uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Alm, L.
    et al.
    Univ New Hampshire, Space Sci Ctr, Durham, NH, USA.
    Farrugia, C. J.
    Univ New Hampshire, Space Sci Ctr, Durham, NH USA.
    Paulson, K. W.
    Univ New Hampshire, Space Sci Ctr, Durham, NH USA.
    Argall, M. R.
    Univ New Hampshire, Space Sci Ctr, Durham, NH USA.
    Torbert, R. B.
    Univ New Hampshire, Space Sci Ctr, Durham, NH USA; Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA.
    Burch, J. L.
    Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA.
    Ergun, R. E.
    Univ Colorado, Lab Atmospher & Space Phys, Boulder, CO USA.
    Russell, C. T.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, IGPP EPSS, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Strangeway, R. J.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, IGPP EPSS, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Khotyaintsev, Yuri V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Lindqvist, P. -A
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Space & Plasma Phys, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Marklund, G. T.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Space & Plasma Phys, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Giles, B. L.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA.
    Differing Properties of Two Ion-Scale Magnetopause Flux Ropes2018In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 123, no 1, p. 114-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present results from the Magnetospheric Multiscale constellation encountering two ion‐scale, magnetopause flux ropes. The two flux ropes exhibit very different properties and internal structure. In the first flux rope, there are large differences in the currents observed by different satellites, indicating variations occurring over sub‐di spatial scales, and time scales on the order of the ion gyroperiod. In addition, there is intense wave activity and particle energization. The interface between the two flux ropes exhibits oblique whistler wave activity. In contrast, the second flux rope is mostly quiescent, exhibiting little activity throughout the encounter. Changes in the magnetic topology and field line connectivity suggest that we are observing flux rope coalescence.

  • 2.
    Argall, M. R.
    et al.
    Univ New Hampshire, Ctr Space Sci, Durham, NH USA.
    Paulson, K.
    Univ New Hampshire, Ctr Space Sci, Durham, NH USA.
    Alm, L.
    Univ New Hampshire, Ctr Space Sci, Durham, NH USA.
    Rager, A.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA.
    Dorelli, J.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA.
    Shuster, J.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA.
    Wang, S.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA.
    Torbert, R. B.
    Univ New Hampshire, Ctr Space Sci, Durham, NH USA; Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA.
    Vaith, H.
    Univ New Hampshire, Ctr Space Sci, Durham, NH USA.
    Dors, I.
    Univ New Hampshire, Ctr Space Sci, Durham, NH USA.
    Chutter, M.
    Univ New Hampshire, Ctr Space Sci, Durham, NH USA.
    Farrugia, C.
    Univ New Hampshire, Ctr Space Sci, Durham, NH USA.
    Burch, J.
    Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA.
    Pollock, C.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA.
    Giles, B.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA.
    Gershman, D.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA.
    Lavraud, B.
    Univ Toulouse, CNRS, Inst Rech Astrophys & Planetol, UPS, Toulouse, France..
    Russell, C. T.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Earth Planetary & Space Sci, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Strangeway, R.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Earth Planetary & Space Sci, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Magnes, W.
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst, Graz, Austria.
    Lindqvist, P. -A
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Khotyaintsev, Yuri V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Ergun, R. E.
    Univ Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO USA.
    Ahmadi, N.
    Univ Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO USA.
    Electron Dynamics Within the Electron Diffusion Region of Asymmetric Reconnection2018In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 123, no 1, p. 146-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: We investigate the agyrotropic nature of electron distribution functions and their substructure to illuminate electron dynamics in a previously reported electron diffusion region (EDR) event. In particular, agyrotropy is examined as a function of energy to reveal detailed finite Larmor radius effects for the first time. It is shown that the previously reported approximate to 66eV agyrotropic "crescent" population that has been accelerated as a result of reconnection is evanescent in nature because it mixes with a denser, gyrotopic background. Meanwhile, accelerated agyrotropic populations at 250 and 500eV are more prominent because the background plasma at those energies is more tenuous. Agyrotropy at 250 and 500eV is also more persistent than at 66eV because of finite Larmor radius effects; agyrotropy is observed 2.5 ion inertial lengths from the EDR at 500eV, but only in close proximity to the EDR at 66eV. We also observe linearly polarized electrostatic waves leading up to and within the EDR. They have wave normal angles near 90 degrees, and their occurrence and intensity correlate with agyrotropy. Within the EDR, they modulate the flux of 500eV electrons travelling along the current layer. The net electric field intensifies the reconnection current, resulting in a flow of energy from the fields into the plasma.

