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  • 1.
    Bhandage, Amol K.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Jin, Zhe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Korol, Sergiy V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology. Uppsala University.
    Shen, Qiujin
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Pei, Yu
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Deng, Qiaolin
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Espes, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Carlsson, Per-Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Transplantation and regenerative medicine.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Birnir, Bryndis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    GABA Regulates Release of Inflammatory Cytokines From Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and CD4+ T Cells and Is Immunosuppressive in Type 1 Diabetes2018In: EBioMedicine, ISSN 0360-0637, E-ISSN 2352-3964, Vol. 30, p. 283-294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an extracellular signaling molecule in the brain and in pancreatic islets. Here, we demonstrate that GABA regulates cytokine secretion from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and CD4+ T cells. In anti-CD3 stimulated PBMCs, GABA (100nM) inhibited release of 47 cytokines in cells from patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D), but only 16 cytokines in cells from nondiabetic (ND) individuals. CD4+ T cells from ND individuals were grouped into responder or non-responder T cells according to effects of GABA (100nM, 500nM) on the cell proliferation. In the responder T cells, GABA decreased proliferation, and inhibited secretion of 37 cytokines in a concentration-dependent manner. In the non-responder T cells, GABA modulated release of 8 cytokines. GABA concentrations in plasma from T1D patients and ND individuals were correlated with 10 cytokines where 7 were increased in plasma of T1D patients. GABA inhibited secretion of 5 of these cytokines from both T1D PBMCs and ND responder T cells. The results identify GABA as a potent regulator of both Th1- and Th2-type cytokine secretion from human PBMCs and CD4+ T cells where GABA generally decreases the secretion.

  • 2.
    Björkesten, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Enroth, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Shen, Qiujin
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Wik, Lotta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hougaard, David
    Statens Serum Inst, Danish Ctr Neonatal Screening, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cohen, Arieh
    Statens Serum Inst, Danish Ctr Neonatal Screening, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Sörensen, Lene
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Ctr Inherited Metab Dis, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Giedraitis, Vilmantas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Ingelsson, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Stability of Proteins in Dried Blood Spot Biobanks.2017In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 1286-1296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important motivation for the construction of biobanks is to discover biomarkers that identify diseases at early, potentially curable stages. This will require biobanks from large numbers of individuals, preferably sampled repeatedly, where the samples are collected and stored under conditions that preserve potential biomarkers. Dried blood samples are attractive for biobanking because of the ease and low cost of collection and storage. Here we have investigated their suitability for protein measurements. 92 proteins with relevance for oncology were analyzed using multiplex proximity extension assays (PEA) in dried blood spots collected on paper and stored for up to 30 years at either +4&deg;C or -24&deg;C.</p> <p>Our main findings were that 1) the act of drying only slightly influenced detection of blood proteins (average correlation of 0.970), and in a reproducible manner (correlation of 0.999), 2) detection of some proteins was not significantly affected by storage over the full range of three decades (34% and 76% of the analyzed proteins at +4&deg;C and -24&deg;C, respectively), while levels of others decreased slowly during storage with half-lives in the range of 10 to 50 years, and 3) detectability of proteins was less affected in dried samples stored at -24&deg;C compared to at +4&deg;C, as the median protein abundance had decreased to 80% and 93% of starting levels after 10 years of storage at +4&deg;C or -24&deg;C, respectively. The results of our study are encouraging as they suggest an inexpensive means to collect large numbers of blood samples, even by the donors themselves, and to transport, and store biobanked samples as spots of whole blood dried on paper. Combined with emerging means to measure hundreds or thousands of protein, such biobanks could prove of great medical value by greatly enhancing discovery as well as routine analysis of blood biomarkers.

  • 3.
    de Oliveira, Felipe Marques Souza
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mereiter, Stefan
    i3S – Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde and IPATIMUP – Institute of Molecular Pathology and Immunology of the University of Porto, Portugal.
    Lönn, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Siart, Benjamin
    Department of Anthropology, University of Vienna, Austria; Department of Behavioral Biology, University of Vienna, Austria .
    Shen, Qiujin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Heldin, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Raykova, Doroteya
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Karlsson, Niclas G.
    Department of Medical Biochemistry and Cell Biology at Institute of Biomedicine, Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Polom, Karol
    Department of Surgical Oncology, Medical University of Gdansk, Poland; General Surgery and Surgical Oncology Department, Università deli Studi di Siena, Italy..
    Roviello, Franco
    General Surgery and Surgical Oncology Department, Università deli Studi di Siena, Italy..
    Reis, Celso A.
    ) i3S – Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde and IPATIMUP – Institute of Molecular Pathology and Immunology of the University of Porto, Portugal; Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas Abel Salazar (ICBAS), University of Porto, Portugal; Faculty of Medicine of the University of Porto, Portugal.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Detection of post-translational modifications using solid-phase proximity ligation assay2018In: New Biotechnology, ISSN 1871-6784, E-ISSN 1876-4347, Vol. 45, p. 51-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) regulate protein activities to help orchestrate and fine-tune cellular processes. Dysregulation of PTMs is often related with disorders and malignancies, and may serve as a precise biomarker of disease. Developing sensitive tools to measure and monitor low-abundant PTMs in tissue lysates or serum will be instrumental for opening up new PTM-based diagnostic avenues. Here, we investigate the use of solid-phase proximity ligation assay (SP-PLA) for detection of different PTMs. The assay depends on the recognition of the target protein molecule and its modification by three affinity binders. Using antibodies and lectins, we applied the method for detection of glycosylated CD44 and E-Cadherin, and phosphorylated p53 and EGFR. The assay was found to have superior dynamic range and limit of detection compared to standard ELISAs. In summary, we have established the use of SP-PLA as an appropriate method for sensitive detection of PTMs in lysates and sera, which may provide a basis for future PTM-based diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers

  • 4.
    Lindblom, Rickard P F
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Thoracic Surgery.
    Shen, Qiujin
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Axén, Sofie
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Thelin, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Thoracic Surgery.
    Protein Profiling in Serum and Cerebrospinal Fluid Following Complex Surgery on the Thoracic Aorta Identifies Biological Markers of Neurologic Injury.2018In: Journal of Cardiovascular Translational Research, ISSN 1937-5387, E-ISSN 1937-5395, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 503-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surgery on the arch or descending aorta is associated with significant risk of neurological complications. As a consequence of intubation and sedation, early neurologic injury may remain unnoticed. Biomarkers to aid in the initial diagnostics could prove of great value as immediate intervention is critical. Twenty-three patients operated in the thoracic aorta with significant risk of perioperative neurological injury were included. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum were obtained preoperatively and in the first and second postoperative days and assessed with a panel of 92 neurological-related proteins. Three patients suffered spinal cord injury (SCI), eight delirium, and nine hallucinations. There were markers in both serum and CSF that differed between the affected and non-affected patients (SCI; IL6, GFAP, CSPG4, delirium; TR4, EZH2, hallucinations; NF1). The study identifies markers in serum and CSF that reflect the occurrence of neurologic insults following aortic surgery, which may aid in the care of these patients.

  • 5.
    Manell, Hannes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Shen, Qiujin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Forslund, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Endocrinology.
    Bergsten, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Endocrinology.
    TNFSF14: a potential contributor to hyperinsulinaemia in childhood obesity2017In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 60, p. S168-S168Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Shen, Qiujin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Björkesten, Johan
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Galli, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Ekman, Daniel
    Olink Biosci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Broberg, John
    Olink Prote, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Nordberg, Niklas
    Olink Prote, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Tillander, Annika
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Tybring, Gunnel
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Strong impact on plasma protein profiles by precentrifugation delay but not by repeated freeze-thaw cycles, as analyzed using multiplex proximity extension assays2018In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN 1434-6621, E-ISSN 1437-4331, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 582-594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A number of factors regarding blood collection, handling and storage may affect sample quality. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact on plasma protein profiles by delayed centrifugation and plasma separation and multiple freeze-thaw cycles.

    Methods: Blood samples drawn from 16 healthy individuals were collected into ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid tubes and kept either at 4 degrees C or 22 degrees C for 1-36 h prior to centrifugation. Plasma samples prepared 1 h after venipuncture were also subjected to two to eight cycles of freezing at -80 degrees C and thawing at 22 degrees C. Multiplex proximity extension assay, an antibody-based protein assay, was used to investigate the influence on plasma proteins.

    Results: Up to 36 h delay before blood centrifugation resulted in significant increases of 16 and 40 out of 139 detectable proteins in samples kept at 4 degrees C or 22 degrees C, respectively. Some increases became noticeable after 8 h delay at 4 degrees C but already after 1 h at 22 degrees C. For samples stored at 4 degrees C, epidermal growth factor (EGF), NF-kappa-B essential modulator, SRC, interleukin 16 and CD6 increased the most, whereas the five most significantly increased proteins after storage at 22 degrees C were CD40 antigen ligand (CD40-L), EGF, platelet-derived growth factor subunit B, C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 5 and matrix metallopeptidase 1 (MMP1). Only matrix metallopeptidase 7 (MMP7) decreased significantly over time and only after storage at 22 degrees C. No protein levels were found to be significantly affected by up to eight freeze-thaw cycles.

    Conclusions: Plasma should be prepared from blood after a limited precentrifugation delay at a refrigerated temperature. By contrast, the influence by several freeze-thaw cycles on detectable protein levels in plasma was negligible.

  • 7.
    Siart, Benjamin
    et al.
    Univ Vienna, Dept Anthropol, Althanstr 14, A-1090 Vienna, Austria;Univ Vienna, Dept Behav Biol, Althanstr 14, A-1090 Vienna, Austria.
    de Oliveira, Felipe Marques Souza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Shen, Qiujin
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Björkesten, Johan
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Pekar, Thomas
    Univ Appl Sci Wiener Neustadt, Dept Biomed Sci, Johannes Gutenbergstr 3, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt, Austria.
    Steinborn, Ralf
    Univ Vet Med, VetCore, Genom Core Facil, Vet Pl 1, A-1210 Vienna, Austria.
    Nimmerichter, Alfred
    Univ Appl Sci Wiener Neustadt, Fac Training & Sports Sci, Johannes Gutenbergstr 3, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt, Austria.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wallner, Bernard
    Univ Vienna, Dept Behav Biol, Althanstr 14, A-1090 Vienna, Austria.
    Protein measurements in venous plasma, earlobe capillary plasma and in plasma stored on filter paper2019In: Analytical Biochemistry, ISSN 0003-2697, E-ISSN 1096-0309, Vol. 566, p. 146-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, levels of inflammatory protein biomarkers in venous plasma, plasma derived from capillary blood from the earlobe, and capillary plasma stored as dried plasma spots (DPS) were compared. Samples from 12 male individuals were assessed with a panel of 92 inflammation-related proteins using multiplex proximity extension assay. Correlations between sample types varied greatly between analytes. A high correlation of rho > 0.8 was observed between capillary plasma and DPS for 32 analytes. At this level of correlation, 13 analytes correlated between venous and capillary plasma and 5 analytes in the comparison of venous blood with DPS.

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