uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Alaie, Iman
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Philipson, Anna
    Orebro Univ, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Fac Med & Hlth, Orebro, Sweden.
    Ssegonja, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Hagberg, Lars
    Orebro Univ, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Fac Med & Hlth, Orebro, Sweden.
    Feldman, Inna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Sampaio, Filipa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Moller, Margareta
    Orebro Univ, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Fac Med & Hlth, Orebro, Sweden.
    Arinell, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
    Ramklint, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
    Päären, Aivar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
    Olsson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Bohman, Hannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Inst KIND, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Ctr Neurodev Disorders,Pediat Neuropsychiat Unit, Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Cty Council, Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uppsala Longitudinal Adolescent Depression Study (ULADS)2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 3, article id e024939Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To present the Uppsala Longitudinal Adolescent Depression Study, initiated in Uppsala, Sweden, in the early 1990s. The initial aim of this epidemiological investigation was to study the prevalence, characteristics and correlates of adolescent depression, and has subsequently expanded to include a broad range of social, economic and health-related long-term outcomes and cost-of-illness analyses.

    Participants: The source population was first-year students (aged 16-17) in upper-secondary schools in Uppsala during 1991-1992, of which 2300 (93%) were screened for depression. Adolescents with positive screening and sex/age-matched peers were invited to a comprehensive assessment. A total of 631 adolescents (78% females) completed this assessment, and 409 subsequently completed a 15year follow-up assessment. At both occasions, extensive information was collected on mental disorders, personality and psychosocial situation. Detailed social, economic and health-related data from 1993 onwards have recently been obtained from the Swedish national registries for 576 of the original participants and an age-matched reference population (N=200 000).

    Findings to date: The adolescent lifetime prevalence of a major depressive episode was estimated to be 11.4%. Recurrence in young adulthood was reported by the majority, with a particularly poor prognosis for those with a persistent depressive disorder or multiple somatic symptoms. Adolescent depression was also associated with an increased risk of other adversities in adulthood, including additional mental health conditions, low educational attainment and problems related to intimate relationships.

    Future plans: Longitudinal studies of adolescent depression are rare and must be responsibly managed and utilised. We therefore intend to follow the cohort continuously by means of registries. Currently, the participants are approaching mid-adulthood. At this stage, we are focusing on the overall long-term burden of adolescent depression. For this purpose, the research group has incorporated expertise in health economics. We would also welcome extended collaboration with researchers managing similar datasets.

  • 2.
    Fabian, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP. Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Ssegonja, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Salari, Raziye
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Feldman, Inna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Mental health and academic failure in Swedish adolescents2017In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 27, p. 388-388Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3. Lalouni, Maria
    et al.
    Ljótsson, Brjánn
    Bonnert, Marianne
    Ssegonja, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Benninga, Marc
    Bjureberg, Johan
    Högström, Jens
    Sahlin, Hanna
    Simrén, Magnus
    Feldman, Inna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Hedman-Lagerlöf, Erik
    Serlachius, Eva
    Olén, Ola
    Clinical and Cost Effectiveness of Online Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Children with Functional Abdominal Pain Disorders2019In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 1542-3565, E-ISSN 1542-7714, Vol. 17, no 11, p. 2236-2244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Scalable and effective treatments are needed for children with functional abdominal pain disorders (FAPDs). We performed a randomized controlled trial of the efficacy and cost effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy delivered online (internet CBT) compared to usual therapy.

    METHODS: We studied children (8-12 years old) diagnosed with FAPDs, based on the Rome IV criteria, in Sweden from September 2016 through April 2017. The patients were randomly assigned to groups that received 10 weeks of therapist-guided, internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy (internet CBT, n=46) or usual treatment (treatments within the healthcare and school systems, including medications and visits to doctors and other healthcare professionals; n=44). The primary outcome was Global child-rated gastrointestinal symptom severity assessed using the Pediatric Quality of Life Gastrointestinal Symptom scale. All outcomes were collected from September 2016 through January 2018. Secondary outcomes included quality of life, gastrointestinal-specific anxiety, avoidance behaviors, and parental responses to children's symptoms. Societal costs and costs for healthcare consumption were collected during the treatment.