    Plain Language Summary: The process of reconnection involves an explosive transfer of magnetic energy into particle energy. When energetic particles contact modern technology such as satellites, cell phones, or other electronic devices, they can cause random errors and failures. Exactly how particles are energized via reconnection, however, is still unknown. Fortunately, the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission is finally able to detect and analyze reconnection processes. One recent finding is that energized particles take on a crescent-shaped configuration in the vicinity of reconnection and that this crescent shape is related to the energy conversion process. In our paper, we explain why the crescent shape has not been observed until now and inspect particle motions to determine what impact it has on energy conversion. When reconnection heats the plasma, the crescent shape forms from the cool, tenuous particles. As plasmas from different regions mix, dense, nonheated plasma obscures the crescent shape in our observations. The highest-energy particle population created by reconnection, though, also contains features of the crescent shape that are more persistent but appear less dramatically in the data.

  • 3.
    Farrugia, C. J.
    et al.
    Univ New Hampshire, Space Sci Ctr, Durham, NH 03824 USA.
    Cohen, I. J.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Appl Phys Lab, Laurel, MD USA.
    Vasquez, B. J.
    Univ New Hampshire, Space Sci Ctr, Durham, NH 03824 USA.
    Lugaz, N.
    Univ New Hampshire, Space Sci Ctr, Durham, NH 03824 USA.
    Alm, Love
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Torbert, R. B.
    Univ New Hampshire, Space Sci Ctr, Durham, NH 03824 USA.
    Argall, M. R.
    Univ New Hampshire, Space Sci Ctr, Durham, NH 03824 USA.
    Paulson, K.
    Univ New Hampshire, Space Sci Ctr, Durham, NH 03824 USA.
    Lavraud, B.
    UPMC Univ Paris 06, Univ Paris Sud, Ecole Polytech, LPP,UMR7648,CNRS,Observ Paris, Paris, France.
    Gershman, D. J.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA.
    Gratton, F. T.
    Acad Nacl Ciencias Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina.
    Matsui, H.
    Univ New Hampshire, Space Sci Ctr, Durham, NH 03824 USA.
    Rogers, A.
    Univ New Hampshire, Space Sci Ctr, Durham, NH 03824 USA.
    Forbes, T. G.
    Univ New Hampshire, Space Sci Ctr, Durham, NH 03824 USA.
    Payne, D.
    Univ New Hampshire, Space Sci Ctr, Durham, NH 03824 USA.
    Ergun, R. E.
    Univ Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Mauk, B.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Appl Phys Lab, Laurel, MD USA.
    Burch, J. L.
    Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA.
    Russell, C. T.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Strangeway, R. J.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Shuster, J.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA.
    Nakamura, R.
    Space Res Inst, Graz, Austria.
    Fuselier, S. A.
    Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA;Univ Texas San Antonio, San Antonio, TX USA.
    Giles, B. L.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA.
    Khotyaintsev, Yuri V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Lindqvist, P. A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Marklund, Göran T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Petrinec, S. M.
    Lockheed Martin Adv Technol Ctr, Palo Alto, CA USA.
    Pollock, C. J.
    West Virginia Univ, Morgantown, WV USA.
    Effects in the Near-Magnetopause Magnetosheath Elicited by Large-Amplitube Alfvenic Fluctuations Terminating in a Field and Flow Discontinuity2018In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics, ISSN 2169-9380, E-ISSN 2169-9402, Vol. 123, no 11, p. 8983-9004Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we report on a sequence of large-amplitude Alfvenic fluctuations terminating in a field and flow discontinuity and their effects on electromagnetic fields and plasmas in the near-magnetopause magnetosheath. An arc-polarized structure in the magnetic field was observed by the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms-C in the solar wind, indicative of nonlinear Alfven waves. It ends with a combined tangential discontinuity/vortex sheet, which is strongly inclined to the ecliptic plane and at which there is a sharp rise in the density and a drop in temperature. Several effects resulting from this structure were observed by the Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft in the magnetosheath close to the subsolar point (11:30 magnetic local time) and somewhat south of the geomagnetic equator (-33 degrees magnetic latitude): (i) kinetic Alfven waves; (ii) a peaking of the electric and magnetic field strengths where E . J becomes strong and negative (-1 nW/m(3)) just prior to an abrupt dropout of the fields; (iii) evolution in the pitch angle distribution of energetic (a few tens of kilo-electron-volts) ions (H+, Hen+, and On+) and electrons inside a high-density region, which we attribute to gyrosounding of the tangential discontinuity/vortex sheet structure passing by the spacecraft; (iv) field-aligned acceleration of ions and electrons that could be associated with localized magnetosheath reconnection inside the high-density region; and (v) variable and strong flow changes, which we argue to be unrelated to reconnection at partial magnetopause crossings and likely result from deflections of magnetosheath flow by a locally deformed, oscillating magnetopause.

  • 4.
    Gingell, I
    et al.
    Imperial Coll London, Blackett Lab, London, England.
    Schwartz, S. J.
    Imperial Coll London, Blackett Lab, London, England;Univ Colorado, Lab Atmospher & Space Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Eastwood, J. P.
    Imperial Coll London, Blackett Lab, London, England.
    Burch, J. L.
    Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA.
    Ergun, R. E.
    Univ Colorado, Lab Atmospher & Space Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Fuselier, S.
    Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA.
    Gershman, D. J.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA.
    Giles, B. L.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA.
    Khotyaintsev, Yuri V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Lavraud, B.
    Univ Toulouse, Inst Rech Astrophys & Planetol, CNRS, UPS,CNES, Toulouse, France.
    Lindqvist, P. A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Paterson, W. R.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD USA.
    Phan, T. D.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Space Sci Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Russell, C. T.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Inst Geophys & Planetary Phys, Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA.
    Stawarz, J. E.
    Imperial Coll London, Blackett Lab, London, England.
    Strangeway, R. J.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Inst Geophys & Planetary Phys, Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA.
    Torbert, R. B.
    Univ New Hampshire, Dept Phys, Durham, NH 03824 USA.
    Wilder, F.
    Univ Colorado, Lab Atmospher & Space Phys, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Observations of Magnetic Reconnection in the Transition Region of Quasi-Parallel Shocks2019In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 1177-1184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using observations of Earth's bow shock by the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission, we show for the first time that active magnetic reconnection is occurring at current sheets embedded within the quasi-parallel shock's transition layer. We observe an electron jet and heating but no ion response, suggesting we have observed an electron-only mode. The lack of ion response is consistent with simulations showing reconnection onset on sub-ion time scales. We also discuss the impact of electron heating in shocks via reconnection.

  • 5.
    Stawarz, J. E.
    et al.
    Department of Physics, Imperial College London.
    Eastwood, J.P.
    Department of Physics, Imperial College London.
    Varsani, A.
    Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences.
    Ergun, R.E.
    Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder; Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado Boulder.
    Shay, M.A.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware.
    Nakamura, R.
    pace Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences.
    Phan, T.D.
    Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California.
    Burch, J. L.
    South West Research Institute.
    Gershman, D. J.
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
    Giles, B. L.
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
    Goodrich, K. A.
    Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder; Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado Boulder.
    Khotyaintsev, Yuri V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Lindqvist, P. -A
    School of Electrical Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Russell, C. T.
    Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, University of California.
    Strangeway, R. J.
    Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, University of California.
    Torbert, R. B.
    Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire.
    Magnetospheric Multiscale analysis of intense field-aligned Poynting flux near the Earth's plasma sheet boundary2017In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 44, no 14, p. 7106-7113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale mission is employed to examine intense Poynting flux directed along the background magnetic field toward Earth, which reaches amplitudes of nearly 2 mW/m(2). The event is located within the plasma sheet but likely near the boundary at a geocentric distance of 9 RE in association with bulk flow signatures. The fluctuations have wavelengths perpendicular to the magnetic field of 124-264 km (compared to an ion gyroradius of 280 km), consistent with highly kinetic Alfven waves. While the wave vector remains highly perpendicular to the magnetic field, there is substantial variation of the direction in the perpendicular plane. The field-aligned Poynting flux may be associated with kinetic Alfven waves released along the separatrix by magnetotail reconnection and/or the radiation of waves excited by bursty bulk flow braking and may provide a means through which energy released by magnetic reconnection is transferred to the auroral region.

