uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 17 of 17
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bini, Monica
    et al.
    Univ Pisa, Dipartimento Sci Terra, Pisa, Italy.
    Zanchetta, Giovanni
    Univ Pisa, Dipartimento Sci Terra, Pisa, Italy.
    Persoiu, Aurel
    Romanian Acad, Emil Racovita Inst Speleol, Cluj Napoca, Romania.
    Cartier, Rosine
    Lund Univ, Dept Geol, Quaternary Sci, Lund, Sweden.
    Catala, Albert
    Univ Barcelona, Fac Geol, GRC Geociencies Marines, Dept Dinam Terra & Ocea, Barcelona, Spain.
    Cacho, Isabel
    Univ Barcelona, Fac Geol, GRC Geociencies Marines, Dept Dinam Terra & Ocea, Barcelona, Spain.
    Dean, Jonathan R.
    Univ Hull, Sch Environm Sci, Kingston Upon Hull, N Humberside, England.
    Di Rita, Federico
    Univ Roma La Sapienza, Dipartimento Biol Ambientale, Rome, Italy.
    Drysdale, Russell N.
    Univ Melbourne, Sch Geog, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Finné, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history. Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Isola, Ilaria
    Ist Nazl Geofis & Vulcanol, Sez Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    Jalali, Bassem
    Univ Paris 06, Sorbonne Univ, LOCEAN Lab, CNRS,IRD,MNHN,UPMC, Paris, France.
    Lirer, Fabrizio
    CNR Napoli, Ist Sci Marine ISMAR, Naples, Italy.
    Magri, Donatella
    Univ Roma La Sapienza, Dipartimento Biol Ambientale, Rome, Italy.
    Masi, Alessia
    Univ Roma La Sapienza, Dipartimento Biol Ambientale, Rome, Italy.
    Marks, Leszek
    Univ Warsaw, Fac Geol, Warsaw, Poland.
    Mercuri, Anna Maria
    Univ Reggio Emilia & Modena, Dipartimento Sci Vita, Modena, Italy.
    Peyron, Odile
    Univ Montpellier, Inst Sci Evolut ISEM, Montpellier, France.
    Sadori, Laura
    Univ Roma La Sapienza, Dipartimento Biol Ambientale, Rome, Italy.
    Sicre, Marie-Alexandrine
    Univ Paris 06, Sorbonne Univ, LOCEAN Lab, CNRS,IRD,MNHN,UPMC, Paris, France.
    Welc, Fabian
    Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski Univ, Inst Archaeol, Warsaw, Poland.
    Zielhofer, Christoph
    Univ Leipzig, Chair Phys Geog, Leipzig, Germany.
    Brisset, Elodie
    Inst Catala Paleoecol Humana & Evolucio Social, IPHES, Tarragona, Spain;Univ Rovira & Virgili, Area Prehist, Tarragona, Spain.
    The 4.2 ka BP Event in the Mediterranean region: an overview2019In: Climate of the Past, ISSN 1814-9324, E-ISSN 1814-9332, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 555-577Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Mediterranean region and the Levant have returned some of the clearest evidence of a climatically dry period occurring around 4200 years ago. However, some regional evidence is controversial and contradictory, and issues remain regarding timing, progression, and regional articulation of this event. In this paper, we review the evidence from selected proxies (sea-surface temperature, precipitation, and temperature reconstructed from pollen, delta O-18 on speleothems, and delta O-18 on lacustrine carbonate) over the Mediterranean Basin to infer possible regional climate patterns during the interval between 4.3 and 3.8 ka. The values and limitations of these proxies are discussed, and their potential for furnishing information on seasonality is also explored. Despite the chronological uncertainties, which are the main limitations for disentangling details of the climatic conditions, the data suggest that winter over the Mediterranean involved drier conditions, in addition to already dry summers. However, some exceptions to this prevail - where wetter conditions seem to have persisted - suggesting regional heterogeneity in climate patterns. Temperature data, even if sparse, also suggest a cooling anomaly, even if this is not uniform. The most common paradigm to interpret the precipitation regime in the Mediterranean - a North Atlantic Oscillation-like pattern - is not completely satisfactory to interpret the selected data.

  • 2.
    Bonnier, Anton
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Finné, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Weiberg, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Examining Land-Use through GIS-Based Kernel Density Estimation: A Re-Evaluation of Legacy Data from the Berbati-Limnes Survey2019In: Journal of field archaeology, ISSN 0093-4690, E-ISSN 2042-4582, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 70-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of archaeological survey data for evaluation of landscape dynamics has commonly been concerned with the distribution of settlements and changes in number of recorded sites over time. Here we present a new quantitative approach to survey-based legacy data, which allows further assessments of the spatial configuration of possible land-use areas. Utilizing data from an intensive archaeological survey in the Berbati-Limnes area, Greece, we demonstrate how GIS-based kernel density estimations (KDE) can be used to produce cluster-based density surfaces that may be linked to past land-use strategies. By relating density surfaces to elevation and slope, it is also possible to quantify shifts in the use of specific environments on a regional scale, allowing us to model and visualize land-use dynamics over time. In this respect, the approach provides more multifaceted information to be drawn from archaeological legacy data, providing an extended platform for research on human-environment interactions.

  • 3.
    Comas-Bru, Laia
    et al.
    Univ Reading, Sch Archaeol Geog & Environm Sci, Reading RG6 6AH, Berks, England;Univ Coll Dublin, Sch Earth Sci, Dublin 4, Ireland.
    Harrison, Sandy P.
    Univ Reading, Sch Archaeol Geog & Environm Sci, Reading RG6 6AH, Berks, England.
    Werner, Martin
    Helmholtz Ctr Polar & Marine Res, Alfred Wegener Inst, Climate Sci Div, Div Climate Sci Paleoclimate Dynam, Bussestr 24, D-27570 Bremerhaven, Germany.
    Rehfeld, Kira
    Heidelberg Univ, Inst Environm Phys, Neuenheimer Feld 229, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Scroxton, Nick
    Univ Massachusetts, Dept Geosci, 611 North Pleasant St, Amherst, MA 01003 USA.
    Veiga-Pires, Cristina
    Univ Algarve, Marine & Environm Res Ctr CIMA, Campus Gambelas, P-8005139 Faro, Portugal.
    Ahmad, Syed Masood
    Jamia Millia Islamia, Fac Nat Sci, Dept Geog, New Delhi 110025, India.
    Brahim, Yassine Ait
    Xi An Jiao Tong Univ, Inst Global Environm Change, Xian, Shaanxi, Peoples R China.
    Mozhdehi, Sahar Amirnezhad
    Univ Coll Dublin, Sch Earth Sci, Dublin 4, Ireland.
    Arienzo, Monica
    Desert Res Inst, Div Hydrol Sci, 2215 Raggio Pkwy, Reno, NV 89512 USA.
    Atsawawaranunt, Kamolphat
    Univ Reading, Sch Archaeol Geog & Environm Sci, Reading RG6 6AH, Berks, England.
    Baker, Andy
    Univ New South Wales, Sch Biol Earth & Environm Sci, Kensington, NSW 2052, Australia.
    Braun, Kerstin
    Arizona State Univ, Inst Human Origins, POB 874101, Tempe, AZ 85287 USA.
    Breitenbach, Sebastian
    Ruhr Univ Bochum, Inst Geol Mineral & Geophys, Sediment & Isotope Geol, Univ Str 150,IA E5-179, D-44801 Bochum, Germany.
    Burstyn, Yuval
    Geol Survey Israel, 32 Yeshayahu Leibowitz, IL-9371234 Jerusalem, Israel;Hebrew Univ Jerusalem, Inst Earth Sci, Edmond J Safra Campus, IL-91904 Jerusalem, Israel.
    Chawchai, Sakonvan
    Chulalongkorn Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Geol, MESA Res Unit, 254 Phayathai Rd, Bangkok 10330, Thailand.
    Columbu, Andrea
    Dept Biol Geol & Environm Sci, Via Zamboni 67, I-40126 Bologna, Italy.
    Deininger, Michael
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Geosci, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 21, D-55128 Mainz, Germany.
    Demeny, Attila
    Hungarian Acad Sci, Res Ctr Astron & Earth Sci, Inst Geol & Geochem Res, Budaorsi Ut 45, H-1112 Budapest, Hungary.
    Dixon, Bronwyn
    Univ Reading, Sch Archaeol Geog & Environm Sci, Reading RG6 6AH, Berks, England;Univ Melbourne, Sch Geog, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia.
    Hatvani, Istvan Gabor
    Hungarian Acad Sci, Res Ctr Astron & Earth Sci, Inst Geol & Geochem Res, Budaorsi Ut 45, H-1112 Budapest, Hungary.
    Hu, Jun
    Univ Southern Calif, Dept Earth Sci, 3651 Trousdale Pkwy, Los Angeles, CA 90089 USA.
    Kaushal, Nikita
    Univ Oxford, Dept Earth Sci, South Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3AN, England.
    Kern, Zoltan
    Hungarian Acad Sci, Res Ctr Astron & Earth Sci, Inst Geol & Geochem Res, Budaorsi Ut 45, H-1112 Budapest, Hungary.
    Labuhn, Inga
    Univ Bremen, Inst Geog, Celsiusstr 2, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Lachniet, Matthew S.
    Univ Nevada, Dept Geosci, POB 4022, Las Vegas, NV 89154 USA.
    Lechleitner, Franziska A.
    Univ Oxford, Dept Earth Sci, South Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3AN, England.
    Lorrey, Andrew
    Natl Inst Water & Atmospher Res, Climate Atmosphere & Hazards Ctr, 41 Market Pl, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Markowska, Monika
    Univ Tubingen, Holderlinstr 12, D-72074 Tubingen, Germany.
    Nehme, Carole
    Univ Rouen Normandie, IDEES UMR CNRS 6266, Dept Geog, Mont St Aignan, France.
    Novello, Valdir F.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Inst Geociencias, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Oster, Jessica
    Vanderbilt Univ, Dept Earth & Environm Sci, Nashville, TN 37206 USA.
    Perez-Mejias, Carlos
    Xi An Jiao Tong Univ, Inst Global Environm Change, Xian, Shaanxi, Peoples R China;Pyrenean Inst Ecol IPE CSIC, Dept Geoenvironm Proc & Global Change, Ave Montanana 1005, Zaragoza 50059, Spain.
    Pickering, Robyn
    South Africa & Human Evolut Res Inst, Dept Geol Sci, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Sekhon, Natasha
    Univ Texas Austin, Jackson Sch Geosci, Dept Geol Sci, Austin, TX 78712 USA.
    Wang, Xianfeng
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Earth Observ Singapore, Singapore 636798, Singapore.
    Warken, Sophie
    Heidelberg Univ, Inst Environm Phys, Neuenheimer Feld 229, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Atkinson, Tim
    UCL, Dept Earth Sci, London WC1E 6BT, England;UCL, Dept Geog, London WC1E 6BT, England.
    Ayalon, Avner
    Geol Survey Israel, 32 Yeshayahu Leibowitz, IL-9371234 Jerusalem, Israel.
    Baldini, James
    Univ Durham, Dept Earth Sci, Durham DH1 3LE, England.
    Bar-Matthews, Miryam
    Geol Survey Israel, 32 Yeshayahu Leibowitz, IL-9371234 Jerusalem, Israel.
    Bernal, Juan Pablo
    Univ Nacl Autonoma Mexico, Ctr Geociencias, Campus UNAM Juriquilla, Queretaro 76230, Queretaro, Mexico.
    Boch, Ronny
    Graz Univ Technol, Inst Appl Geosci, Rechbauerstr 12, A-8010 Graz, Austria.
    Borsato, Andrea
    Univ Newcastle, Sch Environm & Life Sci, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia.
    Boyd, Meighan
    Royal Holloway Univ London, Dept Earth Sci, Egham TW20 0EX, Surrey, England.
    Brierley, Chris
    UCL, Dept Geog, London WC1E 6BT, England.
    Cai, Yanjun
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Earth Environm, State Key Lab Loess & Quaternary Geol, Xian 710061, Shaanxi, Peoples R China.
    Carolin, Stacy
    Univ Innsbruck, Inst Geol, Innrain 52, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria.
    Cheng, Hai
    Xi An Jiao Tong Univ, Inst Global Environm Change, Xian, Shaanxi, Peoples R China.
    Constantin, Silviu
    Emil Racovita Inst Speleol, Str Frumoasa 31, Bucharest, Romania.
    Couchoud, Isabelle
    Univ Grenoble Alpes, Univ Savoie Mt Blanc, EDYTEM, UMR CNRS 5204, F-73370 Le Bourget Du Lac, France.
    Cruz, Francisco
    Univ Sao Paulo, Inst Geociencias, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Denniston, Rhawn
    Cornell Coll, Dept Geol, Mt Vernon, IA 52314 USA.
    Dragusin, Virgil
    Emil Racovita Inst Speleol, Str Frumoasa 31, Bucharest, Romania.
    Duan, Wuhui
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Geol & Geophys, Key Lab Cenozo Geol & Environm, Beijing 100029, Peoples R China.
    Ersek, Vasile
    Northumbria Univ, Dept Geog & Environm Sci, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.
    Finné, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Fleitmann, Dominik
    Univ Reading, Sch Archaeol Geog & Environm Sci, Dept Archaeol, Reading RG6 6AB, Berks, England.
    Fohlmeister, Jens
    Univ Potsdam, Inst Earth & Environm Sci, Karl Liebknecht Str 24-25, D-14476 Potsdam, Germany.
    Frappier, Amy
    Skidmore Coll, Dept Geosci, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866 USA.
    Genty, Dominique
    CNRS, Lab Sci Climat & Environm, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, France.
    Holzkamper, Steffen
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hopley, Philip
    Birkbeck Univ London, Dept Earth & Planetary Sci, Malet St, London WC1E 7HX, England.
    Johnston, Vanessa
    Slovenian Acad Sci & Arts, Res Ctr, Karst Res Inst, Titov Trg 2, Postojna 6230, Slovenia.
    Kathayat, Gayatri
    Xi An Jiao Tong Univ, Inst Global Environm Change, Xian, Shaanxi, Peoples R China.
    Keenan-Jones, Duncan
    Univ Queensland, Sch Hist & Philosoph Inquiry, St Lucia, Qld 4072, Australia.
    Koltai, Gabriella
    Univ Innsbruck, Inst Geol, Innrain 52, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria.
    Li, Ting-Yong
    Southwest Univ, Sch Geog Sci, Chongqing Key Lab Karst Environm, Chongqing 400715, Peoples R China;Minist Nat Resources China, Field Sci Observat & Res Base Karst Ecoenvironm N, Chongqing 408435, Peoples R China.
    Lone, Mahjoor Ahmad
    Natl Taiwan Univ, Dept Geosci, High Precis Mass Spectrometry & Environm Change L, Taipei 10617, Taiwan;Natl Taiwan Univ, Res Ctr Future Earth, Taipei 10617, Taiwan.
    Luetscher, Marc
    Swiss Inst Speleol & Karst Studies SISKA, Rue Serre 68, CH-2301 La Chaux De Fonds, Switzerland.
    Mattey, Dave
    Royal Holloway Univ London, Dept Earth Sci, Egham TW20 0EX, Surrey, England.
    Moreno, Ana
    Inst Pirena Ecol CSIC, Dept Proc Geoambientales & Cambio Global, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Moseley, Gina
    Univ Innsbruck, Inst Geol, Innrain 52, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria.
    Psomiadis, David
    Imprint Analyt GmbH, Werner von Siemens Str 1, A-7343 Neutal, Austria.
    Ruan, Jiaoyang
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Sch Earth Sci & Engn, Guangdong Prov Key Lab Geodynam & Geohazards, Guangzhou 510275, Guangdong, Peoples R China.
    Scholz, Denis
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Geosci, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 21, D-55128 Mainz, Germany.
    Sha, Lijuan
    Xi An Jiao Tong Univ, Inst Global Environm Change, Xian, Shaanxi, Peoples R China.
    Smith, Andrew Christopher
    British Geol Survey, NERC Isotope Geosci Facil, Nottingham, England.
    Strikis, Nicolas
    Univ Fed Fluminense, Dept Geoquim, Niteroi, RJ, Brazil.
    Treble, Pauline
    ANSTO, Lucas Heights, NSW, Australia.
    Unal-Imer, Ezgi
    Middle East Tech Univ, Dept Geol Engn, Ankara, Turkey.
    Vaks, Anton
    Geol Survey Israel, 32 Yeshayahu Leibowitz, IL-9371234 Jerusalem, Israel.
    Vansteenberge, Stef
    Vrije Univ Brussel, Dept Chem, Analyt, Environm & Geochem, Brussels, Belgium.
    Voarintsoa, Ny Riavo G.
    Hebrew Univ Jerusalem, Inst Earth Sci, Edmond J Safra Campus, IL-91904 Jerusalem, Israel.
    Wong, Corinne
    Univ Texas Austin, Inst Environm Sci, 2275 Speedway, Austin, TX 78712 USA.
    Wortham, Barbara
    Univ Calif Davis, Dept Earth & Planetary Sci, Davis, CA 95616 USA.
    Wurtzel, Jennifer
    Australian Natl Univ, Res Sch Earth Sci, Canberra, ACT, Australia;Australian Natl Univ, ARC Ctr Excellence Climate Syst Sci, Canberra, ACT, Australia.
    Zhang, Haiwei
    Xi An Jiao Tong Univ, Inst Global Environm Change, Xian, Shaanxi, Peoples R China.
    Evaluating model outputs using integrated global speleothem records of climate change since the last glacial2019In: Climate of the Past, ISSN 1814-9324, E-ISSN 1814-9332, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 1557-1579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although quantitative isotope data from speleothems has been used to evaluate isotope-enabled model simulations, currently no consensus exists regarding the most appropriate methodology through which to achieve this. A number of modelling groups will be running isotope-enabled palaeoclimate simulations in the framework of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6, so it is timely to evaluate different approaches to using the speleothem data for data-model comparisons. Here, we illustrate this using 456 globally distributed speleothem delta O-18 records from an updated version of the Speleothem Isotopes Synthesis and Analysis (SISAL) database and palaeoclimate simulations generated using the ECHAM5-wiso isotope-enabled atmospheric circulation model. We show that the SISAL records reproduce the first-order spatial patterns of isotopic variability in the modern day, strongly supporting the application of this dataset for evaluating model-derived isotope variability into the past. However, the discontinuous nature of many speleothem records complicates the process of procuring large numbers of records if data-model comparisons are made using the traditional approach of comparing anomalies between a control period and a given palaeoclimate experiment. To circumvent this issue, we illustrate techniques through which the absolute isotope values during any time period could be used for model evaluation. Specifically, we show that speleothem isotope records allow an assessment of a model's ability to simulate spatial isotopic trends. Our analyses provide a protocol for using speleothem isotope data for model evaluation, including screening the observations to take into account the impact of speleothem mineralogy on delta O-18 values, the optimum period for the modern observational baseline and the selection of an appropriate time window for creating means of the isotope data for palaeo-time-slices.