    RESULTS: Children who received internet CBT had a significantly larger improvement in gastrointestinal symptom severity with a medium effect size (Cohen's d=0.46; 95% CI, 0.05-0.88; number needed to treat, 3.8) compared with children who received the usual treatment. The children's quality of life, gastrointestinal-specific anxiety, avoidance behaviors, and parental responses to children's symptoms also improved significantly in the internet CBT group compared with the usual treatment group. The effects of internet CBT persisted through 36 weeks of follow up. Children who received internet CBT had significantly less healthcare use than children who received usual treatment, with an average cost difference of US $137 (P=.011). We calculated a cost saving of US $1050 for every child treated with internet CBT compared with usual treatment.

    CONCLUSION: In a randomized trial of pediatric patients with FAPDs, we found internet CBT to be clinically and cost effective compared with usual treatment. Internet CBT has the potential to increase the availability of treatment for a number of patients and reduce healthcare costs. ClinicalTrials.gov no.: NCT02873078.

  • 4.
    Lenhard, F.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ssegonja, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Andersson, E.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Feldman, Inna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Ruck, C.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mataix-Cols, D.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Serlachius, E.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Cost-Effectiveness Of Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavior Therapy For Adolescent Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder2016In: Value in Health, ISSN 1098-3015, E-ISSN 1524-4733, Vol. 19, no 7, p. A521-A521Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Lenhard, Fabian
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Cty Council, Stockholm Healthcare Serv, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ssegonja, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Andersson, Erik
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Feldman, Inna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ruck, Christian
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Cty Council, Stockholm Healthcare Serv, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mataix-Cols, David
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Cty Council, Stockholm Healthcare Serv, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Serlachius, Eva
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Cty Council, Stockholm Healthcare Serv, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Cost-effectiveness of therapist-guided internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy for paediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder: results from a randomised controlled trial2017In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 5, article id e015246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a therapist-guided internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT) intervention for adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) compared with untreated patients on a waitlist. Design Single-blinded randomised controlled trial. Setting A research clinic within the regular child and adolescent mental health service in Stockholm, Sweden. Participants Sixty-seven adolescents (12-17 years) with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fifth Edition diagnosis of OCD. Interventions Either a 12-week, therapist-guided ICBT intervention or a wait list condition of equal duration. Primary outcome measures Cost data were collected at baseline and after treatment, including healthcare use, supportive resources, prescription drugs, prescription-free drugs, school absence and productivity loss, as well as the cost of ICBT. Health outcomes were defined as treatment responder rate and quality-adjusted life years gain. Bootstrapped mixed model analyses were conducted comparing incremental costs and health outcomes between the groups from the societal and healthcare perspectives. Results Compared with waitlist control, ICBT generated substantial societal cost savings averaging US$-144.98 (95% CI -159.79 to -130.16) per patient. The cost reductions were mainly driven by reduced healthcare use in the ICBT group. From the societal perspective, the probability of ICBT being cost saving compared with waitlist control was approximately 60%. From the healthcare perspective, the cost per additional responder to ICBT compared with waitlist control was approximately US$78. Conclusions The results suggest that therapist-guided ICBT is a cost-effective treatment and results in societal cost savings, compared with patients who do not receive evidence-based treatment. Since, at present, most patients with OCD do not have access to evidence-based treatments, the results have important implications for the increasingly strained national and healthcare budgets. Future studies should compare the cost-effectiveness of ICBT with regular face-to-face CBT.

  • 6.
    Lenhard, Fabian
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Ctr Psychiat Res, Dept Clin Neurosci, Karolinska Inst,Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth,CHAP, Islandsgatan 2,Plan 3 Muninhuset, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden.;Stockholm Cty Council, Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ssegonja, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Andersson, Erik
    Uppsala Univ, Ctr Psychiat Res, Dept Clin Neurosci, Karolinska Inst,Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth,CHAP, Islandsgatan 2,Plan 3 Muninhuset, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Feldman, Inna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Rück, Christian
    Uppsala Univ, Ctr Psychiat Res, Dept Clin Neurosci, Karolinska Inst,Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth,CHAP, Islandsgatan 2,Plan 3 Muninhuset, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden.;Stockholm Cty Council, Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mataix-Cols, David
    Uppsala Univ, Ctr Psychiat Res, Dept Clin Neurosci, Karolinska Inst,Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth,CHAP, Islandsgatan 2,Plan 3 Muninhuset, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden.;Stockholm Cty Council, Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Serlachius, Eva
    Uppsala Univ, Ctr Psychiat Res, Dept Clin Neurosci, Karolinska Inst,Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth,CHAP, Islandsgatan 2,Plan 3 Muninhuset, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden.;Stockholm Cty Council, Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Cost-effectiveness of Therapist-guided Internet-delivered Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder2017In: Journal of Mental Health Policy and Economics, ISSN 1091-4358, E-ISSN 1099-176X, Vol. 20, no S1, p. S21-S21Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Nystrand, Camilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Jonsson, U.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Feldman, Inna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Langenskiöld, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Economics.
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Ssegonja, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Indicated preventive interventions for depression in Children and Adolescents: A meta-analysis2017In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 27, p. 371-371Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Nystrand, Camilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Ssegonja, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Sampaio, Filipa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Quality of life and service use amongst parents of young children: Results from the Children and Parents in Focus trial2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the quality of life (QoL) and service use of parents who have preschool-aged children, and whether the mental-health problems of parents and their children predict these outcomes. Methods: Cross-sectional data were gathered in 2015–2016 in Uppsala County in Sweden where 3164 parents of children aged three- to five-years-old were asked to self-report their own and their children’s mental-health status and service use in the past 12 months. Data from the General Health Questionnaire were used to derive health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measures for adults. Results: Very few parents reported mental-health problems, while approximately 15% of the sample used any type of parental support and/or psychological health-care service. Families without problems used the least amount of resources. Parents’ own mental-health problems predicted usage of both psychotherapy and couples’ therapy, while child problems predicted the former but also the use of a parenting program. Parental HRQoL was predicted by mental-health problems, and all families with at least one individual experiencing problems rated their QoL lower than families without problems. Conclusions: Parental service use and HRQoL is associated not only with their own mental-health status but also with their children’s mental-health problems.

  • 9.
    Salari, Raziye
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Ssegonja, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Pilot study of a group intervention for unaccompanied refugee minors with symptoms of PTSD in Sweden2017In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 27, p. 120-120Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Sampaio, Filipa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Bonnert, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olen, O.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedman, E.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lalouni, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lenhard, F.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ljotsson, B.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nystrand, Camilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Ssegonja, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Serlachius, E.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Feldman, Inna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Cost-Effectiveness of Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Adolescents with Irritable Bowel Syndrome2018In: Value in Health, ISSN 1098-3015, E-ISSN 1524-4733, Vol. 21, p. S42-S42Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Sampaio, Filipa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Bonnert, Marianne
    Olén, Ola
    Hedman, Erik
    Lalouni, Maria
    Lenhard, Fabian
    Ljótsson, Brjánn
    Ssegonja, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Serlachius, Eva
    Feldman, Inna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Cost-effectiveness of internet-delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy for adolescents with irritable bowel syndrome2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 1, article id e023881Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To assess whether exposure-based internet-delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy (internet-CBT) is a cost-effective treatment for adolescents with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) compared with a waitlist control, from a societal perspective, based on data from a randomised trial.

    DESIGN:

    Within-trial cost-effectiveness analysis.

    SETTING:

    Participants were recruited from the whole of Sweden via primary, secondary and tertiary care clinics reached through news media and advertising.

    PARTICIPANTS:

    Adolescents (aged 13-17) with a diagnosis of IBS.

    INTERVENTIONS:

    Participants were randomised to either an exposure-based internet-CBT, including 10 weekly modules for adolescents and five modules for parents, or a waitlist.

    OUTCOME MEASURES:

    The main health outcome was the quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) estimated by mapping Pediatric Quality-of-Life Inventory (PedsQL) scores onto EQ-5D-3L utilities. The secondary outcome was the point improvement on the PedsQL scale. Data on health outcomes and resource use were collected at baseline and 10 weeks post-treatment. Resource use was measured using the Trimbos and Institute of Medical Technology Assessment Cost Questionnaire for Psychiatry (TIC-P) . Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER) were calculated as the difference in average costs by the difference in average outcomes between groups.

    RESULTS:

    The base-case results showed that internet-CBT costs were on average US$170.24 (95% CI 63.14 to 315.04) more per participant than the waitlist. Adolescents in the internet-CBT group showed small QALY gains (0.0031; 95% CI 0.0003 to 0.0061), and an average improvement of 5.647 points (95% CI 1.82 to 9.46) on the PedsQL compared with the waitlist. Internet-CBT yielded an ICER of $54 916/QALY gained and a probability of cost-effectiveness of 74% given the Swedish willingness-to-pay threshold. The ICER for the outcome PedsQL was US$85.29/point improvement.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Offering internet-CBT to adolescents with IBS improves health-related quality of life and generates small QALY gains at a higher cost than a waitlist control. Internet-CBT is thus likely to be cost-effective given the strong efficacy evidence, small QALY gains and low cost.

  • 12.
    Sampaio, Filipa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ssegonja, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Nystrand, Camilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Feldman, Inna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Health, public sector service use and related costs of Swedish preschool children: results from the Children and Parents in Focus trial2019In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 43-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite Sweden's good child health statistics, data on the mental health and wellbeing of Swedish preschool children is scarce and not routinely collected in healthcare. The study aimed to: identify the proportion of preschool children with mental health and somatic problems, the public sector services used by these children and whether they differ by type of problems, investigate whether other factors affect service use, and estimate the costs associated with these services. This study used cross-sectional data on a sample of 3175 children aged 3-5 from the "Children and Parents in Focus trial". Data on service use, child health and demographics were obtained from primary caregivers. Child mental health was assessed by both primary caregivers and teachers. 8.9% of the sample reported mental health problems, and approximately 1% had comorbid somatic and mental health problems. Over 50% of the preschoolers used any service, with school assistant being the most frequently used. The average annual cost per child, regardless of health status, was US$921, with 75% of the costs accruing at school. The presence of both somatic and mental health problems predicted higher service use, in particular extra services used at school and at home (mean annual cost US$13826 and US$1583, respectively). Children with comorbid problems accounted for the highest mean costs. Mental health problems among preschool children were particularly high compared to studies from other countries. There is a need to strengthen school mental health services to engage in proactive early identification of children with mental health problems so that appropriate care is provided.

    Trial registration number: ISRCTN16513449. Registered 23 July 2013.

  • 13.
    Sarkadi, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Ådahl, Kajsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Ssegonja, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Fängström, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Salari, Raziye
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Evaluation of a group intervention for unaccompanied refugee minors with PTSD symptoms in Sweden2018In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, no Supplement: 1, p. 105-105Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Sarkadi, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Ådahl, Kajsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Stenvall, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Ssegonja, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Batti, Hemrin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Gavra, Parthena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Fängström, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Salari, Raziye
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Teaching Recovery Techniques: evaluation of a group intervention for unaccompanied refugee minors with symptoms of PTSD in Sweden2018In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 467-479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2015, a total of 35,369 unaccompanied refugee minors (URMs) sought asylum in Sweden. In a previous study of 208 URMs, we found that 76% screened positive for PTSD. This study aimed to (1) evaluate the indicated prevention program Teaching Recovery Techniques (TRT) in a community setting and describe the program's effects on symptoms of PTSD and depression in URMs; and (2) examine participants' experiences of the program. The study included 10 groups. Methods for evaluation included the Children's Revised Impact of Event Scale (CRIES-8) and the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale Self-report (MADRS-S) at baseline and at post-intervention. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 22 participating URMs to elicit their experiences. Pre- and post-measures were available for 46 participants. At baseline, 83% of the participants reported moderate or severe depression and 48% suicidal ideation or plans. Although more than half (62%) of the participants reported negative life events during the study period, both PTSD (CRIES-8) and depression (MADRS-S) symptoms decreased significantly after the intervention (p = 0.017, 95% CI − 5.55; − 0.58; and p < 0.001, 95% CI − 8.94; − 2.88, respectively). The qualitative content analysis resulted in six overall categories: social support, normalisation, valuable tools, comprehensibility, manageability, and meaningfulness when the youth described their experiences of the program, well reflecting TRT's program theory. Overall, results indicate that TRT, delivered in a community setting, is a promising indicated preventive intervention for URMs with PTSD symptoms. This successful evaluation should be followed up with a controlled study.