  • 6.
    Steinvall, Konrad
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Khotyaintsev, Yuri V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Graham, Daniel B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Vaivads, Andris
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Lindqvist, P. -A
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Space & Plasma Phys, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Russell, C. T.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Earth Planetary & Space Sci, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Burch, J. L.
    Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX USA.
    Multispacecraft Analysis of Electron Holes2019In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 55-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electron holes (EHs) are nonlinear electrostatic structures in plasmas. Most previous in situ studies of EHs have been limited to single‐ and two‐spacecraft methods. We present statistics of EHs observed by Magnetospheric Multiscale on the magnetospheric side of the magnetopause during October 2016 when the spacecraft separation was around 6 km. Each EH is observed by all four spacecraft, allowing EH properties to be determined with unprecedented accuracy. We find that the parallel length scale, l, scales with the Debye length. The EHs can be separated into three groups of speed and potential based on their coupling to ions. We present a method for calculating the perpendicular length scale, l. The method can be applied to a small subset of the observed EHs for which we find shapes ranging from almost spherical to more oblate. For the remaining EHs we use statistical arguments to find l/l≈5, implying dominance of oblate EHs.

    Plain Language Summary: Electron holes are positively charged structures moving along the magnetic field and are frequently observed in space plasmas in relation to strong currents and electron beams. Electron holes interact with the plasma, leading to electron heating and scattering. In order to understand the effect of these electron holes, we need to accurately determine their properties, such as velocity, length scale, and potential. Most earlier studies have relied on single‐ or two‐spacecraft methods to analyze electron holes. In this study we use the four satellites of the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission to analyze 236 electron holes with unprecedented accuracy. We find that the holes can be divided into three distinct groups with different properties. Additionally, we calculate the width of individual electron holes, finding that they are typically much wider than long, resembling

  • 7.
    Tang, B. -B
    et al.
    Chinese Acad Sci, State Key Lab Space Weather, Natl Space Sci Ctr, Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Li, Wenya
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division. Chinese Acad Sci, State Key Lab Space Weather, Natl Space Sci Ctr, Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Graham, Daniel B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Rager, A. C.
    Catholic Univ Amer, Dept Phys, Washington, DC, USA; NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD, USA.
    Wang, C.
    Chinese Acad Sci, State Key Lab Space Weather, Natl Space Sci Ctr, Beijing, Peoples R China; Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Coll Earth & Planetary Sci, Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Lavraud, B.
    Univ Toulouse, Inst Rech Astrophys & Planetol, Toulouse, France.
    Hasegawa, H.
    Japan Aerosp Explorat Agcy, Inst Space & Astronaut Sci, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, Japan.
    Zhang, Y. -C
    Chinese Acad Sci, State Key Lab Space Weather, Natl Space Sci Ctr, Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Dai, L.
    Chinese Acad Sci, State Key Lab Space Weather, Natl Space Sci Ctr, Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Giles, B. L.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD, USA.
    Dorelli, J. C.
    NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD, USA.
    Russell, C. T.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Earth & Space Sci, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
    Lindqvist, P. A.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ergun, R. E.
    Univ Colorado, Lab Atmospher & Space Phys, Boulder, CO, USA.
    Burch, J. L.
    Southwest Res Inst, San Antonio, TX, USA.
    Crescent-Shaped Electron Distributions at the Nonreconnecting Magnetopause: Magnetospheric Multiscale Observations2019In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 3024-3032Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crescent‐shaped electron distributions perpendicular to the magnetic field are an important indicator of the electron diffusion region in magnetic reconnection. They can be formed by the electron finite gyroradius effect at plasma boundaries or by demagnetized electron motion. In this study, we present Magnetospheric Multiscale mission observations of electron crescents at the flank magnetopause on 20 September 2017, where reconnection signatures are not observed. These agyrotropic electron distributions are generated by electron gyromotion at the thin electron‐scale magnetic boundaries of a magnetic minimum after magnetic curvature scattering. The variation of their angular range in the perpendicular plane is in good agreement with predictions. Upper hybrid waves are observed to accompany the electron crescents at all four Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft as a result of the beam‐plasma instability associated with these agyrotropic electron distributions. This study suggests electron crescents can be more frequently formed at the magnetopause.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf