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  • 1.
    Blieck, Alain
    et al.
    Université Lille – 1, France.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Early and Middle Palaeozoic Vertebrate Palaeobiogeography: recent advances and critical comments2011In: Palaeozoic Early Vertebrates: II Obruchev Symposium. Abstracts / [ed] Oleg Lebedev and Alexander Ivanov, 2011, p. 28-28Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Blieck, Alain
    et al.
    Université Lille – 1, France.
    Žigaitė, Živilė
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Paléobiogéographie des vertébrés du Paléozoïque inférieur et moyen: données et interprétations récentes2011In: Résumés des communications du congrès 2011 de l’Association Paléontologique Française / [ed] Bertrand Lefebre, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Blom, Henning
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    New thelodont findings from the Lower Devonian Andrée Land Group, Spitsbergen, and their implications for biostratigraphy2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Fadel, Alexandre
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Blom, Henning
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Perez-Huerta, Alberto
    Jeffries, Teresa
    Maersse, Tiiu
    Ahlberg, Per Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Palaeoenvironmental signatures revealed from rare earth element (REE) compositions of vertebrate microremains of the Vesiku Bone Bed (Homerian, Wenlock), Saaremaa Island, Estonia2015In: Estonian journal of earth sciences, ISSN 1736-4728, E-ISSN 1736-7557, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 36-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rare earth elements (REEs) have been analysed from fossil vertebrate microremains (thelodont scales) from the Vesiku Bone Bed, Saaremaa, Estonia, using in situ microsampling by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Well-preserved scales of three species of the genus Thelodus (T. carinatus, T. laevis and Thelodus sp.) show very uniform REE patterns with slightly lower overall REE concentrations in enameloid than in dentine, with enrichment in middle REEs, depletion in heavy REEs and pronounced negative europium anomaly, but no cerium anomaly. The results of this study suggest a similar diagenetic history and possibly contemporaneous habitats for all three Thelodus species, as well as possible suboxic to anoxic conditions of the bottom and pore waters during the formation of the Vesiku Bone Bed.

  • 5.
    Histon, Kathleen
    et al.
    University of Modena.
    Zigaite, ZivileUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Evolutionary palaeoecology and palaeobiogeography2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Histon, Kathleen
    et al.
    University of Modena.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Preface2015In: Estonian journal of earth sciences, ISSN 1736-4728, E-ISSN 1736-7557, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Evolutionary palaeoecology and palaeobiogeography: year 4 of the IGCP-591 project 'The Early to Middle Palaeozoic Revolution - Bridging the Gap between the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event and the Devonian Terrestrial Revolution

  • 7.
    Qvarnström, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Niedzwiedzki, Grzegorz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Tafforeau, Paul
    European Synchrotron Radiat Facil, 71 Ave Martyrs,CS40200, F-38043 Grenoble, France..
    Zigaite, Zivile
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Ahlberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Synchrotron phase-contrast microtomography of coprolites generates novel palaeobiological data2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 2723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coprolites (fossil faeces) reveal clues to ancient trophic relations, and contain inclusions representing organisms that are rarely preserved elsewhere. However, much information is lost by classical techniques of investigation, which cannot find and image the inclusions in an adequate manner. We demonstrate that propagation phase-contrast synchrotron microtomography (PPC-SR mu CT) permits high-quality virtual 3D-reconstruction of coprolite inclusions, exemplified by two coprolites from the Upper Triassic locality Krasiejow, Poland; one of the coprolites contains delicate beetle remains, and the other one a partly articulated fish and fragments of bivalves.

  • 8.
    Qvarnström, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Niedzwiedzki, Grzegorz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Vertebrate coprolites (fossil faeces): An underexplored Konservat-Lagerstatte2016In: Earth-Science Reviews, ISSN 0012-8252, E-ISSN 1872-6828, Vol. 162, p. 44-57Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fossilized soft tissues of animals (e.g. muscles, hair and feathers) are valuable sources of palaeobiological information, but a poor preservation potential makes them undesirably scarce in the fossil record. The aim of this review is to summarize main findings, current progress and the analytical constraints of detecting fossilized soft tissues in coprolites from, mainly, freshwater and terrestrial carnivorous vertebrates. We conclude that soft-tissue inclusions in coprolites are sources of two important lines of information: the fossils can be put in a direct palaeoecological context, and characters of extinct taxa are more likely preserved in the phosphate-rich taphonomic microenvironment of coprolites than elsewhere. As a result, it is possible to unravel the deep-time origins of host-parasite relations, to understand ancient trophic food webs and detect new soft-tissue characters of different animal groups. Examples of the latter include muscle tissues from a tyrannosaurid prey, tapeworm eggs (including a developing embryo) in a Permian shark coprolite, as well as hair from multituberculates and, probably, from stem-mammals (Therapsids). Additionally, the use of coprolites in an archaeological context is briefly reviewed with focus on key aspects that may become implemented in studies of pre-Quaternary specimens as well. In summary, there is a wide range of information that can be extracted from coprolites, which has not yet been fully explored in palaeontological studies.

  • 9.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Endemic thelodonts (Vertebrata: Thelodonti) from the Lower Silurian of central Asia and southern Siberia2013In: Earth and environmental science transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, ISSN 1755-6910, E-ISSN 1755-6929, Vol. 104, no 2, p. 123-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New fossil vertebrate microremains from the Lower Silurian of NW Mongolia, Tuva and S Siberia have been discovered, and previous collections of thelodonts (Vertebrata: Thelodonti) from this region re-studied, figured and described, following recent advances in morphology and systematics of thelodont scales. As a result, six thelodont species are described here and attributed to two families and three genera. An emended diagnosis is given for each species. Morpohological scale varieties of each species are revised, and the squamation types are introduced to the species descriptions, resulting in newly grouped morphological sets of scales. The previously monotypic genus Talimaalepis Zigaite, 2004, is proposed to contain two different species; therefore, two new combinations of morphological scale sets of two species are described for the first time. Both of them show transitional scale structure between the genera Loganellia (family Loganellidae) and Helenolepis (family Phlebolepididae). Two of the thelodont genera, Angaralepis and Talimaalepis, as well as all the six species, are endemic and not known anywhere else in the world. They are accompanied by a variety of other peculiar early vertebrates, such as mongolepids, two endemic genera of acanthodians, and putative galeaspids. This work enhances our knowledge of early Silurian vertebrate diversity, and provides evidence of regional palaeoenvironmental conditions and palaeogeographical relationships of the Siberia and Tuva terranes.

  • 10.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    et al.
    University of Lille-1.
    Blick, Alain
    University of Lille-1.
    Palaeobiogeographical significance of Early Silurian thelodonts from central Asia and southern Siberia2006In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 128, no 2, p. 203-206Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Blieck, Alain
    University Lille 1, France.
    Palaeobiogeography of Early Palaeozoic vertebrates2013In: Early Palaeozoic Biogeography and Palaeogeography / [ed] Harper, DAT; Servais, T, London, 2013, Vol. 38, p. 449-460Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The oldest known Palaeozoic vertebrate record currently is Early Cambrian in age. The first taxa with mineralized exoskeletons are at least Ordovician in age, followed by a sporadic fossil record with Talimaa’s Gap of c. 3 myr in the Rhuddanian (earliest Silurian). Ordovician and Silurian vertebrate faunas are dominated by ‘agnathans’. Early Palaeozoic vertebrates occupied a wide range of environments: nearshore marine to restricted marine in the Ordovician, and on the marine epicontinental shelves of the Silurian. Silurian vertebrates are useful biostratigraphical indicators, as well as good markers of palaeocontinental margins. Two main palaeobiogeographical units are renamed for the Ordovician: a Gondwana Realm and a Laurentia–Siberia–Baltica Realm. Vertebrate fossil localities are more numerous in the Silurian; therefore a series of palaeobiogeographical provinces and realms are defined on Laurentia, Baltica, Avalonia, Siberia, South China and East Gondwana. More discoveries of Silurian vertebrate-bearing localities should certainly help to define additional provinces, in particular along the northern margins of Gondwana and in SE Asia.

  • 12.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Blom, Henning
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Goujet, Daniel
    Thelodont biostratigraphy indicates the extension of the Lower-Middle Devonian palaeobasin in Svalbard, Norvegian Arctics2012In: Geophysical Research Abstracts, 2012, p. EGU2012-10028-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Blom, Henning
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Perez-Huerta, Alberto
    University of Alabama.
    Goujet, Daniel
    Museum nationale d'histoire naturelle Paris.
    Vertebrate microfossils as tool in stratigraphy: a study of the Lower Devonian Andree Land Group, Spitsbergen2014In: STRATI 2013: First International Congress on Stratigraphy At the Cutting Edge of Stratigraphy, Cham: Springer International Publishing , 2014, p. 1167-1171Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Fadel, Alexandre
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Blom, Henning
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Perez-Huerta, Alberto
    Jeffries, Teresa
    Maerss, Tiiu
    Ahlberg, Per Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Rare earth elements (REEs) in vertebrate microremains from the upper Pridoli Ohesaare beds of Saaremaa Island, Estonia: geochemical clues to palaeoenvironment2015In: Estonian journal of earth sciences, ISSN 1736-4728, E-ISSN 1736-7557, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 115-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rare earth element (REE) compositions of Nostolepis sp. scales, spines, plates and tesserae from Ohesaare bone beds were measured by in situ microsampling using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The obtained REE concentrations, normalized to Post-Archean Australian Shale concentrations, were evaluated using basic geochemical calculations and quantifications. The REE compositions were nearly identical across all the morphotypes and histologies of Nostolepis microremains, showing flat REE patterns with slight depletion in heavy REEs. There was no visible enrichment in middle REEs, indicating good geochemical preservation of bioapatite and absence of any pronounced fractionated REE incorporation during later stages of diagenesis. The shale-normalized (La/Yb)(SN) and (La/Sm)(SN) REE ratio compilations indicated adsorption as the dominating REE uptake mechanism across all datapoints. The absence of well-defmed Ce anomaly suggested oxic palaeoseawater conditions, which agrees with the existing interpretations of the Ohesaare sequence as high-energy shoal and regressive open ocean sedimentary environments.

  • 15.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Fadel, Alexandre
    Universite Lille-1.
    Blom, Henning
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Perez-Huerta, Alberto
    University of Alabama.
    Jeffries, Teressa
    Natural History Museum London.
    Ahlberg, Per Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Rare earth and trace elements in fossil vertebrate biomineral as indicators of palaeoecology and palaeoenvironment2014In: 4th Annual Meeting of IGCP 591 The Early to Middle Paleozoic Revolution Estonia, 10-19 June 2014Abstracts & Field Guide, 2014, p. 105-105Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Fadel, Alexandre
    Universite Lille-1.
    Perez-Huerta, Alberto
    University of Alabama.
    Jeffries, Teresa
    London Natural History Museum.
    Blom, Henning
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Ahlberg, Per Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Rare earth and trace elements of fossil bioapatite as palaeoenvironmental proxies: the Lower Devonian of the Andree Land, Svalbard2014In: Résumés dela 24eRéunion des Sciences de la Terre Abstracts, 2014, p. 481-481Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Fadel, Alexandre
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Univ Lille 1, CNRS UMR8217, Lab Geosyst, F-59655 Villeneuve Dascq, France.
    Perez-Huerta, Alberto
    Univ Alabama, Dept Geol Sci, 2018 Bevill Bldg, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 USA.
    Jeffries, Teresa
    Dept Earth Sci, Nat Hist Museum, Cromwell Rd, London SW7 5BD, England.
    Goujet, Daniel
    Museum Natl Hist Nat, Dept Hist Terre, Lab Paleontol, UMR CNRS 7207, 57 Rue Cuvier, F-75231 Paris 5, France.
    Ahlberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Palaeoenvironments revealed by rare-earth element systematics in vertebrate bioapatite from the Lower Devonian of Svalbard2016In: Canadian journal of earth sciences (Print), ISSN 0008-4077, E-ISSN 1480-3313, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 788-794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In situ rare-earth element (REE) compositions have been measured in early vertebrate microremains from the Lower Devonian basin of Andree Land (Svalbard), with the aim of obtaining information about their early depositional environment and potential reworking. Vertebrate microremains with different histology were used for the analyses, sourced from two different localities of marginal marine to freshwater sediments from geographically distant parts of the Grey Hoek Formation (Skamdalen and Tavlefjellet members). We selected thelodont and undescribed ? chondrichthyan scales, which allowed us to define potential taxonomic, histological, and taphonomic variables of the REE uptake. Results showed REE concentrations to be relatively uniform within the scales of each taxon, but apparent discrepancies were visible between the studied localities and separate taxa. The compilation of REE abundance patterns as well as REE ratios have revealed that thelodont and ? chondrichthyan originating from the same locality must have had different burial and early diagenetic histories. The shapes of the REE profiles, together with the presence and absence of the Eu and Ce anomalies, equally suggested different depositional and diagenetic environments for these two sympatric taxa resulting from either stratigraphical or long-distance reworking. The REE concentrations appear to have visible differences between separate dental tissues, particularly between enameloid and dentine of thelodonts, emphasizing the importance of in situ measurements in microfossil biomineral geochemistry.

  • 18.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Goujet, Daniel
    Museum National Histoire Naturelle.
    New observations on the squamation patterns of articulated specimens of Loganellia scotica (Traquair, 1898) (Vertebrata: Thelodonti) from the Lower Silurian of Scotland2012In: Geodiversitas, ISSN 1280-9659, E-ISSN 1638-9395, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 253-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Articulated squamations of Loganellia scotica (Traquair, 1898) from the Lower Silurian Lesmahagow inliers of southern Scotland have been studied. They include seven articulated specimens, three of them representing complete thelodont fossils, and four partially preserved postpectoral, precaudal and caudal parrs of the exoskeleton. All the five main types of thelodont scales that is rostral, cephalo-pectoral, postpectoral, precaudal and pinnal sacles, as well as respective squamation patterns have been observed on articulated specimens. The specific orbital, branchial, and bucco-pharyngeal scales, characteristic of L. scotica, have not been found due to the poor or non-preservation of these particular areas within the specimens studied. Tail morphology and squamation pattern of the caudal fin have been studied with particular attention, and the constitution of the caudal fin rays has been analyzed. The rostral squamation pattern is argued to be characteristic to L. scotico.

  • 19.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Karatajute-Talimaa, Valentina
    Vilnius University.
    Aspidin or galeaspidin: new early vertebrate histology from the Lower Silurian of Southern Siberia2011In: Program and Abstracts: 71st Annual Meeting Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, 2011, p. Sec1: 221-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Karatajute-Talimaa, Valentina
    Vilnius University.
    Goujet, Daniel
    Museum national d'histoire naturelle.
    Blom, Henning
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Thelodont scales from the Lower and Middle Devonian Andree Land Group, Spitsbergen2013In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 135, no 1, p. 57-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scales of six thelodont taxa are described from the Devonian of Spitsbergen. Numerous samples from localities widely dispersed on Spitsbergen yield several assemblages considered to represent different depositional phases of the late Lower lower Middle Devonian of the Andrée Land Group, but also support the view that certain lithostratigraphic units of the Andrée Land Group should be regarded as contemporaneous lithofacies subjected to different sedimentary environments, rather than as separate stratigraphic members. The description of Woodfjordia collisa gen. et sp. nov., Talivalia svalbardia sp. nov., Canonia cf. C. grossi, Amaltheolepis montiwatsonia sp. nov., Amaltheolepis winsnesi and Amaltheolepis austfjordia sp. nov. also allows for a comparison with similar faunas from other regions of the Northern Hemisphere and motivates further elaboration of Early-Middle Devonian thelodont biostratigraphy.

  • 21.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    et al.
    University of Lille-1.
    Karatakute-Talimaa, Valentina
    New genus of Chondrichthyans from the Silurian-Devonian boundary deposits of Tuva (Russia)2008In: Acta geologica Polonica, ISSN 0001-5709, E-ISSN 2300-1887, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 127-131Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Kear, Ben
    Pérez-Huerta, P
    Jeffries, T, T
    Blom, Henning
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    REE compositions in fossil vertebrate dental tissues indicate biomineral preservation2012In: Geophysical Research Abstracts, 2012, p. EGU2012-9873-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Kear, Benjamin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Joachimski, Michael M.
    University of Erlangen-Nuremberg.
    Tutken, Thomas
    University of Bonn.
    Whitehouse, Martin
    Naturhistoriska Riksmuseet.
    Blom, Henning
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Geochemistry of dental bioapatite, the key to palaeoclimate2013In: Proceedings of the 3rd IGCP 591 Annual Meeting, Lund, Sweden, 9-19 June 2013 / [ed] Anders Lindskog and Kristina Mehlqvist, Lund: Department of Geology, Lund University , 2013, p. 361-362Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Kear, Benjamin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Perez-Huerta, Alberto
    University of Alabama.
    Jeffries, Teresa
    Natural History Museum.
    Do fossil vertebrate biominerals hold the key to Palaeozoic climate?2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fossil vertebrate hard tissues - teeth and dermoskeleton - are considered among the most geochemically stable biominerals, and therefore are widely used for palaeoenvironmental and palaeoclimatic reconstructions. Elemental and isotopic compositions of fossil dental tissues may provide unique palaeoenvironmental information, ranging from the diet and trophic positions on a food chain, to the palaeosalinity and water temperatures of ancient seas. However, before starting any geochemical interpretations, the preservation potential of fossil tissues must be studied carefully, considering possible alteration of the primary geochemical composition. Evaluation of fossil hard tissue preservation can be made by semiquantitative spot geochemistry analyses on fine polished teeth and scale thin sections using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS), and help to roughly preview the chemical composition. The Electron Backscatter Diffractometry (EBSD) is useful to examine the cristallinity and possible structural alterations. In addition, rare earth element (REE) abundances can be measured in situ within the fine fossil tissues (such as enamel vs. dentine) using Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass-spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), and give us information about the selective geochemical resilience between separate vertebrate hard tissues. To conclude, in order to decipher the geochemical signal of fossil biominerals correctly, the evaluation of preservation should be the starting point to any further geochemical studies.

  • 25.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Kear, Benjamin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Tütken, Thomas
    University of Mainz.
    Whitehouse, Martin
    Naturhistoriska Riksmuseet Stockholm.
    Joachimski, Michael M
    University of Erlangen-Nuremberg.
    Jeffries, Teresa
    London Natural History Museum.
    Blom, Henning
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Oxygen isotope records in fossil bioapatite reveal sothern high-latitude low-temperature environment during the Early Cretaceous2014In: Résumés dela 24e Réunion des Sciences de la Terre Abstracts, 2014, p. 257-257Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Perez-Huerta, Alberto
    University of Alabama.
    Jeffries, Teresa
    Natural History Museum.
    Kear, Benjamin P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Blom, Henning
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Geochemistry of fossilised dental remains - key to palaeobiology and palaeoenvironment.2013In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 135, no 1, p. 25-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Richter, Martha
    Natural History Museum.
    Karatajute-Talimaa, Valentina
    Vilnius University.
    Meredith Smith, Moya
    King's College London, Dental Institute.
    Tissue diversity and evolutionary trends of the dermal skeleton of Silurian thelodonts2013In: Historical Biology, ISSN 0891-2963, E-ISSN 1029-2381, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 143-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previously described scale morphotypes of Silurian thelodonts, constrained by their representation as isolated dermaldenticles are reassessed to provide a more robust character basis for their inclusion in future phylogenetic studies. Asrelatively common microfossils, thelodonts are important biostratigraphical markers, but their interrelationships withgeologically younger species known by complete skeletons are still unresolved. We examined scales of 21 knownmorphotypes from north-eastern Europe, Siberia and central Asia and described their distinct tissue arrangementsconsidering (1) thickness and direction of dentine tubules, (2) presence or absence of a pulp canal, (3) number and positionof pulp canals, (4) the presence or absence of a distinct outer crown layer and (5) the extent of Sharpey’s fibres penetratingthe scale base. We correlated the traditional thelodont scale type morphologies with these distinct scale histologies, as foundin Silurian thelodonts. In addition, a new histological type for thelodont scales, the Talimaalepis type, is described torepresent a new taxon, from the Early-Mid Silurian. Our study suggests that, through time, there is a general trend ofincreasing complexity in thelodont dermal tissue structures. Three types of dentine and internal scale organisations weredistinguished in Silurian species studied, namely (1) irregular, thin tubular dentine; (2) irregular, thick tubular dentine, withtwo subtypes as a function of pulp canal development and (3) regular, tubular dentine (orthodentine).

  • 28.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Sansom, Ivan
    University of Birmingham.
    Whitehouse, Martin
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet.
    Boomer, Ian
    University of Birmingham.
    Stable oxygen isotope compositions in shark enameloid as a proxy to seawater chemistry2013In: Proceedings of the 3rd IGCP 591 Annual Meeting, Lund, Sweden, 9-19 June 2013 / [ed] Anders Lindskog and Kristina Mehlqvist, Lund: Department of Geology, Lund University , 2013, p. 363-364Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Sansom, Ivan
    Whitehouse, Martin
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet Stockholm.
    Joachimski, Michael M.
    University of Erlangen-Nuremberg.
    Stable isotope compositions in shark dental tissues as a proxy to seawater chemistry2013In: The Palaeontological Association Newsletter ISSN 0954-9900 / [ed] Christian Klug, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Zigaite, Zivile
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Whitehouse, Martin
    Stable oxygen isotopes of dental biomineral: differentiation at the intra- and inter-tissue level of modern shark teeth2014In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 136, no 1, p. 337-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In situ oxygen isotopic composition of the sandbar shark (Carcharhinus plumbeus) teeth grown at a constant water temperature and salinity were analysed by high precision and high spatialresolution secondary ion mass spectrometry, targeting dental biomineral within the parallel-bundled enameloid (PBE), the tangle-bundled enameloid (TBE) and the dentine. Measured O-18 values had comparable inter-tissue variability in each tooth analysed. The PBE enameloid had the smallest scatter of oxygen isotope ratios, while the TBE enameloid had slightly higher intra-tissue variation of O-18, but similar average values. The dentine had largest variability and lower average O-18. The enameloid of shark teeth is therefore recommended as a target biomineral and a preferential biogeochemical reference for environmental and palaeoenvironmental studies.

  • 31.
    Zivile, Zigaite
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Histon, KathleenUniversity of Modena.
    Evolutionary palaeoecology and palaeobiogeography2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Zivile, Zigaite
    et al.
    University of Lille.
    Joachimski, M. M.
    Lehnert, O.
    Brazauskas, A.
    δ 18O composition of conodont apatite indicates climatic cooling during the middle Pridoli2010In: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, ISSN 0031-0182, E-ISSN 1872-616X, Vol. 294, p. 242-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphatic microfossils, such as conodonts and fish microremains (dermal scales) from the upper Silurian(Pridoli) of Lithuania have been studied for their oxygen isotope composition. The conodont colour alterationindex of the biogenic apatite did not exceed 1.5 reflecting only a minor thermal alteration. Conodontδ18Oapatite values range from 17.7 to 19.2‰ V-SMOW, with the average values around 18.3‰. Fossil apatite offish exoskeleton microremains from the same samples have lower δ18Oapatite values ranging from 15.2 to17.4‰ V-SMOW, with the average values around 16.3‰ V-SMOW. Palaeoseawater temperatures calculatedfrom conodont apatite δ18O range from 24.8–31.5 °C, those derived from fish δ18O give approximately 10 °Chigher temperatures ranging from 32.6 to 38.1 °C. The lower δ18Oapatite values of fish apatite and thus theunrealistic high palaeotemperatures are interpreted as a result of diagenetic alteration. A significant positiveshift in conodont apatite δ18O of +1.1‰ at the boundary between the Vievis and Lapės formations isobserved, coinciding with a major facies change. It is interpreted as a mid-Pridoli event within theOzarkodina eosteinhornensis Bizone, or the Ozarkodina remscheidensis Biozone reflecting a major coolingevent, which may have resulted in the formation of an ice sheet in high latitudes and a glacio-eustatic sealevelfall.

  • 33.
    Žigaitė, Živilė
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Blom, Henning
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Goujet, Daniel
    National Museum of Natural History, France.
    Karatajute-Talimaa, Valentina
    Vilnius University.
    New vertebrate assemblages from the Andrée Land Group, Spitsbergen, and their biostratigraphic significance2010In: Programme and Abstracts: The Palaeontological Association: 54th Annual Meeting 17th–20th December 2010: Ghent University, 2010, p. 80-81Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Lower and Middle Devonian successions of Spitsbergen provide excellent examples of vertebrate biostratigraphy applied to sedimentary basin analysis. A number of previous works on the Red Bay Group (Lochkovian, Lower Devonian) made a notable study of the earliest Devonian vertebrate record, and their use in biostratigraphy. Our current study concerns the Lower to Middle Devonian of the Andrée Land Group, which comprises the Wood Bay Formation, spanning from Pragian to Emsian in age, and the Grey Hoek Formation, representing the Eifelian. It consists of thick layers of terrigenous sediments, the stratigraphy is largely based on the lithofacies.

    Two new thelodont assemblages are considered to represent different depostional phases of the late Lower - early Middle Devonian of the Andrée Land Group. The first, older assemblage comprises turiinid, talivaliid, and furcacaudid thelodonts, and identifies the lower Wood Bay Formation. The second, younger assemblage is prevailed by the talivaliid thelodont <i>Amaltheolepis winsnesi</i>, and is characteristic for the upper Wood Bay Fm., as well as the lower Grey Hoek Fm. The recognition of these two new thelodont assemblages allows us to precise the relative age of the Lower – Middle Devonian strata.

  • 34.
    Žigaitė, Živilė
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Karatajūtė-Talimaa, Valentina
    Blieck, Alain
    Vertebrate microremains from the Lower Silurian of Siberia and Central Asia: palaeobiodiversity and palaeobiogeography2011In: Journal of Micropalaeontology, ISSN 0262-821X, E-ISSN 2041-4978, Vol. 30, p. 97-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The biostratigraphic and palaeogeographical distributions of early vertebrate microfossils from a number of Lower Silurian localities in northwestern Mongolia, Tuva and southern Siberia were reviewed. Vertebrate microremains showed high taxonomic diversity, comprising acanthodians, chondrichthyans, putative galeaspids, heterostracans, mongolepids, tesakoviaspids, thelodonts and possible eriptychiids. The majority of taxa have lower stratigraphic levels of occurrence compared to other Silurian palaeobiogeographical provinces, such as the European-Russian or Canadian Arctic. Vertebrate microremains are numerous within the samples, which may indicate warm-water low-latitude palaeobasins with rich shelf faunas. This disagrees with the recent interpretations of the territory as a northern high-latitude Siberian palaeocontinent. The palaeobiogeographical distribution of vertebrate taxa indicates an endemic palaeobiogeographical province of connected epeiric palaeoseas with external isolation during the early Silurian. In previous works separation between Tuvan and Siberian palaeobiogeographical provinces has been suggested. After careful revision of the vertebrate microfossil record of the region, we find that differences in a few vertebrate taxa do not provide not strong enough evidence to reliably distinguish these provinces. We therefore dispute the hypothesis of two biogeographical provinces in the early Silurian of the Siberian palaeocontinent, and propose a single unified Siberian-Tuvan palaeobiogeographical province.

  • 35.
    Žigaitė, Živilė
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Pérez-Huerta, Alberto
    University of Alabama, USA.
    Jeffries, Teresa
    Natural History Museum, London, UK.
    Kear, Benjamin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Blom, Henning
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    REE compositions in fossil vertebrate dental tissues – key to biomineral preservation2011In: The Palaeontological Association Newsletter, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Rare earth element (REE) abundances have been measured in a number of Palaeozoic and Mesozoic vertebrate hard tissues (teeth and dermoskeleton) using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Fossil vertebrate analysed comprise scales and tesserae of Silurian and Devonian thelodonts, chondrichthyans, galeaspids, mongolepids, spines of acanthodians, as well as teeth of Cretaceous lungfish and marine reptiles.

    Pre-evaluation of fossil preservation level has been made by semi-quantitative spot geochemistry analyses on fine polished teeth and scale thin sections, using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Silicification of bioapatite, together with elevated heavy element concentrations corresponded to fossil tissue structure and colour alteration. Stable oxygen isotope measurements (δ<sup>18</sup>O) of bulk biomineral have been conducted in parallel, generally yielding lower heavy oxygen values in stronger alterated teeth and scales. Clear distinction in REE concentrations was observed between dentine and enamel of Cretaceous plesiosaurs, suggesting enamel to be more geochemically resistant to diagenetic overprint.

  • 36.
    Žigaitė, Živilė
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Pérez-Huerta, Alberto
    Department of Geological Sciences, University of Alabama.
    Jeffries, Teresa
    Mineralogy Department, Natural History Museum, London.
    Kear, Benjamin P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Blom, Henning
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Geochemistry of fossilised dental remains: a key to palaeobiology and palaeoenvironment2011In: Abstracts: The 2nd Wiman meeting : Carl Wiman's Legacy: 100 years of Swedish Palaeontology : Uppsala 17–18 November 2011 / [ed] Benjamin P. Kear, Michael Streng, 2011, p. 24-25Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Žigaitė, Živilė
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Pérez-Huerta, Alberto
    University of Alabama, USA.
    Joachimski, Michael M.
    University of Erlangen-Nürnberg.
    Lehnert, Oliver
    University of Erlangen-Nürnberg.
    The 18O/16O ratio in vertebrate biogenic apatite as a proxy to Palaeozoic seawater temperatures2011In: Geophysical Research Abstracts: Vol. 13, EGU2011-11965, Göttingen: Copernicus , 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 37 of 37
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