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  • 1.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Klinisk Nutrition.
    Hedman, Anu
    Olsson, Roger
    Sjödin, Anders
    Vessby, Bengt
    Skelettmuskelns fettsyraprofil i relation till fysisk aktivitet, dietärt fett och fibertyp1999In: Svenska Läkarsällskapets Riksstämma 30 nov-2dec, 1999, 1999Conference paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 2.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Klinisk Nutrition.
    Sjödin, Anders
    Klinisk Nutrition.
    Hedman, Anu
    Olsson, Roger
    Vessby, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Klinisk Nutrition.
    Fatty acid profile of skeletal muscle phospholipids in trained and undtrained young men.1999In: 8th European Nutrition Conference, Lillehammer, Norge 17-19 juni, 1999.: Scand. J. Nutr. 73S, suppl 34, 2/1999, 1999Conference paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 3.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Sjödin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hedman, Anu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Olsson, Roger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Fatty acid profile of skeletal muscle phospholipids in trained and untrained young men2000In: American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0193-1849, E-ISSN 1522-1555, Vol. 279, no 4, p. E744-E751Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Endurance trained (n = 14) and untrained young men (n = 15) were compared regarding the fatty acid profile of the vastus lateralis muscle after 8 wk on diets with a similar fatty acid composition. The skeletal muscle phospholipids in the trained group contained lower proportions of palmitic acid (16:0) (-12.4%, P < 0.001) and di-homo-gamma-linolenic acid [20:3(n-6)] (-15.3%, P = 0.018), a lower n-6-to-n-3 ratio (-42.0%, P = 0.015), higher proportions of stearic acid (18:0) (+9.8%, P = 0.004) and sum of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (+33.8%, P = 0.009), and a higher ratio between 20:4(n-6) to 20:3(n-6) (+18.4%, P = 0.006) compared with those in the untrained group. The group differences in 16:0, 20:3(n-6), 18:0/16:0, and 20:4(n-6)/20:3(n-6) were independent of fiber-type distribution. The trained group also showed a lower proportion of 16:0 (-7.9%, P < 0.001) in skeletal muscle triglycerides irrespective of fiber type. In conclusion, the fatty acid profile of the skeletal muscle differed between trained and untrained individuals, although the dietary fatty acid composition was similar. This difference was not explained by different fiber-type distribution alone but appears to be a direct consequence of changes in fatty acid metabolism due to the higher level of physical activity.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Klinisk Nutrition.
    Sjödin, Anders
    Olsson, Roger
    Vessby, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Klinisk Nutrition.
    Effects of physical exercise on fatty acid composition in skeletal muscle.1998In: International 15th Puijo Symposium Kuopio, Finland, 22-25 juni, 1998.: Kuopio University Publications D. Medical Scinces 149, 1998., 1998Conference paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 5.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Sjödin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Olsson, Roger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Effects of physical exercise on phospholipid fatty acid composition in skeletal muscle1998In: American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0193-1849, E-ISSN 1522-1555, Vol. 274, no 37, p. E432-E438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of low-intensity exercise on the fatty acid composition in skeletal muscle and in serum were studied in 19 sedentary, middle-aged Swedish men. During a 10-wk period, all subjects were given a standardized diet with an identical fat composition. After 4 wk on this diet, they were randomly allocated to a daily exercise program (55% peak oxygen uptake) or to continue to live a sedentary life for the remaining 6 wk. Aerobic capacity (submaximal bicycle test) and peripheral insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp) improved with training, whereas the body weight as well as the body composition (underwater weighing and bioimpedance) were unchanged. The proportions of palmitic acid (16:0) and linoleic acid [18:2(n-6)] and the sum of n-6 fatty acids [18:2(n-6), 20:3(n-6), 20:4(n-6)] were decreased in skeletal muscle phospholipids, whereas the proportion of oleic acid [18:1(n-9)] was increased, by training. The fatty acid profile in skeletal muscle triglycerides remained unchanged. We conclude that regular low-intensity exercise influences the fatty acid composition of the phospholipids in skeletal muscle, which hypothetically may contribute to changes of the skeletal muscle membrane fluidity and influence the peripheral insulin sensitivity.

  • 6.
    Branth, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Hambraeus, Leif
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Piehl-Aulin, Karin
    Department of Caring Science, Division for Biomedicine, University of Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Essén-Gustavsson, Birgitta
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Åkerfeldt, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Olsson, Roger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Stridsberg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Ronquist, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Metabolic stress-like condition can be induced by prolonged strenuous exercise in athletes2009In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 114, no 1, p. 12-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Few studies have examined energy metabolism during prolonged, strenuous exercise. We wanted therefore to investigate energy metabolic consequences of a prolonged period of continuous strenuous work with very high energy expenditure. Twelve endurance-trained athletes (6 males and 6 females) were recruited. They performed a 7-h bike race on high work-load intensity. Physiological, biochemical, endocrinological, and anthropometric muscular compartment variables were monitored before, during, and after the race. The energy expenditure was high, being 5557 kcal. Work-load intensity (% of VO2 peak) was higher in females (77.7%) than in men (69.9%). Muscular glycogen utilization was pronounced, especially in type I fibres (>90%). Additionally, muscular triglyceride lipolysis was considerably accelerated. Plasma glucose levels were increased concomitantly with an unchanged serum insulin concentration which might reflect an insulin resistance state in addition to proteolytic glyconeogenesis. Increased reactive oxygen species (malondialdehyde (MDA)) were additional signs of metabolic stress. MDA levels correlated with glycogen utilization rate. A relative deficiency of energy substrate on a cellular level was indicated by increased intracellular water of the leg muscle concomitantly with increased extracellular levels of the osmoregulatory amino acid taurine. A kindred nature of a presumed insulin-resistant state with less intracellular availability of glucose for erythrocytes was also indicated by the findings of decreased MCV together with increased MCHC (haemoconcentration) after the race. This strenuous energy-demanding work created a metabolic stress-like condition including signs of insulin resistance and deteriorated intracellular glucose availability leading to compromised fuelling of ion pumps, culminating in a disturbed cellular osmoregulation indicated by taurine efflux and cellular swelling.

  • 7.
    Branth, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ronquist, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Stridsberg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Hambraeus, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Kindgren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Olsson, Roger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Carlander, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Arnetz, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Development of abdominal fat and incipient metabolic syndrome in young healthy men exposed to long-term stress2007In: NMCD. Nutrition Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, ISSN 0939-4753, E-ISSN 1590-3729, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 427-435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: The sympathetic nervous system may be involved in the pathophysiology of insulin resistance and metabolic cardiovascular syndrome in young men. The aim was to study the effects of long-term stress on different features of the metabolic syndrome (MES) in formerly non-obese healthy young males during 5 months of defined conditions. METHODS AND RESULTS: Sixteen healthy male sailors (mean age 36.5 (SD)+/-7 years) participating in a sailing race around the world were recruited for the study. Investigations were done before the start and at stop overs after finishing laps 1, 2 and 4 (1, 2(1/2) and 5 months, respectively). Anthropometric and blood pressure data as well as biochemical data associated with MES were substantiated. Food intake and exercise were chartered and largely controlled. A mean weight loss of 4.5+/-2 kg (P<0.005), comprising both fat and lean body mass, was recorded during the first lap. Subsequently after 5 months, a weight gain, mainly consisting of 1.2+/-1.1 kg body fat (P<0.05), took place, concomitantly with a protein mass drop of 0.6+/-1.1 kg (P<0.05). The body fat gain accumulated on the abdominal region. Elevated blood levels of HbA1c, insulin and the triglycerides/high-density lipoprotein ratio were also observed during the race. Likewise heart rate and systolic blood pressure increased slightly but to a statistically significant extent. CONCLUSIONS: Non-obese healthy young men exposed to long-term stress developed abdominal obesity and signs of a metabolic syndrome in embryo, also emphasized by biochemical and blood pressure alterations. It is suggested that long-term and sustained stress activation might be an additional risk factor for the development of MES, even after control of dietary and exercise habits.

  • 8.
    Bratteby Tollerz, Linda U
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Olsson, Roger M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Forslund, Anders H
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Norrlin, Simone E
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Reliability of energy cost calculations in children with cerebral palsy, cystic fibrosis and healthy controls2011In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 100, no 12, p. 1616-1620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To study test-retest reliability of physiological cost index (PCI) and total cost index (TCI) in three groups of children. TCI modified PCI by excluding rest heart rate in calculation.

    Methods: Energy cost was evaluated from two consecutive walking tests, and results were compared between methods, tests and groups. Thirty-nine children, eight with cerebral palsy, 11 with cystic fibrosis and 20 healthy controls, aged 5-16 years participated in the study conducted at the Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism laboratory, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. Heart rate was recorded during sitting and walking at self-selected speed. PCI and TCI were calculated using both non-steady-state and steady-state work heart rates. Test-retest reliability was analysed by mean of differences, pooled SD, coefficient of variation (CV%) and correlation coefficients.

    Results: Reliability was high for PCI and TCI. TCI showed consistently lower variation between tests than PCI for all groups. In the group with cerebral palsy, using non-steady-state showed highest reliability.

    Conclusion: Both PCI and TCI were reliable methods when calculating energy cost in children with cerebral palsy, cystic fibrosis and controls. TCI seemed to be a suitable alternative in the evaluation of gait efficiency in children.

  • 9. El-Khoury, Antoine E
    et al.
    Forslund, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Olsson, Roger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Branth, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Sjödin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Atkinson, Alan
    Selvaraj, Amalini
    Hambraeus, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Young, Vernon R
    Moderate exercise at energy balance does not affect 24-h leucine oxidation or nitrogen retention in healthy men1997In: American Journal of Physiology, ISSN 0002-9513, E-ISSN 2163-5773, Vol. 273, no 2, p. E394-E407Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Short-term metabolic experiments have revealed that physical exercise increases the oxidation of leucine, which has been interpreted to indicate an increased requirement for dietary protein in physically active subjects. Because it may be inaccurate to extrapolate measurements of amino acid oxidation made over a few hours to the entire day, we have carried out a continuous 24-h intravenous [1-13C]leucine/[15N]urea tracer study in eight healthy adult men. Their diet supplied 1 g protein.kg-1.day-1, and exercise (mean maximal O2 consumption 46%) was for 90 min during the 12-h fast and 12-h fed periods of the day. Subjects were adapted to the diet and exercise regimen for 6 days. Then, on day 7, they were dressed in the University of Uppsala energy metabolic unit's direct calorimeter suit, were connected to an open-hood indirect calorimeter, and received the tracers. Exercise increased leucine oxidation by approximately 50 and 30% over preexercise rates for fast and fed periods, respectively. This increase amounted to approximately 4-7% of daily leucine oxidation. Subjects remained in body leucine equilibrium (balance -4.6 +/- 10.5 mg.kg-1.day-1; -3.6 +/- 8.3% of intake; P = not significant from zero balance). Therefore, moderate exercise did not cause a significant deterioration in leucine homeostasis at a protein intake of 1 g.kg-1.day-1. These findings underscore the importance of carrying out precise, continuous, 24-h measurements of whole body leucine kinetics; this model should be of value in studies concerning the quantitative interactions among physical exercise, energy/protein metabolism, and diet in humans.

  • 10.
    Hallin, Runa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Arnardottir, Harpa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Olsson, Roger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Emtner, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Branth, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemical endocrinology.
    Boman, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Slinde, Frode
    Relation between physical capacity, nutritional status and systemic inflammation in COPD2011In: Clinical Respiratory Journal, ISSN 1752-6981, E-ISSN 1752-699X, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 136-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Decreased physical capacity, weight loss, fat-free mass depletion and systemic inflammation are frequently observed in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    Objective: Our aim was to examine relations between physical capacity, nutritional status, systemic inflammation and disease severity in COPD.

    Method: Forty nine patients with moderate to severe COPD were included in the study. Spirometry was preformed. Physical capacity was determined by a progressive symptom limited cycle ergo meter test, incremental shuttle walking test, 12-minute walk distance and hand grip strength test. Nutritional status was investigated by anthropometric measurements, (weight, height, arm and leg circumferences and skinfold thickness) and bioelectrical impedance assessment was performed. Blood samples were analyzed for C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen.

    Result: Working capacity was positively related to forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) (p < 0.001), body mass index and fat free mass index (p = 0.01) and negatively related to CRP (p = 0.02) and fibrinogen (p = 0.03). Incremental shuttle walk test was positively related to FEV(1) (p < 0.001) and negatively to CRP (p = 0.048). Hand grip strength was positively related to fat free mass index, and arm and leg circumferences. Fifty to 76% of the variation in physical capacity was accounted for when age, gender, FEV(1), fat free mass index and CRP were combined in a multiple regression model.

    Conclusion: Physical capacity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is related to lung function, body composition and systemic inflammation. A depiction of all three aspects of the disease might be important when targeting interventions in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  • 11.
    Nilsson, Björn Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Olsson, Roger M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Öman, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Wiesel, Frits-Axel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Forslund, Anders H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Physical capacity, respiratory quotient and energy expenditure during exercise in male patients with schizophrenia compared with healthy controls2012In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 206-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    Despite massive research on weight gain and metabolic complications in schizophrenia there are few studies on energy expenditure and no current data on physical capacity. AIM: To determine oxygen uptake capacity, respiratory quotient (RQ) and energy expenditure during a submaximal exercise test in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls.

    METHOD

    Ten male patients and 10 controls were included. RQ and energy expenditure were investigated with indirect calorimetry during a cycle ergometer test. The submaximal work level was defined by heart rate and perceived exhaustion. Physical capacity was determined from predicted maximal oxygen uptake capacity (VO(2-max)).

    RESULTS

    The patients exhibited significantly higher RQ on submaximal workloads and lower physical capacity. A significant lower calculated VO(2-max) remained after correction for body weight and fat free mass (FFM). Energy expenditure did not differ on fixed workloads.

    CONCLUSION

    RQ was rapidly increasing in the patients during exercise indicating a faster transition to carbohydrate oxidation and anaerobic metabolism that also implies a performance closer to maximal oxygen uptake even at submaximal loads. This may restrict the capacity for everyday activity and exercise and thus contribute to the risk for weight gain. Physical capacity was consequently significantly lower in the patients.

  • 12. Omarsdottir, S
    et al.
    Ljunggren, O
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Mallmin, H
    Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Olsson, R
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Prytz, H
    Lööf, L
    Interfaculty Units, Centre for Clinical Research.
    Longitudinal bone loss in postmenopausal women with primary biliary cirrhosis and well-preserved liver function.2002In: J Intern Med, ISSN 0954-6820, Vol. 252, no 6, p. 537-41Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Tollerz, Linda. U. Bratteby
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Forslund, Anders H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Olsson, Roger. M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Lidström, Helene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, Norrkoping, Sweden..
    Holmbäck, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Children with cerebral palsy do not achieve healthy physical activity levels2015In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 104, no 11, p. 1125-1129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimThis study compared daily activity energy expenditure (AEE) in children with cerebral palsy with a control group and investigated whether the children achieved healthy levels of physical activity. MethodsWe enrolled eight children with bilateral cerebral palsy, from eight to 10years of age, and a group of controls matched for age and gender. For three days, physical activity was simultaneously measured by accelerometers and self-reports using a diary. The daily AEE results were compared between groups and methods. The number of children that achieved healthy physical activity levels in each group was explored. ResultsChildren with cerebral palsy had significantly lower daily AEE, as measured by accelerometers, than the controls, and they did not achieve the healthy moderate to heavy physical activity level defined in the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations. Self-reports using the diaries resulted in an overestimation of physical activity compared with the ankle accelerometer measurements in both groups. ConclusionOur investigation of physical activity in children with cerebral palsy and controls using accelerometers and a diary found low levels of daily AEE and physical activity, and these results were most prominent in the group with cerebral palsy. The diaries overestimated physical activity in both groups.

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