  • 4.
    Finné, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history. Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, Stockholm, Sweden.;Navarino Environm Observ, Costa Navarino, Messinia, Greece..
    Holmgren, Karin
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, Stockholm, Sweden.;Navarino Environm Observ, Costa Navarino, Messinia, Greece.;Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Shen, Chuan-Chou
    Natl Taiwan Univ, High Precis Mass Spectrometry & Environm Change L, Dept Geosci, Taipei, Taiwan..
    Hu, Hsun-Ming
    Natl Taiwan Univ, High Precis Mass Spectrometry & Environm Change L, Dept Geosci, Taipei, Taiwan..
    Boyd, Meighan
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, Stockholm, Sweden.;Navarino Environm Observ, Costa Navarino, Messinia, Greece.;Royal Holloway Univ London, Dept Earth Sci, Egham, Surrey, England..
    Stocker, Sharon
    Univ Cincinnati, Dept Class, 410 Blegen Lib, Cincinnati, OH USA..
    Late Bronze Age climate change and the destruction of the Mycenaean Palace of Nestor at Pylos2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 12, article id e0189447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper offers new high-resolution oxygen and carbon isotope data from Stalagmite S1 from Mavri Trypa Cave, SW Peloponnese. Our data provide the climate background to the destruction of the nearby Mycenaean Palace of Nestor at Pylos at the transition from Late Helladic (LH) IIIB to LH IIIC, similar to 3150-3130 years before present (before AD 1950, hereafter yrs BP) and the subsequent period. S1 is dated by 24 U-Th dates with an averaged precision of +/- 26 yrs (2s), providing one of the most robust paleoclimate records from the eastern Mediterranean for the end of the Late Bronze Age (LBA). The delta O-18 record shows generally wetter conditions at the time when the Palace of Nestor at Pylos was destroyed, but a brief period of drier conditions around 3200 yrs BP may have disrupted the Mycenaean agricultural system that at the time was likely operating close to its limit. Gradually developing aridity after 3150 yrs BP, i.e. subsequent to the destruction, probably reduced crop yields and helped to erode the basis for the reinstitution of a central authority and the Palace itself.

  • 5.
    Finné, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history. Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Salonen, Sakari
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Geosci & Geog, POB 64, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland;Univ Bordeaux, Environm & Paleoenvironm Ocean & Continentaux, UMR 5805, F-33615 Pessac, France.
    Frank, Norbert
    Heidelberg Univ, Inst Environm Phys, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Helmens, Karin F.
    Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden;Univ Helsinki, Inst Atmospher & Earth Syst Res INAR Phys, Varrio Res Stn, POB 64, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Schröder-Ritzrau, Andrea
    Heidelberg Univ, Inst Environm Phys, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Deininger, Michael
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Geosci, D-55128 Mainz, Germany.
    Holzkämper, Steffen
    Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Last Interglacial Climate in Northern Sweden - Insights from a Speleothem Record2019In: QUATERNARY, ISSN 2571-550X, Vol. 2, no 3, article id 29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Continental records with absolute dates of the timing and progression of climatic conditions during the Last Interglacial (LIG) from northern Europe are rare. Speleothems from northern Europe have a large potential as archives for LIG environmental conditions since they were formed in sheltered environments and may be preserved beneath ice sheets. Here, we present delta C-13 and delta O-18 values from speleothem Kf-21, from Korallgrottan in Jamtland (northwest Sweden). Kf-21 is dated with five MC-ICPMS U-Th dates with errors smaller than similar to 1 ka. Kf-21 started forming at similar to 130.2 ka and the main growth phase with relatively constant growth rates lasted from 127.3 ka to 124.4 ka, after which calcite formation ceased. Both delta C-13 and delta O-18 show rapid shifts but also trends, with a range of values within their Holocene counterparts from Korallgrottan. Our results indicate an early onset of the LIG in northern Europe with ice-free conditions at similar to 130 ka. Higher growth rates combined with more negative delta O-18 values between similar to 127.3 and 126.8 ka, interpreted here as warmer and more humid conditions, as well as indications of a millennial-scale cold spell centered at 126.2 ka, resemble findings from speleothem records from other parts of Europe, highlighting that these were regional scale climatic patterns.

  • 6.
    Finné, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history. Navarino Environmental Observatory, Navarino Dunes, Costa Navarino, Greece.
    Woodbridge, Jessie
    Labuhn, Inga
    Roberts, C. Neil
    Holocene hydro-climatic variability in the Mediterranean: A synthetic multi-proxy reconstruction2019In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 847-863Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we identify and analyze proxy data interpreted to reflect hydro-climatic variability over the last 10,000 years from the Mediterranean region to (1) outline millennial and multi-centennial-scale trends and (2) identify regional patterns of hydro-climatic variability. A total of 47 lake, cave, and marine records were transformed to z-scores to allow direct comparisons between sites, put on a common time scale, and binned into 200-year time slices. Six different regions were identified based on numerical and spatial analyzes of z-scores: S Iberia and Maghreb, N Iberia, Italy, the Balkans, Turkey, and the Levant, and the overall hydro-climate history of each region was reconstructed. N Iberia is largely decoupled from the five other regions throughout the Holocene. Wetter conditions occur in the five other regions between 8500 and 6100 yr BP. After 6000 yr BP, climate oscillated until around 3000 ± 300 yr BP, which seems to have been the overall driest period in the eastern Mediterranean and North Africa. In contrast, Italy and N Iberia seem to have remained wetter during this period. In addition, non-metric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) was applied to 18 long, continuous climate z-score records that span the majority of the Holocene. nMDS axes 1 and 2 illustrate the main trends in the z-score data. The first axis captures a long-term development of drier condition in the Mediterranean from 7900 to 3700 yr BP. Rapid shifts occur in nMDS axis 2 at 6700–6300 BP, 4500–4300 BP, and 3500–3300 BP indicating centennial-scale climate change. Our synthesis highlights a dominant south/east versus north/west Mediterranean hydro-climate dipole throughout the Holocene and therefore confirms that there was no single climate trajectory characterizing the whole Mediterranean basin during the last 10 millennia.

  • 7. Hughes, Ryan E.
    et al.
    Weiberg, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Bonnier, Anton
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Finné, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Kaplan, Jed O.
    Quantifying Land Use in Past Societies from Cultural Practice and Archaeological Data2018In: Land, ISSN ISSN 2073-445X, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantitative reconstructions of past land use facilitate comparisons between livelihoods in space and time. However, comparison between different types of land use strategies is challenging as land use has a multitude of expressions and intensities. The quantitative method presented here facilitates the exploration and synthetization of uneven archaeological and textual evidence from past societies. The approach quantifies the area required for habitation, agriculture, arboriculture, pasturage, and fuel supply, based on a combination of archaeological, historical, ethnographic and modern evidence from the relevant geographical region. It is designed to stimulate discussion and can be used to test a wide range of hypotheses regarding local and regional economies, ancient trade and redistribution, and the resilience and/or vulnerability of past societies to environmental change. The method also helps identify where our gaps in knowledge are in understanding past human–environment interaction, the ecological footprint of past cultures and their influence on the landscape in a transparent and quantitative manner. The present article focuses especially on the impact of dietary estimates and crop yield estimates, two main elements in calculating land use in past societies due to their uncertainty as well as their significant impact on calculations. By employing archaeological data, including botanical, zoological and isotopic evidence, alongside available textual sources, this method seeks to improve land use and land cover change models by increasing their representativeness and accuracy.

  • 8.
    Katrantsiotis, Christos
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, Stockholm, Sweden; NEO, Messenia, Greece; Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Norstrom, Elin
    NEO, Messenia, Greece; Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Dept Geol Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Smittenberg, Rienk H.
    Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Dept Geol Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Finné, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Weiberg, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Hattestrand, Martina
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, Stockholm, Sweden; NEO, Messenia, Greece; Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Avramidis, Pavlos
    Univ Patras, Dept Geol, Rion, Greece.
    Wastegard, Stefan
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Climate changes in the Eastern Mediterranean over the last 5000 years and their links to the high-latitude atmospheric patterns and Asian monsoons2019In: Global and Planetary Change, ISSN 0921-8181, E-ISSN 1872-6364, Vol. 175, p. 36-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research aims to improve the knowledge of the mid to late Holocene climate changes and the underlying drivers in the eastern Mediterranean. We focus on the Peloponnese peninsula, SW Greece, characterized by a W-E rainfall/temperature gradient and a strong climate-sensitivity to shifts in the large-scale atmospheric patterns. A radiocarbon-dated sediment core, taken from the ancient Lake Lerna, a former lake in NE Peloponnese, was analyzed for distribution and hydrogen isotope (δD) composition of n-alkanes and bulk organic geochemistry (δ13C, TOC). The predominantly macrophyte (submerged/floating)-derived δD23 profile exhibits the largest long-term fluctuation in the record and co-varies with δD of long-chain n-alkanes providing evidence for precipitation and temperature changes over the last 5000 years. The Lerna δD23 signal is sometimes in agreement with other n-alkane δD records from SW Peloponnese indicating wetter conditions in the peninsula at ca 5000–4600, ca 4500–4100, ca 3000–2600 (more unstable in SW) and after ca 700 cal BP with drier periods at ca 4100–3900 and ca 1000–700 cal BP. Conversely, a NE-SW climate see-saw is revealed at ca 4600–4500, ca 3200, ca 2600–1800, and ca 1200–1000 cal BP when the δD23 Lerna exhibits more positive trends (drier in NE) with a reversal at ca 3900–3300, ca 3200–3000 and ca 1800–1300 cal BP. These opposing and sometimes similar signals between NE and SW Peloponnese can be explained by the relative dominance of high-latitude atmospheric patterns over the peninsula. A similar signal would be expected when the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) exerts the main control with NAO (+) creating conditions of reduced moisture. The dipole pattern is likely driven by shifts in North Sea–Caspian Atmospheric pattern (NCP), which account for the present-day regional climate variability with NCP (+) leading to wetter and colder conditions in NE Peloponnese. The Asian monsoonal system likely has an additional impact on the δD variabilities through influencing the summer temperatures. There is a consistency between the Peloponnesian δD signals and monsoonal records after ca 4000 cal BP confirming the actualistic models. Strong monsoonal periods coincide with cooler summers (lower δD values) in Lerna, due to the northerly winds, the Etesians. On the contrary, SW Peloponnese is dominated by warmer conditions during the same periods as the area is located on the lee side of the mountain and highly influenced by the adiabatic warming associated with the subsidence over the Eastern Mediterranean.

  • 9. Labuhn, Inga
    et al.
    Finné, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Izdebski, Adam
    Roberts, Neil
    Woodbridge, Jessie
    Climatic Changes and Their Impacts in the Mediterranean during the First Millennium AD2018In: Late Antique Archaeology, ISSN 1570-6893, E-ISSN 2213-4522, Vol. 12, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many events and developments in human history have been suspected to be, at least partly, influenced by climate and environmental changes. In order to investigate climate impacts on societies, reliable palaeoclimatic data of adequate dating precision, resolution, spatial representativeness, and so on, are needed. This paper presents a survey and analysis of published palaeoclimatic data of the Mediterranean for the 1st millennium AD, and identifies regional patterns of hydro-climate variability, useful for comparison with archaeological/historical studies. It also provides general guidelines to palaeoclimatic data for archaeologists/historians interested in climatic change. We conclude with a discussion of how the emerging patterns of regional climate histories may have had an impact on Mediterranean societies in Late Antiquity.

  • 10.
    Norstrom, Elin
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, Stockholm, Sweden;Navarino Environm Observ, Costa Navarino, Messenia, Greece;Stockholm Univ, Dept Geol Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Katrantsiotis, Christos
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, Stockholm, Sweden;Navarino Environm Observ, Costa Navarino, Messenia, Greece.
    Finné, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history. Navarino Environm Observ, Costa Navarino, Messenia, Greece.
    Risberg, Jan
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, Stockholm, Sweden;Navarino Environm Observ, Costa Navarino, Messenia, Greece.
    Smittenberg, Rienk H.
    Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Univ, Dept Geol Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bjursater, Stefan
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Biomarker hydrogen isotope composition (D) as proxy for Holocene hydroclimatic change and seismic activity in SW Peloponnese, Greece2018In: Journal of Quaternary Science, ISSN 0267-8179, E-ISSN 1099-1417, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 563-574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a 6000-year-long record tracing hydroclimate changes in SW Greece, based on hydrogen isotope composition of aquatic plant-derived n-C-23 alkanes (D-C23) in a sediment core from the Messenian plain, Peloponnese. The D-C23 record co-varies with other eastern Mediterranean records, suggesting relatively wetter conditions c. 6-4.5ka, followed by progressively drier conditions leading up to maximum aridity c. 2.8 ka. This arid phase was interrupted by a shift in D-C23 between 3.3 and 3.1ka inferring wetter conditions and/or tentative responses to anthropogenic water regulating activities during the Late Bronze Age. After 2.7ka, a return to more humid conditions was followed by increased dryness and stronger seasonality contrasts from c. 2.0ka. The D-C23 record shows three short-lived excursions (5.7, 5.3, 2.8ka), where isotope values dropped by >20 parts per thousand and immediately stabilized again. The events were paralleled by abrupt increases in sedimentation rates. We hypothesize that the isotopic shifts represent a response to mixing of ground water systems during tectonic events, followed by sealing of seismically derived cracks in the active fault. The outcome of the study is promising for future expansion of isotope-based proxies on sediments in the region, to reconstruct both hydroclimate and past seismic activity.

  • 11. Walsh, Kevin
    et al.
    Berger, Jean-François
    Roberts, C. Neil
    Vanniere, Boris
    Ghilardi, Matthieu
    Brown, Antony G.
    Woodbridge, Jessie
    Lespez, Laurent
    Estrany, Joan
    Glais, Arthur
    Palmisano, Alessio
    Finné, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Verstraeten, Gert
    Holocene demographic fluctuations, climate and erosion in the Mediterranean: A meta data-analysis2019In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 864-885Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As part of the Changing the Face of the Mediterranean Project, we consider how human pressure and concomitant erosion has affected a range of Mediterranean landscapes between the Neolithic and, in some cases, the post-medieval period. Part of this assessment comprises an investigation of relationships among palaeodemographic data, evidence for vegetation change and some consideration of rapid climate change events. The erosion data include recent or hitherto unpublished work from the authors. Where possible, we consider summed probabilities of 14C dates as well as the first published synthesis of all known optically stimulated luminescence dated sequences. The results suggest that while there were some periods when erosion took place contemporaneously across a number of regions, possibly induced by climate changes, more often than not, we see a complex and heterogeneous interplay of demographic and environmental changes that result in a mixed pattern of erosional activity across the Mediterranean.

  • 12.
    Weiberg, Erika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Bevan, Andrew
    Kouli, Katerina
    Katsianis, Markos
    Woodbridge, Jessie
    Bonnier, Anton
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Engel, Max
    Finné, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Fyfe, Ralph
    Maniatis, Yannis
    Palmisano, Alessio
    Panajiotidis, Sampson
    Roberts, C. Neil
    Shennan, Stephen
    Long-term trends of land use and demography in Greece: A comparative study2019In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 742-760Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper offers a comparative study of land use and demographic development in northern and southern Greece from the Neolithic to the Byzantine period. Results from summed probability densities (SPD) of archaeological radiocarbon dates and settlement numbers derived from archaeological site surveys are combined with results from cluster-based analysis of published pollen core assemblages to offer an integrated view of human pressure on the Greek landscape through time. We demonstrate that SPDs offer a useful approach to outline differences between regions and a useful complement to archaeological site surveys, evaluated here especially for the onset of the Neolithic and for the Final Neolithic (FN)/Early Bronze Age (EBA) transition. Pollen analysis highlight differences in vegetation between the two sub-regions, but also several parallel changes. The comparison of land cover dynamics between two sub-regions of Greece further demonstrates the significance of the bioclimatic conditions of core locations and that apparent oppositions between regions may in fact be two sides of the same coin in terms of socio-ecological trajectories. We also assess the balance between anthropogenic and climate-related impacts on vegetation and suggest that climatic variability was as an important factor for vegetation regrowth. Finally, our evidence suggests that the impact of humans on land cover is amplified from the Late Bronze Age (LBA) onwards as more extensive herding and agricultural practices are introduced.

  • 13.
    Weiberg, Erika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Finné, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Resilience and persistence of ancient societies in the face of climate change: a case study from Late Bronze Age Peloponnese2018In: World archaeology, ISSN 0043-8243, E-ISSN 1470-1375, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 584-602Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Instances of resilience and persistence in ancient societies during periods of climate stress are necessary as counter weights to simplified collapse archaeology. The authors offer an evaluation of societal trajectories during the Late Bronze Age (LBA) in the Peloponnese against the backdrop of recently available local climate data. By considering climate volatility as well as climate change, the long-term perspective suggests that the end of the LBA should be viewed in light of the socio-environmental mismatches that developed during its earlier phases. Varying socio-political complexity and population densities are preconditioning components for inherent resilience under climate stress and climate impacts cannot be determined by climate conditions alone. While arid climate does not equal negative societal change, beneficial climate conditions may be favourable in the relative short term while at the same time supporting an ultimately unsustainable economy that proved detrimental in the long term.

  • 14.
    Weiberg, Erika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Hughes, Ryan E.
    ARVE Res Sarl, Pully, Switzerland.
    Finné, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Bonnier, Anton
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Kaplan, Jed O.
    ARVE Res Sarl, Pully, Switzerland;Univ Hong Kong, Dept Earth Sci, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Mediterranean land use systems from prehistory to antiquity: a case study from Peloponnese (Greece)2019In: Journal of Land Use Science, ISSN 1747-423X, E-ISSN 1747-4248, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the sustainability of land use systems over time requires an accounting of the diversity of land uses and their varying influences on the environment. Here we present a standardized review of land use systems in the Peloponnese, Greece, from the Neolithic to the Roman period (similar to 6500 BC-AD 300). Using a combination of sources, we synthesize the fundamental information required to characterize and quantify the spatial requirements of land use. We contextualize our results in a discussion of temporal trends, the probable drivers of change, and how these changes can be integrated with the general knowledge of these societies and the overall effect of land use across time. While our review concentrates on the Peloponnese, our methodology is widely applicable where suitable archaeological and historical records are available, and is broadly representative of the prehistoric and early historical evolution of agricultural land use systems in the eastern Mediterranean.

  • 15.
    Weiberg, Erika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Hughes, Ryan E.
    ARVE Res Sarl, Pully, Switzerland.
    Finné, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Bonnier, Anton
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Kaplan, Jed O.
    ARVE Res Sarl, Pully, Switzerland;Univ Hong Kong, Dept Earth Sci, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Mediterranean land use systems from prehistory to antiquity: a case study from Peloponnese (Greece)2019In: Journal of Land Use Science, ISSN 1747-423X, E-ISSN 1747-4248, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the sustainability of land use systems over time requires an accounting of the diversity of land uses and their varying influences on the environment. Here we present a standardized review of land use systems in the Peloponnese, Greece, from the Neolithic to the Roman period (similar to 6500 BC-AD 300). Using a combination of sources, we synthesize the fundamental information required to characterize and quantify the spatial requirements of land use. We contextualize our results in a discussion of temporal trends, the probable drivers of change, and how these changes can be integrated with the general knowledge of these societies and the overall effect of land use across time. While our review concentrates on the Peloponnese, our methodology is widely applicable where suitable archaeological and historical records are available, and is broadly representative of the prehistoric and early historical evolution of agricultural land use systems in the eastern Mediterranean.

  • 16.
    Weiberg, Erika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Unkel, Ingmar
    Kouli, Katerina
    Holmgren, Karin
    Avramidis, Pavlos
    Bonnier, Anton
    Dibble, Flint
    Finné, Martin
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden; Navarino Environm Observ, Costa Navarino 24001, Messinia, Greece .
    Izdebski, Adam
    Katrantsiotis, Christos
    Stocker, Sharon R.
    Andwinge, Maria
    Baika, Kalliope
    Boyd, Meighan
    Heymann, Christian
    The socio-environmental history of the Peloponnese during the Holocene: Towards an integrated understanding of the past2016In: Quaternary Science Reviews, ISSN 0277-3791, E-ISSN 1873-457X, Vol. 136, p. 40-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Published archaeological, palaeoenvironmental, and palaeoclimatic data from the Peloponnese in Greece are compiled, discussed and evaluated in order to analyse the interactions between humans and the environment over the last 9000 years. Our study indicates that the number of human settlements found scattered over the peninsula have quadrupled from the prehistoric to historical periods and that this evolution occurred over periods of climate change and seismo–tectonic activity. We show that societal development occurs both during periods of harsh as well as favourable climatic conditions. At some times, some settlements develop while others decline. Well-known climate events such as the 4.2 ka and 3.2 ka events are recognizable in some of the palaeoclimatic records and a regional decline in the number and sizes of settlements occurs roughly at the same time, but their precise chronological fit with the archaeological record remains uncertain. Local socio-political processes were probably always the key drivers behind the diverse strategies that human societies took in times of changing climate. The study thus reveals considerable chronological parallels between societal development and palaeoenvironmental records, but also demonstrates the ambiguities in these correspondences and, in doing so, highlights some of the challenges that will face future interdisciplinary projects. We suggest that there can be no general association made between societal expansion phases and periods of advantageous climate. We also propose that the relevance of climatic and environmental regionality, as well as any potential impacts of seismo-tectonics on societal development, need to be part of the interpretative frameworks.

  • 17. Woodbridge, Jessie
    et al.
    Roberts, C. Neil
    Palmisano, Alessio
    Bevan, Andrew
    Shennan, Stephen
    Fyfe, Ralph
    Eastwood, Warren J.
    Izdebski, Adam
    Çakırlar, Canan
    Woldring, Henk
    Broothaerts, Nils
    Kaniewski, David
    Finné, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Classical archaeology and ancient history.
    Labuhn, Inga
    Pollen-inferred regional vegetation patterns and demographic change in Southern Anatolia through the Holocene2019In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 728-741Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Southern Anatolia is a highly significant area within the Mediterranean, particularly in terms of understanding how agriculture moved into Europe from neighbouring regions. This study uses pollen, palaeoclimate and archaeological evidence to investigate the relationships between demography and vegetation change, and to explore how the development of agriculture varied spatially. Data from 21 fossil pollen records have been transformed into forested, parkland and open vegetation types using cluster analysis. Patterns of change have been explored using non-metric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) and through analysis of indicator groups, such as an Anthropogenic Pollen Index, and Simpson’s Diversity. Settlement data, which indicate population densities, and summed radiocarbon dates for archaeological sites have been used as a proxy for demographic change. The pollen and archaeological records confirm that farming can be detected earlier in Anatolia in comparison with many other parts of the Mediterranean. Dynamics of change in grazing indicators and the OJCV (Olea, Juglans, Castanea and Vitis) index for cultivated trees appear to match cycles of population expansion and decline. Vegetation and land use change is also influenced by other factors, such as climate change. Investigating the early impacts of anthropogenic activities (e.g. woodcutting, animal herding, the use of fire and agriculture) is key to understanding how societies have modified the environment since the mid–late Holocene, despite the capacity of ecological systems to absorb recurrent disturbances. The results of this study suggest that shifting human population dynamics played an important role in shaping land cover in central and southern Anatolia.

1 - 17 of 17
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf