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  • 1. Adams, Charleen
    et al.
    Richmond, Rebecca C
    Santos Ferreira, Diana L
    Spiller, Wes
    Tan, Vanessa Y
    Zheng, Jie
    Wurtz, Peter
    Donovan, Jenny L
    Hamdy, Freddie C
    Neal, David E
    Lane, J Athene
    Davey Smith, George
    Relton, Caroline L
    Eeles, Rosalind A
    Henderson, Brian E
    Haiman, Christopher A
    Kote-Jarai, Zsofia
    Schumacher, Fredrick R
    Amin Al Olama, Ali
    Benlloch, Sara
    Muir, Kenneth
    Berndt, Sonja I
    Conti, David V
    Wiklund, Fredrik
    Chanock, Stephen J
    Gapstur, Susan M
    Stevens, Victoria L
    Tangen, Catherine M
    Batra, Jyotsna
    Clements, Judith A
    Grönberg, Henrik
    Pashayan, Nora
    Schleutker, Johanna
    Albanes, Demetrius
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    West, Catharine M L
    Mucci, Lorelei A
    Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine
    Koutros, Stella
    Sørensen, Karina D
    Maehle, Lovise
    Travis, Ruth C
    Hamilton, Robert
    Ingles, Sue Ann
    Rosenstein, Barry S
    Lu, Yong-Jie
    Giles, Graham G
    Kibel, Adam S
    Vega, Ana
    Kogevinas, Manolis
    Penney, Kathryn L
    Park, Jong Y
    Stanford, Janet L
    Cybulski, Cezary
    Nordestgaard, Borge G
    Brenner, Hermann
    Maier, Christiane
    Kim, Jeri
    John, Esther M
    Teixeira, Manuel R
    Neuhausen, Susan L
    DeRuyck, Kim
    Razack, Azad
    Newcomb, Lisa F
    Lessel, Davor
    Kaneva, Radka P
    Usmani, Nawaid
    Claessens, Frank
    Townsend, Paul
    Gago Dominguez, Manuela
    Roobol, Monique J
    Menegaux, Florence
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Cannon-Albright, Lisa A
    Pandha, Hardev
    Thibodeau, Stephen N
    Martin, Richard M
    Circulating Metabolic Biomarkers of Screen-Detected Prostate Cancer in the ProtecT Study.2018In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, article id cebp.0079.2018Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Whether associations between circulating metabolites and prostate cancer are causal is unknown. We report on the largest study of metabolites and prostate cancer (2,291 cases and 2,661 controls) and appraise causality for a subset of the prostate cancer-metabolite associations using two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR).

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: The case-control portion of the study was conducted in nine UK centres with men aged 50-69 years who underwent prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening for prostate cancer within the Prostate testing for cancer and Treatment (ProtecT) trial. Two data sources were used to appraise causality: a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of metabolites in 24,925 participants and a GWAS of prostate cancer in 44,825 cases and 27,904 controls within the Association Group to Investigate Cancer Associated Alterations in the Genome (PRACTICAL) consortium.

    RESULTS: Thirty-five metabolites were strongly associated with prostate cancer (p <0.0014, multiple-testing threshold). These fell into four classes: i) lipids and lipoprotein subclass characteristics (total cholesterol and ratios, cholesterol esters and ratios, free cholesterol and ratios, phospholipids and ratios, and triglyceride ratios); ii) fatty acids and ratios; iii) amino acids; iv) and fluid balance. Fourteen top metabolites were proxied by genetic variables, but MR indicated these were not causal.

    CONCLUSIONS: We identified 35 circulating metabolites associated with prostate cancer presence, but found no evidence of causality for those 14 testable with MR. Thus, the 14 MR-tested metabolites are unlikely to be mechanistically important in prostate cancer risk.

    IMPACT: The metabolome provides a promising set of biomarkers that may aid prostate cancer classification.

  • 2. Bellavia, Andrea
    et al.
    Tektonidis, Thanasis G
    Orsini, Nicola
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Quantifying the benefits of Mediterranean diet in terms of survival.2016In: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 527-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Beneficial effects of Mediterranean diet (MD) have been consistently documented. However, to fully understand the public health implications of MD adherence, an informative step is to quantify these effects in terms of survival time differences. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of MD on survival, presenting results in terms of differences in median age at death. We used data from 71,333 participants from a large population-based cohort of Swedish men and women, followed-up between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2012. A total score of MD, ranging from 0 to 8, was calculated by including information on vegetables and fruits consumption, legumes and nuts, non-refined/high fiber grains, fermented dairy products, fish, red meat, use of olive oil/rapeseed oil, and moderate alcohol intake. Multivariable-adjusted differences in median age at death were estimated with Laplace regression and presented as a function of the MD score. During 15 years of follow-up we documented 14,697 deaths. We observed a linear dose-response association between the MD score and median age at death, with higher score associated with longer survival. The difference in median age at death between participants with the extreme scores (0 vs 8) of MD was up to 2 years (23 months, 95 % CI: 16-29). In this study we documented that adherence to MD may accrue benefits up to 2 years of longer survival.

  • 3.
    Benetou, V.
    et al.
    Univ Athens, WHO Collaborating Ctr Nutr & Hlth, Unit Nutr Epidemiol & Nutr Publ Hlth, Dept Hyg Epidemiol & Med Stat,Sch Med, 75 Mikras Asias St, Athens 11527, Greece.
    Orfanos, P.
    Hellen Hlth Fdn, Athens, Greece;Univ Athens, WHO Collaborating Ctr Nutr & Hlth, Unit Nutr Epidemiol & Nutr Publ Hlth, Dept Hyg Epidemiol & Med Stat,Sch Med, 75 Mikras Asias St, Athens 11527, Greece.
    Feskanich, D.
    Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA;Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Channing Div Network Med, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Pettersson-Kymmer, U.
    Umea Univ, Dept Pharmacol & Clin Neurosci, Umea, Sweden;Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden.
    Byberg, Liisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Eriksson, S.
    Umea Univ, Dept Community Med, Umea, Sweden.
    Grodstein, F.
    Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA;Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Channing Div Network Med, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Div Nutr Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jankovic, N.
    Wageningen Univ, Div Human Nutr, Wageningen, Netherlands;Univ Duisburg Essen, Inst Med Informat Biometry & Epidemiol, Ctr Clin Epidemiol, Fac Med, Essen, Germany.
    de Groot, L. C. P. G. M.
    Wageningen Univ, Div Human Nutr, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Boffetta, P.
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Inst Translat Epidemiol, New York, NY 10029 USA;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Tisch Canc Inst, New York, NY 10029 USA.
    Trichopoulou, A.
    Hellen Hlth Fdn, Athens, Greece.
    Mediterranean diet and hip fracture incidence among older adults: the CHANCES project2018In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 29, no 7, p. 1591-1599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The association between adherence to Mediterranean diet (MD) and hip fracture incidence is not yet established. In a diverse population of elderly, increased adherence to MD was associated with lower hip fracture incidence. Except preventing major chronic diseases, adhering to MD might have additional benefits in lowering hip fracture risk. Hip fractures constitute a major public health problem among older adults. Latest evidence links adherence to Mediterranean diet (MD) with reduced hip fracture risk, but still more research is needed to elucidate this relationship. The potential association of adherence to MD with hip fracture incidence was explored among older adults. A total of 140,775 adults (116,176 women, 24,599 men) 60 years and older, from five cohorts from Europe and the USA, were followed-up for 1,896,219 person-years experiencing 5454 hip fractures. Diet was assessed at baseline by validated, cohort-specific, food-frequency questionnaires, and hip fractures were ascertained through patient registers or telephone interviews/questionnaires. Adherence to MD was evaluated by a scoring system on a 10-point scale modified to be applied also to non-Mediterranean populations. In order to evaluate the association between MD and hip fracture incidence, cohort-specific hazard ratios (HR), adjusted for potential confounders, were estimated using Cox proportional-hazards regression and pooled estimates were subsequently derived implementing random-effects meta-analysis. A two-point increase in the score was associated with a significant 4% decrease in hip fracture risk (pooled adjusted HR 0.96; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.92-0.99, p(heterogeneity) = 0.446). In categorical analyses, hip fracture risk was lower among men and women with moderate (HR 0.93; 95% CI 0.87-0.99) and high (HR 0.94; 95% CI 0.87-1.01) adherence to the score compared with those with low adherence. In this large sample of older adults from Europe and the USA, increased adherence to MD was associated with lower hip fracture incidence.

  • 4.
    Bien, Stephanie A.
    et al.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Su, Yu-Ru
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Conti, David V.
    Univ Southern Calif, USC Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA 90089 USA;Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Harrison, Tabitha A.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Qu, Conghui
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Guo, Xingyi
    Vanderbilt Univ, Sch Med, Div Epidemiol, Nashville, TN 37232 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Lu, Yingchang
    Vanderbilt Univ, Sch Med, Div Epidemiol, Nashville, TN 37232 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Albanes, Demetrius
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Auer, Paul L.
    Univ Wisconsin, Joseph J Zilber Sch Publ Hlth, Milwaukee, WI 53205 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Banbury, Barbara L.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Berndt, Sonja I.
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Bezieau, Stephane
    CHU Hotel Dieu, F-44093 Nantes, France;CHU Nantes, Serv Genet Med, F-44093 Nantes, France;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Brenner, Hermann
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, Div Prevent Oncol, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;Natl Ctr Tumor Dis NCT, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;German Canc Consortium DKTK, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Buchanan, Daniel D.
    Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Parkville, Vic 3010, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Dept Pathol, Colorectal Oncogen Grp, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia;Royal Melbourne Hosp, Genet Med & Familial Canc Ctr, Parkville, Vic 3010, Australia;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Caan, Bette J.
    Kaiser Permanente Med Care Program Northern Calif, Div Res, Oakland, CA 94612 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Campbell, Peter T.
    Amer Canc Soc, Epidemiol Res Program, Atlanta, GA 30329 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Carlson, Christopher S.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Chan, Andrew T.
    Harvard Med Sch, Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Div Gastroenterol, Boston, MA 02114 USA;Brigham & Womens Hosp, Channing Div Network Med, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Unit Genet Epidemiol, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;Univ Canc Ctr Hamburg, Univ Med Ctr Hamburg, Genet Tumour Epidemiol Grp, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Chen, Sai
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Connolly, Charles M.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Easton, Douglas F.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth, Cambridge, England;Univ Cambridge, Primary Care Sch Clin Med, Cambridge, England;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Feskens, Edith J. M.
    Wageningen Univ & Res, Div Human Nutr, Wageningen, Netherlands;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Gallinger, Steven
    Univ Toronto, Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Res Inst, Mt Sinai Hosp, Toronto, ON ON 1X5, Canada;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Giles, Graham G.
    Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Parkville, Vic 3010, Australia;Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol & Intelligence Div, Melbourne, Vic 3004, Australia;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Aarhus Univ, Sect Epidemiol, Dept Publ Hlth, Aarhus, Denmark;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Hampe, Jochen
    Univ Hosp Dresden, Med Dept 1, TU Dresden, D-01307 Dresden, Germany;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Huyghe, Jeroen R.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Hoffmeister, Michael
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Hudson, Thomas J.
    Ontario Inst Canc Res, Toronto, ON, Canada;AbbVie Inc, 1500 Seaport Blvd, Redwood City, CA 94063 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Jacobs, Eric J.
    Amer Canc Soc, Epidemiol Res Program, Atlanta, GA 30329 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Jenkins, Mark A.
    Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Parkville, Vic 3010, Australia;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Kampman, Ellen
    Wageningen Univ & Res, Div Human Nutr, Wageningen, Netherlands;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Kang, Hyun Min
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Kuehn, Tilman
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Heidelberg, Germany;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Kury, Sebastien
    CHU Hotel Dieu, F-44093 Nantes, France;CHU Nantes, Serv Genet Med, F-44093 Nantes, France;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Lejbkowicz, Flavio
    Natl Israeli Canc Control Ctr, Clalit Hlth Serv, IL-34361 Haifa, Israel;Carmel Hosp, Dept Community Med & Epidemiol, IL-34361 Haifa, Israel;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Le Marchand, Loic
    Univ Hawaii, Canc Ctr, Honolulu, HI 96813 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Milne, Roger L.
    Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Parkville, Vic 3010, Australia;Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol & Intelligence Div, Melbourne, Vic 3004, Australia;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Li, Li
    Case Western Reserve Univ, Dept Family Med & Community Hlth, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Li, Christopher I.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Lindblom, Annika
    Karolinska Univ, Hosp Solna, Dept Clin Genet, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst Solna, Dept Mol Med & Surg, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Lindor, Noralane M.
    Mayo Clin Arizona, Dept Hlth Sci Res, Scottsdale, AZ 85259 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Martin, Vicente
    Univ Leon, Biomed Inst IBIOMED, Leon, Spain;CIBER Epidemiol & Salud Publ CIBERESP, Madrid 28029, Spain;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    McNeil, Caroline E.
    Univ Southern Calif, USC Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA 90089 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Melas, Marilena
    Univ Southern Calif, USC Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA 90089 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Moreno, Victor
    CIBER Epidemiol & Salud Publ CIBERESP, Madrid 28029, Spain;Bellvitge Biomed Res Inst IDIBELL, Catalan Inst Oncol, Barcelona 08028, Spain;Univ Barcelona, E-08007 Barcelona, Spain;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Newcomb, Polly A.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Offit, Kenneth
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Clin Genet Serv, Dept Med, New York, NY 10065 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Pharaoh, Paul D. P.
    Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge CB2 1TN, England;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Potter, John D.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Qu, Chenxu
    Univ Southern Calif, USC Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA 90089 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Riboli, Elio
    Imperial Coll London, Sch Publ Hlth, London, England;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Rennert, Gad
    Natl Israeli Canc Control Ctr, Clalit Hlth Serv, IL-34361 Haifa, Israel;Carmel Hosp, Dept Community Med & Epidemiol, IL-34361 Haifa, Israel;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Sala, Nuria
    Catalan Inst Oncol IDIBELL, Canc Epidemiol Res Program, Unit Nutr & Canc, Barcelona 08908, Spain;Catalan Inst Oncol IDIBELL, Mol Epidemiol Grp, Translat Res Lab, Barcelona 08908, Spain;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Schafmayer, Clemens
    Univ Hosp Schleswig Holstein, Dept Gen & Thorac Surg, Campus Kiel, D-24118 Kiel, Germany;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Scacheri, Peter C.
    Case Western Reserve Univ, Dept Genet & Genome Sci, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Schmit, Stephanie L.
    H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst Inc, Dept Canc Epidemiol, Tampa, FL 33612 USA;H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst Inc, Dept Gastrointestinal Oncol, Tampa, FL 33612 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Severi, Gianluca
    Inst Cancerol Gustave Roussy, Ctr Res Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, Villejuif, France;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Slattery, Martha L.
    Univ Utah, Dept Internal Med, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Smith, Joshua D.
    Univ Washington, Dept Genome Sci, Seattle, WA 98195 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Hellen Hlth Fdn, 13 Kaisareias & Alexandroupoleos, Athens 11527, Greece;Univ Athens, WHO Collaborating Ctr Nutr & Hlth, Unit Nutrit Epidemiol & Nutr Publ Hlth, Dept Hyg Epidemiol & Med Stat,Med Sch, Mikras Asias 11527, Greece;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Tumino, Rosario
    Azienda Sanit Prov Ragusa, Dept Prevent, Affiliat Canc Registry, Ragusa, Italy;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Ulrich, Cornelia M.
    Huntsman Canc Inst, Populat Sci, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    van Duijnhoven, Franzel J. B.
    Wageningen Univ & Res, Div Human Nutr, Wageningen, Netherlands;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, Umea, Sweden;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Weinstein, Stephanie J.
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    White, Emily
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst Solna, Inst Environm Med, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Woods, Michael O.
    Mem Univ Newfoundland, Fac Med, Discipline Genet, St John, NF A1B 3V6, Canada;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Wu, Anna H.
    Univ Southern Calif, USC Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA 90089 USA;Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Abecasis, Goncalo R.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Casey, Graham
    Inst Cancerol Gustave Roussy, Ctr Res Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, Villejuif, France;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Nickerson, Deborah A.
    Univ Washington, Dept Genome Sci, Seattle, WA 98195 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Gruber, Stephen B.
    Univ Southern Calif, USC Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA 90089 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Hsu, Li
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Zheng, Wei
    Vanderbilt Univ, Sch Med, Div Epidemiol, Nashville, TN 37232 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA;Vanderbilt Univ, Vanderbilt Ingram Canc Ctr, Nashville, TN 37232 USA.
    Peters, Ulrike
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA;Univ Virginia, Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.
    Genetic variant predictors of gene expression provide new insight into risk of colorectal cancer2019In: Human Genetics, ISSN 0340-6717, E-ISSN 1432-1203, Vol. 138, no 4, p. 307-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genome-wide association studies have reported 56 independently associated colorectal cancer (CRC) risk variants, most of which are non-coding and believed to exert their effects by modulating gene expression. The computational method PrediXcan uses cis-regulatory variant predictors to impute expression and perform gene-level association tests in GWAS without directly measured transcriptomes. In this study, we used reference datasets from colon (n=169) and whole blood (n=922) transcriptomes to test CRC association with genetically determined expression levels in a genome-wide analysis of 12,186 cases and 14,718 controls. Three novel associations were discovered from colon transverse models at FDR0.2 and further evaluated in an independent replication including 32,825 cases and 39,933 controls. After adjusting for multiple comparisons, we found statistically significant associations using colon transcriptome models with TRIM4 (discovery P=2.2x10(-4), replication P=0.01), and PYGL (discovery P=2.3x10(-4), replication P=6.7x10(-4)). Interestingly, both genes encode proteins that influence redox homeostasis and are related to cellular metabolic reprogramming in tumors, implicating a novel CRC pathway linked to cell growth and proliferation. Defining CRC risk regions as one megabase up- and downstream of one of the 56 independent risk variants, we defined 44 non-overlapping CRC-risk regions. Among these risk regions, we identified genes associated with CRC (P<0.05) in 34/44 CRC-risk regions. Importantly, CRC association was found for two genes in the previously reported 2q25 locus, CXCR1 and CXCR2, which are potential cancer therapeutic targets. These findings provide strong candidate genes to prioritize for subsequent laboratory follow-up of GWAS loci. This study is the first to implement PrediXcan in a large colorectal cancer study and findings highlight the utility of integrating transcriptome data in GWAS for discovery of, and biological insight into, risk loci.

  • 5. Crippa, Alessio
    et al.
    Larsson, Susanna C
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Discacciati, Andrea
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Orsini, Nicola
    Red and processed meat consumption and risk of bladder cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis of epidemiological studies.2018In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 689-701Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Several epidemiological studies have analyzed the associations between red and processed meat and bladder cancer risk but the shape and strength of the associations are still unclear. Therefore, we conducted a dose-response meta-analysis to quantify the potential association between red and processed meat and bladder cancer risk.

    METHODS: Relevant studies were identified by searching the PubMed database through January 2016 and reviewing the reference lists of the retrieved articles. Results were combined using random-effects models.

    RESULTS: Five cohort studies with 3262 cases and 1,038,787 participants and 8 cases-control studies with 7009 cases and 27,240 participants met the inclusion criteria. Red meat was linearly associated with bladder cancer risk in case-control studies, with a pooled RR of 1.51 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13, 2.02) for every 100 g increase per day, while no association was observed among cohort studies (P heterogeneity across study design = 0.02). Based on both case-control and cohort studies, the pooled relative risk (RR) for every 50 g increase of processed meat per day was 1.20 (95% CI 1.06, 1.37) (P heterogeneity across study design = 0.22).

    CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis suggests that processed meat may be positively associated with bladder cancer risk. A positive association between red meat and risk of bladder cancer was observed only in case-control studies, while no association was observe in prospective studies.

  • 6. Dadaev, Tokhir
    et al.
    Saunders, Edward J
    Newcombe, Paul J
    Anokian, Ezequiel
    Leongamornlert, Daniel A
    Brook, Mark N
    Cieza-Borrella, Clara
    Mijuskovic, Martina
    Wakerell, Sarah
    Olama, Ali Amin Al
    Schumacher, Fredrick R
    Berndt, Sonja I
    Benlloch, Sara
    Ahmed, Mahbubl
    Goh, Chee
    Sheng, Xin
    Zhang, Zhuo
    Muir, Kenneth
    Govindasami, Koveela
    Lophatananon, Artitaya
    Stevens, Victoria L
    Gapstur, Susan M
    Carter, Brian D
    Tangen, Catherine M
    Goodman, Phyllis
    Thompson, Ian M
    Batra, Jyotsna
    Chambers, Suzanne
    Moya, Leire
    Clements, Judith
    Horvath, Lisa
    Tilley, Wayne
    Risbridger, Gail
    Gronberg, Henrik
    Aly, Markus
    Nordström, Tobias
    Pharoah, Paul
    Pashayan, Nora
    Schleutker, Johanna
    Tammela, Teuvo L J
    Sipeky, Csilla
    Auvinen, Anssi
    Albanes, Demetrius
    Weinstein, Stephanie
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Hakansson, Niclas
    West, Catharine
    Dunning, Alison M
    Burnet, Neil
    Mucci, Lorelei
    Giovannucci, Edward
    Andriole, Gerald
    Cussenot, Olivier
    Cancel-Tassin, Géraldine
    Koutros, Stella
    Freeman, Laura E Beane
    Sorensen, Karina Dalsgaard
    Orntoft, Torben Falck
    Borre, Michael
    Maehle, Lovise
    Grindedal, Eli Marie
    Neal, David E
    Donovan, Jenny L
    Hamdy, Freddie C
    Martin, Richard M
    Travis, Ruth C
    Key, Tim J
    Hamilton, Robert J
    Fleshner, Neil E
    Finelli, Antonio
    Ingles, Sue Ann
    Stern, Mariana C
    Rosenstein, Barry
    Kerns, Sarah
    Ostrer, Harry
    Lu, Yong-Jie
    Zhang, Hong-Wei
    Feng, Ninghan
    Mao, Xueying
    Guo, Xin
    Wang, Guomin
    Sun, Zan
    Giles, Graham G
    Southey, Melissa C
    MacInnis, Robert J
    FitzGerald, Liesel M
    Kibel, Adam S
    Drake, Bettina F
    Vega, Ana
    Gómez-Caamaño, Antonio
    Fachal, Laura
    Szulkin, Robert
    Eklund, Martin
    Kogevinas, Manolis
    Llorca, Javier
    Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma
    Penney, Kathryn L
    Stampfer, Meir
    Park, Jong Y
    Sellers, Thomas A
    Lin, Hui-Yi
    Stanford, Janet L
    Cybulski, Cezary
    Wokolorczyk, Dominika
    Lubinski, Jan
    Ostrander, Elaine A
    Geybels, Milan S
    Nordestgaard, Børge G
    Nielsen, Sune F
    Weisher, Maren
    Bisbjerg, Rasmus
    Røder, Martin Andreas
    Iversen, Peter
    Brenner, Hermann
    Cuk, Katarina
    Holleczek, Bernd
    Maier, Christiane
    Luedeke, Manuel
    Schnoeller, Thomas
    Kim, Jeri
    Logothetis, Christopher J
    John, Esther M
    Teixeira, Manuel R
    Paulo, Paula
    Cardoso, Marta
    Neuhausen, Susan L
    Steele, Linda
    Ding, Yuan Chun
    De Ruyck, Kim
    De Meerleer, Gert
    Ost, Piet
    Razack, Azad
    Lim, Jasmine
    Teo, Soo-Hwang
    Lin, Daniel W
    Newcomb, Lisa F
    Lessel, Davor
    Gamulin, Marija
    Kulis, Tomislav
    Kaneva, Radka
    Usmani, Nawaid
    Slavov, Chavdar
    Mitev, Vanio
    Parliament, Matthew
    Singhal, Sandeep
    Claessens, Frank
    Joniau, Steven
    Van den Broeck, Thomas
    Larkin, Samantha
    Townsend, Paul A
    Aukim-Hastie, Claire
    Gago-Dominguez, Manuela
    Castelao, Jose Esteban
    Martinez, Maria Elena
    Roobol, Monique J
    Jenster, Guido
    van Schaik, Ron H N
    Menegaux, Florence
    Truong, Thérèse
    Koudou, Yves Akoli
    Xu, Jianfeng
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Cannon-Albright, Lisa
    Pandha, Hardev
    Michael, Agnieszka
    Kierzek, Andrzej
    Thibodeau, Stephen N
    McDonnell, Shannon K
    Schaid, Daniel J
    Lindstrom, Sara
    Turman, Constance
    Ma, Jing
    Hunter, David J
    Riboli, Elio
    Siddiq, Afshan
    Canzian, Federico
    Kolonel, Laurence N
    Le Marchand, Loic
    Hoover, Robert N
    Machiela, Mitchell J
    Kraft, Peter
    Freedman, Matthew
    Wiklund, Fredrik
    Chanock, Stephen
    Henderson, Brian E
    Easton, Douglas F
    Haiman, Christopher A
    Eeles, Rosalind A
    Conti, David V
    Kote-Jarai, Zsofia
    Fine-mapping of prostate cancer susceptibility loci in a large meta-analysis identifies candidate causal variants.2018In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 2256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prostate cancer is a polygenic disease with a large heritable component. A number of common, low-penetrance prostate cancer risk loci have been identified through GWAS. Here we apply the Bayesian multivariate variable selection algorithm JAM to fine-map 84 prostate cancer susceptibility loci, using summary data from a large European ancestry meta-analysis. We observe evidence for multiple independent signals at 12 regions and 99 risk signals overall. Only 15 original GWAS tag SNPs remain among the catalogue of candidate variants identified; the remainder are replaced by more likely candidates. Biological annotation of our credible set of variants indicates significant enrichment within promoter and enhancer elements, and transcription factor-binding sites, including AR, ERG and FOXA1. In 40 regions at least one variant is colocalised with an eQTL in prostate cancer tissue. The refined set of candidate variants substantially increase the proportion of familial relative risk explained by these known susceptibility regions, which highlights the importance of fine-mapping studies and has implications for clinical risk profiling.

  • 7. Drca, Nikola
    et al.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Jensen-Urstad, Mats
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Physical activity is associated with a reduced risk of atrial fibrillation in middle-aged and elderly women2015In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 101, no 20, p. 1627-1630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have found that regular participation in intense physical activity increases the risk of developing atrial fibrillation (AF) in men, but it remains unclear how physical activity influences the risk of AF in women. We aimed to examine whether physical activity of different types and at different ages influences the development of AF in women.

    METHODS: In the population-based Swedish Mammography Cohort, information about physical activity was obtained from 36 513 AF-free women (49-83 years old, median age 60 years) who had completed a questionnaire at study entry (1997). Participants reported their time spent on leisure-time exercise and on walking or bicycling throughout their lifetime (at study entry, and at 30 and 50 years of age). We used the Swedish National Inpatient Register (IPR) to determine whether the participants were diagnosed with AF. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate relative risks (RR) with 95% CI, adjusted for potential confounders.

    RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 12 years (10th percentile 7.5 years, 90th percentile 12.0 years), 2915 cases of AF were diagnosed. The risk of AF decreased with increasing levels of leisure-time exercise at study entry (RR 0.85, 95% CI 0.75 to 0.95 for ≥4 h/week vs <1 h/week) and walking/bicycling (RR 0.81, 95% CI 0.72 to 0.92, for ≥40 min/day vs almost never).

    CONCLUSIONS: Physical activity is associated with a reduced risk of AF in women. Moderate amount of physical activity was sufficient to significantly reduce AF risk.

  • 8.
    Dörk, Thilo
    et al.
    Hannover Med Sch, Gynaecol Res Unit, Hannover, Germany.
    Peterlongo, Paolo
    IFOM FIRC Inst Mol Oncol, Genome Diagnost Program, Milan, Italy.
    Mannermaa, Arto
    Univ Eastern Finland, Translat Canc Res Area, Kuopio, Finland;Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Clin Med Pathol & Forens Med, Kuopio, Finland;Kuopio Univ Hosp, Imaging Ctr, Dept Clin Pathol, Kuopio, Finland.
    Bolla, Manjeet K.
    Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England.
    Wang, Qin
    Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England.
    Dennis, Joe
    Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England.
    Ahearn, Thomas
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Dept Hlth & Human Serv, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Andrulis, Irene L.
    Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Res Inst Mt Sinai Hosp, Fred A Litwin Ctr Canc Genet, Toronto, ON, Canada;Univ Toronto, Dept Mol Genet, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Anton-Culver, Hoda
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Epidemiol, Genet Epidemiol Res Inst, Irvine, CA USA.
    Arndt, Volker
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, C070, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Aronson, Kristan J.
    Queens Univ, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Kingston, ON, Canada;Queens Univ, Canc Res Inst, Kingston, ON, Canada.
    Augustinsson, Annelie
    Lund Univ, Dept Canc Epidemiol, Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden.
    Freeman, Laura E. Beane
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Dept Hlth & Human Serv, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Beckmann, Matthias W.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nuremberg, Univ Hosp Erlangen, Comprehens Canc Ctr ER EMN, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, Erlangen, Germany.
    Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia
    Vanderbilt Univ, Sch Med, Vanderbilt Ingram Canc Ctr, Div Epidemiol,Dept Med,Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr, Nashville, TN 37212 USA.
    Behrens, Sabine
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Bermisheva, Marina
    Russian Acad Sci, Ufa Fed Res Ctr, Inst Biochem & Genet, Ufa, Russia.
    Blomqvist, Carl
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Helsinki, Finland;Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Orebro, Sweden.
    Bogdanova, Natalia, V
    Hannover Med Sch, Gynaecol Res Unit, Hannover, Germany;Hannover Med Sch, Dept Radiat Oncol, Hannover, Germany;NN Alexandrov Res Inst Oncol & Med Radiol, Minsk, BELARUS.
    Bojesen, Stig E.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Copenhagen Gen Populat Study, Herlev, Denmark;Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Dept Clin Biochem, Herlev, Denmark;Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Brauch, Hiltrud
    Dr Margarete Fischer Bosch Inst Clin Pharmacol, Stuttgart, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, German Canc Consortium DKTK, Heidelberg, Germany;Univ Tubingen, iFIT Cluster Excellence, Tubingen, Germany.
    Brenner, Hermann
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, C070, Heidelberg, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, German Canc Consortium DKTK, Heidelberg, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, Div Prevent Oncol, Heidelberg, Germany;Natl Ctr Tumor Dis NCT, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Burwinkel, Barbara
    German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Epidemiol Grp, C080, Heidelberg, Germany;Heidelberg Univ, Univ Womens Clin Heidelberg, Mol Biol Breast Canc, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Canzian, Federico
    German Canc Res Ctr, Genom Epidemiol Grp, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Chan, Tsun L.
    Canc Genet Ctr, Hong Kong Hereditary Breast Canc Family Registry, Happy Valley, Hong Kong, Peoples R China;Hong Kong Sanat & Hosp, Dept Pathol, Happy Valley, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Heidelberg, Germany;Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, UCCH, Canc Epidemiol Grp, Hamburg, Germany.
    Chanock, Stephen J.
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Dept Hlth & Human Serv, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Choi, Ji-Yeob
    Seoul Natl Univ, Dept Biomed Sci, Grad Sch, Seoul, South Korea;Seoul Natl Univ, Canc Res Inst, Seoul, South Korea.
    Christiansen, Hans
    Hannover Med Sch, Dept Radiat Oncol, Hannover, Germany.
    Clarke, Christine L.
    Univ Sydney, Westmead Inst Med Res, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Couch, Fergus J.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Lab Med & Pathol, Rochester, MN USA.
    Czene, Kamila
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Daly, Mary B.
    Fox Chase Canc Ctr, Dept Clin Genet, 7701 Burholme Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19111 USA.
    dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Dept Noncommunicable Dis Epidemiol, London, England.
    Dwek, Miriam
    Univ Westminster, Fac Sci & Technol, Dept Biomed Sci, London, England.
    Eccles, Diana M.
    Univ Southampton, Canc SciencesAcad Unit, Fac Med, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Ekici, Arif B.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nuremberg, Univ Hosp Erlangen, Comprehens Canc Ctr Erlangen EMN, Inst Human Genet, Erlangen, Germany.
    Eriksson, Mikael
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Evans, D. Gareth
    Univ Manchester, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Fac Biol, Sch Biol Sci,Div Evolut & Genom Sci, Manchester, Lancs, England;Manchester Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, St Marys Hosp, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Manchester Ctr Genom Med, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Fasching, Peter A.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nuremberg, Univ Hosp Erlangen, Comprehens Canc Ctr ER EMN, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, Erlangen, Germany;Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Med, David Geffen Sch Med, Div Hematol & Oncol, Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA.
    Figueroa, Jonine
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Dept Hlth & Human Serv, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA;Univ Edinburgh, Usher Inst Populat Hlth Sci & Informat, Med Sch, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland;Canc Res UK Edinburgh Ctr, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.
    Flyger, Henrik
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Dept Breast Surg, Herlev, Denmark.
    Fritschisl, Lin
    Curtin Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Gabrielson, Marike
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gago-Dominguez, Manuela
    Complejo Hosp Univ Santiago, SERGAS, Inst Invest Sanitaria Santiago de Compostela IDIS, Genom Med Grp,Galician Fdn Genom Med, Santiago De Compostela, Spain;Univ Calif San Diego, Moores Canc Ctr, La Jolla, CA 92093 USA.
    Gao, Chi
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Program Genet Epidemiol & Stat Genet, Boston, MA USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA.
    Gapstur, Susan M.
    Amer Canc Soc, Behav & Epidemiol Res Grp, Atlanta, GA 30329 USA.
    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Dept Hlth & Human Serv, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA;Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, London, England.
    Garcia-Saenz, Jose A.
    Ctr Invest Biomed Red Canc CIBERONC, Inst Invest Sanitaria San Carlos IdISSC, Hosp Clin San Carlos, Med Oncol Dept, Madrid, Spain.
    Gaudet, Mia M.
    Amer Canc Soc, Behav & Epidemiol Res Grp, Atlanta, GA 30329 USA.
    Giles, Graham G.
    Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol Div, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Monash Univ, Dept Epidemiol & Prevent Med, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Goldberg, Mark S.
    McGill Univ, Dept Med, Montreal, PQ, Canada;McGill Univ, Royal Victoria Hosp, Div Clin Epidemiol, Montreal, PQ, Canada.
    Goldgar, David E.
    Univ Utah, Sch Med, Huntsman Canc Inst, Dept Dermatol, Salt Lake City, UT USA.
    Guenel, Pascal
    Univ Paris Sud, Univ Paris Saclay, INSERM, Canc & Environm Grp,Ctr Res Epidemiol & Populat H, Villejuif, France.
    Haeberle, Lothar
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nuremberg, Comprehens Canc Ctr Erlangen EMN, Univ Hosp Erlangen, Dept Gynaecol & Obstet, Erlangen, Germany.
    Haiman, Christopher A.
    Univ Southern Calif, Dept Prevent Med, Keck Sch Med, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Hakansson, Niclas
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hall, Per
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden;Soder Sjukhuset, Dept Oncol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hamann, Ute
    German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Genet Breast Canc, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Hartman, Mikael
    Natl Univ Singapore, Saw Swee Hock Sch Publ Hlth, Singapore, Singapore;Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Dept Surg, Singapore, Singapore.
    Hauke, Jan
    Univ Cologne, Fac Med, Ctr Familial Breast & Ovarian Canc, Cologne, Germany;Univ Cologne, Univ Hosp Cologne, Cologne, Germany;Univ Cologne, Fac Med, CMMC, Cologne, Germany;Univ Cologne, Fac Med, CIO, Cologne, Germany.
    Hein, Alexander
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nuremberg, Univ Hosp Erlangen, Comprehens Canc Ctr ER EMN, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, Erlangen, Germany.
    Hillemanns, Peter
    Hannover Med Sch, Gynaecol Res Unit, Hannover, Germany.
    Hogervorst, Frans B. L.
    Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Netherlands Canc Inst, Family Canc Clin, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Hooning, Maartje J.
    Erasmus MC Canc Inst, Dept Med Oncol, Family Canc Clin, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Hopper, John L.
    Univ Melbourne, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Howell, Tony
    Univ Manchester, Div Canc Sci, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Huo, Dezheng
    Univ Chicago, Ctr Clin Canc Genet, Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Ito, Hidemi
    Aichi Canc Ctr Res Inst, Div Canc Epidemiol & Prevent, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan;Nagoya Univ, Div Canc Epidemiol, Grad Sch Med, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan.
    Iwasaki, Motoki
    Natl Canc Ctr, Ctr Publ Hlth Sci, Div Epidemiol, Tokyo, Japan.
    Jakubowska, Anna
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Dept Genet & Pathol, Szczecin, Poland;Pomeranian Med Univ, Lab Mol Biol & Genet Diagnost, Szczecin, Poland.
    Janni, Wolfgang
    Univ Hosp Ulm, Dept Gynaecol & Obstet, Ulm, Germany.
    John, Esther M.
    Stanford Univ, Sch Med, Stanford Canc Inst, Div Oncol,Dept Med, Stanford, CA USA.
    Jung, Audrey
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Kang, Daehee
    Seoul Natl Univ, Dept Biomed Sci, Grad Sch, Seoul, South Korea;Seoul Natl Univ, Canc Res Inst, Seoul, South Korea;Seoul Natl Univ, Dept Prevent Med, Coll Med, Seoul, South Korea.
    Kapoor, Pooja Middha
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Heidelberg, Germany;Heidelberg Univ, Fac Med, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Khusnutdinova, Elza
    Russian Acad Sci, Ufa Fed Res Ctr, Inst Biochem & Genet, Ufa, Russia;Bashkir State Univ, Dept Genet & Fundamental Med, Ufa, Russia.
    Kim, Sung-Won
    Daer St Marys Hosp, Dept Surg, Seoul, South Korea.
    Kitahara, Cari M.
    NCI, Radiat Epidemiol Branch, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Koutros, Stella
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Dept Hlth & Human Serv, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Kraft, Peter
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Program Genet Epidemiol & Stat Genet, Boston, MA USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA.
    Kristensen, Vessela N.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Radiumhosp, Inst Canc Res, Dept Canc Genet, Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Kwon, Ava
    Canc Genet Ctr, Hong Kong Hereditary Breast Canc Family Registry, Happy Valley, Hong Kong, Peoples R China;Univ Hong Kong, Dept Surg, Pok Fu Lam, Hong Kong, Peoples R China;Hong Kong Sanat & Hosp, Dept Surg, Happy Valley, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Lambrechts, Diether
    VIB, VIB Ctr Canc Biol, Leuven, Belgium;Univ Leuven, Dept Human Genet, Lab Translat Genet, Leuven, Belgium.
    Le Marchand, Loic
    Univ Hawaii, Epidemiol Program, Canc Ctr, Honolulu, HI 96822 USA.
    Li, Jingmei
    Genome Inst Singapore, Human Genet Div, Singapore, Singapore.
    Lindstrom, Sara
    Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol, Sch Publ Hlth, Seattle, WA 98195 USA;Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Linet, Martha
    NCI, Radiat Epidemiol Branch, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Lo, Wing-Yee
    Dr Margarete Fischer Bosch Inst Clin Pharmacol, Stuttgart, Germany;Univ Tubingen, Tubingen, Germany.
    Long, Jirong
    Vanderbilt Univ, Sch Med, Vanderbilt Ingram Canc Ctr, Div Epidemiol,Dept Med,Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr, Nashville, TN 37212 USA.
    Lophatananon, Artitaya
    Univ Manchester, Fac Biol Med & Hlth, Sch Hlth Sci, Div Populat Hlth,Hlth Serv Res & Primary Care, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Lubinski, Jan
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Dept Genet & Pathol, Szczecin, Poland.
    Manoochehri, Mehdi
    German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Genet Breast Canc, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Manoukian, Siranoush
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori Milano, Dept Med Oncol & Hematol, Unit Med Genet, Milan, Italy.
    Margolin, Sara
    Soder Sjukhuset, Dept Oncol, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Sodersjukhuset, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Martinez, Elena
    Univ Calif San Diego, Moores Canc Ctr, La Jolla, CA 92093 USA;Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Family Med & Publ Hlth, La Jolla, CA 92093 USA.
    Matsuo, Keitaro
    Aichi Canc Ctr Res Inst, Div Canc Epidemiol & Prevent, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan;Nagoya Univ, Div Canc Epidemiol, Grad Sch Med, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan.
    Mavroudis, Dimitris
    Univ Hosp Heraklion, Dept Med Oncol, Iraklion, Greece.
    Meindl, Alfons
    Ludwig Maximilian Univ Munich, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, Munich, Germany.
    Menon, Usha
    UCL, Inst Clin Trials & Methodol, MRC Clin Trials Unit, London, England.
    Milne, Roger L.
    Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol Div, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Monash Univ, Sch Clin Sci, Precis Med, Monash Hlth, Clayton, Vic, Australia.
    Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd
    Univ Malaya, UM Canc Res Inst, Breast Canc Res Unit, Med Ctr, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
    Muir, Kenneth
    Univ Warwick, Warwick Med Sch, Div Hlth Sci, Coventry, W Midlands, England;Univ Manchester, Fac Biol Med & Hlth, Sch Hlth Sci, Div Populat Hlth,Hlth Serv Res & Primary Care, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Mulligan, Anna Marie
    Univ Toronto, Dept Lab Med & Pathobiol, Toronto, ON, Canada;Univ Hlth Network, Lab Med Program, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Neuhausen, Susan L.
    City Hope Natl Med Ctr, Dept Populat Sci, Beckman Res Inst, Duarte, CA USA.
    Nevanlinna, Heli
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Helsinki, Finland.
    Neven, Patrick
    Univ Hosp Leuven, Leuven Multidisciplinary Breast Ctr, Leuven Canc Inst, Dept OfOncol, Leuven, Belgium.
    Newman, William G.
    Univ Manchester, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Fac Biol, Sch Biol Sci,Div Evolut & Genom Sci, Manchester, Lancs, England;Manchester Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, St Marys Hosp, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Manchester Ctr Genom Med, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Offit, Kenneth
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Clin Genet Res Lab, Dept Canc Biol & Genet, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10021 USA;Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Med, Clin Genet Serv, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10021 USA.
    Olopade, Olufunmilayo, I
    Univ Chicago, Ctr Clin Canc Genet, Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Olshan, Andrew F.
    Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, Dept Epidemiol, Gillings Sch Global Publ Hlth, Chapel Hill, NC USA;Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, UNC Lineberger Comprehens Canc Ctr, Chapel Hill, NC USA.
    Olson, Janet E.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Hlth Sci Res, Rochester, MN USA.
    Olsson, Hakan
    Lund Univ, Dept Canc Epidemiol, Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden.
    Park, Sue K.
    Seoul Natl Univ, Dept Biomed Sci, Grad Sch, Seoul, South Korea;Seoul Natl Univ, Canc Res Inst, Seoul, South Korea;Seoul Natl Univ, Dept Prevent Med, Coll Med, Seoul, South Korea.
    Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won
    Hannover Med Sch, Gynaecol Res Unit, Hannover, Germany.
    Peto, Julian
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Dept Noncommunicable Dis Epidemiol, London, England.
    Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana
    Macedonian Acad Sci & Arts, Res Ctr Genet Engn & Biotechnol Georgi D Efremov, Skopje, Macedonia.
    Pohl-Rescigno, Esther
    Univ Cologne, Fac Med, Ctr Familial Breast & Ovarian Canc, Cologne, Germany;Univ Cologne, Univ Hosp Cologne, Cologne, Germany;Univ Cologne, Fac Med, CMMC, Cologne, Germany;Univ Cologne, Fac Med, CIO, Cologne, Germany.
    Presneau, Nadege
    Univ Westminster, Fac Sci & Technol, Dept Biomed Sci, London, England.
    Rack, Brigitte
    Univ Hosp Ulm, Dept Gynaecol & Obstet, Ulm, Germany.
    Radice, Paolo
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori INT, Dept Res, Unit Mol Bases Genet Risk & Genet Testing, Milan, Italy.
    Rashid, Muhammad U.
    German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Genet Breast Canc, Heidelberg, Germany;Shaukat Khanum Mem Canc Hosp & Res Ctr SKMCH & RC, Dept Basic Sci, Lahore, Pakistan.
    Rennert, Gad
    Carmel Hosp, Clalit Natl Canc Control Ctr, Haifa, Israel;Technion Fac Med, Haifa, Israel.
    Rennert, Hedy S.
    Carmel Hosp, Clalit Natl Canc Control Ctr, Haifa, Israel;Technion Fac Med, Haifa, Israel.
    Romero, Atocha
    Hosp Univ Puerta Hierro, Med Oncol Dept, Madrid, Spain.
    Ruebner, Matthias
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nuremberg, Comprehens Canc Ctr Erlangen EMN, Univ Hosp Erlangen, Dept Gynaecol & Obstet, Erlangen, Germany.
    Saloustros, Emmanouil
    Univ Hosp Larissa, Dept Oncol, Larisa, Greece.
    Schmidt, Marjanka K.
    Antoni von Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Div Mol Pathol, Netherlands Canc Inst, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Antoni von Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Div Psychosocial Res & Epidemiol, Netherlands Canc Inst, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Schmutzler, Rita K.
    Univ Cologne, Fac Med, Ctr Familial Breast & Ovarian Canc, Cologne, Germany;Univ Cologne, Univ Hosp Cologne, Cologne, Germany;Univ Cologne, Fac Med, CMMC, Cologne, Germany;Univ Cologne, Fac Med, CIO, Cologne, Germany.
    Schneider, Michael O.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nuremberg, Comprehens Canc Ctr Erlangen EMN, Univ Hosp Erlangen, Dept Gynaecol & Obstet, Erlangen, Germany.
    Schoemaker, Minouk J.
    Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, London, England.
    Scott, Christopher
    Mayo Clin, Dept Hlth Sci Res, Rochester, MN USA.
    Shen, Chen-Yang
    Acad Sinica, Inst Biomed Sci, Taipei, Taiwan;China Med Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Taichung, Taiwan.
    Shu, Xiao-Ou
    Vanderbilt Univ, Sch Med, Vanderbilt Ingram Canc Ctr, Div Epidemiol,Dept Med,Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr, Nashville, TN 37212 USA.
    Simard, Jacques
    Univ Laval, CHU Quebec, Res Ctr, Genom Ctr, Quebec City, PQ, Canada.
    Slager, Susan
    Mayo Clin, Dept Hlth Sci Res, Rochester, MN USA.
    Smichkoska, Snezhana
    Ss Cyril & Methodius Univ Skopje, Med Fac, Univ Clin Radiotherapy & Oncol, Skopje, Macedonia.
    Southey, Melissa C.
    Monash Univ, Sch Clin Sci, Precis Med, Monash Hlth, Clayton, Vic, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Dept Clin Pathol, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Spinelli, John J.
    BC Canc, Populat Oncol, Vancouver, BC, Canada;Univ British Columbia, Sch Populat & Publ Hlth, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Stone, Jennifer
    Univ Melbourne, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Curtin Univ, Curtin UWA Ctr Genet Origins Hlth & Dis, Perth, WA, Australia;Univ Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Surowy, Harald
    German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Epidemiol Grp, C080, Heidelberg, Germany;Heidelberg Univ, Univ Womens Clin Heidelberg, Mol Biol Breast Canc, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Swerdlow, Anthony J.
    Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, London, England;Inst Canc Res, Div Breast Canc Res, London, England.
    Tamimi, Rulla M.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Program Genet Epidemiol & Stat Genet, Boston, MA USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA;Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Channing Div Network Med, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Tapper, William J.
    Univ Southampton, Fac Med, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Teo, Soo H.
    Univ Malaya, UM Canc Res Inst, Breast Canc Res Unit, Med Ctr, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia;Canc Res Malaysia, Subang Jaya, Selangor, Malaysia.
    Terry, Mary Beth
    Columbia Univ, Mailman Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, New York, NY USA.
    Toland, Amanda E.
    Ohio State Univ, Dept Canc Biol & Genet, Columbus, OH 43210 USA.
    Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.
    Leiden Univ, Dept Surg, Med Ctr, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Torres, Diana
    German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Genet Breast Canc, Heidelberg, Germany;Pontificia Univ Javeriana, Inst Human Genet, Bogota, Colombia.
    Torres-Mejia, Gabriela
    Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Ctr Populat Hlth Res, Mexico City, DF, Mexico.
    Troester, Melissa A.
    Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, Dept Epidemiol, Gillings Sch Global Publ Hlth, Chapel Hill, NC USA;Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, UNC Lineberger Comprehens Canc Ctr, Chapel Hill, NC USA.
    Truong, Therese
    Univ Paris Sud, Univ Paris Saclay, INSERM, Canc & Environm Grp,Ctr Res Epidemiol & Populat H, Villejuif, France.
    Tsugane, Shoichiro
    Natl Canc Ctr, Ctr Publ Hlth Sci, Tokyo, Japan.
    Untch, Michael
    Helios Clin Berlin Buch, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, Berlin, Germany.
    Vachon, Celine M.
    Mayo Clin, Div Epidemiol, Dept Hlth Sci Res, Rochester, MN USA.
    van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Clin Genet, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    van Veen, Elke M.
    Univ Manchester, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Fac Biol, Sch Biol Sci,Div Evolut & Genom Sci, Manchester, Lancs, England;Manchester Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, St Marys Hosp, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Manchester Ctr Genom Med, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Vijai, Joseph
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Clin Genet Res Lab, Dept Canc Biol & Genet, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10021 USA;Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Med, Clin Genet Serv, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10021 USA.
    Wendt, Camilla
    Karolinska Inst, Sodersjukhuset, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Yu, Jyh-Cherng
    Triserv Gen Hosp, Natl Def Med Ctr, Dept Surg, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Zheng, Wei
    Vanderbilt Univ, Sch Med, Vanderbilt Ingram Canc Ctr, Div Epidemiol,Dept Med,Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr, Nashville, TN 37212 USA.
    Ziogas, Argyrios
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Epidemiol, Genet Epidemiol Res Inst, Irvine, CA USA.
    Ziv, Elad
    Univ Calif San Francisco, UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehens Canc Ctr, Inst Human Genet, Dept Med, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Dunning, Alison M.
    Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Oncol, Cambridge, England.
    Pharoah, Paul D. P.
    Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England;Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Oncol, Cambridge, England.
    Schindler, Detlev
    Univ Wurzburg, Bioctr, Inst Human Genet, Wurzburg, Germany.
    Devilee, Peter
    Leiden Univ, Dept Pathol, Med Ctr, Leiden, Netherlands;Leiden Univ, Dept Human Genet, Med Ctr, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Easton, Douglas F.
    Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England;Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Oncol, Cambridge, England.
    Balleine, Rosemary
    Pathol West ICPMR, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Baxter, Robert
    Univ Sydney, Royal North Shore Hosp, Kollig Inst Med Res, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Braye, Stephen
    John Hunter Hosp, Pathol North, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.
    Carpenter, Jane
    Univ Sydney, Westmead Inst Med Res, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Dahlstrom, Jane
    Canberra Hosp, Dept Anat Pathol, ACT Pathol, Canberra, ACT, Australia;Australian Natl Univ, ANU Med Sch, Canberra, ACT, Australia.
    Forbes, John
    Univ Newcastle, Dept Surg Oncol, Calvary Mater Newcastle Hosp, Australian New Zealand Breast Canc Trials Grp, Newcastle, NSW, Australia;Univ Newcastle, Sch Med & Publ Hlth, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.
    Lee, C. Soon
    Univ Western Sydney, Sch Sci & Hlth, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Marsh, Deborah
    Univ Sydney, Royal North Shore Hosp, Kolling Inst Med Res, Hormones & Canc Grp, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Morey, Adrienne
    Syd Path St Vincents Hosp, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Pathmanathan, Nirmala
    Westmead Hosp, Westmead Breast Canc Inst, Dept Tissue Pathol & Diagnost Oncol, Pathol West, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Scott, Rodney
    Hunter Med Res Inst, Ctr Informat Based Med, Newcastle, NSW, Australia;Univ Newcastle, Fac Hlth, Prior Res Ctr Canc, Sch Biomed Sci & Pharm, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.
    Simpson, Peter
    Univ Queensland, UQ Ctr Clin Res & Sch Med, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.
    Spigelman, Allan
    St Vincents Hosp, Kinghorn Canc Ctr, Hereditary Canc Clin, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Wilcken, Nicholas
    Westmead Hosp, Crown Princess Mary Canc Ctr, Sydney, NSW, Australia;Univ Sydney, Sydney Med Sch Westmead, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Yip, Desmond
    Australian Natl Univ, ANU Med Sch, Canberra, ACT, Australia;Canberra Hosp, Dept Med Oncol, Canberra, ACT, Australia.
    Zeps, Nikolajs
    St John God Perth Northern Hosp, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Radiumhosp, Inst Canc Res, Dept Canc Genet, Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Alnaes, Grethe I. Grenaker
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Radiumhosp, Inst Canc Res, Dept Canc Genet, Oslo, Norway.
    Sahlberg, Kristine K.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Radiumhosp, Inst Canc Res, Dept Canc Genet, Oslo, Norway;Vestre Viken Hosp, Dept Res, Drammen, Norway;Oslo Univ Hosp, Breast Canc Res Consortium, Oslo, Norway.
    Ottestad, Lars
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Radiumhosp, Inst Canc Res, Dept Canc Genet, Oslo, Norway.
    Karesen, Rolf
    Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway;Oslo Univ Hosp Ulleval, Div Surg Canc & Transplantat Med, Dept Canc, Sect Breast & Endocrine Surg, Oslo, Norway.
    Schlichting, Ellen
    Oslo Univ Hosp Ulleval, Div Surg Canc & Transplantat Med, Dept Canc, Sect Breast & Endocrine Surg, Oslo, Norway.
    Holmen, Marit Muri
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Radiol & Nucl Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Sauer, Toril
    Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway;Akershus Univ Hosp, Dept Pathol, Lorenskog, Norway.
    Haakensen, Vilde
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Radiumhosp, Inst Canc Res, Dept Canc Genet, Oslo, Norway.
    Engebraten, Olav
    Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway;Oslo Univ Hosp, Inst Canc Res, Dept Tumor Biol, Oslo, Norway;Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Div Surg Canc & Transplantat Med, Radiumhosp, Oslo, Norway.
    Naume, Bjorn
    Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway;Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Div Surg Canc & Transplantat Med, Radiumhosp, Oslo, Norway.
    Fossa, Alexander
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Div Surg Canc & Transplantat Med, Radiumhosp, Oslo, Norway;Oslo Univ Hosp, Natl Advisory Unit Late Effects Canc Treatment, Radiumhosp, Oslo, Norway.
    Kiserud, Cecile E.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Div Surg Canc & Transplantat Med, Radiumhosp, Oslo, Norway;Oslo Univ Hosp, Natl Advisory Unit Late Effects Canc Treatment, Radiumhosp, Oslo, Norway.
    Reinertsen, Kristin, V
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Div Surg Canc & Transplantat Med, Radiumhosp, Oslo, Norway;Oslo Univ Hosp, Natl Advisory Unit Late Effects Canc Treatment, Radiumhosp, Oslo, Norway.
    Helland, Aslaug
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Radiumhosp, Inst Canc Res, Dept Canc Genet, Oslo, Norway;Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Div Surg Canc & Transplantat Med, Radiumhosp, Oslo, Norway.
    Riis, Margit
    Oslo Univ Hosp Ulleval, Div Surg Canc & Transplantat Med, Dept Canc, Sect Breast & Endocrine Surg, Oslo, Norway.
    Geisler, Juergen
    Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway;Akershus Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Lorenskog, Norway.
    Two truncating variants in FANCC and breast cancer risk2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 12524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder with 22 disease-causing genes reported to date. In some FA genes, monoallelic mutations have been found to be associated with breast cancer risk, while the risk associations of others remain unknown. The gene for FA type C, FANCC, has been proposed as a breast cancer susceptibility gene based on epidemiological and sequencing studies. We used the Oncoarray project to genotype two truncating FANCC variants (p.R185X and p.R548X) in 64,760 breast cancer cases and 49,793 controls of European descent. FANCC mutations were observed in 25 cases (14 with p.R185X, 11 with p.R548X) and 26 controls (18 with p.R185X, 8 with p.R548X). There was no evidence of an association with the risk of breast cancer, neither overall (odds ratio 0.77, 95% CI 0.44-1.33, p = 0.4) nor by histology, hormone receptor status, age or family history. We conclude that the breast cancer risk association of these two FANCC variants, if any, is much smaller than for BRCA1, BRCA2 or PALB2 mutations. If this applies to all truncating variants in FANCC it would suggest there are differences between FA genes in their roles on breast cancer risk and demonstrates the merit of large consortia for clarifying risk associations of rare variants.

  • 9.
    Escala-Garcia, Maria
    et al.
    Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Netherlands Canc Inst, Divi Mol Pathol, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Abraham, Jean
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Oncol, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Cambridge, England;Cambridge Expt Canc Med Ctr, Cambridge, England;Univ Cambridge NHS Fdn Hosp, NIHR Cambridge Biomed Res Ctr, Cambridge, England;Univ Cambridge NHS Fdn Hosp, Cambridge Breast Unit, Cambridge, England.
    Andrulis, Irene L.
    Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Res Inst Mt Sinai Hosp, Fred A Litwin Ctr Canc Genet, Toronto, ON, Canada;Univ Toronto, Dept Mol Genet, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Anton-Culver, Hoda
    Univ Calif Irvine, Genet Epidemiol Res Inst, Dept Epidemiol, Irvine, CA USA.
    Arndt, Volker
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Ashworth, Alan
    Univ Calif San Francisco, UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehens Canc Ctr, San Francisco, CA USA.
    Auer, Paul L.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Canc Prevent Program, Seattle, WA USA;Univ Wisconsin Milwaukee, Zilber Sch Publ Hlth, Milwaukee, WI USA.
    Auvinen, Paivi
    Kuopio Univ Hosp, Canc Ctr, Kuopio, Finland;Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Clin Med, Oncol, Kuopio, Finland;Univ Eastern Finland, Translat Canc Res Area, Kuopio, Finland.
    Beckmann, Matthias W.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nuremberg, Univ Hosp Erlangen, Comprehens Canc Ctr ER EMN, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, Erlangen, Germany.
    Beesley, Jonathan
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Dept Genet & Computat Biol, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.
    Behrens, Sabine
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Benitez, Javier
    Spanish Natl Canc Res Ctr CNIO, Human Canc Genet Programme, Madrid, Spain;Biomed Network Rare Dis CIBERER, Madrid, Spain.
    Bermisheva, Marina
    Ufa Sci Ctr Russian Acad Sci, Inst Biochem & Genet, Ufa, Russia.
    Blomqvist, Carl
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Helsinki, Finland;Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Orebro, Sweden.
    Blot, William
    Vanderbilt Univ Sch Med, Vanderbilt Ingram Canc Ctr, Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr, Dept Med,Div Epidemiol, Nashville, TN USA;Int Epidemiol Inst, Rockville, MD USA.
    Bogdanova, Natalia V.
    Hannover Med Sch, Dept Radiat Oncol, Hannover, Germany;Hannover Med Sch, Gynaecol Res Unit, Hannover, Germany;NN Alexandrov Res Inst Oncol & Med Radiol, Minsk, BELARUS.
    Bojesen, Stig E.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Copenhagen Gen Populat Study, Herlev, Denmark;Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Dept Clin Biochem, Herlev, Denmark;Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Bolla, Manjeet K.
    Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England.
    Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise
    Oslo Univ Hosp Radiumhosp, Inst Canc Res, Dept Canc Genet, Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Brauch, Hiltrud
    Dr Margarete Fischer Bosch Inst Clin Pharmacol, Stuttgart, Germany;Univ Tubingen, iFIT Cluster Excellence, Tubingen, Germany;German Canc Consortium DKTK, German Canc Res Ctr DKFZ, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Brenner, Hermann
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Heidelberg, Germany;German Canc Consortium DKTK, German Canc Res Ctr DKFZ, Heidelberg, Germany;Natl Ctr Tumor Dis NCT, Heidelberg, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, Div Prevent Oncol, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Brucker, Sara Y.
    Univ Tubingen, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, Tubingen, Germany.
    Burwinkel, Barbara
    German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Epidemiol Grp, C080, Heidelberg, Germany;Heidelberg Univ, Univ Womens Clin Heidelberg, Mol Biol Breast Canc, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Caldas, Carlos
    Univ Cambridge, Li Ka Shing Ctr, Canc Res UK Cambridge Inst, Dept Oncol, Cambridge, England;CRUK Cambridge Canc Ctr, Breast Canc Programme, Cambridge, England;Cambridge Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, NIHR Biomed Res Ctr, Cambridge, England.
    Canzian, Federico
    German Canc Res Ctr, Gen Epidemiol Grp, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Heidelberg, Germany;Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Univ Canc Ctr Hamburg UCCH, Canc Epidemiol Grp, Hamburg, Germany.
    Chanock, Stephen J.
    Natl Canc Inst, Natl Inst Hlth, Dept Hlth & Human Serv, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Bethesda, MD USA.
    Chin, Suet-Feung
    Univ Cambridge, Canc Res UK Cambridge Inst, Cambridge, England.
    Clarke, Christine L.
    Univ Sydney, Westmead Inst Med Res, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Couch, Fergus J.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Lab Med & Pathol, Rochester, MN USA.
    Cox, Angela
    Univ Sheffield, Sheffield Inst Nucle Acids SInFoNiA, Dept Oncol & Metab, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England.
    Cross, Simon S.
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Neurosci, Acad Unit Pathol, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England.
    Czene, Kamila
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Daly, Mary B.
    Fox Chase Canc Ctr, Dept Clin Genet, Philadelphia, PA USA.
    Dennis, Joe
    Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England.
    Devilee, Peter
    Leiden Univ Med Ctr, Dept Pathol, Leiden, Netherlands;Leiden Univ Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Dunn, Janet A.
    Univ Warwick, Warwick Clin Trials Unit, Coventry, W Midlands, England.
    Dunning, Alison M.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Oncol, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Cambridge, England.
    Dwek, Miriam
    Univ Westminster, Fac Sci & Technol, Dept Biomed Sci, London, England.
    Earl, Helena M.
    Univ Cambridge NHS Fdn Hosp, NIHR Cambridge Biomed Res Ctr, Cambridge, England;Univ Cambridge NHS Fdn Hosp, Cambridge Breast Unit, Cambridge, England;Univ Cambridge, Dept Oncol, Cambridge, England.
    Eccles, Diana M.
    Univ Southampton, Fac Med, Canc Sci Acad Unit, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Eliassen, A. Heather
    Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Channing Div Network Med, Boston, MA USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA.
    Ellberg, Carolina
    Lund Univ, Dept Canc Epidemiol Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden.
    Evans, D. Gareth
    Univ Manchester, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Fac Biol Med & Hlth, Sch Biol Sci,Div Evolut & Genom Med, Manchester, Lancs, England;Manchester Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Manchester Ctr Genom Med, St Marys Hosp,Genom Med, Manchester, Lancs, England;Manchester Univ NHS Fdn Trust, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, NIHR Manchester Biomed Res Ctr, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Fasching, Peter A.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nuremberg, Univ Hosp Erlangen, Comprehens Canc Ctr ER EMN, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, Erlangen, Germany;Univ Calif Los Angeles, David Geffen Sch Med, Dept Med, Div Hematol & Oncol, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Figueroa, Jonine
    Natl Canc Inst, Natl Inst Hlth, Dept Hlth & Human Serv, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Bethesda, MD USA;Univ Edinburgh Med Sch, Usher Inst Populat Hlth Sci & Informat, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland;Canc Res UK Edinburgh Ctr, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.
    Flyger, Henrik
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Dept Breast Surg, Herlev, Denmark.
    Gago-Dominguez, Manuela
    Complejo Hospitalario Univ Santiago, SERGAS, Inst Invest Sanitaria Santiago Compostela IDIS, Galician Fdn Genom Med,Genom Med Grp, Santiago De Compostela, Spain;Univ Calif San Diego, Moores Canc Ctr, La Jolla, CA USA.
    Gapstur, Susan M.
    Amer Canc Soc, Epidemiol Res Program, Atlanta, GA USA.
    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat
    Natl Canc Inst, Natl Inst Hlth, Dept Hlth & Human Serv, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Bethesda, MD USA;Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, London, England.
    Garcia-Saenz, Jose A.
    Hosp Clino San Carlos, Inst Invest Sanitaria San Carlos IdISSC, Ctr Invest Biomed Red Canc CIBERONC, Madrid, Spain.
    Gaudet, Mia M.
    Amer Canc Soc, Epidemiol Res Program, Atlanta, GA USA.
    George, Angela
    Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, London, England.
    Giles, Graham G.
    Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol Div, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Monash Univ, Dept Epidemiol & Prevent Med, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Goldgar, David E.
    Univ Utah Sch Med Salt, Huntsman Canc Inst, Dept Dermatol, Salt Lake City, UT USA.
    Gonzalez-Neira, Anna
    Spanish Natl Canc Res Ctr CNIO, Human Canc Genet Programme, Madrid, Spain.
    Grip, Mervi
    Univ Oulu, Oulu Univ Hosp, Dept Surg, Oulu, Finland.
    Guenel, Pascal
    Univ Paris Sud, INSERM, Univ Paris Saclay, Ctr Res Epidemiol & Populat Hlth CESP,Canc & Envi, Villejuif, France.
    Guo, Qi
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Unit, Cambridge, England.
    Haiman, Christopher A.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Hakansson, Niclas
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hamann, Ute
    German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Genet Breast Canc, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Harrington, Patricia A.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Oncol, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Cambridge, England.
    Hiller, Louise
    Univ Warwick, Warwick Clin Trials Unit, Coventry, W Midlands, England.
    Hooning, Maartje J.
    Erasmus MC Canc Inst, Family Canc Clin, Dept Med Oncol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Hopper, John L.
    Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Howell, Anthony
    Univ Manchester, Div Canc Sci, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Huang, Chiun-Sheng
    Natl Taiwan Univ Hosp, Dept Surg, Taipei, Taiwan;Natl Taiwan Univ Coll Med, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Huang, Guanmengqian
    German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Genet Breast Canc, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Hunter, David J.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Program Genet Epidemiol & Stat Genet, Boston, MA USA;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Populat Hlth, Oxford, England.
    Jakubowska, Anna
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Dept Genet & Pathol, Szczecin, Poland;Pomeranian Med Univ, Independent Lab Mol Biol & Genet Diagnost, Szczecin, Poland.
    John, Esther M.
    Stanford Univ Sch Med, Stanford Canc Inst, Dept Med, Div Oncol, Stanford, CA USA.
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Kapoor, Pooja Middha
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Heidelberg, Germany;Heidelberg Univ, Fac Med, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Keeman, Renske
    Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Netherlands Canc Inst, Divi Mol Pathol, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Kitahara, Cari M.
    Natl Canc Inst, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Radiat Epidemiol Branch, Bethesda, MD USA.
    Koppert, Linetta B.
    Erasmus MC Canc Inst, Family Canc Clin, Dept Surg Oncol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Kraft, Peter
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Program Genet Epidemiol & Stat Genet, Boston, MA USA.
    Kristensen, Vessela N.
    Oslo Univ Hosp Radiumhosp, Inst Canc Res, Dept Canc Genet, Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Lambrechts, Diether
    VIB Ctr Canc Biol, VIB, Leuven, Belgium;Univ Leuven, Lab Translat Genet, Dept Human Genet, Leuven, Belgium.
    Le Marchand, Loic
    Univ Hawaii Canc Ctr, Epidemiol Program, Honolulu, HI USA.
    Lejbkowicz, Flavio
    Clalit Natl Canc Control Ctr, Technion Fac Med, Haifa, Israel;Carmel Hosp, Haifa, Israel.
    Lindblom, Annika
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Genet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lubinski, Jan
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Dept Genet & Pathol, Szczecin, Poland.
    Mannermaa, Arto
    Univ Eastern Finland, Translat Canc Res Area, Kuopio, Finland;Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Clin Med Pathol & Forens Med, Kuopio, Finland;Kuopio Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Pathol, Imaging Ctr, Kuopio, Finland.
    Manoochehri, Mehdi
    German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Genet Breast Canc, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Manoukian, Siranoush
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori Milano INT, Dept Med Oncol & Hematol, Unit Med Genet, Milan, Italy.
    Margolin, Sara
    Ssdersjukhuset, Dept Oncol, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Ssdersjukhuset, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Martinez, Maria Elena
    Univ Calif San Diego, Moores Canc Ctr, La Jolla, CA USA;Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Family Med & Publ Hlth, La Jolla, CA USA.
    Maurer, Tabea
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Univ Canc Ctr Hamburg UCCH, Canc Epidemiol Grp, Hamburg, Germany.
    Mavroudis, Dimitrios
    Univ Hosp Herakl, Dept Med Oncol, Iraklion, Greece.
    Meindl, Alfons
    Ludwig Maximilian Univ Munich, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, Munich, Germany.
    Milne, Roger L.
    Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol Div, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Monash Univ, Sch Clin Sci Monash Hlth, Precis Med, Clayton, Vic, Australia.
    Mulligan, Anna Marie
    Univ Toronto, Dept Lab Med & Pathobiol, Toronto, ON, Canada;Univ Hlth Network, Lab Med Program, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Neuhausen, Susan L.
    Beckman Res Inst City Hope, Dept Populat Sci, Duarte, CA USA.
    Nevanlinna, Heli
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Helsinki, Finland.
    Newman, William G.
    Univ Manchester, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Fac Biol Med & Hlth, Sch Biol Sci,Div Evolut & Genom Med, Manchester, Lancs, England;Manchester Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Manchester Ctr Genom Med, St Marys Hosp,Genom Med, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Olshan, Andrew F.
    Univ N Carolina, Lineberger Comprehens Canc Ctr, Dept Epidemiol, Chapel Hill, NC USA.
    Olson, Janet E.
    Olsson, Hakan
    Lund Univ, Dept Canc Epidemiol Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden.
    Orr, Nick
    Queens Univ Belfast, Ctr Canc Res & Cell Biol, Belfast, Antrim, North Ireland.
    Peterlongo, Paolo
    Inst Mol Oncol, IFOM FIRC Italian Fdn Canc Research, Genome Diagnost Program, Milan, Italy.
    Petridis, Christos
    Guys Hosp, Kings Coll London, Res Oncol, London, England.
    Prentice, Ross L.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Canc Prevent Program, Seattle, WA USA.
    Presneau, Nadege
    Univ Westminster, Fac Sci & Technol, Dept Biomed Sci, London, England.
    Punie, Kevin
    Univ Hosp Leuven, Leuven Canc Inst, Leuven Multidisciplinary Breast Ctr, Dept Oncol, Leuven, Belgium.
    Ramachandran, Dhanya
    Hannover Med Sch, Gynaecol Res Unit, Hannover, Germany.
    Rennert, Gad
    Clalit Natl Canc Control Ctr, Technion Fac Med, Haifa, Israel;Carmel Hosp, Haifa, Israel.
    Romero, Atocha
    Hosp Univ Puerta Hierro, Med Oncol Dept, Madrid, Spain.
    Sachchithananthan, Mythily
    Univ Sydney, Westmead Inst Med Res, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Saloustros, Emmanouil
    Univ Hosp Larissa, Dept Oncol, Larisa, Greece.
    Sawyer, Elinor J.
    Guys Hosp, Kings Coll London, Res Oncol, London, England.
    Schmutzler, Rita K.
    Univ Hosp Cologne, Ctr Hereditary Breast & Ovarian Canc, Cologne, Germany;Univ Cologne, Ctr Mol Med Cologne CMMC, Cologne, Germany.
    Schwentner, Lukas
    Univ Hosp Ulm, Dept Gynaecol & Obstet, Ulm, Germany.
    Scott, Christopher
    Simard, Jacques
    Univ Laval, Ctr Hosp Univ Quebec, Res Ctr, Gen Ctr, Quebec City, PQ, Canada.
    Sohn, Christof
    Heidelberg Univ, Natl Ctr Tumor Dis, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Southey, Melissa C.
    Monash Univ, Sch Clin Sci Monash Hlth, Precis Med, Clayton, Vic, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Dept Clin Pathol, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Swerdlow, Anthony J.
    Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, London, England;Inst Canc Res, Div Breast Canc Res, London, England.
    Tamimi, Rulla M.
    Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Channing Div Network Med, Boston, MA USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Program Genet Epidemiol & Stat Genet, Boston, MA USA.
    Tapper, William J.
    Univ Southampton, Fac Med, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Teixeira, Manuel R.
    Portuguese Oncol Inst, Dept Genet, Porto, Portugal;Univ Porto, Biomed Sci Inst ICBAS, Porto, Portugal.
    Terry, Mary Beth
    Columbia Univ, Mailman Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, New York, NY USA.
    Thorne, Heather
    Peter MacCallum Canc Ctr, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Sir Peter MacCallum Dept Oncol, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.
    Leiden Univ Med Ctr, Dept Surg, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Tomlinson, Ian
    Univ Birmingham, Inst Canc & Genom Sci, Birmingham, W Midlands, England;Univ Oxford, Oxford NIHR Biomed Res Ctr, Oxford, England;Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England.
    Troester, Melissa A.
    Univ N Carolina, Lineberger Comprehens Canc Ctr, Dept Epidemiol, Chapel Hill, NC USA.
    Truong, Therese
    Univ Paris Sud, INSERM, Univ Paris Saclay, Ctr Res Epidemiol & Populat Hlth CESP,Canc & Envi, Villejuif, France.
    Turnbull, Clare
    Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, London, England.
    Vachon, Celine M.
    van der Kolk, Lizet E.
    Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Netherlands Canc Inst, Family Canc Clin, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Wang, Qin
    Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England.
    Winqvist, Robert
    Univ Oulu, Lab Canc Genet & Tumor Biol, Canc & Translat Med Res Unit, Bioctr Oulu, Oulu, Finland;Northern Finland Lab Ctr Oulu, Lab Canc Genet & Tumor Biol, Oulu, Finland.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Yang, Xiaohong R.
    Natl Canc Inst, Natl Inst Hlth, Dept Hlth & Human Serv, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Bethesda, MD USA.
    Ziogas, Argyrios
    Univ Calif Irvine, Genet Epidemiol Res Inst, Dept Epidemiol, Irvine, CA USA.
    Pharoah, Paul D. P.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Oncol, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Cambridge, England;Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England.
    Hall, Per
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden;Ssdersjukhuset, Dept Oncol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.
    Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Netherlands Canc Inst, Div Mol Carcinogenesis, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Delft Univ Technol, Fac EEMCS, Delft, Netherlands.
    Chenevix-Trench, Georgia
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Dept Genet & Computat Biol, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.
    Bader, Gary D.
    Univ Toronto, Dept Mol Genet, Toronto, ON, Canada;Univ Toronto, Donnelly Ctr, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Doerk, Thilo
    Hannover Med Sch, Gynaecol Res Unit, Hannover, Germany.
    Easton, Douglas F.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Oncol, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Cambridge, England;Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England.
    Canisius, Sander
    Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Netherlands Canc Inst, Divi Mol Pathol, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Netherlands Canc Inst, Div Mol Carcinogenesis, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Schmidt, Marjanka K.
    Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Netherlands Canc Inst, Divi Mol Pathol, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Netherlands Canc Inst, Div Psychosocial Res & Epidemiol, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    A network analysis to identify mediators of germline-driven differences in breast cancer prognosis2020In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying the underlying genetic drivers of the heritability of breast cancer prognosis remains elusive. We adapt a network-based approach to handle underpowered complex datasets to provide new insights into the potential function of germline variants in breast cancer prognosis. This network-based analysis studies similar to 7.3 million variants in 84,457 breast cancer patients in relation to breast cancer survival and confirms the results on 12,381 independent patients. Aggregating the prognostic effects of genetic variants across multiple genes, we identify four gene modules associated with survival in estrogen receptor (ER)-negative and one in ER-positive disease. The modules show biological enrichment for cancer-related processes such as G-alpha signaling, circadian clock, angiogenesis, and Rho-GTPases in apoptosis.

  • 10. Farvid, Maryam S
    et al.
    Stern, Mariana C
    Norat, Teresa
    Sasazuki, Shizuka
    Vineis, Paolo
    Weijenberg, Matty P
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Wu, Kana
    Stewart, Bernard W
    Cho, Eunyoung
    Consumption of red and processed meat and breast cancer incidence: A systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies.2018In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 143, no 11, p. 2787-2799Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    = 44.4%). In addition, we identified two nested case-control studies evaluating the association between red meat and breast cancer stratified by N-acetyltransferase 2 acetylator genotype. We did not observe any association among those with either fast (per 25 g/day pooled odds ratio (OR), 1.18; 95%CI, 0.93-1.50) or slow N-acetyltransferase 2 acetylators (per 25 g/day pooled OR, 0.99; 95%CI, 0.91-1.08). In the prospective observational studies, high processed meat consumption was associated with increased breast cancer risk.

  • 11. Ferro, Ana
    et al.
    Morais, Samantha
    Rota, Matteo
    Pelucchi, Claudio
    Bertuccio, Paola
    Bonzi, Rossella
    Galeone, Carlotta
    Zhang, Zuo-Feng
    Matsuo, Keitaro
    Ito, Hidemi
    Hu, Jinfu
    Johnson, Kenneth C
    Yu, Guo-Pei
    Palli, Domenico
    Ferraroni, Monica
    Muscat, Joshua
    Malekzadeh, Reza
    Ye, Weimin
    Song, Huan
    Zaridze, David
    Maximovitch, Dmitry
    Aragonés, Nuria
    Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma
    Vioque, Jesus
    Navarrete-Muñoz, Eva M
    Pakseresht, Mohammadreza
    Pourfarzi, Farhad
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Orsini, Nicola
    Bellavia, Andrea
    Håkansson, Niclas
    Mu, Lina
    Pastorino, Roberta
    Kurtz, Robert C
    Derakhshan, Mohammad H
    Lagiou, Areti
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Boffetta, Paolo
    Boccia, Stefania
    Negri, Eva
    La Vecchia, Carlo
    Peleteiro, Bárbara
    Lunet, Nuno
    Tobacco smoking and gastric cancer:: meta-analyses of published data versus pooled analyses of individual participant data (StoP Project).2018In: European Journal of Cancer Prevention, ISSN 0959-8278, E-ISSN 1473-5709, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 197-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tobacco smoking is one of the main risk factors for gastric cancer, but the magnitude of the association estimated by conventional systematic reviews and meta-analyses might be inaccurate, due to heterogeneous reporting of data and publication bias. We aimed to quantify the combined impact of publication-related biases, and heterogeneity in data analysis or presentation, in the summary estimates obtained from conventional meta-analyses. We compared results from individual participant data pooled-analyses, including the studies in the Stomach Cancer Pooling (StoP) Project, with conventional meta-analyses carried out using only data available in previously published reports from the same studies. From the 23 studies in the StoP Project, 20 had published reports with information on smoking and gastric cancer, but only six had specific data for gastric cardia cancer and seven had data on the daily number of cigarettes smoked. Compared to the results obtained with the StoP database, conventional meta-analyses overvalued the relation between ever smoking (summary odds ratios ranging from 7% higher for all studies to 22% higher for the risk of gastric cardia cancer) and yielded less precise summary estimates (SE ≤2.4 times higher). Additionally, funnel plot asymmetry and corresponding hypotheses tests were suggestive of publication bias. Conventional meta-analyses and individual participant data pooled-analyses reached similar conclusions on the direction of the association between smoking and gastric cancer. However, published data tended to overestimate the magnitude of the effects, possibly due to publication biases and limited the analyses by different levels of exposure or cancer subtypes.

  • 12.
    Ferro, Ana
    et al.
    Univ Porto, Inst Saude Publ, EPIUnit, Rua Taipas 135, P-4050600 Porto, Portugal.
    Morais, Samantha
    Univ Porto, Inst Saude Publ, EPIUnit, Rua Taipas 135, P-4050600 Porto, Portugal.
    Rota, Matteo
    Univ Milan, Dept Biomed & Clin Sci, Milan, Italy;Univ Milan, Dept Clin Sci & Community Hlth DISCCO, Milan, Italy.
    Pelucchi, Claudio
    Univ Milan, Dept Clin Sci & Community Hlth DISCCO, Milan, Italy.
    Bertuccio, Paola
    Univ Milan, Dept Clin Sci & Community Hlth DISCCO, Milan, Italy.
    Bonzi, Rossella
    Univ Milan, Dept Clin Sci & Community Hlth DISCCO, Milan, Italy.
    Galeone, Carlotta
    Univ Milan, Dept Clin Sci & Community Hlth DISCCO, Milan, Italy.
    Zhang, Zuo-Feng
    UCLA, Dept Epidemiol, Fielding Sch Publ Hlth, Los Angeles, CA USA;Jonsson Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA 90034 USA.
    Matsuo, Keitaro
    Aichi Canc Ctr, Div Mol Med, Res Inst, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan.
    Ito, Hidemi
    Aichi Canc Ctr, Div Mol Med, Res Inst, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan.
    Hu, Jinfu
    Harbin Med Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Harbin, Heilongjiang, Peoples R China.
    Johnson, Kenneth C.
    Univ Ottawa, Fac Med, Sch Epidemiol Publ Hlth & Prevent Med, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
    Yu, Guo-Pei
    Peking Univ, Med Informat Ctr, Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Palli, Domenico
    ISPO, Canc Res & Prevent Inst, Mol & Nutr Epidemiol Unit, Florence, Italy.
    Ferraroni, Monica
    Univ Milan, Dept Clin Sci & Community Hlth DISCCO, Milan, Italy.
    Muscat, Joshua
    Penn State Univ, Coll Med, Penn State Hershey Med Ctr, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Hershey, PA USA.
    Malekzadeh, Reza
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Digest Dis Res Inst, Digest Oncol Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran.
    Ye, Weimin
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Song, Huan
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Ctr Publ Hlth Sci, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Zaridze, David
    Russian NN Blokhin Canc Res Ctr, Dept Epidemiol & Prevent, Moscow, Russia.
    Maximovitch, Dmitry
    Russian NN Blokhin Canc Res Ctr, Dept Epidemiol & Prevent, Moscow, Russia.
    Fernandez de Larrea, Nerea
    Inst Salud Carlos III, Natl Ctr Epidemiol, Environm & Canc Epidemiol Unit, Madrid, Spain;CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain.
    Kogevinas, Manolis
    CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain;Ctr Res Environm Epidemiol CREAL, ISGlobal, Barcelona, Spain;Hosp del Mar, Med Res Inst, IMIM, Barcelona, Spain;UPF, Barcelona, Spain.
    Vioque, Jesus
    Miguel Hernandez Univ, Campus San Juan, Alicante, Spain;ISABIAL FISABIO Fdn, Campus San Juan, Alicante, Spain.
    Navarrete-Munoz, Eva M.
    Miguel Hernandez Univ, Campus San Juan, Alicante, Spain;ISABIAL FISABIO Fdn, Campus San Juan, Alicante, Spain.
    Pakseresht, Mohammadreza
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Digest Dis Res Inst, Digest Oncol Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran;Univ Alberta, Dept Agr Food & Nutr Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada;Univ Leeds, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Nutr Epidemiol Grp, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England.
    Pourfarzi, Farhad
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Digest Dis Res Inst, Digest Oncol Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran;Ardabil Univ Med Sci, Digest Dis Res Ctr, Ardebil, Iran.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Orsini, Nicola
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bellavia, Andrea
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Håkansson, Niclas
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mu, Lina
    Univ Buffalo, Sch Publ Hlth & Hlth Profess, Dept Epidemiol & Environm Hlth, Buffalo, NY USA.
    Pastorino, Roberta
    Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, IRCCS Fdn Policlin Agostino Gemelli, Inst Publ Hlth, Sect Hyg, Lgo F Vito 1, I-00168 Rome, Italy.
    Kurtz, Robert C.
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Med, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10021 USA.
    Derakhshan, Mohammad H.
    Univ Tehran Med Sci, Digest Dis Res Inst, Digest Oncol Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran;Univ Glasgow, Inst Cardiovasc & Med Sci, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland.
    Lagiou, Areti
    Athens Technol Educ Inst, Sch Hlth Profess, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Hlth, Athens, Greece.
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Univ Athens, Sch Med, Dept Hyg Epidemiol & Med Stat, Athens, Greece;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA.
    Boffetta, Paolo
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Tisch Canc Inst, New York, NY 10029 USA.
    Boccia, Stefania
    Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, IRCCS Fdn Policlin Agostino Gemelli, Inst Publ Hlth, Sect Hyg, Lgo F Vito 1, I-00168 Rome, Italy.
    Negri, Eva
    Univ Milan, Dept Biomed & Clin Sci, Milan, Italy.
    La Vecchia, Carlo
    Univ Milan, Dept Clin Sci & Community Hlth DISCCO, Milan, Italy.
    Peleteiro, Barbara
    Univ Porto, Inst Saude Publ, EPIUnit, Rua Taipas 135, P-4050600 Porto, Portugal;Univ Porto, Fac Med, Dept Ciencias Saude Publ & Forenses & Educ Med, Al Prof Hernani Monteiro, P-4200319 Porto, Portugal.
    Lunet, Nuno
    Univ Porto, Inst Saude Publ, EPIUnit, Rua Taipas 135, P-4050600 Porto, Portugal;Univ Porto, Fac Med, Dept Ciencias Saude Publ & Forenses & Educ Med, Al Prof Hernani Monteiro, P-4200319 Porto, Portugal.
    Alcohol intake and gastric cancer: Meta-analyses of published data versus individual participant data pooled analyses (StoP Project)2018In: Cancer Epidemiology, ISSN 1877-7821, E-ISSN 1877-783X, Vol. 54, p. 125-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Individual participant data pooled analyses allow access to non-published data and statistical reanalyses based on more homogeneous criteria than meta-analyses based on systematic reviews. We quantified the impact of publication-related biases and heterogeneity in data analysis and presentation in summary estimates of the association between alcohol drinking and gastric cancer.

    Methods: We compared estimates obtained from conventional meta-analyses, using only data available in published reports from studies that take part in the Stomach Cancer Pooling (StoP) Project, with individual participant data pooled analyses including the same studies.

    Results: A total of 22 studies from the StoP Project assessed the relation between alcohol intake and gastric cancer, 19 had specific data for levels of consumption and 18 according to cancer location; published reports addressing these associations were available from 18, 5 and 5 studies, respectively. The summary odds ratios [OR, (95%CI)] estimate obtained with published data for drinkers vs. non-drinkers was 10% higher than the one obtained with individual StoP data [18 vs. 22 studies: 1.21 (1.07-1.36) vs. 1.10 (0.99-1.23)] and more heterogeneous (1(2): 63.6% vs 54.4%). In general, published data yielded less precise summary estimates (standard errors up to 2.6 times higher). Funnel plot analysis suggested publication bias.

    Conclusion: Meta-analyses of the association between alcohol drinking and gastric cancer tended to overestimate the magnitude of the effects, possibly due to publication bias. Additionally, individual participant data pooled analyses yielded more precise estimates for different levels of exposure or cancer subtypes.

  • 13.
    Figlioli, Gisella
    et al.
    IFOM FIRC Inst Mol Oncol, Genome Diagnost Program, Milan, Italy.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Young, Mary Ann
    Genome One, Darlinghurst, NSW, Australia.
    The FANCM:p.Arg658* truncating variant is associated with risk of triple-negative breast cancer2019In: NPJ BREAST CANCER, ISSN 2374-4677, Vol. 5, article id 38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Breast cancer is a common disease partially caused by genetic risk factors. Germline pathogenic variants in DNA repair genes BRCA1, BRCA2, PAM, ATM, and CHEK2 are associated with breast cancer risk. FANCM, which encodes for a DNA translocase, has been proposed as a breast cancer predisposition gene, with greater effects for the ER-negative and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtypes. We tested the three recurrent protein-truncating variants FANCM:p.Arg658*, p.Gln1701*, and pArg1931* for association with breast cancer risk in 67,112 cases, 53,766 controls, and 26,662 carriers of pathogenic variants of BRCA1 or BRCA2. These three variants were also studied functionally by measuring survival and chromosome fragility in FANCM(-/-) patient-derived immortalized fibroblasts treated with diepoxybutane or olaparib. We observed that FANCM:p.Arg658* was associated with increased risk of ER-negative disease and TNBC (OR = 2.44, P = 0.034 and OR = 3.79; P = 0.009, respectively). In a country-restricted analysis, we confirmed the associations detected for FANCM:p.Arg658* and found that also FANCM:p.Arg1931* was associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk (OR = 1.96; P = 0.006). The functional results indicated that all three variants were deleterious affecting cell survival and chromosome stability with FANCM:p.Arg658* causing more severe phenotypes. In conclusion, we confirmed that the two rare FANCM deleterious variants p.Arg658* and p.Arg1931* are risk factors for ER-negative and TNBC subtypes. Overall our data suggest that the effect of truncating variants on breast cancer risk may depend on their position in the gene. Cell sensitivity to olaparib exposure, identifies a possible therapeutic option to treat FANCM-associated tumors.

  • 14. Gaudet, Mia M
    et al.
    Gierach, Gretchen L
    Carter, Brian D
    Luo, Juhua
    Milne, Roger L
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Giles, Graham G
    Tamimi, Rulla M
    Eliassen, A Heather
    Rosner, Bernard
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Adami, Hans-Olov
    Margolis, Karen L
    Gapstur, Susan M
    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat
    Brinton, Louise A
    Pooled Analysis of Nine Cohorts Reveals Breast Cancer Risk Factors by Tumor Molecular Subtype.2018In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 78, no 20, p. 6011-6021Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Various subtypes of breast cancer defined by estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and HER2 exhibit etiologic differences in reproductive factors, but associations with other risk factors are inconsistent. To clarify etiologic heterogeneity, we pooled data from nine cohort studies. Multivariable, joint Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for molecular subtypes. Of 606,025 women, 11,741 invasive breast cancers with complete tissue markers developed during follow-up: 8,700 luminal A–like (ER+ or PR+/HER2), 1,368 luminal B–like (ER+ or PR+/HER2+), 521 HER2-enriched (ER/PR/HER2+), and 1,152 triple-negative (ER/PR/HER2) disease. Ever parous compared with never was associated with lower risk of luminal A–like (HR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.73–0.83) and luminal B–like (HR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.64–0.87) as well as a higher risk of triple-negative disease (HR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.02–1.50; P value for overall tumor heterogeneity < 0.001). Direct associations with luminal-like, but not HER2-enriched or triple-negative, tumors were found for age at first birth, years between menarche and first birth, and age at menopause (P value for overall tumor heterogeneity < 0.001). Age-specific associations with baseline body mass index differed for risk of luminal A–like and triple-negative breast cancer (P value for tumor heterogeneity = 0.02). These results provide the strongest evidence for etiologic heterogeneity of breast cancer to date from prospective studies.

    Significance: These findings comprise the largest study of prospective data to date and contribute to the accumulating evidence that etiological heterogeneity exists in breast carcinogenesis. Cancer Res; 78(20); 6011–21. ©2018 AACR.

    .

  • 15.
    Genkinger, J. M.
    et al.
    Columbia Univ, Mailman Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Med Ctr, New York, NY 10019 USA;Columbia Univ, Herbert Irving Comprehens Canc Ctr, Canc Epidemiol Program, Med Ctr, New York, NY 10019 USA.
    Wu, K.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA USA.
    Wang, M.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Boston, MA USA;Harvard Med Sch, Dept Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Albanes, D.
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Black, A.
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    van den Brandt, P. A.
    Maastricht Univ, Grow Sch Oncol & Dev Biol, Dept Epidemiol, Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Burke, K. A.
    Columbia Univ, Mailman Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Med Ctr, New York, NY 10019 USA.
    Cook, M. B.
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Gapstur, S. M.
    Amer Canc Soc, Behav & Epidemiol Res Grp, Atlanta, GA 30329 USA.
    Giles, G. G.
    Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol & Intelligence Div, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Giovannucci, E.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA;Harvard Med Sch, Dept Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Goodman, G. G.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Goodman, P. J.
    SWOG Stat Ctr, Seattle, WA USA.
    Håkansson, N.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Div Nutr Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Key, T. J.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Populat Hlth, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Oxford, England.
    Mannistö, S.
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welf, Dept Publ Hlth Solut, Helsinki, Finland.
    Le Marchand, L.
    Univ Hawaii, Epidemiol Program, Canc Ctr, Honolulu, HI 96822 USA.
    Liao, L. M.
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    MacInnis, R. J.
    Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol & Intelligence Div, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Neuhouser, M. L.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Platz, E. A.
    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Sawada, N.
    Natl Canc Ctr, Ctr Publ Hlth Sci, Epidemiol & Prevent Grp, Tokyo, Japan.
    Schenk, J. M.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Stevens, V. L.
    Amer Canc Soc, Behav & Epidemiol Res Grp, Atlanta, GA 30329 USA.
    Travis, R. C.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Populat Hlth, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Oxford, England.
    Tsugane, S.
    Natl Canc Ctr, Ctr Publ Hlth Sci, Epidemiol & Prevent Grp, Tokyo, Japan.
    Visvanathan, K.
    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Wilkens, L. R.
    Univ Hawaii, Epidemiol Program, Canc Ctr, Honolulu, HI 96822 USA.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Div Nutr Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Smith-Warner, S. A.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA.
    Measures of body fatness and height in early and mid-to-late adulthood and prostate cancer: risk and mortality in The Pooling Project of Prospective Studies of Diet and Cancer2020In: Annals of Oncology, ISSN 0923-7534, E-ISSN 1569-8041, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 103-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Advanced prostate cancer etiology is poorly understood. Few studies have examined associations of anthropometric factors (e.g. early adulthood obesity) with advanced prostate cancer risk.

    Patients and methods: We carried out pooled analyses to examine associations between body fatness, height, and prostate cancer risk. Among 830 772 men, 51 734 incident prostate cancer cases were identified, including 4762 advanced (T4/N1/M1 or prostate cancer deaths) cases, 2915 advanced restricted (same as advanced, but excluding localized cancers that resulted in death) cases, 9489 high-grade cases, and 3027 prostate cancer deaths. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate study-specific hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI); results were pooled using random effects models.

    Results: No statistically significant associations were observed for body mass index (BMI) in early adulthood for advanced, advanced restricted, and high-grade prostate cancer, and prostate cancer mortality. Positive associations were shown for BMI at baseline with advanced prostate cancer (HR = 1.30, 95% CI = 0.95-1.78) and prostate cancer mortality (HR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.12-2.07) comparing BMI >= 35.0 kg/m(2) with 21-22.9 kg/m(2). When considering early adulthood and baseline BMI together, a 27% higher prostate cancer mortality risk (95% CI = 9% to 49%) was observed for men with BMI <25.0 kg/m(2) in early adulthood and BMI >= 30.0 kg/m(2) at baseline compared with BMI <25.0 kg/m(2) in early adulthood and BMI <30.0 kg/m(2) at baseline. Baseline waist circumference, comparing >= 110 cm with <90 cm, and waist-to-hip ratio, comparing >= 1.00 with <0.90, were associated with significant 14%-16% increases in high-grade prostate cancer risk and suggestive or significant 20%-39% increases in prostate cancer mortality risk. Height was associated with suggestive or significant 33%-56% risks of advanced or advanced restricted prostate cancer and prostate cancer mortality, comparing >= 1.90 m with <1.65 m.

    Conclusion: Our findings suggest that height and total and central adiposity in mid-to-later adulthood, but not early adulthood adiposity, are associated with risk of advanced forms of prostate cancer. Thus, maintenance of healthy weight may help prevent advanced prostate cancer.

  • 16.
    Huyghe, Jeroen R.
    et al.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Bien, Stephanie A.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Harrison, Tabitha A.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Kang, Hyun Min
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA;Univ Michigan, Ctr Stat Genet, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA.
    Chen, Sai
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA;Univ Michigan, Ctr Stat Genet, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA.
    Schmit, Stephanie L.
    H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Canc Epidemiol, Tampa, FL USA.
    Conti, David V.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, USC Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Qu, Conghui
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Jeon, Jihyoun
    Univ Michigan, Dept Epidemiol, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA.
    Edlund, Christopher K.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, USC Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Greenside, Peyton
    Stanford Univ, Biomed Informat Program, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Wainberg, Michael
    Stanford Univ, Dept Comp Sci, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Schumacher, Fredrick R.
    Case Western Reserve Univ, Dept Populat & Quantitat Hlth Sci, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA.
    Smith, Joshua D.
    Univ Washington, Dept Genome Sci, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Levine, David M.
    Univ Washington, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Nelson, Sarah C.
    Univ Washington, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Sinnott-Armstrong, Nasa A.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Genet, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Albanes, Demetrius
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Alonso, M. Henar
    Catalan Inst Oncol IDIBELL, Canc Prevent & Control Program, Barcelona, Spain;CIBER Epidemiol & Salud Publ CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain;Univ Barcelona, Dept Clin Sci, Fac Med, Barcelona, Spain.
    Anderson, Kristin
    Univ Minnesota, Div Epidemiol & Community Hlth, Minneapolis, MN USA.
    Arnau-Collell, Coral
    Univ Barcelona, Dept Gastroenterol, Hosp Clin, Inst Invest Biomed August Pi & Sunyer IDIBAPS,Ctr, Barcelona, Spain.
    Arndt, Volker
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Bamia, Christina
    Hellen Hlth Fdn, Athens, Greece;Univ Athens, WHO Collaborating Ctr Nutr & Hlth, Unit Nutr Epidemiol & Nutr Publ Hlth, Dept Hyg Epidemiol & Med Stat,Sch Med, Athens, Greece.
    Banbury, Barbara L.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Baron, John A.
    Univ N Carolina, Dept Med, Sch Med, Chapel Hill, NC 27515 USA.
    Berndt, Sonja I.
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Bezieau, Stephane
    Ctr Hosp Univ CHU Nantes, Serv Genet Med, Nantes, France.
    Bishop, D. Timothy
    St Jamess Univ Leeds, Leeds Inst Med Res, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England.
    Boehm, Juergen
    Univ Utah, Huntsman Canc Inst, Salt Lake City, UT USA;Univ Utah, Dept Populat Hlth Sci, Salt Lake City, UT USA.
    Boeing, Heiner
    German Inst Human Nutr Potsdam Rehbrucke, Dept Epidemiol, Potsdam, Germany.
    Brenner, Hermann
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Heidelberg, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, Div Prevent Oncol, Heidelberg, Germany;Natl Ctr Tumor Dis NCT, Heidelberg, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, German Canc Consortium DKTK, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Brezina, Stefanie
    Med Univ Vienna, Inst Canc Res, Dept Med 1, Vienna, Austria.
    Buch, Stephan
    Tech Univ Dresden, Dept Med 1, Univ Hosp Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
    Buchanan, Daniel D.
    Univ Melbourne, Colorectal Oncogen Grp, Dept Clin Pathol, Parkville, Vic, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Ctr Canc Res, Victorian Comprehens Canc Ctr, Parkville, Vic, Australia;Royal Melbourne Hosp, Genom Med & Family Canc Clin, Parkville, Vic, Australia.
    Burnett-Hartman, Andrea
    Kaiser Permanente Colorado, Inst Hlth Res, Denver, CO USA.
    Butterbach, Katja
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Caan, Bette J.
    Kaiser Permanente Med Care Program, Div Res, Oakland, CA 94611 USA.
    Campbell, Peter T.
    Amer Canc Soc, Behav & Epidemiol Res Grp, Atlanta, GA 30329 USA.
    Carlson, Christopher S.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA;Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Castellvi-Bel, Sergi
    Univ Barcelona, Dept Gastroenterol, Hosp Clin, Inst Invest Biomed August Pi & Sunyer IDIBAPS,Ctr, Barcelona, Spain.
    Chan, Andrew T.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Div Gastroenterol, Boston, MA 02114 USA;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02114 USA;Brigham & Womens Hosp, Channing Div Network Med, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Clin & Translat Epidemiol Unit, Boston, MA 02114 USA;Broad Inst Harvard & MIT, Cambridge, MA USA;Harvard Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard Univ, Dept Immunol & Infect Dis, Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Heidelberg, Germany;UCCH, Canc Epidemiol Grp, Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
    Chanock, Stephen J.
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    CIBER Epidemiol & Salud Publ CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain;Murcia Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Reg Hlth Council, IMIB Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain.
    Cho, Sang Hee
    Chonnam Natl Univ Hosp, Dept Hematol Oncol, Hwasun, South Korea.
    Connolly, Charles M.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Cross, Amanda J.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, London, England;Imperial Coll London, Dept Surg & Canc, London, England.
    Cuk, Katarina
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Curtis, Keith R.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    de la Chapelle, Albert
    Ohio State Univ, Dept Canc Biol & Genet, Columbus, OH 43210 USA;Ohio State Univ, Ctr Comprehens Canc, Columbus, OH 43210 USA.
    Doheny, Kimberly F.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Inst Med Genet, CIDR, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Duggan, David
    City Hope Natl Med Ctr, Translat Genom Res Inst, Phoenix, AZ USA.
    Easton, Douglas F.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England;Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Oncol, Cambridge, England.
    Elias, Sjoerd G.
    Univ Utrecht, Julius Ctr Hlth Sci & Primary Care, Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Elliott, Faye
    St Jamess Univ Leeds, Leeds Inst Med Res, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England.
    English, Dallas R.
    Univ Melbourne, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol & Intelligence Div, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Feskens, Edith J. M.
    Wageningen Univ & Res, Div Human Nutr & Hlth, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Figueiredo, Jane C.
    Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Dept Med, Samuel Oschin Comprehens Canc Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA;Univ Southern Calif, Dept Prevent Med, Keck Sch Med, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Fischer, Rocky
    Univ Michigan, Ctr Comprehens Canc, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA.
    FitzGerald, Liesel M.
    Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol & Intelligence Div, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Univ Tasmania, Menzies Inst Med Res, Hobart, Tas, Australia.
    Forman, David
    WHO, Int Agcy Res Canc, Lyon, France.
    Gala, Manish
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Div Gastroenterol, Boston, MA 02114 USA;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02114 USA;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Clin & Translat Epidemiol Unit, Boston, MA 02114 USA.
    Gallinger, Steven
    Univ Toronto, Mt Sinai Hosp, Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Res Inst, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Gauderman, W. James
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, USC Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Giles, Graham G.
    Univ Melbourne, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol & Intelligence Div, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Gillanders, Elizabeth
    NCI, Div Canc Control & Populat Sci, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Gong, Jian
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Goodman, Phyllis J.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, SWOG Stat Ctr, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Grady, William M.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Res, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Grove, John S.
    Univ Hawaii, Canc Res Ctr, Honolulu, HI 96813 USA.
    Gsur, Andrea
    Med Univ Vienna, Inst Canc Res, Dept Med 1, Vienna, Austria.
    Gunter, Marc J.
    WHO, Nutr & Metab Sect, Int Agcy Res Canc, Lyon, France.
    Haile, Robert W.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Med, Div Oncol, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Hampe, Jochen
    Tech Univ Dresden, Dept Med 1, Univ Hosp Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
    Hampel, Heather
    Ohio State Univ, Ctr Comprehens Canc, Div Human Genet, Dept Internal Med, Columbus, OH 43210 USA.
    Harlid, Sophia
    Umea Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, Oncol Unit, Umea, Sweden.
    Hayes, Richard B.
    NYU, Sch Med, Div Epidemiol, Dept Populat Hlth, New York, NY USA.
    Hofer, Philipp
    Med Univ Vienna, Inst Canc Res, Dept Med 1, Vienna, Austria.
    Hoffmeister, Michael
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Hopper, John L.
    Univ Melbourne, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Seoul Natl Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Sch Publ Hlth, Seoul, South Korea;Seoul Natl Univ, Inst Hlth & Environm, Seoul, South Korea.
    Hsu, Wan-Ling
    Univ Washington, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Huang, Wen-Yi
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Hudson, Thomas J.
    Ontario Inst Canc Res, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Hunter, David J.
    Harvard Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Populat Hlth, Oxford, England.
    Ibanez-Sanz, Gemma
    Catalan Inst Oncol IDIBELL, Canc Prevent & Control Program, Barcelona, Spain;Bellvitge Univ Hosp, Gastroenterol Dept, Barcelona, Spain;Bellvitge Biomed Res Inst IDIBELL, Colorectal Canc Grp, ONCOBELL Program, Barcelona, Spain.
    Idos, Gregory E.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, USC Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Ingersoll, Roxann
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Inst Med Genet, CIDR, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Jackson, Rebecca D.
    Ohio State Univ, Dept Med, Div Endocrinol Diabet & Metab, Columbus, OH 43210 USA.
    Jacobs, Eric J.
    Amer Canc Soc, Behav & Epidemiol Res Grp, Atlanta, GA 30329 USA.
    Jenkins, Mark A.
    Univ Melbourne, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Joshi, Amit D.
    Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02114 USA;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Clin & Translat Epidemiol Unit, Boston, MA 02114 USA;Harvard Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Joshu, Corinne E.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Keku, Temitope O.
    Univ N Carolina, Ctr Gastrointestinal Biol & Dis, Chapel Hill, NC 27515 USA.
    Key, Timothy J.
    Univ Oxford, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Nuffield Dept Populat Hlth, Oxford, England.
    Kim, Hyeong Rok
    Chonnam Natl Univ, Dept Surg, Hwasun Hosp & Med Sch, Hwasun, South Korea.
    Kobayashi, Emiko
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Kolonel, Laurence N.
    Univ Hawaii Manoa, Off Publ Hlth Studies, Honolulu, HI 96822 USA.
    Kooperberg, Charles
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Kuehn, Tilman
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Kury, Sebastien
    Ctr Hosp Univ CHU Nantes, Serv Genet Med, Nantes, France.
    Kweon, Sun-Seog
    Chonnam Natl Univ, Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Gwangju, South Korea;Chonnam Natl Univ, Jeonnam Reg Canc Ctr, Hwasun Hosp, Hwasun, South Korea.
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurie, Cecelia A.
    Univ Washington, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Le Marchand, Loic
    Univ Hawaii, Canc Res Ctr, Honolulu, HI 96813 USA.
    Leal, Suzanne M.
    Baylor Coll Med, Ctr Stat Genet, Dept Mol & Human Genet, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Lee, Soo Chin
    Natl Univ, Inst Canc, Dept Haematol Oncol, Singapore, Singapore;Natl Univ Singapore, Canc Sci Inst Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.
    Lejbkowicz, Flavio
    Carmel, Clalit Hlth Serv, Personalized Genom Serv, Haifa, Israel;Lady Davis Carmel Med Ctr, Dept Community Med & Epidemiol, Haifa, Israel;Clalit Natl Canc Control Ctr, Haifa, Israel.
    Lemire, Mathieu
    Ontario Inst Canc Res, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Li, Christopher I.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Li, Li
    Case Western Reserve Univ, Ctr Community Hlth Integrat, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA;Case Western Reserve Univ, Case Comprehens Canc Ctr, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA.
    Lieb, Wolfgang
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel, Inst Epidemiol, PopGen Biobank, Kiel, Germany.
    Lin, Yi
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Lindblom, Annika
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Genet, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindor, Noralane M.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Hlth Sci Res, Scottsdale, AZ USA.
    Ling, Hua
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Inst Med Genet, CIDR, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Louie, Tin L.
    Univ Washington, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Mannisto, Satu
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welf, Dept Publ Hlth Solut, Helsinki, Finland.
    Markowitz, Sanford D.
    Case Western Reserve Univ, Dept Med, Case Comprehens Canc Ctr, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA;Case Western Reserve Univ, Dept Genet, Case Comprehens Canc Ctr, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA;Univ Hosp Cleveland, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA.
    Martin, Vicente
    CIBER Epidemiol & Salud Publ CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain;Univ Leon, Biomed Inst IBIOMED, Leon, Spain.
    Masala, Giovanna
    Inst Canc Res Prevent & Clin Network ISPRO, Canc Risk Factors & Life Style Epidemiol Unit, Florence, Italy.
    McNeil, Caroline E.
    Univ Southern Calif, USC Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Melas, Marilena
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, USC Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Milne, Roger L.
    Univ Melbourne, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol & Intelligence Div, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Moreno, Lorena
    Univ Barcelona, Dept Gastroenterol, Hosp Clin, Inst Invest Biomed August Pi & Sunyer IDIBAPS,Ctr, Barcelona, Spain.
    Murphy, Neil
    WHO, Nutr & Metab Sect, Int Agcy Res Canc, Lyon, France.
    Myte, Robin
    Umea Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, Oncol Unit, Umea, Sweden.
    Naccarati, Alessio
    Czech Acad Sci, Dept Mol Biol Canc, Inst Expt Med, Prague, Czech Republic;IIGM, Turin, Italy.
    Newcomb, Polly A.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA;Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Offit, Kenneth
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Med, Clin Genet Serv, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10021 USA;Weill Cornell Med Coll, Dept Med, New York, NY USA.
    Ogino, Shuji
    Broad Inst Harvard & MIT, Cambridge, MA USA;Harvard Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard Med Sch, Program MPE Mol Pathol Epidemiol, Dept Pathol, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Boston, MA USA;Dana Farber Canc Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte
    Univ Utrecht, Julius Ctr Hlth Sci & Primary Care, Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Pardini, Barbara
    IIGM, Turin, Italy;Univ Turin, Dept Med Sci, Turin, Italy.
    Parfrey, Patrick S.
    Mem Univ, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Sch Med, St John, NF, Canada.
    Pearlman, Rachel
    Ohio State Univ, Ctr Comprehens Canc, Div Human Genet, Dept Internal Med, Columbus, OH 43210 USA.
    Perduca, Vittorio
    Univ Paris 05, Lab Math Appl MAP5, CNRS, UMR 8145, Paris, France;Univ Paris Saclay, CESP, INSERM, U1018,Fac Med,Univ Paris Sud,UVSQ,Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France.
    Pharoah, Paul D. P.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England.
    Pinchev, Mila
    Lady Davis Carmel Med Ctr, Dept Community Med & Epidemiol, Haifa, Israel.
    Platz, Elizabeth A.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Prentice, Ross L.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Pugh, Elizabeth
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Inst Med Genet, CIDR, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Raskin, Leon
    Vanderbilt Univ, Sch Med, Div Epidemiol, Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr, Nashville, TN 37212 USA.
    Rennert, Gad
    Lady Davis Carmel Med Ctr, Dept Community Med & Epidemiol, Haifa, Israel;Clalit Natl Canc Control Ctr, Haifa, Israel;Technion Israel Inst Technol, Ruth & Bruce Rappaport Fac Med, Haifa, Israel.
    Rennert, Hedy S.
    Lady Davis Carmel Med Ctr, Dept Community Med & Epidemiol, Haifa, Israel;Clalit Natl Canc Control Ctr, Haifa, Israel;Technion Israel Inst Technol, Ruth & Bruce Rappaport Fac Med, Haifa, Israel.
    Riboli, Elio
    Imperial Coll London, Sch Publ Hlth, London, England.
    Rodriguez-Barranco, Miguel
    CIBER Epidemiol & Salud Publ CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain;Univ Granada, Escuela Andaluza Salud Publ, Inst Invest Biosanitaria Ibs GRANADA, Hosp Univ Granada, Granada, Spain.
    Romm, Jane
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Inst Med Genet, CIDR, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Sakoda, Lori C.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA;Kaiser Permanente Northern Calif, Div Res, Oakland, CA USA.
    Schafmayer, Clemens
    Univ Hosp Schleswig Holstein, Dept Gen & Thorac Surg, Campus Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Schoen, Robert E.
    Univ Pittsburgh, Med Ctr, Dept Med & Epidemiol, Pittsburgh, PA USA.
    Seminara, Daniela
    NCI, Div Canc Control & Populat Sci, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Shah, Mitul
    Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Oncol, Cambridge, England.
    Shelford, Tameka
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Inst Med Genet, CIDR, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Shin, Min-Ho
    Chonnam Natl Univ, Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Gwangju, South Korea.
    Shulman, Katerina
    Hillel Yaffe Med Ctr, Oncol Unit, Hadera, Israel.
    Sieri, Sabina
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori, Epidemiol & Prevent Unit, Milan, Italy.
    Slattery, Martha L.
    Univ Utah, Dept Internal Med, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA.
    Southey, Melissa C.
    Univ Melbourne, Genet Epidemiol Lab, Dept Pathol, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Stadler, Zsofia K.
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Med, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10021 USA.
    Stegmaier, Christa
    Saarland Canc Registry, Saarbrucken, Germany.
    Su, Yu-Ru
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Tangen, Catherine M.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, SWOG Stat Ctr, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Thibodeau, Stephen N.
    Mayo Clin, Div Lab Genet, Dept Lab Med & Pathol, Rochester, MN USA.
    Thomas, Duncan C.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, USC Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Thomas, Sushma S.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Toland, Amanda E.
    Ohio State Univ, Ctr Comprehens Canc, Dept Canc Biol & Genet, Columbus, OH 43210 USA;Ohio State Univ, Ctr Comprehens Canc, Dept Internal Med, Columbus, OH 43210 USA.
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Hellen Hlth Fdn, Athens, Greece;Univ Athens, WHO Collaborating Ctr Nutr & Hlth, Unit Nutr Epidemiol & Nutr Publ Hlth, Dept Hyg Epidemiol & Med Stat,Sch Med, Athens, Greece.
    Ulrich, Cornelia M.
    Univ Utah, Huntsman Canc Inst, Salt Lake City, UT USA;Univ Utah, Dept Populat Hlth Sci, Salt Lake City, UT USA.
    Van den Berg, David J.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, USC Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    van Duijnhoven, Franzel J. B.
    Wageningen Univ & Res, Div Human Nutr & Hlth, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umea Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, Oncol Unit, Umea, Sweden.
    van Kranen, Henk
    Natl Inst Publ Hlth & Environm RIVM, Bilthoven, Netherlands.
    Vijai, Joseph
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Med, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10021 USA.
    Visvanathan, Kala
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Baltimore, MD USA.
    Vodicka, Pavel
    Czech Acad Sci, Dept Mol Biol Canc, Inst Expt Med, Prague, Czech Republic;Charles Univ Prague, Inst Biol & Med Genet, Fac Med 1, Prague, Czech Republic;Charles Univ Prague, Fac Med, Plzen, Czech Republic;Charles Univ Prague, Biomed Ctr Pilsen, Plzen, Czech Republic.
    Vodickova, Ludmila
    Czech Acad Sci, Dept Mol Biol Canc, Inst Expt Med, Prague, Czech Republic;Charles Univ Prague, Inst Biol & Med Genet, Fac Med 1, Prague, Czech Republic;Charles Univ Prague, Fac Med, Plzen, Czech Republic;Charles Univ Prague, Biomed Ctr Pilsen, Plzen, Czech Republic.
    Vymetalkova, Veronika
    Czech Acad Sci, Dept Mol Biol Canc, Inst Expt Med, Prague, Czech Republic;Charles Univ Prague, Inst Biol & Med Genet, Fac Med 1, Prague, Czech Republic;Charles Univ Prague, Fac Med, Plzen, Czech Republic;Charles Univ Prague, Biomed Ctr Pilsen, Plzen, Czech Republic.
    Weigl, Korbinian
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Heidelberg, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, German Canc Consortium DKTK, Heidelberg, Germany;Heidelberg Univ, Med Fac, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Weinstein, Stephanie J.
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    White, Emily
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Win, Aung Ko
    Royal Melbourne Hosp, Genom Med & Family Canc Clin, Parkville, Vic, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Wolf, C. Roland
    Univ Dundee, Sch Med, Dundee, Scotland.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Woods, Michael O.
    Mem Univ Newfoundland, Discipline Genet, St John, NF, Canada.
    Wu, Anna H.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, USC Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Zaidi, Syed H.
    Ontario Inst Canc Res, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Zanke, Brent W.
    Univ Toronto, Div Hematol, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Zhang, Qing
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Genom Shared Resource, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Zheng, Wei
    Vanderbilt Univ, Sch Med, Div Epidemiol, Dept Med,Vanderbilt Ingram Canc Ctr,Vanderbilt Ep, Nashville, TN 37212 USA.
    Scacheri, Peter C.
    Case Western Reserve Univ, Sch Med, Dept Genet & Genome Sci, Case Comprehens Canc Ctr, Cleveland, OH USA.
    Potter, John D.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Bassik, Michael C.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Genet, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Kundaje, Anshul
    Stanford Univ, Dept Comp Sci, Stanford, CA 94305 USA;Stanford Univ, Dept Genet, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Casey, Graham
    Univ Virginia, Ctr Publ Hlth Genom, Charlottesville, VA USA.
    Moreno, Victor
    Catalan Inst Oncol IDIBELL, Canc Prevent & Control Program, Barcelona, Spain;CIBER Epidemiol & Salud Publ CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain;Univ Barcelona, Dept Clin Sci, Fac Med, Barcelona, Spain;Bellvitge Biomed Res Inst IDIBELL, Colorectal Canc Grp, ONCOBELL Program, Barcelona, Spain.
    Abecasis, Goncalo R.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA;Univ Michigan, Ctr Stat Genet, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA.
    Nickerson, Deborah A.
    Univ Washington, Dept Genome Sci, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Gruber, Stephen B.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, USC Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Hsu, Li
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA;Univ Washington, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Peters, Ulrike
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA;Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Discovery of common and rare genetic risk variants for colorectal cancer2019In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 76-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To further dissect the genetic architecture of colorectal cancer (CRC), we performed whole-genome sequencing of 1,439 cases and 720 controls, imputed discovered sequence variants and Haplotype Reference Consortium panel variants into genome-wide association study data, and tested for association in 34,869 cases and 29,051 controls. Findings were followed up in an additional 23,262 cases and 38,296 controls. We discovered a strongly protective 0.3% frequency variant signal at CHD1. In a combined meta-analysis of 125,478 individuals, we identified 40 new independent signals at P < 5 x 10(-8), bringing the number of known independent signals for CRC to similar to 100. New signals implicate lower-frequency variants, Kruppel-like factors, Hedgehog signaling, Hippo-YAP signaling, long noncoding RNAs and somatic drivers, and support a role for immune function. Heritability analyses suggest that CRC risk is highly polygenic, and larger, more comprehensive studies enabling rare variant analysis will improve understanding of biology underlying this risk and influence personalized screening strategies and drug development.

  • 17.
    Jiang, Xia
    et al.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Program Genet Epidemiol & Stat Genet, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Cardiovasc Epidemiol, Nobels Vagen 13, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Finucane, Hilary K.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Program Med & Populat Genet, 75 Ames St, Cambridge, MA 02142 USA.
    Schumacher, Fredrick R.
    Case Western Reserve Univ, Dept Populat & Quantitat Hlth Sci, 10900 Eucid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA;Univ Hosp, Seidman Canc Ctr, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA.
    Schmit, Stephanie L.
    H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Canc Epidemiol, 12902 Magnolia Dr MRC CANCONT, Tampa, FL 33612 USA;H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Gastrointestinal Oncol, 12902 Magnolia Dr MRC CANCONT, Tampa, FL 33612 USA.
    Tyrer, Jonathan P.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Oncol, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Han, Younghun
    Geisel Sch Med Dartmouth, Dept Biomed Data Sci, 1 Med Ctr Dr, Dartmouth, NS, Lebanon.
    Michailidou, Kyriaki
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England;Cyprus Inst Neurol & Genet, Dept Elect Microscopy Mol Pathol, CY-1683 Nicosia, Cyprus.
    Lesseur, Corina
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Int Agcy Res Canc, Sect Genet, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France.
    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.
    UCL, Div Psychiat, Maple House,149 Tottenham Court Rd, London W1T 7NF, England;UCL, UCL Genet Inst, Gower St, London WC1E 6BT, England.
    Dennis, Joe
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Conti, David V.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA 48109 USA.
    Casey, Graham
    Univ Virginia, Publ Hlth Sci, POB 800717, Charlottesville, VI 80071 USA;Univ Virginia, Ctr Publ Hlth Genom, POB 800717, Charlottesville, VI 80071 USA.
    Gaudet, Mia M.
    Amer Canc Soc, Epidemiol Res Program, 250 Williams St NW, Atlanta, GA 30303 USA.
    Huyghe, Jeroen R.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.
    Albanes, Demetrius
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, 9609 Med Ctr Dr, Rockville, MD 20850 USA.
    Aldrich, Melinda C.
    Vanderbilt Univ, Div Epidemiol, Dept Thorac Surg, Med Ctr, 609 Oxford House, Nashville, TN 37232 USA.
    Andrew, Angeline S.
    Dartmouth Hitchcock Med Ctr, Dept Neurol, 7927 Rubin Bldg,Room 860,One Med Ctr Dr, Lebanon, NH 3756 USA.
    Andrulis, Irene L.
    Mt Sinai Hosp, Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Res Inst, Fred ALitwin Ctr Canc Genet, 600 Univ Ave, Toronto, ON M5G 1X5, Canada;Univ Toronto, Dept Mol Genet, 1 Kings Coll Circle, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada.
    Anton-Culver, Hoda
    Univ Calif Irvine, Genet Epidemiol Res Inst, Dept Epidemiol, 224 Irvine Hall, Irvine, CA 92617 USA.
    Antoniou, Antonis C.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Antonenkova, Natalia N.
    NNAlexandrov Res Inst Oncol & Med Radiol, Settlement Lesnoy 2, Minsk 223040, BELARUS.
    Arnold, Susanne M.
    Univ Kentucky, Markey Canc Ctr, 800 Rose St,Cc445, Lexington, KY 40508 USA.
    Aronson, Kristan J.
    Queens Univ, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, 10 Stuart St, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada;Queens Univ, Canc Res Inst, 10 Stuart St, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada.
    Arun, Banu K.
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Breast Med Oncol, 1155 Pressler St, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Bandera, Elisa V.
    Rutgers Canc Inst New Jersey, Canc Prevent & Control Program, 195 Little Albany St,Room 5568, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 USA.
    Barkardottir, Rosa B.
    Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Pathol, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, BMC Biomed Ctr, Vatnsmyrarvegi 16, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Barnes, Daniel R.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Batra, Jyotsna
    Australian Prostate Canc Res Ctr Qld, Translat Res Inst, 37 Kent St, Woolloongabba, Qld 4102, Australia;Queensland Univ Technol, Inst Hlth & Biomed Innovat, 60 Musk Ave, Kelvin Grove, Qld 4059, Australia;Queensland Univ Technol, Sch Biomed Sci, 60 Musk Ave, Kelvin Grove, Qld 4059, Australia.
    Beckmann, Matthias W.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nuremberg, Univ Hosp Erlangen, Comprehens Canc Ctr Erlangen Nuremberg, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, Univ Str 21-23, D-91054 Erlangen, Germany.
    Benitez, Javier
    Spanish Natl Canc Res Ctr CNIO, Human Canc Genet Programme, Calle Melchor Fernandez Almagro 3, Madrid 28029, Spain;Biomed Network Rare Dis CIBERER, AvMonforte Lemos,3-5Pabellon 11Planta 0, Madrid 28029, Spain.
    Benlloch, Sara
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England;Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, 15 Cotswold Rd, Sutton SM2 5NG, Surrey, England.
    Berchuck, Andrew
    Duke Univ, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Med Ctr, 25171 Morris Bldg, Durham, NC 27710 USA.
    Berndt, Sonja I.
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, 9609 Med Ctr Dr, Rockville, MD 20850 USA.
    Bickeboeller, Heike
    Univ Med Ctr Goettingen, Dept Genet Epidemiol, Humboldtallee 32, D-37073 Gottingen, Germany.
    Bien, Stephanie A.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA;Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, 1959 NE Pacific St,Hlth Sci Bldg,F-350, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Blomqvist, Carl
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Haartmaninkatu 4, FIN-00290 Helsinki, Finland;Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, S-70185 Orebro, Sweden.
    Boccia, Stefania
    Fdn Policlin Univ AGemelli IRCCS, I-00168 Rome, Italy;Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, I-00168 Rome, Italy.
    Bogdanova, Natalia V.
    NNAlexandrov Res Inst Oncol & Med Radiol, Settlement Lesnoy 2, Minsk 223040, BELARUS;Hannover Med Sch, Dept Radiat Oncol, Carl Neuberg Str 1, D-30625 Hannover, Germany;Hannover Med Sch, Gynaecol Res Unit, Carl Neuberg Str 1, D-30625 Hannover, Germany.
    Bojesen, Stig E.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Copenhagen Gen Populat Study, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-75 Herlev, Denmark;Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Dept Clin Biochem, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-75 Herlev, Denmark;Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Blegdamsvej 3B, DK-2200 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Bolla, Manjeet K.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Brauch, Hiltrud
    DrMargarete Fischer Bosch Inst Clin Pharmacol, Auerbachstr112, D-70376 Stuttgart, Germany;Univ Tubingen, Geschwister Scholl Pl, D-72074 Tubingen, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, German Canc Consortium DKTK, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Brenner, Hermann
    German Canc Res Ctr, German Canc Consortium DKTK, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, Div Prevent Oncol, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;Natl Ctr Tumor Dis NCT, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Brenton, James D.
    Univ Cambridge, Canc Res UK Cambridge Inst, Li Ka Shing Ctr, Robinson Way, Cambridge CB2 0RE, England.
    Brook, Mark N.
    Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, 15 Cotswold Rd, Sutton SM2 5NG, Surrey, England.
    Brunet, Joan
    CIBERONC, Catalan Inst Oncol, IDIBGI Inst Invest Biomed Girona, Genet Counseling Unit,Hereditary Canc Program, AvFranca S-N, Girona 17007, Spain.
    Brunnstrom, Hans
    Lund Univ, Clin Sci, Box 117, S-22100 Lund, Sweden;Dept Genet & Pathol, Div Lab Med, S-22185 Lund, Sweden.
    Buchanan, Daniel D.
    Univ Melbourne, Victorian Comprehens Canc Ctr, Ctr Canc Res, Parkville, Vic 3010, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Dept Clin Pathol, Colorectal Oncogen Grp, Parkville, Vic 3010, Australia;Royal Melbourne Hosp, Genom Med & Family Canc Clin, Parkville, Vic 3010, Australia.
    Burwinkel, Barbara
    Heidelberg Univ, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Neuenheimer Feld 440, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Epidemiol Grp, C080,Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Butzow, Ralf
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Pathol, Biomed Helsinki 4th Floor,Haartmaninkatu 8, Helsinki 00029, Finland;Helsinki Univ Hosp, Biomed Helsinki 4th Floor,Haartmaninkatu 8, Helsinki 00029, Finland.
    Cadoni, Gabriella
    Fdn Policlin Univ AGemelli IRCCS, I-00168 Rome, Italy;Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, I-00168 Rome, Italy.
    Caldes, Trinidad
    Hosp Clin San Carlos, Inst Invest Sanitaria San Carlos IdISSC, Med Oncol Dept, Ctr Invest Biomed Red Canc CIBERONC, Calle Prof Martin Lagos, Madrid 28040, Spain.
    Caligo, Maria A.
    Univ Pisa, Dept Lab Med, Sect Genet Oncol, Via Roma 67, I-56126 Pisa, Italy;Univ Hosp Pisa, Via Roma 67, I-56126 Pisa, Italy.
    Campbell, Ian
    Peter MacCallum Canc Ctr, 305 Grattan St, Melbourne, Vic 3000, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Sir Peter MacCallum Dept Oncol, 305 Grattan St, Melbourne, Vic 3000, Australia.
    Campbell, Peter T.
    Amer Canc Soc, Epidemiol Res Program, 250 Williams St NW, Atlanta, GA 30303 USA.
    Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine
    Sorbonne Univ, Tenon Hosp, GRC N 5 ONCOTYPE URO, F-75020 Paris, France;Tenon Hosp, CeRePP, F-75020 Paris, France.
    Cannon-Albright, Lisa
    Univ Utah, Dept Med, Div Genet Epidemiol, Sch Med, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA;George EWahlen Dept Vet Affairs Med Ctr, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA.
    Campa, Daniele
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;Univ Pisa, Dept Biol, I-56126 Pisa, Italy.
    Caporaso, Neil
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, 9609 Med Ctr Dr, Rockville, MD 20850 USA.
    Carvalho, Andre L.
    Barretos Canc Hosp, Mol Oncol Res Ctr, Rua Antenor Duarte Villela 1331, BR-784400 Barretos, SP, Brazil;Barretos Canc Hosp, Head & Neck Surg Dept, Pio 12,1331 Antenor Duarte Villela St, BR-14784400 Barretos, SP, Brazil.
    Chan, Andrew T.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Div Gastroenterol, 55 Fruit St, Boston, MA 02114 USA;Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Channing Div Network Med, Dept Med, 181 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, UCCH, Canc Epidemiol Grp, Martinistr 52, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany.
    Chanock, Stephen J.
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, 9609 Med Ctr Dr, Rockville, MD 20850 USA.
    Chen, Chu
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, Program Epidemiol, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.
    Christiani, David C.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Claes, Kathleen B. M.
    Univ Ghent, Ctr Med Genet, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Claessens, Frank
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Dept Cellular & Mol Med, Mol Endocrinol Lab, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.
    Clements, Judith
    Australian Prostate Canc Res Ctr Qld, Translat Res Inst, 37 Kent St, Woolloongabba, Qld 4102, Australia;Queensland Univ Technol, Inst Hlth & Biomed Innovat, 60 Musk Ave, Kelvin Grove, Qld 4059, Australia;Queensland Univ Technol, Sch Biomed Sci, 60 Musk Ave, Kelvin Grove, Qld 4059, Australia.
    Collee, J. Margriet
    Erasmus MC, Dept Clin Genet, Wytemaweg 80, NL-3015 CN Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Correa, Marcia Cruz
    Univ Puerto Rico Med Sci Campus, San Juan, PR 00936 USA;Comprehens Canc Ctr, San Juan, PR 00936 USA.
    Couch, Fergus J.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Lab Med & Pathol, 200 First StSW, Rochester, MN 55905 USA.
    Cox, Angela
    Univ Sheffield, Sheffield Inst Nucle Acids SInFoNiA, Dept Oncol & Metab, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN, S Yorkshire, England.
    Cunningham, Julie M.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Lab Med & Pathol, 200 First StSW, Rochester, MN 55905 USA.
    Cybulski, Cezary
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Dept Genet & Pathol, Int Hereditary Canc Ctr, ulUnii Lubelskiej 1, PL-71252 Szczecin, Poland.
    Czene, Kamila
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Daly, Mary B.
    Fox Chase Canc Ctr, Dept Clin Genet, 333 Cottman Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19111 USA.
    defazio, Anna
    Univ Sydney, Westmead Inst Med Res, Ctr Canc Res, 176 Hawkesbury Rd, Sydney, NSW 2145, Australia;Westmead Hosp, Dept Gynaecol Oncol, Hawkesbury Rd & Darcy Rd, Sydney, NSW 2145, Australia.
    Devilee, Peter
    Leiden Univ Med Ctr, Dept Pathol, Albinusdreef 2, NL-2333 ZA Leiden, Netherlands;Leiden Univ Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Albinusdreef 2, NL-2333 ZA Leiden, Netherlands.
    Diez, Orland
    Univ Hosp Vall dHebron, Vall dHebron Inst Oncol VHIO, Clin & Mol Genet Area, Oncogenet Grp, Passeig Vall dHebron 119-129, Barcelona 08035, Spain.
    Gago-Dominguez, Manuela
    Complejo Hosp Univ Santiago, SERGAS, Inst Invest Sanitaria Santiago de Compostela IDIS, Genom Med Grp,Galician Fdn Genom Med, Travesia Choupana S-N, Santiago De Compostela 15706, Spain;Univ Calif San Diego, Moores Canc Ctr, 3855 Hlth Sci Dr, La Jolla, CA 92037 USA.
    Donovan, Jenny L.
    Univ Bristol, Sch Social & Community Med, Bristol BS8 1TH, Avon, England.
    Doerk, Thilo
    Duell, Eric J.
    ICO IDIBELL, Canc Epidemiol Res Program, Unit Nutr & Canc, AvGran Via 199-203, Barcelona 08908, Spain.
    Dunning, Alison M.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Oncol, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Dwek, Miriam
    Univ Westminster, Fac Sci & Technol, Dept Biomed Sci, 309 Regent St, London W1B 2HW, England.
    Eccles, Diana M.
    Univ Southampton, Canc Sci Acad Unit, Fac Med, Tremona Rd, Southampton SO16 6YD, Hants, England.
    Edlund, Christopher K.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Med, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA.
    Edwards, Digna R. Velez
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr,Vanderbilt Genet Inst, 2525 West End Ave,Suite 600, Nashville, TN 37203 USA.
    Ellberg, Carolina
    Lund Univ, Dept Canc Epidemiol, Clin Sci, Barngatan 4, S-22242 Lund, Sweden.
    Evans, D. Gareth
    Univ Manchester, Cent Manchester Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, Manchester Ctr Genom Med, Div Evolut & Genom Sci,St Marys Hosp, Oxford Rd, Manchester M13 9WL, Lancs, England.
    Fasching, Peter A.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nuremberg, Univ Hosp Erlangen, Comprehens Canc Ctr Erlangen Nuremberg, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, Univ Str 21-23, D-91054 Erlangen, Germany;Univ Calif Los Angeles, David Geffen Sch Med, Dept Med, Div Hematol & Oncol, 10833 Le Conte Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.
    Ferris, Robert L.
    Univ Pittsburgh, UPMC Hillman Canc Ctr, Dept Otolaryngol, Canc Pavil,Suite 500,5150 Ctr Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15232 USA.
    Liloglou, Triantafillos
    Univ Liverpool, Mol & Clin Canc Med, Roy Castle Lung Canc Res Programme, Inst Translat Med, Wiliam Duncan Bldg,6 West Derby St, Liverpool L69 3BX, Merseyside, England.
    Figueiredo, Jane C.
    Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Samuel Oschin Comprehens Canc Inst, 8700 Beverly Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA;Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, 1450 Biggy St, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA.
    Fletcher, Olivia
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Inst Canc Res, Breast Canc Now Toby Robins Res Ctr, 123 Old Brompton Rd, London SW7 3RP, England.
    Fortner, Renee T.
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Fostira, Florentia
    Natl Ctr Sci Res Demokritos, Mol Diagnost Lab, INRASTES, Neapoleos 10, Athens 15310, Greece.
    Franceschi, Silvia
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Sect Infect, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France.
    Friedman, Eitan
    Chaim Sheba Med Ctr, Susanne Levy Gertner Oncogenet Unit, Emek HaEla St 1, IL-52621 Ramat Gan, Israel;Tel Aviv Univ, Sackler Fac Med, Haim Levanon 30, IL-69978 Ramat Aviv, Israel.
    Gallinger, Steven J.
    Mt Sinai Hosp, Dept Surg, 600 Univ Ave, Toronto, ON M5G 1X5, Canada;Samuel Lunenfeld Res Inst, 600 Univ Ave, Toronto, ON M5G 1X5, Canada;Univ Hlth Network Toronto Gen Hosp, 200 Elizabeth St, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4, Canada.
    Ganz, Patricia A.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Jonsson Comprehens Canc Ctr, Div Canc Prevent & Control Res, Sch Med, 650 Charles Young Dr South, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA;Univ Calif Los Angeles, Jonsson Comprehens Canc Ctr, Div Canc Prevent & Control Res, Sch Publ Hlth, 650 Charles Young Dr South, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.
    Garber, Judy
    Dana Farber Canc Inst, Canc Risk & Prevent Clin, 450 Brookline Ave, Boston, MA 02215 USA.
    Garcia-Saenz, Jose A.
    Hosp Clin San Carlos, Inst Invest Sanitaria San Carlos IdISSC, Med Oncol Dept, Ctr Invest Biomed Red Canc CIBERONC, Calle Prof Martin Lagos, Madrid 28040, Spain.
    Gayther, Simon A.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, 1975 Zonal Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA;Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Samuel Oschin Comprehens Canc Inst, Ctr Canc Prevent & Translat Genom, Spielberg Bldg,8725 Alden Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA;Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Dept Biomed Sci, Spielberg Bldg,8725 Alden Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA.
    Giles, Graham G.
    Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol & Intelligence Div, 615 St Kilda Rd, Melbourne, Vic 3004, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Level 1,723 Swanston St, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia;Monash Univ, Dept Epidemiol & Prevent Med, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Godwin, Andrew K.
    Univ Kansas, Dept Pathol & Lab Med, Med Ctr, 3901 Rainbow Blvd, Kansas City, KS 66160 USA.
    Goldberg, Mark S.
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;McGill Univ, Dept Med, 1001 Decarie Blvd, Montreal, PQ H4A 3J1, Canada;McGill Univ, Royal Victoria Hosp, Div Clin Epidemiol, 1001 Decarie Blvd, Montreal, PQ H4A 3J1, Canada.
    Goldgar, David E.
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Univ Utah, Huntsman Canc Inst, Dept Dermatol, Sch Med, 2000 Circle Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA.
    Goode, Ellen L.
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Mayo Clin, Dept Hlth Sci Res, 200 First StSW, Rochester, MN 55905 USA.
    Goodman, Marc T.
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Samuel Oschin Comprehens Canc Inst, Canc Prevent & Control, 8700 Beverly Blvd,Room 1S37, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA;Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Dept Biomed Sci, Commun & Populat Hlth Res Inst, 8700 Beverly Blvd,Room 1S37, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA.
    Goodman, Gary
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Swedish Canc Inst, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1221 Madison StSte 300, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.
    Grankvist, Kjell
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Umea Univ, Unit Clin Chem, Dept Med Biosci, 6M Van 2, S-90185 Umea, Sweden.
    Greene, Mark H.
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;NCI, Clin Genet Branch, DCEG, 9609 Med Ctr Dr, Bethesda, MD 20850 USA.
    Gronberg, Henrik
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gronwald, Jacek
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Dept Genet & Pathol, Int Hereditary Canc Ctr, ulUnii Lubelskiej 1, PL-71252 Szczecin, Poland.
    Guenel, Pascal
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Univ Paris Saclay, Univ Paris Sud, Ctr Res Epidemiol & Populat Hlth CESP, Canc & Environm Grp,INSERM, F-94805 Villejuif, France.
    Hakansson, Niclas
    Karolinska Inst, Div Nutr Epidemiol, Dept Environm Med, Nobels Vag 13, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hall, Per
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden;Soder Sjukhuset, Dept Oncol, Sjukhusbacken 10, S-11883 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hamann, Ute
    German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Genet Breast Canc, Neuenheimer Feld 580, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Hamdy, Freddie C.
    Univ Oxford, John Radcliffe Hosp, Nuffield Dept Surg Sci, Fac Med Sci, Oxford OX1 2JD, England.
    Hamilton, Robert J.
    Princess Margaret Canc Ctr, Dept Surg Oncol, 610 Univ Ave, Toronto, ON M5G 2M9, Canada.
    Hampe, Jochen
    Tech Univ Dresden, Univ Hosp Dresden, Dept Internal Med 1, D-01307 Dresden, Germany.
    Haugen, Aage
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;Natl Inst Occupat Hlth STAMI, Gydas Vei 8, N-0033 Oslo, Norway.
    Heitz, Florian
    DrHorst Schmidt Kliniken Wiesbaden, Dept Gynecol & Gynecol Oncol, Ludwig Erhard Str 100, D-65199 Wiesbaden, Germany;Knappschaft GmbH, Dept Gynecol & Gynecol Oncol, Kliniken Essen Mitte, EvangHuyssens Stiftung, Henricistr 92, D-45136 Essen, Germany.
    Herrero, Rolando
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Early Detect & Prevent Sect, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France.
    Hillemanns, Peter
    Hoffmeister, Michael
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Hogdall, Estrid
    Danish Canc Soc Res Ctr, Dept Virus Lifestyle & Genes, Strandboulevarden 49, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark;Univ Copenhagen, Herlev Hosp, Dept Pathol, Mol Unit, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-75 Herlev, Denmark.
    Hong, Yun-Chul
    Seoul Natl Univ, Coll Med, Prevent Med, 1 Gwanak Ro, Seoul 151742, South Korea.
    Hopper, John L.
    Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Level 1,723 Swanston St, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia.
    Houlston, Richard
    Inst Canc Res, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Ingolstadter Landstr1, Sutton SM2 5NG, Surrey, England.
    Hulick, Peter J.
    NorthShore Univ HealthSystem, Ctr Med Genet, Evanston, IL 1000 USA;Univ Chicago, Pritzker Sch Med, 924 E 57th St, Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Hunter, David J.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Program Genet Epidemiol & Stat Genet, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Huntsman, David G.
    BC Canc Agcy, Vancouver Gen Hosp, British Columbias Ovarian Canc Res OVCARE Program, 3427-600 West 10th Ave, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4E6, Canada;Univ British Columbia, 3427-600 West 10th Ave, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4E6, Canada;BC Canc Agcy Res Ctr, Dept Mol Oncol, 3427-600 West 10th Ave, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4E6, Canada.
    Idos, Gregory
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA 48109 USA.
    Imyanitov, Evgeny N.
    Univ British Columbia, Dept Pathol & Lab Med, 3427-600 West 10th Ave, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4E6, Canada;NNPetrov Inst Oncol, Leningradskaya Ul 68, St Petersburg 197758, Russia.
    Ingles, Sue Ann
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA 48109 USA.
    Isaacs, Claudine
    Georgetown Univ, Lombardi Comprehens Canc Ctr, 3800 Reservoir Rd, Washington, DC 20007 USA.
    Jakubowska, Anna
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Dept Genet & Pathol, Int Hereditary Canc Ctr, ulUnii Lubelskiej 1, PL-71252 Szczecin, Poland;Pomeranian Med Univ, Independent Lab Mol Biol & Genet Diagnost, Rybacka 1, PL-70204 Szczecin, Poland.
    James, Paul
    Univ Melbourne, Sir Peter MacCallum Dept Oncol, 305 Grattan St, Melbourne, Vic 3000, Australia;Peter MacCallum Canc Ctr, Parkville Familial Canc Ctr, 305 Grattan St, Melbourne, Vic 3000, Australia.
    Jenkins, Mark A.
    Univ Melbourne, Victorian Comprehens Canc Ctr, Ctr Canc Res, Parkville, Vic 3010, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Level 1,723 Swanston St, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia.
    Johansson, Mattias
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Sect Genet, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Umea Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, 6M Van 2, S-90185 Umea, Sweden.
    John, Esther M.
    Stanford Univ, Sch Med, Div Oncol, Dept Med, 780 Welch Rd, Stanford, CA 94304 USA;Stanford Univ, Sch Med, Stanford Canc Inst, 780 Welch Rd, Stanford, CA 94304 USA.
    Joshi, Amit D.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Clin & Translat Epidemiol Unit, Boston, MA 02114 USA.
    Kaneva, Radka
    Med Univ Sofia, Fac Med, Dept Med Chem & Biochem, Mol Med Ctr, Sofia 1504, Bulgaria.
    Karlan, Beth Y.
    Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Samuel Oschin Comprehens Canc Inst, Womens Canc Program, 8700 Beverly Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA.
    Kelemen, Linda E.
    Med Univ South Carolina, Hollings Canc Ctr, 68 President St Bioengineering Bldg,MSC955, Charleston, SC 29425 USA;Med Univ South Carolina, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, 68 President St Bioengineering Bldg,MSC955, Charleston, SC 29425 USA.
    Kuhl, Tabea
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, UCCH, Canc Epidemiol, Martinistr 52, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Clin Gerontol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Khusnutdinova, Elza
    Bashkir State Univ, Dept Genet & Fundamental Med, ulZaki Validi 32, Ufa 450076, Russia;Russian Acad Sci, Inst Biochem & Genet, Ufa Sci Ctr, 71 Prosp Oktyabrya, Ufa 450054, Russia.
    Kibel, Adam S.
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Div Urol Surg, Boston, MA USA.
    Kiemeney, Lambertus A.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Radboud Inst Hlth Sci, Med Ctr, Geert Grooteplein 21, NL-6525 EZ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Kim, Jeri
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Genitourinary Med Oncol, 1155 Pressler St, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Kjaer, Susanne K.
    Danish Canc Soc Res Ctr, Dept Virus Lifestyle & Genes, Strandboulevarden 49, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark;Univ Copenhagen, Dept Gynaecol, Rigshosp, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Knight, Julia A.
    Sinai Hlth Syst, Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Res Inst, Prosserman Ctr Populat Hlth Res, 60 Murray St, Toronto, ON M5T 3L9, Canada;Univ Toronto, Dalla Lana Sch Publ Hlth, Div Epidemiol, 155 Coll St, Toronto, ON M5T 3M7, Canada.
    Kogevinas, Manolis
    Biomed Network Rare Dis CIBERER, AvMonforte Lemos,3-5Pabellon 11Planta 0, Madrid 28029, Spain;ISGlobal, Ctr Res Environm Epidemiol CREAL, Barcelona 08036, Spain;IMIM Hosp del Mar Res Inst, Barcelona 08003, Spain;UPF, Barcelona 08002, Spain.
    Kote-Jarai, Zsofia
    Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, 15 Cotswold Rd, Sutton SM2 5NG, Surrey, England.
    Koutros, Stella
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Dept Hlth & Human Serv, NIH, 9609 Med Ctr Dr, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Kristensen, Vessela N.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Inst Canc Res, Dept Canc Genet, Radiumhosp, Ullernchausseen 70, N-0379 Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Kirkeveien 166, N-0450 Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Mol Biol, Kirkeveien 166, N-0450 Oslo, Norway.
    Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta
    Maria Sklodowska Curie Inst, Ctr Oncol, Dept Pathol & Lab Diagnost, Roentgena 5, PL-02781 Warsaw, Poland.
    Lacko, Martin
    Maastricht Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, Head & Neck Surg, PDebyelaan 25,POBox 5800, NL-6202 AZ Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Lam, Stephan
    British Columbia Canc Agcy, Dept Integrat Oncol, Room 10-111 675 West 10th Ave, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1L3, Canada.
    Lambrechts, Diether
    VIB, VIB Ctr Canc Biol, Herestr 49, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium;Univ Leuven, Dept Human Genet, Lab Translat Genet, Oude Markt 13, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.
    Landi, Maria Teresa
    NCI, Integrat Tumor Epidemiol Branch, DCEG, 9609 Med Ctr Dr,Room SG 7E106, Rockville, MD 20850 USA.
    Lazarus, Philip
    Washington State Univ, Coll Pharm, PBS 431 POB 1495, Spokane, WA 99210 USA.
    Le, Nhu D.
    BC Canc Agcy, Canc Control Res, 675 West 10th Ave, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1L3, Canada.
    Lee, Eunjung
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, 1975 Zonal Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA.
    Lejbkowicz, Flavio
    Carmel Hosp, Clalit Natl Israeli Canc Control Ctr, Clalit Hlth Serv, 2 Horev St, IL-3436212 Haifa, Israel.
    Lenz, Heinz-Josef
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Med, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA.
    Leslie, Goska
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Lessel, Davor
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Inst Human Genet, Martinistr 52, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany.
    Lester, Jenny
    Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Samuel Oschin Comprehens Canc Inst, Womens Canc Program, 8700 Beverly Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA.
    Levine, Douglas A.
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Surg, Gynecol Serv, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10065 USA;NYU Langone Med Ctr, Laura & Isaac Pearlmutter Canc Ctr, Gynecol Oncol, 240 East 38th St 19th Floor, New York, NY 10016 USA.
    Li, Li
    Case Western Reserve Univ, Mary Ann Swetland Ctr Environm Hlth, Dept Family Med & Community Hlth, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA;Inst Invest Sanitaria Santiago de Compostela IDIS, Serv Galego Saude SERGAS, Santiago De Compostela 15706, Spain.
    Li, Christopher I.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Translat Res Program, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.
    Lindblom, Annika
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Mol Med & Surg, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindor, Noralane M.
    Mayo Clin Arizona, Hlth Sci Res, 13400 EShea Blvd, Scottsdale, AZ 85259 USA.
    Liu, Geoffrey
    Princess Margaret Canc Ctr, Div Epidemiol, 610 Univ Ave, Toronto, ON M5G 2M9, Canada.
    Loupakis, Fotios
    Ist Oncol Veneto IRCCS, Dept Clin & Expt Oncol, Unit Oncol 1, I-35122 Padua, Italy.
    Lubinski, Jan
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Dept Genet & Pathol, Int Hereditary Canc Ctr, ulUnii Lubelskiej 1, PL-71252 Szczecin, Poland.
    Maehle, Lovise
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Kirkeveien 166, N-0450 Oslo, Norway.
    Maier, Christiane
    Univ Hosp Ulm, Inst Human Genet, Prittwitzstr 43, D-89075 Ulm, Germany.
    Mannermaa, Arto
    Univ Eastern Finland, Translat Canc Res Area, Yliopistonranta 1, Kuopio 70210, Finland;Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Clin Med Pathol & Forens Med, KuopioYliopistonranta 1, Kuopio 70210, Finland;Kuopio Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Pathol, Imaging Ctr, Puijonlaaksontie 2, Kuopio 70210, Finland.
    Le Marchand, Loic
    Univ Hawaii, Program Epidemiol, Ctr Canc, 701 Ilalo St, Honolulu, HI 96813 USA.
    Margolin, Sara
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Sodersjukhuset, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    May, Taymaa
    Univ Hlth Network, Div Gynecol Oncol, Princess Margaret Hosp, 610 Univ Ave,OPG Wing 6-811, Toronto, ON M5G 2M9, Canada.
    McGuffog, Lesley
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Meindl, Alfons
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Tech Univ Munich, Div Gynaecol & Obstet, Arcisstr 21, D-80333 Munich, Germany.
    Middha, Pooja
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;Heidelberg Univ, Fac Med, Neuenheimer Feld 672, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Miller, Austin
    Roswell Pk Canc Inst, Stat & Data Management Ctr, NRG Oncol, Elm & Carlton St, Buffalo, NY 14263 USA.
    Milne, Roger L.
    Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol & Intelligence Div, 615 St Kilda Rd, Melbourne, Vic 3004, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Level 1,723 Swanston St, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia.
    MacInnis, Robert J.
    Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol & Intelligence Div, 615 St Kilda Rd, Melbourne, Vic 3004, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Level 1,723 Swanston St, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia.
    Modugno, Francesmary
    Magee Womens Res Inst, Canc Res Ctr, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 USA;Hillman Canc Ctr, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 USA;Univ Pittsburgh, Sch Med, Dept Obstet Gynecol & Reprod Sci, Div Gynecol Oncol, 300 Halket St, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 USA.
    Montagna, Marco
    Veneto Inst Oncol IOV IRCCS, Immunol & Mol Oncol Unit, Via Gattamelata 64, I-35128 Padua, Italy.
    Moreno, Victor
    Consortium Biomed Res Epidemiol & Publ Hlth CIBER, Bellvitge Biomed Res Inst IDIBELL, Catalan Inst Oncol, Barcelona 08908, Spain;Univ Barcelona, Barcelona 08908, Spain.
    Moysich, Kirsten B.
    Roswell Pk Canc Inst, Div Canc Prevent & Control, Elm & Carlton St, Buffalo, NY 14263 USA.
    Mucci, Lorelei
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Muir, Kenneth
    Univ Manchester, Div Populat Hlth Hlth Serv Res & Primary Care, Oxford Rd, Manchester M13 9PL, Lancs, England;Univ Warwick, Warwick Med Sch, Div Hlth Sci, Coventry CV4 7AL, W Midlands, England.
    Mulligan, Anna Marie
    Univ Toronto, Dept Lab Med & Pathobiol, 1 Kings Coll Circle, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada;Univ Hlth Network, Lab Med Program, 200 Elizabeth St, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4, Canada.
    Nathanson, Katherine L.
    Univ Penn, Perelman Sch Med, Abramson Canc Ctr, Dept Med, 3400 Civ Ctr Blvd, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.
    Neal, David E.
    Univ Cambridge, Canc Res UK Cambridge Inst, Li Ka Shing Ctr, Robinson Way, Cambridge CB2 0RE, England;Univ Oxford, John Radcliffe Hosp, Nuffield Dept Surg Sci, Fac Med Sci, Oxford OX1 2JD, England;Univ Cambridge, Addenbrookes Hosp, Dept Oncol, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Ness, Andrew R.
    Univ Bristol, NIHR Bristol Biomed Res Ctr Nutr Theme, Upper Maudlin St, Bristol BS2 8AE, Avon, England.
    Neuhausen, Susan L.
    Beckman Res Inst City Hope, Dept Populat Sci, 1500 E Duarte, Duarte, CA 91010 USA.
    Nevanlinna, Heli
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Haartmaninkatu 8, FIN-00290 Helsinki, Finland.
    Newcomb, Polly A.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA;Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, 1959 NE Pacific St,Hlth Sci Bldg,F-350, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Newcomb, Lisa F.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA;Univ Washington, Dept Urol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Nielsen, Finn Cilius
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Ctr Genom Med, Rigshosp, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nikitina-Zake, Liene
    Latvian Biomed Res & Study Ctr, Ratsupites Str 1, LV-1067 Riga, Latvia.
    Nordestgaard, Borge G.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Copenhagen Gen Populat Study, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-75 Herlev, Denmark;Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Dept Clin Biochem, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-75 Herlev, Denmark;Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Blegdamsvej 3B, DK-2200 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nussbaum, Robert L.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Canc Genet & Prevent Program, 1600 Div St, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Offit, Kenneth
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Canc Biol & Genet, Clin Genet Res Lab, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10065 USA;Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Med, Clin Genet Serv, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10065 USA.
    Olah, Edith
    Natl Inst Oncol, Dept Mol Genet, Rath Gyorgy u7-9, H-1122 Budapest, Hungary.
    Al Olama, Ali Amin
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England;Univ Cambridge, Dept Clin Neurosci, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England.
    Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.
    Univ Chicago, Ctr Clin Canc Genet, 5841S Maryland Ave, Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Olshan, Andrew F.
    Univ N Carolina, Gillings Sch Global Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 135 Dauer Dr, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA;UNC Lineberger Comprehens Canc Ctr, 450 West Dr, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA.
    Olsson, Hakan
    Lund Univ, Dept Canc Epidemiol, Clin Sci, Barngatan 4, S-22242 Lund, Sweden.
    Osorio, Ana
    Spanish Natl Canc Res Ctr CNIO, Human Canc Genet Programme, Calle Melchor Fernandez Almagro 3, Madrid 28029, Spain;Biomed Network Rare Dis CIBERER, AvMonforte Lemos,3-5Pabellon 11Planta 0, Madrid 28029, Spain.
    Pandha, Hardev
    Univ Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, Surrey, England.
    Park, Jong Y.
    HLee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Canc Epidemiol, 12902 Magnolia Dr, Tampa, FL 33612 USA.
    Pashayan, Nora
    UCL, Dept Appl Hlth Res, 1-19 Torrington Pl, London WC1E 6BT, England;Univ Cambridge, Dept Oncol, Strangeways Lab, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Parsons, Michael T.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Dept Genet & Computat Biol, 300 Herston Rd, Brisbane, Qld 4006, Australia.
    Pejovic, Tanja
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Pk Rd,L-466, Portland, OR 97239 USA;Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Knight Canc Inst, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Pk Rd,L-466, Portland, OR 97239 USA.
    Penney, Kathryn L.
    Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Channing Div Network Med, Dept Med, 181 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Peters, Wilbert H. M.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Gastroenterol, Geert Grooteplein Zuid 10,Internal BOBox 433, NL-6525 GA Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Phelan, Catherine M.
    HLee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Canc Epidemiol, 12902 Magnolia Dr, Tampa, FL 33612 USA.
    Phipps, Amanda I.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA;Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 1959 NE Pacific St, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana
    Macedonian Acad Sci & Arts, Res Ctr Genet Engn & Biotechnol Georgi DEfremov, Blvd Krste Petkov Misirkov, Skopje 1000, Macedonia.
    Pring, Miranda
    Univ Bristol, Bristol Dent Sch, Lower Maudlin St, Bristol BS1 2LY, Avon, England.
    Prokofyeva, Darya
    Bashkir State Univ, Dept Genet & Fundamental Med, ulZaki Validi 32, Ufa 450076, Russia.
    Radice, Paolo
    INT, Fdn IRCCS, Dept Res, Unit Mol Bases Genet Risk & Genet Testing, Via Giacomo Venezian 1, I-20133 Milan, Italy.
    Stefansson, Kari
    Decode Genet, Sturlugata 8, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Ramus, Susan J.
    Univ NSW Sydney, Sch Womens & Childrens Hlth, Fac Med, 18 High St, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia;Garvan Inst Med Res, Kinghorn Canc Ctr, 384 Victoria St, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia.
    Raskin, Leon
    Vanderbilt Univ, Sch Med, Vanderbilt Ingram Canc Ctr, Div Epidemiol,Dept Med,Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr, 1161 21st Ave S D3300, Nashville, TN 37232 USA.
    Rennert, Gad
    Carmel Hosp, Clalit Natl Canc Control Ctr, 7 Michal St, IL-34362 Haifa, Israel;Technion Fac Med, 7 Michal St, IL-34362 Haifa, Israel.
    Rennert, Hedy S.
    Carmel Hosp, Clalit Natl Canc Control Ctr, 7 Michal St, IL-34362 Haifa, Israel;Technion Fac Med, 7 Michal St, IL-34362 Haifa, Israel.
    van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.
    Univ Pretoria, Dept Genet, Private Bag X323, ZA-0007 Arcadia, South Africa.
    Riggan, Marjorie J.
    Duke Univ, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Med Ctr, 25171 Morris Bldg, Durham, NC 27710 USA.
    Risch, Harvey A.
    Yale Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Chron Dis Epidemiol, 60 Coll St, New Haven, CT 06510 USA.
    Risch, Angela
    Salzburg Univ, Dept Mol Biol, Canc Ctr Cluster Salzburg, PLUS, Billrothstr11, A-5020 Salzburg, Austria;DKFZ German Canc Res Ctr, Div Epigen & Canc Risk Factors, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;German Ctr Lung Res DZL, TLRC H, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Roobol, Monique J.
    Erasmus Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Urol, Wytemaweg 80, NL-3015 CN Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Rosenstein, Barry S.
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Dept Radiat Oncol, 1425 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10029 USA;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Dept Genet & Genom Sci, 1425 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10029 USA.
    Rossing, Mary Anne
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, Program Epidemiol, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA;Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol, M4 C308,1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.
    De Ruyck, Kim
    Univ Ghent, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Basic Med Sci, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Saloustros, Emmanouil
    Univ Hosp Heraklion, Hereditary Canc Clin, Iraklion 71110, Greece.
    Sandler, Dale P.
    NIEHS, Epidemiol Branch, NIH, 111TWAlexander Dr, Res Triangle Pk, NC 27709 USA.
    Sawyer, Elinor J.
    Kings Coll London, Guys Hosp, Guys Hosp Great Maze Pond, Res Oncol, London SE1 9RT, England.
    Schabath, Matthew B.
    HLee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Canc Epidemiol, 12902 Magnolia Dr, Tampa, FL 33612 USA.
    Schleutker, Johanna
    Univ Turku, Inst Biomed, Turku 20014, Finland;Turku Univ Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Div Lab, Turku 20014, Finland;Univ Tampere, Fac Med & Life Sci, Prostate Canc Res Ctr, Tampere 33014, Finland;Univ Tampere, BioMediTech Inst, Tampere 33014, Finland.
    Schmidt, Marjanka K.
    Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Netherlands Canc Inst, Div Mol Pathol, Plesmanlaan 121, NL-1066 CX Amsterdam, Netherlands;Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Netherlands Canc Inst, Div Psychosocial Res & Epidemiol, Plesmanlaan 121, NL-1066 CX Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Setiawan, V. Wendy
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, 1450 Biggy St, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA.
    Shen, Hongbing
    Nanjing Med Univ, Collaborat Innovat Ctr Canc Personalized Med, Jiangsu Key Lab Canc Biomarkers Prevent & Treatme, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat,Sch Publ Hlth, 101 Longmian Ave, Nanjing 211166, Jiangsu, Peoples R China.
    Siegel, Erin M.
    H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Canc Epidemiol, 12902 Magnolia Dr MRC CANCONT, Tampa, FL 33612 USA.
    Sieh, Weiva
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Dept Populat Hlth Sci & Policy, Dept Genet & Genom Sci, 1425 Madison Ave,2nd Floor, New York, NY 10029 USA.
    Singer, Christian F.
    Med Univ Vienna, Dept OB GYN, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna, Austria;Med Univ Vienna, Ctr Comprehens Canc, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna, Austria.
    Slattery, Martha L.
    Univ Utah, Dept Internal Med, Hlth Sci Ctr, 295 Chipeta Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 USA.
    Sorensen, Karina Dalsgaard
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Mol Med, DK-8200 Aarhus, Denmark;Aarhus Univ, Dept Clin Med, DK-8200 Aarhus, Denmark.
    Southey, Melissa C.
    Monash Univ, Sch Clin Sci, Precis Med, Monash Hlth, 246 Clayton Rd, Clayton, Vic 3168, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Dept Clin Pathol, Cnr Grattan St, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia;Royal Parade, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia.
    Spurdle, Amanda B.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Dept Genet & Computat Biol, 300 Herston Rd, Brisbane, Qld 4006, Australia.
    Stanford, Janet L.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA;Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 1959 NE Pacific St, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Stevens, Victoria L.
    Amer Canc Soc, Epidemiol Res Program, 250 Williams St NW, Atlanta, GA 30303 USA.
    Stintzing, Sebastian
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Univ Hosp, Dept Med 3, Marchioninistr15, D-81377 Munich, Germany.
    Stone, Jennifer
    Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Level 1,723 Swanston St, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia;Curtin Univ, Curtin UWA Ctr Genet Origins Hlth & Dis, 35 Stirling Hwy, Perth, WA 6000, Australia;Univ Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Perth, WA 6000, Australia.
    Sundfeldt, Karin
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Clin Sci, Sahlgrenska Canc Ctr, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Bla Straket 6, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sutphen, Rebecca
    Univ S Florida, Coll Med, Epidemiol Ctr, 3650 Spectrum Blvd,Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33612 USA.
    Swerdlow, Anthony J.
    Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, 15 Cotswold Rd, Sutton SM2 5NG, Surrey, England;Inst Canc Res, Div Breast Canc Res, London SW7 3RP, England.
    Tajara, Eloiza H.
    Sch Med Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Dept Mol Biol, Av Brig Faria Lima 5416 Vila Sao Pedro, BR-15090000 Sao Jose Do Rio Preto, SP, Brazil;Univ Sao Paulo, Inst Biosci, Dept Genet & Evolut Biol, Rua Matao 321, BR-05508090 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil.
    Tangen, Catherine M.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, SWOG Stat Ctr, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.
    Tardon, Adonina
    Univ Oviedo, Fac Med, Campus Cristo S-N, E-33006 Oviedo, Spain;CIBERESP, Campus Cristo S-N, Oviedo 33006, Spain.
    Taylor, Jack A.
    NIEHS, Epidemiol Branch, NIH, 111TWAlexander Dr, Res Triangle Pk, NC 27709 USA;NIEHS, Epigenet & Stem Cell Biol Lab, NIH, 111TWAlexander Dr, Res Triangle Pk, NC 27709 USA.
    Teare, M. Dawn
    Univ Sheffield, Sch Hlth & Related Res ScHARR, Med Stat Grp, Regent Court,30 Regent St, Sheffield S1 4DA, S Yorkshire, England.
    Teixeira, Manuel R.
    Portuguese Oncol Inst, Dept Genet, Rua DrAntonio Bernardino de Almeida 62, P-4220072 Porto, Portugal;Univ Porto, Biomed Sci Inst ICBAS, RJorge de Viterbo Ferreira 228, P-4050013 Porto, Portugal.
    Terry, Mary Beth
    Columbia Univ, Mailman Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 722 West 168th St, New York, NY 10032 USA.
    Terry, Kathryn L.
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Obstet & Gynecol Epidemiol Ctr, 221 Longwood Ave RFB 368, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard THChan Sch Publ Hlth, 221 Longwood Ave RFB 368, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Thibodeau, Stephen N.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Lab Med & Pathol, 200 First StSW, Rochester, MN 55905 USA.
    Thomassen, Mads
    Odense Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Genet, Sonder Blvd 29, DK-5000 Odense C, Denmark.
    Bjorge, Line
    Haukeland Hosp, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, N-5021 Bergen, Norway;Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Ctr Canc Biomarkers CCBIO, N-5021 Bergen, Norway.
    Tischkowitz, Marc
    McGill Univ, Dept Human Genet & Oncol, Program Canc Genet, 1001 Decarie Blvd, Montreal, PQ H4A 3J1, Canada;Univ Cambridge, Dept Med Genet, Hills Rd, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England.
    Toland, Amanda E.
    Ohio State Univ, Dept Canc Biol & Genet, 460W12th Ave, Columbus, OH 43210 USA.
    Torres, Diana
    German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Genet Breast Canc, Neuenheimer Feld 580, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;Pontificia Univ Javeriana, Inst Human Genet, Carrera 7 40-90, Bogota, Colombia.
    Townsend, Paul A.
    Univ Manchester, NIHR Manchester Biomed Res Ctr, Fac Biol Med & Hlth,Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Div Canc Sci,Manchester Canc Res Ctr,Hlth Innovat, Manchester M20 4GJ, Lancs, England.
    Travis, Ruth C.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Populat Hlth, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Oxford OX3 7LF, England.
    Tung, Nadine
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Dept Med Oncol, 330 Brookline Ave, Boston, MA 02215 USA.
    Tworoger, Shelley S.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA;HLee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Canc Epidemiol, 12902 Magnolia Dr, Tampa, FL 33612 USA.
    Ulrich, Cornelia M.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA;Univ Utah, Huntsman Canc Inst, 2000 Circle Hope,Rm 4125, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA;Univ Utah, Dept Populat Hlth Sci, 2000 Circle Hope,Rm 4125, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA.
    Usmani, Nawaid
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Univ Alberta, Cross Canc Inst, Dept Oncol, 116 St & 85 Ave, Edmonton, AB T6G 2R3, Canada;Univ Alberta, Cross Canc Inst, Div Radiat Oncol, 116 St & 85 Ave, Edmonton, AB T6G 2R3, Canada.
    Vachon, Celine M.
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Mayo Clin, Dept Hlth Sci Res, 200 First StSW, Rochester, MN 55905 USA.
    Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els
    Univ Hosp Leuven, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Div Gynecol Oncol, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium;Univ Hosp Leuven, Leuven Canc Inst, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.
    Vega, Ana
    Biomed Network Rare Dis CIBERER, AvMonforte Lemos,3-5Pabellon 11Planta 0, Madrid 28029, Spain;Fdn Publ Galega Med Xenom, Calle Choupana S-N, Santiago De Compostela 15706, Spain;Inst Invest Sanitaria Santiago de Compostela, Calle Choupana S-N, Santiago De Compostela 15706, Spain.
    Aguado-Barrera, Miguel Elias
    Fdn Publ Galega Med Xenom, Calle Choupana S-N, Santiago De Compostela 15706, Spain;Inst Invest Sanitaria Santiago de Compostela, Calle Choupana S-N, Santiago De Compostela 15706, Spain.
    Wang, Qin
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Webb, Penelope M.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Populat Hlth Dept, 300 Herston Rd, Brisbane, Qld 4006, Australia.
    Weinberg, Clarice R.
    NIEHS, Biostat & Computat Biol Branch, NIH, 111TWAlexander Dr, Res Triangle Pk, NC 27709 USA.
    Weinstein, Stephanie
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, 9609 Med Ctr Dr, Rockville, MD 20850 USA.
    Weissler, Mark C.
    Univ N Carolina, Dept Otolaryngol Head & Neck Surg, Chapel Hill, NC 27514 USA.
    Weitzel, Jeffrey N.
    City Hope Clin Canc Genom Community Res Network, 1500 East Duarte Rd, Duarte, CA 91010 USA.
    West, Catharine M. L.
    Univ Manchester, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Christie Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, Div Canc Sci,Manchester Canc Res Ctr, Manchester M13 9PL, Lancs, England.
    White, Emily
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA;Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.
    Whittemore, Alice S.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Hlth Res & Policy Epidemiol, Sch Med, 259 Campus Dr, Stanford, CA 94305 USA;Stanford Univ, Dept Biomed Data Sci, Sch Med, 259 Campus Dr, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Wichmann, H-Erich
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Inst Med Informat Biometry & Epidemiol, Chair Epidemiol, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany;Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Inst Med Informat Biometry & Epidemiol, Chair Epidemiol, Munich, Bavaria, Germany;German Res Ctr Environm Hlth GmbH, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Inst Epidemiol, Ingolstadter Landstr1, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany;Tech Univ Munich, Inst Med Stat & Epidemiol, D-80333 Munich, Germany.
    Wiklund, Fredrik
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Winqvist, Robert
    Univ Oulu, Lab Canc Genet & Tumor Biol, Canc & Translat Med Res Unit, Bioctr Oulu, Aapistie 5A, SF-90220 Oulu, Finland;Northern Finland Lab Ctr Oulu, Lab Canc Genet & Tumor Biol, Aapistie 5A, Oulu 90220, Finland.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Div Nutr Epidemiol, Dept Environm Med, Nobels Vag 13, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Woll, Penella
    Univ Sheffield, Weston Pk Hosp, Acad Unit Clin Oncol, Whitham Rd, Sheffield S10 2SJ, S Yorkshire, England.
    Woods, Michael
    Mem Univ Newfoundland, Discipline Genet, St John, NF A1C 5S7, Canada.
    Wu, Anna H.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, 1975 Zonal Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA.
    Wu, Xifeng
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Div Canc Prevent & Populat Sci, Dept Epidemiol, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Yannoukakos, Drakoulis
    Natl Ctr Sci Res Demokritos, Mol Diagnost Lab, INRASTES, Neapoleos 10, Athens 15310, Greece.
    Zheng, Wei
    Vanderbilt Univ, Sch Med, Vanderbilt Ingram Canc Ctr, Div Epidemiol,Dept Med,Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr, 1161 21st Ave S D3300, Nashville, TN 37232 USA.
    Zienolddiny, Shanbeh
    Natl Inst Occupat Hlth STAMI, Gydas Vei 8, N-0033 Oslo, Norway.
    Ziogas, Argyrios
    Univ Calif Irvine, Genet Epidemiol Res Inst, Dept Epidemiol, 224 Irvine Hall, Irvine, CA 92617 USA.
    Zorn, Kristin K.
    Univ Pittsburgh, Womens Hosp, Sch Med, 300 Halket St, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 USA.
    Lane, Jacqueline M.
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Program Med & Populat Genet, 75 Ames St, Cambridge, MA 02142 USA;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Ctr Genom Med, Boston, MA 02114 USA;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Anasthesia, Boston, MA 02114 USA.
    Saxena, Richa
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Program Med & Populat Genet, 75 Ames St, Cambridge, MA 02142 USA;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Ctr Genom Med, Boston, MA 02114 USA;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Anasthesia, Boston, MA 02114 USA.
    Thomas, Duncan
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, 1975 Zonal Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA.
    Hung, Rayjean J.
    Sinai Hlth Syst, Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Res Inst, Prosserman Ctr Populat Hlth Res, 60 Murray St, Toronto, ON M5T 3L9, Canada;Univ Toronto, Dalla Lana Sch Publ Hlth, Div Epidemiol, 155 Coll St, Toronto, ON M5T 3M7, Canada.
    Diergaarde, Brenda
    Univ Pittsburgh, Grad Sch Publ Hlth, Human Genet, UPMC Canc Pavil,Suite 4C,Off 467,5150 Ctr Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15232 USA;UPMC Hillman Canc Ctr, Pittsburgh, PA 15232 USA.
    Mckay, James
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Canc Susceptibil Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France.
    Peters, Ulrike
    Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 1959 NE Pacific St, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Hsu, Li
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.
    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, 9609 Med Ctr Dr, Rockville, MD 20850 USA.
    Eeles, Rosalind A.
    Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, 15 Cotswold Rd, Sutton SM2 5NG, Surrey, England;Inst Canc Res, Oncogenet Team, Downs Rd, Sutton SM2 5NG, Surrey, England;Royal Marsden NHS Fdn Trust, Downs Rd, Sutton SM2 5NG, Surrey, England.
    Chenevix-Trench, Georgia
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Dept Genet & Computat Biol, 300 Herston Rd, Brisbane, Qld 4006, Australia.
    Brennan, Paul J.
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Sect Genet, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France.
    Haiman, Christopher A.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA 48109 USA.
    Simard, Jacques
    Univ Laval, Res Ctr, Ctr Hosp Univ Quebec, Genom Ctr, 2705 Laurier Blvd, Quebec City, PQ G1V 4G2, Canada.
    Easton, Douglas F.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Oncol, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England;Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Gruber, Stephen B.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, 1975 Zonal Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA.
    Pharoah, Paul D. P.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Oncol, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England;Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Price, Alkes L.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Program Genet Epidemiol & Stat Genet, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Program Med & Populat Genet, 75 Ames St, Cambridge, MA 02142 USA.
    Pasaniuc, Bogdan
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, UCLA Path & Lab Med, 10833 Le Conte Ave, Los Angeles, CA 19009 USA.
    Amos, Christopher I.
    Baylor Coll Med, Inst Clin & Translat Res, Epidemiol Sect, Dept Med, One Baylor Plaza,MS BCM451,Suite 100D, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Kraft, Peter
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Program Genet Epidemiol & Stat Genet, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Lindstrom, Sara
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA;Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 1959 NE Pacific St, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Shared heritability and functional enrichment across six solid cancers2019In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, article id 431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantifying the genetic correlation between cancers can provide important insights into the mechanisms driving cancer etiology. Using genome-wide association study summary statistics across six cancer types based on a total of 296,215 cases and 301,319 controls of European ancestry, here we estimate the pair-wise genetic correlations between breast, colorectal, head/neck, lung, ovary and prostate cancer, and between cancers and 38 other diseases. We observed statistically significant genetic correlations between lung and head/neck cancer (r(g) = 0.57, p = 4.6 x 10(-8)), breast and ovarian cancer (r(g) = 0.24, p = 7 x 10(-5)), breast and lung cancer (r(g) = 0.18, p = 1.5 x 10(-6)) and breast and colorectal cancer (r(g) = 0.15, p = 1.1 x 10(-4)). We also found that multiple cancers are genetically correlated with non-cancer traits including smoking, psychiatric diseases and metabolic characteristics. Functional enrichment analysis revealed a significant excess contribution of conserved and regulatory regions to cancer heritability. Our comprehensive analysis of cross-cancer heritability suggests that solid tumors arising across tissues share in part a common germline genetic basis.