  • 15.
    Ssegonja, Richard
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Alaie, Iman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Philipson, Anna
    Orebro Univ, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Fac Med & Hlth, Orebro, Sweden.
    Hagberg, Lars
    Orebro Univ, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Fac Med & Hlth, Orebro, Sweden.
    Sampaio, Filipa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Möller, Margareta
    Orebro Univ, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Fac Med & Hlth, Orebro, Sweden.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP. Murdoch Childrens Res Inst, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Langenskiöld, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Learning Informat Management & Eth LIME, Stockholm, Sweden.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Bohman, Hannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Karolinska Inst Kind, Ctr Neurodev Disorders, Pediat Neuropsychiat Unit, Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Feldman, Inna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Depressive disorders in adolescence, recurrence in early adulthood, and healthcare usage in mid-adulthood: A longitudinal cost-of-illness study2019In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 258, p. 33-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Depression in adolescence is associated with increased healthcare consumption in adulthood, but prior research has not recognized the heterogeneity of depressive disorders. This paper investigated the additional healthcare usage and related costs in mid-adulthood for individuals with adolescent depression, and examined the mediating role of subsequent depression in early adulthood.

    Methods: This study was based on the Uppsala Longitudinal Adolescent Depression Study, initiated in Sweden in the early 1990s. Depressive disorders were assessed in adolescence (age 16-17) and early adulthood (age 19-30). Healthcare usage and related costs in mid-adulthood (age 31-40) were estimated using nationwide population-based registries. Participants with specific subtypes of adolescent depression (n = 306) were compared with matched non-depressed peers (n = 213).

    Results: Women with persistent depressive disorder (PDD) in adolescence utilized significantly more healthcare resources in mid-adulthood. The association was not limited to psychiatric care, and remained after adjustment for individual and parental characteristics. The total additional annual cost for a single age group of females with a history of PDD at a population level was estimated at 3.10 million USD. Depression recurrence in early adulthood mediated the added costs for psychiatric care, but not for somatic care.

    Limitations: Primary health care data were not available, presumably resulting in an underestimation of the true healthcare consumption. Estimates for males had limited precision due to a relatively small male proportion.

    Conclusions: On a population level, the additional healthcare costs incurred in mid-adulthood in females with a history of adolescent PDD are considerable. Early treatment and prevention should be prioritized.

  • 16.
    Ssegonja, Richard
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Feldman, Inna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Lalouni, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ljotsson, B.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bonnert, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Benninga, M.
    Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Bjureberg, J.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Högström, J.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sahlin, H.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Simren, M.
    Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hedman, E.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Serlachius, E.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olen, O.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cost-Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Delivered Via Internet for Children with Functional Abdominal Pain Disorders: Evaluation Alongside A Randomized Controlled Trial2018In: Value in Health, ISSN 1098-3015, E-ISSN 1524-4733, Vol. 21, p. S85-S85Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Ssegonja, Richard
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Nystrand, Camilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Feldman, Inna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Langenskiöld, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Indicated Preventive Interventions for Depression in Children and Adolescents: A Meta-Analysis And Meta-Regression2018In: Value in Health, ISSN 1098-3015, E-ISSN 1524-4733, Vol. 21, p. S181-S181Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Ssegonja, Richard
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Nystrand, Camilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Feldman, Inna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Langenskiöld, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Economics. Karolinska Inst, Dept Learning Informat Management & Eth LIME, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Karolinska Inst, Ctr Neurodev Disorders KIND, Div Neuropsychiat, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Psychiat Res, Child & Adolescent Psychiat, BUP KIND, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Indicated preventive interventions for depression in children and adolescents: A meta-analysis and meta-regression2019In: Preventive Medicine, ISSN 0091-7435, E-ISSN 1096-0260, Vol. 118, p. 7-15Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Depression contributes about 2% to the global burden of disease. A first onset of depressive disorder or subsyndromal depressive symptoms is common in adolescence, indicating that early prevention is a priority. However, trials of preventive interventions for depression in youths show conflicting results. This systematic review and meta-analysis investigated the effectiveness of group-based cognitive behavioral therapy (GB-CBT) as a preventive intervention targeting subsyndromal depression in children and adolescents. In addition, the impact of different covariates (type of comparator and use of booster sessions) was assessed. Relevant articles were identified from previous systematic reviews, and supplemented with an electronic search spanning from 01/09/2014 to 28/02/2018. The retrieved articles were assessed for eligibility and risk of bias. Relevant data were extracted. Intervention effectiveness was pooled using a random-effects model and the impact of covariates assessed using meta-regression. 38 eligible articles (34 trials) were obtained. The analysis showed GB-CBT to significantly reduce the incidence (relative risk 0.43, 95% CI 0.21-0.87) and symptoms (Cohen's d -0.22, 95% CI -0.32 to -0.11) of depression at post-test compared to all controls. Comparisons with passive comparators suggested that the effect decayed over time. However, compared to active controls, a significant intervention effect was evident only after 12 month or more. Our results suggest that the preventive effect of GB-CBT wears off, but still lasts longer than the effect of active comparators. Only a few studies included booster sessions, precluding firm conclusions. Future studies should clarify to what extent maintenance strategies can prolong the preventive effect of GB-CBT.

  • 19.
    Ssegonja, Richard
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Pihl, Charlotte
    Natl Board Hlth & Welf Socialstyrelsen, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zethraeus, Niklas
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Learning Informat Management & Eth LIME, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Langenskiöld, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Economics.
    How Robust are Economic Evaluations of Parenting Programs for Managing Conduct Disorder?: A Systematic Literature Review2017In: Journal of Mental Health Policy and Economics, ISSN 1091-4358, E-ISSN 1099-176X, Vol. 20, no S1, p. S31-S32Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Worodria, William
    et al.
    Infect Dis Inst, Kampala, Uganda;Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Div Infect Dis, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA;Makerere Univ, Coll Hlth Sci, Dept Med, Kampala, Uganda.
    Ssempijja, Victor
    Leidos Biomed Res Inc, Clin Res Directorate, Clin Monitoring Res Program, NCI Campus Frederick, Frederick, MD USA.
    Hanrahan, Coleen
    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Ssegonja, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Muhofwa, Abdallah
    Infect Dis Inst, Kampala, Uganda.
    Mazapkwe, Doreen
    Infect Dis Inst, Kampala, Uganda.
    Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet
    Infect Dis Inst, Kampala, Uganda;Makerere Univ, Coll Hlth Sci, Dept Med, Kampala, Uganda.
    Reynolds, Steven J.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Div Infect Dis, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA;Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Baltimore, MD USA;NIAID, Div Intramural Res, NIH, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Colebunders, Robert
    Univ Antwerp, Global Hlth Inst, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Manabe, Yukari C.
    Infect Dis Inst, Kampala, Uganda;Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Div Infect Dis, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA.
    Opportunistic diseases diminish the clinical benefit of immediate antiretroviral therapy in HIV-tuberculosis co-infected adults with low CD4+ cell counts2018In: AIDS (London), ISSN 0269-9370, E-ISSN 1473-5571, Vol. 32, no 15, p. 2141-2149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: HIV-tuberculosis (TB) co-infection remains an important cause of mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. Clinical trials have reported early (within 2 weeks of TB therapy) antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces mortality among HIV-TB co-infected research participants with low CD4(+) cell counts, but this has not been consistently observed. We aimed to evaluate the currentWHO recommendations for ART in HIV-TB co-infected patients on mortality in routine clinical settings.

    Methods: We compared two cohorts before (2008-2010) and after (2012-2013) policy change on ART timing after TB and examined the effectiveness of early versus delayed ART on mortality in HIV-TB co-infected participants with CD4(+) cell count 100 cells/ml or less. We used inverse probability censoring-weighted Cox models on baseline characteristics to balance the study arms and generated hazard ratios for mortality.

    Results: Of 356 participants with CD4(+) cell counts 100 cells/ml or less, 180 were in the delayed ART cohorts whereas 176 were in the early ART cohorts. Their median age (32.5 versus 32 years) and baseline CD4(+) cell counts (26.5 versus 26 cells/ml) respectively were similar. There was no difference in mortality rates of both cohorts. The risk of death increased in participants with a positive Cryptococcal antigen (CrAg) test in both the early ART cohort (aHR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.0-6.8; P = 0.045) and the delayed ART cohort (aHR = 4.2, 95% CI 1.9-9.0; P< 0.001

    Conclusion: Early ART in patients with HIV-TB co-infection was not associated with reduced risk of mortality in routine care. Asymptomatic Cryptococcal antigenaemia increased the risk of mortality in both cohorts.

1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf