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  • 1.
    Aktekin, Burak
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    The Electrochemistry of LiNi0.5-xMn1.5+xO4-δ in Li-ion Batteries: Structure, Side-reactions and Cross-talk2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of Li-ion batteries in portable electronic products is today widespread and on-going research is extensively dedicated to improve their performance and energy density for use in electric vehicles. The largest contribution to the overall cell weight comes from the positive electrode material, and improvements regarding this component thereby render a high potential for the development of these types of batteries. A promising candidate is LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LMNO), which offers both high power capability and energy density. However, the instability of conventional electrolytes at the high operating potential (~4.7 V vs. Li+/Li) associated with this electrode material currently prevents its use in commercial applications.

    This thesis work aims to investigate practical approaches which have the potential of overcoming issues related to fast degradation of LNMO-based batteries. This, in turn, necessitates a comprehensive understanding of degradation mechanisms. First, the effect of a well-known electrolyte additive, fluoroethylene carbonate is investigated in LNMO-Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) cells with a focus on the positive electrode. Relatively poor cycling performance is found with 5 wt% additive while 1 wt% additive does not show a significant difference as compared to additive-free electrolytes. Second, a more fundamental study is performed to understand the effect of capacity fading mechanisms contributing to overall cell failure in high-voltage based full-cells. Electrochemical characterization of LNMO-LTO cells in different configurations show how important the electrode interactions (cross-talk) can be for the overall cell behaviour. Unexpectedly fast capacity fading at elevated temperatures is found to originate from a high sensitivity of LTO to cross-talk.

    Third, in situ studies of LNMO are conducted with neutron diffraction and electron microscopy. These show that the oxygen release is not directly related to cation disordering. Moreover, microstructural changes upon heating are observed. These findings suggest new sample preparation strategies, which allow the control of cation disorder without oxygen loss. Following this guidance, ordered and disordered samples with the same oxygen content are prepared. The negative effect of ordering on electrochemical performance is investigated and changes in bulk electronic structure following cycling are found in ordered samples, accompanied by thick surface films on surface and rock-salt phase domains near surface.

    List of papers
    1. The Effect of the Fluoroethylene Carbonate Additive in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 - Li4Ti5O12 Lithium-Ion Cells
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Effect of the Fluoroethylene Carbonate Additive in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 - Li4Ti5O12 Lithium-Ion Cells
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    2017 (English)In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 164, no 4, p. A942-A948Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of the electrolyte additive fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) for Li-ion batteries has been widely discussed in literature in recent years. Here, the additive is studied for the high-voltage cathode LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) coupled to Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) to specifically study its effect on the cathode side. Electrochemical performance of full cells prepared by using a standard electrolyte (LP40) with different concentrations of FEC (0, 1 and 5 wt%) were compared and the surface of cycled positive electrodes were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that addition of FEC is generally of limited use for this battery system. Addition of 5 wt% FEC results in relatively poor cycling performance, while the cells with 1 wt% FEC showed similar behavior compared to reference cells prepared without FEC. SEM and XPS analysis did not indicate the formation of thick surface layers on the LNMO cathode, however, an increase in layer thickness with increased FEC content in the electrolyte could be observed. XPS analysis on LTO electrodes showed that the electrode interactions between positive and negative electrodes occurred as Mn and Ni were detected on the surface of LTO already after 1 cycle. (C) The Author(s) 2017. Published by ECS. All rights reserved.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ELECTROCHEMICAL SOC INC, 2017
    National Category
    Chemical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-323509 (URN)10.1149/2.0231706jes (DOI)000400958600056 ()
    Available from: 2017-06-14 Created: 2017-06-14 Last updated: 2019-07-29Bibliographically approved
    2. Understanding the Capacity Loss in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4-Li4Ti5O12 Lithium-Ion Cells at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding the Capacity Loss in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4-Li4Ti5O12 Lithium-Ion Cells at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 122, no 21, p. 11234-11248Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The high-voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4, (LNMO) is an attractive positive electrode because of its operating voltage around 4.7 V (vs Li/Li+) and high power capability. However, problems including electrolyte decomposition at high voltage and transition metal dissolution, especially at elevated temperatures, have limited its potential use in practical full cells. In this paper, a fundamental study for LNMO parallel to Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) full cells has been performed to understand the effect of different capacity fading mechanisms contributing to overall cell failure. Electrochemical characterization of cells in different configurations (regular full cells, back-to-back pseudo-full cells, and 3-electrode full cells) combined with an intermittent current interruption technique have been performed. Capacity fade in the full cell configuration was mainly due to progressively limited lithiation of electrodes caused by a more severe degree of parasitic reactions at the LTO electrode, while the contributions from active mass loss from LNMO or increases in internal cell resistance were minor. A comparison of cell formats constructed with and without the possibility of cross-talk indicates that the parasitic reactions on LTO occur because of the transfer of reaction products from the LNMO side. The efficiency of LTO is more sensitive to temperature, causing a dramatic increase in the fading rate at 55 degrees C. These observations show how important the electrode interactions (cross-talk) can be for the overall cell behavior. Additionally, internal resistance measurements showed that the positive electrode was mainly responsible for the increase of resistance over cycling, especially at 55 degrees C. Surface characterization showed that LNMO surface layers were relatively thin when compared with the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) on LTO. The SEI on LTO does not contribute significantly to overall internal resistance even though these films are relatively thick. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy measurements showed that the Mn and Ni observed on the anode were not in the metallic state; the presence of elemental metals in the SEI is therefore not implicated in the observed fading mechanism through a simple reduction process of migrated metal cations.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    American Chemical Society (ACS), 2018
    National Category
    Materials Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-357732 (URN)10.1021/acs.jpcc.8b02204 (DOI)000434236700007 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Energy Agency, 42031-1
    Available from: 2018-08-31 Created: 2018-08-31 Last updated: 2019-07-29Bibliographically approved
    3. Cation Ordering and Oxygen Release in LiNi0.5-xMn1.5+xO4-y (LNMO): In Situ Neutron Diffraction and Performance in Li Ion Full Cells
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cation Ordering and Oxygen Release in LiNi0.5-xMn1.5+xO4-y (LNMO): In Situ Neutron Diffraction and Performance in Li Ion Full Cells
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    2019 (English)In: ACS APPLIED ENERGY MATERIALS, ISSN 2574-0962, Vol. 2, no 5, p. 3323-3335Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Lithium ion cells utilizing LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) as the positive electrode are prone to fast capacity fading, especially when operated in full cells and at elevated temperatures. The crystal structure of LNMO can adopt a P4(3)32 (cation-ordered) or Fd (3) over barm (disordered) arrangement, and the fading rate of cells is usually mitigated when samples possess the latter structure. However, synthesis conditions leading to disordering also lead to oxygen deficiencies and rock-salt impurities and as a result generate Mn3+. In this study, in situ neutron diffraction was performed on disordered and slightly Mn-rich LNMO samples to follow cation ordering-disordering transformations during heating and cooling. The study shows for the first time that there is not a direct connection between oxygen release and cation disordering, as cation disordering is observed to start prior to oxygen release when the samples are heated in a pure oxygen atmosphere. This result demonstrates that it is possible to tune disordering in LNMO without inducing oxygen deficiencies or forming the rock-salt impurity phase. In the second part of the study, electrochemical testing of samples with different degrees of ordering and oxygen content has been performed in LNMO vertical bar vertical bar LTO (Li4Ti5O12) full cells. The disordered sample exhibits better performance, as has been reported in other studies; however, we observe that all cells behave similarly during the initial period of cycling even when discharged at a 10 C rate, while differences arise only after a period of cycling. Additionally, the differences in fading rate were observed to be time-dependent rather than dependent on the number of cycles. This performance degradation is believed to be related to instabilities in LNMO at higher voltages, that is, in its lower lithiation states. Therefore, it is suggested that future studies should target the individual effects of ordering and oxygen content. It is also suggested that more emphasis during electrochemical testing should be placed on the stability of samples in their delithiated state.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2019
    Keywords
    high-voltage spinel, neutron diffraction, LNMO, cation ordering, oxygen deficiency
    National Category
    Materials Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-387975 (URN)10.1021/acsaem.8b02217 (DOI)000469885300040 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Energy Agency, 42758-1Swedish Energy Agency, 39043-1StandUp
    Available from: 2019-06-27 Created: 2019-06-27 Last updated: 2019-07-29Bibliographically approved
    4. The role of anionic processes in Li1xNi0.44Mn1.56O4 studied by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of anionic processes in Li1xNi0.44Mn1.56O4 studied by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering
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    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Materials Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-389847 (URN)
    Available from: 2019-07-29 Created: 2019-07-29 Last updated: 2019-08-13
    5. How Mn/Ni ordering controls electrochemical performance in high-voltage spinel LiNi0.44Mn1.56O4 (LNMO) with fixed oxygen content
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>How Mn/Ni ordering controls electrochemical performance in high-voltage spinel LiNi0.44Mn1.56O4 (LNMO) with fixed oxygen content
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Keywords
    High voltage spinel, LNMO, cation ordering, oxygen deficiency, rock-salt, anionic redox activity
    National Category
    Materials Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-389799 (URN)
    Available from: 2019-07-28 Created: 2019-07-28 Last updated: 2019-08-13
  • 2.
    Aktekin, Burak
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Brant, William
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Valvo, Mario
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Marzano, Fernanda
    Scania CV AB.
    Zipprich, Wolfgang
    Volkswagen AG.
    Brandell, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Cation Ordering and Oxygen Release in LiNi0.5-xMn1.5+xO4-y (LNMO)—In Situ Neutron Diffraction and Performance in Li-Ion Full Cells2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) is a promising spinel-type positive electrode for lithium ion batteries as it operates at high voltage and possesses high power capability. However, rapid performance degradation in full cells, especially at elevated temperatures, is a problem. There has been a considerable interest in its crystal structure as this is known to affect its electrochemical performance. LNMO can adopt a P4332 (cation ordered) or Fd-3m (cation disordered) arrangement depending on the synthesis conditions. Most of the studies in literature agree on better electrochemical performance for disordered LNMO [1], however, a clear understanding of the reason for this behaviour is still lacking. This partly arises from the fact that synthesis conditions leading to disordering also lead to oxygen deficiency, rock-salt impurities and therefore generate some Mn3+ [2]. Most commonly, X-ray diffraction is used to characterize these materials, however, accurate structural analysis is difficult due to the near identical scattering lengths of Mn and Ni. This is not the case for neutron diffraction. In this study, an in-situ neutron diffraction heating-cooling experiment was conducted on slightly Mn-rich LNMO under pure oxygen atmosphere in order to investigate relationship between disordering and oxygen deficiency. The study shows for the first time that there is no direct relationship between oxygen loss and cation disordering, as disordering starts prior to oxygen release. Our findings suggest that it is possible to obtain samples with varying degrees of ordering, yet with the same oxygen content and free from impurities. In the second part of the study, highly ordered, partially ordered and fully disordered samples have been tested in LNMO∥LTO (Li4Ti5O12) full cells at 55 °C. It is shown that differences in their performances arise only after repeated cycling, while all the samples behave similarly at the beginning of the test. The difference is believed to be related to instabilities of LNMO at higher voltages, that is, in its lower lithiation states.

    [1] A. Manthiram, K. Chemelewski, E.-S. Lee, Energy Environ. Sci. 7 (2014) 1339.

    [2] M. Kunduraci, G.G. Amatucci, J. Power Sources. 165 (2007) 359–367.

  • 3.
    Aktekin, Burak
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Lacey, Matthew J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Nordh, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Younesi, Reza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Tengstedt, Carl
    Scania CV AB, SE-15187 Sodertalje, Sweden.
    Zipprich, Wolfgang
    Volkswagen AG, D-38436 Wolfsburg, Germany.
    Brandell, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Understanding the Capacity Loss in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4-Li4Ti5O12 Lithium-Ion Cells at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures2018In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 122, no 21, p. 11234-11248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The high-voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4, (LNMO) is an attractive positive electrode because of its operating voltage around 4.7 V (vs Li/Li+) and high power capability. However, problems including electrolyte decomposition at high voltage and transition metal dissolution, especially at elevated temperatures, have limited its potential use in practical full cells. In this paper, a fundamental study for LNMO parallel to Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) full cells has been performed to understand the effect of different capacity fading mechanisms contributing to overall cell failure. Electrochemical characterization of cells in different configurations (regular full cells, back-to-back pseudo-full cells, and 3-electrode full cells) combined with an intermittent current interruption technique have been performed. Capacity fade in the full cell configuration was mainly due to progressively limited lithiation of electrodes caused by a more severe degree of parasitic reactions at the LTO electrode, while the contributions from active mass loss from LNMO or increases in internal cell resistance were minor. A comparison of cell formats constructed with and without the possibility of cross-talk indicates that the parasitic reactions on LTO occur because of the transfer of reaction products from the LNMO side. The efficiency of LTO is more sensitive to temperature, causing a dramatic increase in the fading rate at 55 degrees C. These observations show how important the electrode interactions (cross-talk) can be for the overall cell behavior. Additionally, internal resistance measurements showed that the positive electrode was mainly responsible for the increase of resistance over cycling, especially at 55 degrees C. Surface characterization showed that LNMO surface layers were relatively thin when compared with the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) on LTO. The SEI on LTO does not contribute significantly to overall internal resistance even though these films are relatively thick. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy measurements showed that the Mn and Ni observed on the anode were not in the metallic state; the presence of elemental metals in the SEI is therefore not implicated in the observed fading mechanism through a simple reduction process of migrated metal cations.

  • 4.
    Aktekin, Burak
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Lacey, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Nordh, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Tengstedt, Carl
    Scania CV AB.
    Brandell, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Understanding the Rapid Capacity Fading of LNMO-LTO Lithium-ion Cells at Elevated Temperature2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The high voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) has an average operating potential around 4.7 V vs. Li/Li+ and a gravimetric charge capacity of 146 mAh/g making it a promising high energy density positive electrode for Li-ion batteries. Additionally, the 3-D lithium transport paths available in the spinel structure enables fast diffusion kinetics, making it suitable for power applications [1]. However, the material displays large instability during cycling, especially at elevated temperatures. Therefore, significant research efforts have been undertaken to better understand and improve this electrode material.

    Electrolyte (LiPF6 in organic solvents) oxidation and transition metal dissolution are often considered as the main problems [2] for the systems based on this cathode material. These can cause a variety of problems (in different parts of the cell) eventually increasing internal cell resistance, causing active mass loss and decreasing the amount of cyclable lithium.

    Among these issues, cyclable lithium loss cannot be observed in half cells since lithium metal will provide almost unlimited capacity. Being a promising full cell chemistry for high power applications, there has also been a considerable interest on LNMO full cells with Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) used as the negative electrode. For this chemistry, for an optimized cell, quite stable cycling for >1000 cycles has been reported at room temperature while fast fading is still present at 55 °C [3]. This difference in performance (RT vs. 55 °C) is beyond most expectations and likely does not follow any Arrhenius-type of trend.

    In this study, a comprehensive analysis of LNMO-LTO cells has been performed at different temperatures (RT, 40 °C and 55 °C) to understand the underlying reasons behind stable cycling at room temperature and rapid fading at 55 °C. For this purpose, testing was made on regular cells (Figure 1a), 3-electrode cells (Figure 1b) and back-to-back cells [4] (Figure 1c). Electrode interactions (cross-talk) have been shown to exist in the LTO-LNMO system [5] and back-to-back cells have therefore been used to observe fading under conditions where cross-talk is impossible [4]. Galvanostatic cycling combined with short-duration intermittent current interruptions [6] was performed in order to separately observe changes in internal resistance for LNMO and LTO electrodes in a full cell. Ex-situ characterization of electrodes have also been performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES).

    Our findings show how important the electrode interactions can be in full cells, as a decrease in lithium inventory was shown to be the major factor for the observed capacity fading at elevated temperature. In this presentation, the effect of other factors – active mass loss and internal cell resistance – will be discussed together with the consequences of cross-talk.

    References

    [1] A. Kraytsberg et al. Adv. Energy Mater., vol. 2, pp. 922–939,2012.

    [2] J. H. Kim et al., ChemPhysChem, vol. 15, pp. 1940–1954, 2014.

    [3] H. M. Wu et al. J. E. Soc., vol. 156, pp. A1047–A1050, 2009.

    [4] S. R. Li et al., J. E. Soc., vol. 160, no. 9, pp. A1524–A1528, 2013.

    [5] Dedryvère et al. J. Phys. C., vol. 114 (24), pp. 10999–11008, 2010.

    [6] M. J. Lacey, ChemElectroChem, pp. 1–9, 2017.

  • 5.
    Aktekin, Burak
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Lacey, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Nordh, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Younesi, Reza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Tengstedt, Carl
    Scania CV AB.
    Zipprich, Wolfgang
    Volkswagen AG.
    Brandell, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Understanding the Capacity Loss in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 - Li4Ti5O12 Lithium-Ion Cells at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The high voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O(LNMO) is an attractive positive electrode due to its operating voltage around 4.7 V (vs. Li/Li+) arising from the Ni2+/Ni4+ redox couple. In addition to high voltage operation, a second advantage of this material is its capability for fast lithium diffusion kinetics through 3-D transport paths in the spinel structure. However, the electrode material is prone to side reactions with conventional electrolytes, including electrolyte decomposition and transition metal dissolution, especially at elevated temperatures1. It is important to understand how undesired reactions originating from the high voltage spinel affect the aging of different cell components and overall cycle life. Half-cells are usually considered as an ideal cell configuration in order to get information only from the electrode of interest. However, this cell configuration may not be ideal to understand capacity fading for long-term cycling and the assumption of ‘stable’ lithium negative electrode may not be valid, especially at high current rates2. Also, among the variety of capacity fading mechanisms, the loss of “cyclable” lithium from the positive electrode (or gain of lithium from electrolyte into the negative electrode) due to side reactions in a full-cell can cause significant capacity loss. This capacity loss is not observable in a typical half-cell as a result of an excessive reserve of lithium in the negative electrode.

    In a full-cell, it is desired that the negative electrode does not contribute to side reactions in a significant way if the interest is more on the positive side. Among candidates on the negative side, Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) is known for its stability since its voltage plateau (around 1.5 V vs. Li/Li+) is in the electrochemical stability window of standard electrolytes and it shows a very small volume change during lithiation. These characteristics make the LNMO-LTO system attractive for a variety of applications (e.g. electric vehicles) but also make it a good model system for studying aging in high voltage spinel-based full cells.

    In this study, we aim to understand the fundamental mechanisms resulting in capacity fading for LNMO-LTO full cells both at room temperature and elevated temperature (55°C). It is known that electrode interactions occur in this system due to migration of reaction products from LNMO to the LTO side3, 4. For this purpose, three electrode cells have been cycled galvanostatically with short-duration intermittent current interruptionsin order to observe internal resistance for both LNMO and LTO electrodes in a full cell, separately. Change of voltage curves over cycling has also been observed to get an insight into capacity loss. For comparison purposes, back-to-back cells (a combination of LNMO and LTO cells connected electrically by lithium sides) were also tested similarly. Post-cycling of harvested electrodes in half cells was conducted to determine the degree of capacity loss due to charge slippage compared to other aging factors. Surface characterization of LNMO as well as LTO electrodes after cycling at room temperature and elevated temperature has been done via SEM, XPS, HAXPES and XANES.

    References

    1. A. Kraytsberg, Y. Ein-Eli, Adv. Energy Mater., vol. 2, pp. 922–939, 2012.

    2. Aurbach, D., Zinigrad, E., Cohen, Y., & Teller, H. Solid State Ionics, 148(3), 405-416, 2002.

    3. Li et al., Journal of The Electrochemical Society, 160 (9) A1524-A1528, 2013.

    4. Aktekin et al., Journal of The Electrochemical Society 164.4: A942-A948. 2017.

    5. Lacey, M. J., ChemElectroChem. Accepted Author Manuscript. doi:10.1002/celc.201700129, 2017. 

  • 6.
    Aktekin, Burak
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Valvo, Mario
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Smith, Ronald I.
    Rutherford Appleton Lab, ISIS Pulsed Neutron & Muon Source, Harwell Campus, Didcot OX11 0QX, Oxon, England.
    Sörby, Magnus H.
    Inst Energy Technol, Dept Neutron Mat Characterizat, POB 40, NO-2027 Kjeller, Norway.
    Marzano, Fernanda Lodi
    Scania CV AB, SE-15187 Sodertalje, Sweden.
    Zipprich, Wolfgang
    Volkswagen AG, D-38436 Wolfsburg, Germany.
    Brandell, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Brant, William
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Cation Ordering and Oxygen Release in LiNi0.5-xMn1.5+xO4-y (LNMO): In Situ Neutron Diffraction and Performance in Li Ion Full Cells2019In: ACS APPLIED ENERGY MATERIALS, ISSN 2574-0962, Vol. 2, no 5, p. 3323-3335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lithium ion cells utilizing LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) as the positive electrode are prone to fast capacity fading, especially when operated in full cells and at elevated temperatures. The crystal structure of LNMO can adopt a P4(3)32 (cation-ordered) or Fd (3) over barm (disordered) arrangement, and the fading rate of cells is usually mitigated when samples possess the latter structure. However, synthesis conditions leading to disordering also lead to oxygen deficiencies and rock-salt impurities and as a result generate Mn3+. In this study, in situ neutron diffraction was performed on disordered and slightly Mn-rich LNMO samples to follow cation ordering-disordering transformations during heating and cooling. The study shows for the first time that there is not a direct connection between oxygen release and cation disordering, as cation disordering is observed to start prior to oxygen release when the samples are heated in a pure oxygen atmosphere. This result demonstrates that it is possible to tune disordering in LNMO without inducing oxygen deficiencies or forming the rock-salt impurity phase. In the second part of the study, electrochemical testing of samples with different degrees of ordering and oxygen content has been performed in LNMO vertical bar vertical bar LTO (Li4Ti5O12) full cells. The disordered sample exhibits better performance, as has been reported in other studies; however, we observe that all cells behave similarly during the initial period of cycling even when discharged at a 10 C rate, while differences arise only after a period of cycling. Additionally, the differences in fading rate were observed to be time-dependent rather than dependent on the number of cycles. This performance degradation is believed to be related to instabilities in LNMO at higher voltages, that is, in its lower lithiation states. Therefore, it is suggested that future studies should target the individual effects of ordering and oxygen content. It is also suggested that more emphasis during electrochemical testing should be placed on the stability of samples in their delithiated state.

  • 7.
    Aktekin, Burak
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Younesi, Reza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Zipprich, Wolfgang
    Volkswagen AG, Wolfsburg, Germany..
    Tengstedt, Carl
    Scania CV AB, Södertalje..
    Brandell, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Edström, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    The Effect of the Fluoroethylene Carbonate Additive in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 - Li4Ti5O12 Lithium-Ion Cells2017In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 164, no 4, p. A942-A948Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of the electrolyte additive fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) for Li-ion batteries has been widely discussed in literature in recent years. Here, the additive is studied for the high-voltage cathode LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) coupled to Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) to specifically study its effect on the cathode side. Electrochemical performance of full cells prepared by using a standard electrolyte (LP40) with different concentrations of FEC (0, 1 and 5 wt%) were compared and the surface of cycled positive electrodes were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that addition of FEC is generally of limited use for this battery system. Addition of 5 wt% FEC results in relatively poor cycling performance, while the cells with 1 wt% FEC showed similar behavior compared to reference cells prepared without FEC. SEM and XPS analysis did not indicate the formation of thick surface layers on the LNMO cathode, however, an increase in layer thickness with increased FEC content in the electrolyte could be observed. XPS analysis on LTO electrodes showed that the electrode interactions between positive and negative electrodes occurred as Mn and Ni were detected on the surface of LTO already after 1 cycle. (C) The Author(s) 2017. Published by ECS. All rights reserved.

  • 8.
    Edström, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Gustafsson, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Aktekin, Burak
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Nordh, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Lacey, Matthew
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Liivat, Anti
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Reach MAX: Reach maximum volymetric capacity for lithium batteries with high voltage cathodes2017Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 8 of 8
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