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  • 1.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Paget, Susan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Sallnäs Pysander, Eva Lotta
    Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Playing Close to Home: Interaction and Emerging Play in Outdoor Play Installations2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Outdoor play is becoming an increasingly marginalised activity in the urban landscape. Even in HCI, research on interactive solutions for outdoor play has largely been limited to special areas and in particular playgrounds. But children play everywhere, and especially play close to home is central in children's play activities. In this article we draw upon knowledge about designing for children's play in interaction design as well as in landscape architecture, to study how interactive play installations can be integrated in outdoor environments of a residential area. We present a field study in which digitally enhanced play installations were installed, in dialogue with the landscape, in between the buildings of a residential area. We focus on how emerging play activities made use of the installations as well as of the surrounding landscape in expected as well as unexpected ways. Based on the observations, we discuss how residential play is special, and how this affects how to design for it.

  • 2.
    Martin-Niedecken, Anna Lisa
    et al.
    Zurich University of the Arts, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Rogers, Katja
    Ulm University, Ulm, Germany.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Mekler, Elisa D.
    University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    ExerCube vs. Personal Trainer: Evaluating a Holistic, Immersive, and Adaptive Fitness Game Setup2019In: Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019, p. 1-15, article id 88Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today's spectrum of playful fitness solutions features systems that are clearly game-first or fitness-first in design; hardly any sufficiently incorporate both areas. Consequently, existing applications and evaluations often lack in focus on attractiveness and effectiveness, which should be addressed on the levels of body, controller, and game scenario following a holistic design approach. To contribute to this topic and as a proof-of-concept, we designed the ExerCube, an adaptive fitness game setup. We evaluated participants’ multi-sensory and bodily experiences with a non-adaptive and an adaptive ExerCube version and compared them with personal training to reveal insights to inform the next iteration of the ExerCube. Regarding flow, enjoyment and motivation, the ExerCube is on par with personal training. Results further reveal differences in perception of exertion, types and quality of movement, social factors, feedback, and audio experiences. Finally, we derive considerations for future research and development directions in holistic fitness game setups.

  • 3.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Luis, Parrilla Bel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Using Training Technology Probes in Bodystorming for Physical Training2019In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Movement and Computing, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A promising domain technology design for physical training is as assistive tangible and wearable tools to help people understand, access, and act on their movement senses. To design these tools in close relation to a targeted training practice, we propose an embodied design activity using Training Technology Probes (TTPs). These are pieces of technology with a simple interactivity augmenting and exteriorizing cues from those senses. Here, we explain how we used existing TTPs as design material to spur creativity in an embodied co-creation design workshop that happened as part of an ongoing technology-supported circus training course for children with motor difficulties. Our contribution is two-fold: We present a novel form of embodied ideation method using TTPs as design materials. We also present and characterize novel design concepts, elaborating on three that were implemented and deployed in the context of our circus training class. We discuss their relevance in several physical training domains.

  • 4.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Rostami, Asreen
    Stockholm University.
    Bodystorming for movement-based interaction design2016In: Human Technology, ISSN 1795-6889, E-ISSN 1795-6889, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 193-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After a decade of movement-based interaction in human–computer interaction, designing for the moving body still remains a challenge. Research in this field requires methods to help access, articulate, and harness embodied experiences in ways that can inform the design process. To address this challenge, this article appropriates bodystorming, an embodied ideation method for movement-based interaction design. The proposed method allows for early consideration of the physical, collocated, and social aspects of a designed activity as illustrated with two explorative workshops in different application domains: interactive body games and interactive performances. Using a qualitative methods approach, we used video material from the workshops, feedback from participants, and our own experience as participants and facilitators to outline important characteristics of the bodystorming method in the domain of movement-based interaction. The proposed method is compared with previous ones and application implications are discussed.

  • 5.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Rostami, Asreen
    Stockholm Univ, Mobile Life Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Embodied Sketching2016In: 34th Annual Chi Conference On Human Factors In Computing Systems, Chi 2016, New York, USA: ACM Digital Library, 2016, p. 6014-6027Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing bodily experiences is challenging. In this paper, we propose embodied sketching as a way of practicing design that involves understanding and designing for bodily experiences early in the design process. Embodied sketching encompasses ideation methods that are grounded in, and inspired by, the lived experience and includes the social and spatial settings as design resources in the sketching. Embodied sketching is also based on harnessing play and playfulness as the principal way to elicit creative physical engagement. We present three different ways to implement and use embodied sketching in the application domain of co-located social play. These include bodystorming of ideas, co-designing with users, and sensitizing designers. The latter helps to uncover and articulate significant, as well as novel embodied experiences, whilst the first two are useful for developing a better understanding of possible design resources. 

  • 6.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Designing for Instructed Physical Training2018In: Proceedings of the Twelfth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, New York: ACM Digital Library, 2018, p. 706-708Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of technology to assist in instructed physical training in collocated, social settings remains underexplored. In this short paper, I present an overview of my PhD research, which focuses on designing for supporting these activities and opening up their design space by taking into consideration the spatial, physical and social contexts in which they unravel. Following a Research Through Design approach, I conduct a series of design explorations to investigate how to ecologically design technological support for in-the-moment instructed physical training.

  • 7.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Documenting the Elusive and Ephemeral in Embodied Design Ideation Activities2018In: Multimodal Technologies and Interaction, ISSN ISSN 2414-4088, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 1-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Documenting embodied ideation activities is challenging, as they often result in ephemeral design constructs and elusive design knowledge difficult to document and represent. Here, we explore documentation forms designers can use internally during the design process in the domain of movement-based interaction in collocated, social settings. Using previous work and our experience from embodied ideation workshops, we propose three documentation forms with complementing perspectives of embodied action from a first and a third person view. We discuss how they capture ephemeral embodied action and elusive design and experiential knowledge, in relation to two interdependent aspects of documentation forms: their performativity and the medium they use. The novelty of these forms lies in what is being captured: ephemeral design constructs that emerge as designers engage with the embodied ideation activity; how it is portrayed: in aggregation forms that highlight elusive design knowledge; and their purpose: to clarify and augment analytical results improving the designer-researchers’ understanding of key aspects of the embodied ideation process and its outcomes, useful to advance the design process and for research dissemination.

  • 8.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Christopher, Boyer
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Enlightened Yoga: Designing an Augmented Class with Wearable Lights to Support Instruction2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing technology to support instructed physical training is challenging, due to how instructions rely on complex interactional and situational social processes. To support in-the-moment instruction, we engaged in a co-creative Research through Design process with a Yoga instructor. Together, we designed and deployed Enlightened Yoga: a training class featuring wearable projecting lights that augment the instructor's and trainee's movements, and highlight the orientation and positioning of key body parts. We present insights from the design process and a study of the class. We show how the wearable lights enabled a new shared frame of reference between instructor and trainees, that became instructable through the way participants could reference and orient themselves to it. This allowed the instructor to extend his instructional strategies, and enabled trainees to better act upon cues. We discuss how this was made possible by jointly designing the technology, its coupling with the body, instructions and exercises.

  • 9.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Parrilla Bel, Luis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    BalBoa: A Balancing Board for Handstand Training2019In: CHI EA '19 Extended Abstracts of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019, article id LBW1414Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Balance is an essential physical skill to master, but a challenging one given that it requires a heightened body awareness to control, maintain and develop. In HCI physical training research, the design space of technology support for developing such body awareness remains narrow. Here, we introduce BalBoa, a balancing board to support balance training during handstands. We describe key highlights of the design process behind the Balboa, and present a work-in-progress prototype, which we tested with handstand beginners and experts. We discuss feedback from our users, preliminary insights, and sketch the future steps towards a fully developed prototype.

  • 10.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Parrilla Bel, Luis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Exteriorizing Body Alignment in Collocated Physical Training2018In: Extended Abstracts of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Móntreal, Canada: ACM Digital Library, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Proprioceptive awareness is an essential but challenging skill to master. In HCI physical training research, the design space of how technology can help people to develop such awareness remains narrow. Here, we present a technological device that exteriorizes misalignments of different body parts by translating them to haptic feedback. We present preliminary insights gained during the design process and device testing, and trace the future steps of its technological development.

  • 11.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Movement Correction in Instructed Fitness Training: Design Recommendations and Opportunities2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of technology to assist in instructed fitness training in collocated social settings is underexplored. Here we focus on how technology can be designed to fit within, leverage, and be part of the strategies and tools that fitness trainees and instructors use to detect and correct performance errors. Drawing on ethnomethodological approaches and using the concept of correction to focus our analysis, we scrutinize the interaction between instructor and trainees in two fitness activities, AntiGravity Fitness and Pilates. We identify social configurations and resources employed in instances of correction. We also present an analytical tool useful for deconstructing such correction processes, highlighting the strategies and resources used by the social actors, and their impact on performance. Based on insights gained from our analyses, we propose design recommendations and identify design opportunities that capitalize on existing tools and collaborative correction strategies, such as scaffolding the correction process.

  • 12.
    Turmo Vidal, Laia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Sensory bodystorming for collocated physical training desig2018In: NordiCHI '18 Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, Oslo, Norway: ACM Publications, 2018, p. 247-259Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the use of technology to support physical training has been gaining traction in HCI, the design space of sensory augmentations to improve and support physical training remains narrow. To help open this design space in the domain of collocated instructed physical training, we first present Sensory Bodystorming, a hybrid ideation method influenced by material and embodied approaches to ideation. Sensory Bodystorming targets the generation of ideas that support, and are underpinned by, a rich and nuanced sensorial experience. Ideas are generated through physically engaging with evocative sensorial stimuli elicited by ideation probes featuring diverse material qualities. Secondly, we present ideas resulting from three Sensory Bodystorming sessions that extend prior sensory augmentation works in the domain. Lastly, we identify interesting research and design directions based on prior works and our own.

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