inst Technol, Mobile Life Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Playification: The PhyseEar case2016In: Chi Play 2016: Proceedings Of The 2016 Annual Symposium On Computer-Human Interaction In Play, 2016, p. 376-388Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of playification has recently been proposed as an extension of, or alternative to, gamification. We present a playification design project targeting the re-design of physiotherapist rehabilitative therapy for elderly inpatients. The menial and repetitive nature of the physical exercises targeted for design might seem ideal for shallow widespread gamification approaches that add external rewards to entice usage. In our project, we introduced a “third agent” instead, a NAO robot that would take over some of the work typically carried out by the physiotherapist.  This technological intervention triggered the emergence of playfulness, when inpatients and the therapist re-signified the ongoing activity by engaging in playful role-taking, such as blaming the robot for mistakes, or for sensitivity to the inpatient’s inaccurate movements. Based on the experiences from this project, we discuss some of the major differences between playification and gamification.

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