  • 18.
    Kaluza, J
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Håkansson, N
    Harris, H R
    Orsini, N
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Influence of anti-inflammatory diet and smoking on mortality and survival in men and women: two prospective cohort studies.2019In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 285, no 1, p. 75-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The associations between an anti-inflammatory diet and both all-cause and cause-specific mortality have been studied previously; however, the influence of an anti-inflammatory diet on survival time has not been investigated. Moreover, the potential modification of these associations by smoking status remains unclear.

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to examine the associations between an anti-inflammatory diet index (AIDI) and all-cause and cause-specific mortality, to determine the association between the AIDI and differences in survival time and to assess effect modification by smoking status.

    METHODS: The study population included 68 273 Swedish men and women (aged 45-83 years) at baseline. The anti-inflammatory potential of the diet was estimated using the validated AIDI, which includes 11 potential anti-inflammatory and five potential pro-inflammatory foods. Cox proportional hazards and Laplace regression were used to estimate hazard ratios and differences in survival time.

    RESULTS: During 16 years of follow-up (1 057 959 person-years), 16 088 deaths [5980 due to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and 5252 due to cancer] were recorded. Participants in the highest versus lowest quartile of the AIDI had lower risks of all-cause (18% reduction, 95% CI: 14-22%), CVD (20%, 95% CI: 14-26%) and cancer (13%, 95% CI: 5-20%) mortality. The strongest inverse associations between the highest and lowest quartiles of AIDI and risk of mortality were observed in current smokers: 31%, 36% and 22% lower risks of all-cause, CVD and cancer mortality, respectively. The difference in survival time between current smokers in the lowest AIDI quartile and never smokers in the highest quartile was 4.6 years.

    CONCLUSION: Adherence to a diet with high anti-inflammatory potential may reduce all-cause, CVD and cancer mortality and prolong survival time especially amongst smokers.

  • 19. Kaluza, Joanna
    et al.
    Harris, Holly
    Linden, Anders
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Long-term unprocessed and processed red meat consumption and risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a prospective cohort study of women2019In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 665-672Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Limited studies have examined red meat consumption in relation to risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and none have examined the impact of long-term diet on COPD risk. We sought to investigate the association between long-term red meat consumption and risk of COPD.

    METHODS: The population-based prospective Swedish Mammography Cohort included 34,053 women, aged 48-83 years, followed for the current analyses from 2002 to 2014. Unprocessed and processed red meat consumption was assessed with a self-administered questionnaire in 1987 and 1997. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

    RESULTS: Over a mean follow-up of 11.6 years (2002-2014; 393,831 person-years), 1488 COPD cases were ascertained via linkage to the Swedish health registers. A positive association between long-term processed red meat (average from 1987 to 1997) and risk of COPD was observed. In contrast, no association was observed with unprocessed red meat with corresponding HRs of 1.36 (95% CI 1.03-1.79) for processed and 0.87 (95% CI 0.74-1.02) for unprocessed red meat among women who consumed ≥ 50 g/day compared to < 25 g/day. The observed association with processed meat was confined to ex-smokers (P for interaction = 0.30); women consuming of ≥ 50 g/day of processed meat had a 2.3-fold (95% CI 1.24-4.12) higher risk of COPD than those consuming < 25 g/day. No similar associations were observed among current or never smokers.

    CONCLUSION: In this prospective cohort of women with moderate red meat consumption, long-term processed red meat consumption was associated with an increased risk of COPD particularly among ex-smokers.

  • 20.
    Kaluza, Joanna
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.; Warsaw Univ Life Sci SGGW, Dept Human Nutr, Nutr Res Lab, 159C Nowoursynowska St, PL-02776 Warsaw, Poland..
    Harris, Holly
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Program Epidemiol, Div Publ Hlth Sci, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Questionnaire-Based Anti-Inflammatory Diet Index as a Predictor of Low-Grade Systemic Inflammation.2018In: Antioxidants and Redox Signaling, ISSN 1523-0864, E-ISSN 1557-7716, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 78-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is accumulating evidence that diet may be associated with markers of inflammation. We have evaluated if an empirically developed questionnaire-based Anti-Inflammatory Diet Index (AIDI) may predict low-grade systemic chronic inflammation in a Nordic population. The AIDI was developed using a 123-item food frequency questionnaire among 3503 women (56-74 years old) with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) plasma concentration <20 mg/L. Using Spearman correlations, we identified 20 foods (AIDI-20) statistically significantly related to hsCRP. The median (range) of AIDI-20 was 8 (0-17) scores, and the median concentration of hsCRP in the lowest versus the highest quintile of AIDI-20 (≤6 vs. ≥11 scores) varied by 80% (1.8 vs. 1.0 mg/L, respectively). In a multivariable-adjusted linear regression model, women in the highest quintile of AIDI-20 compared with those in the lowest had a 26% (95% confidence interval [CI] 18-33%; p-trend <0.001) lower hsCRP concentration; each 1-score increment in the AIDI-20 was associated with a 0.06 (95% CI 0.04-0.08) mg/L lower hsCRP. The observed association between the AIDI-20 and hsCRP was robust by all hsCRP levels and in subgroups defined by inflammatory-related factors. Our results lead to the hypothesis that the empirically developed questionnaire-based dietary anti-inflammatory index may predict low-grade systemic inflammation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 28, 78-84.

  • 21.
    Kaluza, Joanna
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Cardiovasc & Nutr Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden;Warsaw Univ Life Sci, Fac Human Nutr & Consumer Sci, Dept Human Nutr, 159C Nowoursynowska St, PL-02776 Warsaw, Poland.
    Harris, Holly R.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, Program Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Linden, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Lung & Airway Res, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Resp Med & Allergy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Cardiovasc & Nutr Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden;.
    Alcohol Consumption and Risk of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Prospective Cohort Study of Men2019In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 188, no 5, p. 907-916Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies indicate an inverse association between moderate alcohol consumption and chronic inflammatory diseases; however, the association between alcohol consumption and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) incidence has not been widely studied. We investigated the associations of total alcohol consumption and intake of specific alcoholic beverages with risk of COPD in a population-based prospective cohort study, the Cohort of Swedish Men (n = 44,254). Alcohol consumption was assessed with a self-administered questionnaire in 1997. During follow-up (1998-2014), 2,177 COPD cases were ascertained. Moderate alcohol consumption was associated with the lowest risk of COPD. A J-shaped association was observed for ethanol consumption (P for nonlinearity = 0.003) and beer consumption (P for nonlinearity < 0.001); for wine consumption, a U-shaped association was observed (P for nonlinearity < 0.001). Defining a "standard drink" as 12 g of ethanol, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios were 0.77 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.66, 0.90) and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.81, 1.05) for beer consumption of 4.1-6.0 and >6.0 standard drinks/week (SDW) versus <1.0 SDW, respectively; 0.80 (95% CI: 0.69, 0.93) and 1.00 (95% CI: 0.83, 1.21) for wine consumption of 2.0-4.0 and >4.0 SDW versus <1.0 SDW, respectively; and 1.10 (95% CI: 0.98, 1.24) and 1.20 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.44) for liquor consumption of 2.0-4.0 and >4.0 SDW versus <1.0 SDW, respectively. In conclusion, our findings suggest that moderate beer and wine consumption, but not liquor consumption, may decrease risk of COPD. Additional studies are needed to confirm these associations.

  • 22.
    Kaluza, Joanna
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden;Warsaw Univ Life Sci SGGW, Dept Human Nutr, Nutr Res Lab, Warsaw, Poland.
    Harris, Holly R
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, Program Epidemiol, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Linden, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Lung & Airway Res, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Lung Allergy Clin, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Long-term consumption of fruits and vegetables and risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a prospective cohort study of women2018In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 1897-1909Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Fruits and vegetables, due to high antioxidant capacity, may protect the lung from oxidative damage caused by tobacco smoke and potentially prevent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Only one study based on baseline diet has examined fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to risk of COPD, and no previous studies have examined long-term diet.

    Methods: We investigated whether long-term fruit and vegetable consumption was associated with COPD incidence among 34 739 women (age 48-83 years) in the population-based prospective Swedish Mammography Cohort. Fruit and vegetable consumption was assessed twice (1987, 1997) with a self-administered questionnaire. Cases of COPD were identified by linkage to the Swedish health register. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

    Results: During follow-up from 2002 to 2014, 1512 women were diagnosed with COPD. Long-term fruit was associated with lower risk of COPD; women in the highest vs lowest quintile of consumption (≥2.5 vs <0.8 servings/day) had a 37% lower risk of COPD (95% CI: 25-48%; P-trend < 0.0001). No association was observed with long-term vegetable intake. Current and ex-smokers with low long-term consumption of fruits (<1 serving/day) in comparison to never smokers with high consumption (≥3 servings/day) had a 38-fold (HR: 38.1; 95% CI: 20.2-71.7) and 13-fold (HR: 12.5, 95% CI: 6.5-24.1) higher risk of COPD, respectively. However, no significant interaction between smoking status and fruit intake in relation to COPD incidence was observed (P-interaction = 0.95).

    Conclusions: In this prospective cohort of middle-age and older women, long-term consumption of fruits but not vegetables was inversely associated with COPD incidence.

  • 23. Kaluza, Joanna
    et al.
    Harris, Holly
    Wallin, Alice
    Linden, Anders
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dietary Fiber Intake and Risk of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Prospective Cohort Study of Men.2018In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 254-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The limited literature suggests that dietary fiber intake from whole grains, fruits, and vegetables is negatively associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) via fiber's anti-inflammatory properties. Therefore, we investigated the association between total fiber and fiber sources and risk of COPD in the population-based prospective Cohort of Swedish Men (45,058 men, aged 45-79 years) with no history of COPD at baseline.

    METHODS: Dietary fiber intake was assessed with a self-administered questionnaire in 1997 and was energy-adjusted using the residual method. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) adjusted for potential confounders.

    RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 13.1 years (1998-2012), 1,982 incident cases of COPD were ascertained via linkage to the Swedish health registers. A strong inverse association between total fiber intake (≥36.8 vs. <23.7 g/day) and COPD was observed in current smokers (hazard ratio [HR]=0.54; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.43-0.67) and ex-smokers (HR=0.62, 95%CI=0.50-0.78) but not in never smokers (HR=0.93; 95%CI=0.60-1.45;P-interaction=0.04). For cereal fiber, HRs for highest vs. lowest quintile were 0.62 (95%CI=0.51-0.77,P-trend<0.001) in current smokers and 0.66 (95%CI=0.52-0.82,P-trend<0.001) in ex-smokers; for fruit fiber the HR was 0.65 (95%CI=0.52-0.81,P-trend<0.001) in current smokers and 0.77 (95%CI=0.61-0.98,P-trend=0.17) in ex-smokers; for vegetable fiber it was 0.71 (95%CI=0.57-0.88,P-trend=0.003) in current smokers and 0.92 (95%CI=0.71-1.19,P-trend=0.48) in ex-smokers.

    CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that high fiber intake was inversely associated with COPD incidence in men who are current or ex-smokers.

  • 24. Kaluza, Joanna
    et al.
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Linden, Anders
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Consumption of Unprocessed and Processed Red Meat and the Risk of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Prospective Cohort Study of Men.2016In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 184, no 11, p. 829-836Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Consumption of both processed and unprocessed red meat has been associated with a higher risk of major chronic diseases. However, only processed meat consumption has been studied in relation to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Therefore, we endeavored to determine the association between the risk of COPD and consumption of processed and unprocessed red meat while taking into account smoking status. The population-based prospective Cohort of Swedish Men included 43,848 men who were 45-79 years of age and had no history of COPD or cancer at baseline. Meat consumption was assessed using a self-administered questionnaire in 1997. During 13.2 years of follow-up, 1,909 COPD cases were ascertained. Consumption of processed meat was associated with risk of COPD: Compared with men who consumed less than 25 g/day of processed meat, men who consumed 75 g/day or more had a multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio of 1.21 (95% confidence interval: 1.02, 1.44; P for trend = 0.03). The positive association was confined to current smokers (P for interaction = 0.003); among smokers who consumed 75 g/day or more of processed red meat, the hazard ratio was 1.26 (95% confidence interval: 1.00, 1.60) when compared with persons who consumed less than 25 g/day. Consumption of unprocessed red meat was not associated with COPD incidence. Findings from this prospective study indicate that high consumption of processed red meat is associated with an increased COPD risk among smokers.

  • 25.
    Kaluza, Joanna
    et al.
    Warsaw Univ Life Sci SGGW, Dept Human Nutr, Nutr Res Lab, Warsaw, Poland;Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Cardiovasc & Nutr Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stackelberg, Otto
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Cardiovasc & Nutr Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Harris, Holly Ruth
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, Program Epidemiol, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA;Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Cardiovasc & Nutr Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Anti-inflammatory diet and risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm in two Swedish cohorts2019In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 105, no 24, p. 1876-1883Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The relationship between dietary patterns and development of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is not well understood. Thus, we prospectively evaluated the association between the anti-inflammatory potential of diet and risk of AAA. Methods The study population included the Cohort of Swedish Men (45 072 men) and the Swedish Mammography Cohort (36 633 women), aged 45-83 years at baseline. The anti-inflammatory potential of diet was estimated using Anti-inflammatory Diet Index (AIDI) based on 11 foods with anti-inflammatory potential and 5 with proinflammatory potential (maximum 16 points) that was validated againsthigh sensitivity C reactive protein (hsCRP). Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate HRs and 95% CIs. During the 14.9 years of follow-up (1 217 263 person-years), 1528 AAA cases (277 (18%) ruptured, 1251 non-ruptured) were ascertained via the Swedish Inpatient Register, the National Cause of Death Register and the Register for Vascular Surgery (Swedvasc). Results We observed an inverse association between the AIDI and AAA risk in women and men; HRs between extreme quartiles of the AIDI (>= 8 vs <= 5 points) were 0.55 (95% CI 0.36 to 0.83) in women and 0.81 (95% CI 0.68 to 0.98) in men. The AIDI was inversely associated with both ruptured and non-ruptured AAA incidence; the HR of participants in the highest quartile of AIDI compared with those in the lowest quartile was 0.61 (95% CI 0.41 to 0.90) for ruptured AAA and 0.79 (95% CI 0.65 to 0.95) for non-ruptured AAA. Conclusion Adherence to diet with a high anti-inflammatory potential was associated with a reduced AAA risk, an association that was even more pronounced for AAA rupture.

  • 26. Khalili, Hamed
    et al.
    Hakansson, Niclas
    Chan, Simon S
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F
    Olen, Ola
    Chan, Andrew T
    Hart, Andrew R
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    No Association Between Consumption of Sweetened Beverages and Risk of Later-Onset Crohn's Disease or Ulcerative Colitis.2019In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 1542-3565, E-ISSN 1542-7714, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 123-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Consumption of sweetened beverages has been associated with inflammation based on measurements of C-reactive protein and tumor necrosis factor, as well as immune-mediated disorders including rheumatoid arthritis. We investigated associations with Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC).

    METHODS: We conducted a prospective cohort study of 83,042 participants (age, 44-83 y) enrolled in the Cohort of Swedish Men or the Swedish Mammography Study. Dietary and lifestyle data were collected using a validated food frequency questionnaire at baseline in 1997. Diagnoses of CD and UC were ascertained from the Swedish Patient Register. We used Cox proportional hazards modeling to calculate hazard ratios and 95% CIs.

    RESULTS: Through December of 2014, we confirmed 143 incident cases of CD (incidence rate, 11 cases/100,000 person-years) and 349 incident cases of UC (incidence rate, 28 cases/100,000 person-years) over 1,264,345 person-years of follow-up evaluation. Consumption of sweetened beverages was not associated with increased risk of CD (Ptrend = .34) or UC (Ptrend = .40). Compared with participants who reported no consumption of sweetened beverages, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for 1 or more servings per day were 1.02 for CD (95% CI, 0.60-1.73) and 1.14 for UC (95% CI, 0.83-1.57). The association between consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and risk of CD or UC were not modified by age, sex (cohort), body mass index, or smoking (all Pinteraction ≥ .12).

    CONCLUSIONS: In analyses of data from 2 large prospective cohort studies from Sweden, we observed no evidence for associations between consumption of sweetened beverages and later risk of CD or UC.

  • 27.
    Khalili, Hamed
    et al.
    Harvard Med Sch, Gastroenterol Unit, Clin & Translat Epidemiol Unit, Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Karolinska Inst, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Dept Med Solna, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Reply to: The Association Between Consumption of Sweetened Beverages and the Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Disease2018In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 1542-3565, E-ISSN 1542-7714, Vol. 16, no 10, p. 1682-1682Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28. Kippler, Maria
    et al.
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Berglund, Marika
    Glynn, Anders
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Åkesson, Agneta
    Associations of dietary polychlorinated biphenyls and long-chain omega-3 fatty acids with stroke risk.2016In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 94, p. 706-711, article id S0160-4120(16)30270-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about joint exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and long-chain omega-3 fatty acids [eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)], through fish consumption, on cerebrovascular disease risk.

    OBJECTIVE: To explore associations of dietary PCB exposure and EPA-DHA intake with risk of different stroke subtypes.

    METHODS: This was assessed in the prospective population-based Cohort of Swedish Men including 39,948, middle-aged and elderly men, who were free of cardiovascular disease and cancer at baseline in 1997. Validated estimates of dietary PCBs and EPA-DHA were obtained via a food frequency questionnaire.

    RESULTS: During 12years of follow-up, 2286 and 474 incident cases of ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke, respectively, were ascertained through register linkage. Dietary PCB exposure and EPA-DHA intake were associated with hemorrhagic stroke but not ischemic stroke. Men in the highest quartile of dietary PCB exposure (median 412ng/day) had a multivariable- and EPA-DHA-adjusted RR of hemorrhagic stroke of 2.77 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.48-5.19] compared with men in the lowest quartile (median 128ng/day; p for trend <0.01). The corresponding RRs in men with and without hypertension were 5.45 (95% CI, 1.34-22.1) and 2.37 (95% CI 1.17-4.79), respectively. The multivariable- and PCB-adjusted RR of hemorrhagic stroke for the highest quartile of EPA-DHA intake (median 0.73g/day) versus the lowest quartile (median 0.18g/day) was 0.42 (95% CI, 0.22-0.79).

    CONCLUSION: Dietary PCB exposure was associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke, whereas a protective association was observed for dietary EPA-DHA intake.

  • 29.
    Larsson, S. C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden;Uppsala Univ, Dept Surg Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Håkansson, N.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bäck, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Coffee consumption and risk of aortic valve stenosis: A prospective study2018In: NMCD. Nutrition Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, ISSN 0939-4753, E-ISSN 1590-3729, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 803-807Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: Coffee contains many biologically active compounds with potential adverse or beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. Whether coffee consumption is associated with the risk of aortic valve stenosis (AVS) is unknown. The purpose of this study was therefore to examine the association between coffee consumption and AVS incidence.

    Methods and results: This prospective study included 71 178 men and women who provided information on their coffee consumption through a questionnaire at baseline. Incident cases of AVS were identified through linkage with the Swedish National Patient and Cause of Death Registers. During a mean follow-up of 15.2 years, 1295 participants (777 men and 518 women) were diagnosed with AVS. Coffee consumption was positively associated with risk of AVS in a dose - response manner after adjustment for age, sex, smoking, and other risk factors (P-trend = 0.005). The multivariable hazard ratios were was 1.11 (95% confidence interval 1.04 - 1.19) per 2 cups/day increase of coffee consumption and 1.65 (95% confidence interval 1.10 - 2.48) when comparing the highest (>= 6 cups/day) with the lowest (<0.5 cup/day) category of coffee consumption. The association was not modified by other risk factors.

    Conclusions: This study provides novel evidence that high coffee consumption is associated with an increased risk of AVS.

  • 30.
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Drca, Nikola
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Bäck, Magnus
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Div Valvular & Coronary Dis, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nut consumption and incidence of seven cardiovascular diseases2018In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 104, no 19, p. 1615-1620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Nut consumption has been found to be inversely associated with cardiovascular disease mortality, but the association between nut consumption and incidence of specific cardiovascular diseases is unclear. We examined the association between nut consumption and incidence of seven cardiovascular diseases. Methods This prospective study included 61 364 Swedish adults who had completed a Food Frequency Questionnaire and were followed up for 17 years through linkage with the Swedish National Patient and Death Registers. Results Nut consumption was inversely associated with risk of myocardial infarction, heart failure, atrial fibrillation and abdominal aortic aneurysm in the age-adjusted and sex-adjusted analysis. However, adjustment for multiple risk factors attenuated these associations and only a linear, dose-response, association with atrial fibrillation (p(trend)=0.004) and a non-linear association (p(non-linearity)=0.003) with heart failure remained. Compared with no consumption of nuts, the multivariable HRs (95% CI) of atrial fibrillation across categories of nut consumption were 0.97 (0.93 to 1.02) for 1-3 times/month, 0.88 (0.79 to 0.99) for 1-2 times/week and 0.82 (0.68 to 0.99) for 3times/week. For heart failure, the corresponding HRs (95% CI) were 0.87 (0.80 to 0.94), 0.80 (0.67 to 0.97) and 0.98 (0.76 to 1.27). Nut consumption was not associated with risk of aortic valve stenosis, ischaemic stroke or intracerebral haemorrhage. Conclusions These findings suggest that nut consumption or factors associated with this nutritional behaviour may play a role in reducing the risk of atrial fibrillation and possibly heart failure. Trial registration number NCT01127711 and NCT01127698; Results.

  • 31.
    Larsson, Susanna C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Drca, Nikola
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jensen-Urstad, Mats
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Chocolate consumption and risk of atrial fibrillation: Two cohort studies and a meta-analysis2018In: American Heart Journal, ISSN 0002-8703, E-ISSN 1097-6744, Vol. 195, p. 86-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Chocolate consumption has been inconsistently associated with risk of atrial fibrillation (AF). We investigated the association between chocolate consumption and risk of AF in Swedish adults from two cohort studies and conducted a meta-analysis to summarize available evidence from cohort studies on this topic.

    METHODS: Our study population comprised 40,009 men from the Cohort of Swedish Men and 32,486 women from the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Incident AF cases were ascertained through linkage with the Swedish National Patient Register. Published cohort studies of chocolate consumption in relation to risk of AF were identified by a PubMed search through September 14, 2017.

    RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 14.6 years, AF was diagnosed in 9978 Swedish men and women. Compared with non-consumers, the multivariable hazard ratio of AF for those in the highest category of chocolate consumption (≥3-4 servings/week) was 0.96 (95% CI 0.88-1.04). In a random-effects meta-analysis of 5 cohort studies, including 180,454 participants and 16,356 AF cases, the hazard ratios of AF were 0.97 (95% CI 0.94-1.01) per 2 servings/week increase in chocolate consumption and 0.96 (95% CI 0.90-1.03) for the highest versus lowest category of chocolate consumption.

    CONCLUSION: Available data provide no evidence of an association of chocolate consumption with risk of AF.

  • 32.
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Drca, Nikola
    Jensen-Urstad, Mats
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Coffee consumption is not associated with increased risk of atrial fibrillation: results from two prospective cohorts and a meta-analysis2015In: BMC Medicine, ISSN 1741-7015, E-ISSN 1741-7015, Vol. 13, article id 207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Whether coffee consumption affects the risk of developing atrial fibrillation (AF) remains unclear. We sought to investigate the association between coffee consumption and incidence of AF in two prospective cohorts, and to summarize available evidence using a meta-analysis.

    METHODS: Our study population comprised 41,881 men in the Cohort of Swedish Men and 34,594 women in the Swedish Mammography Cohort who had provided information on coffee consumption in 1997 and were followed up for 12 years. Incident cases of AF were ascertained by linkage with the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register. For the meta-analysis, prospective studies were identified by searching PubMed and Embase through 22 July 2015, and by reviewing the reference lists of retrieved articles. Study-specific relative risks were combined using a random effects model.

    RESULTS: We ascertained 4,311 and 2,730 incident AF cases in men and women, respectively, in the two cohorts. Coffee consumption was not associated with AF incidence in these cohort studies. The lack of association was confirmed in a meta-analysis, including six cohort studies with a total of 10,406 cases of AF diagnosed among 248,910 individuals. The overall relative risk (95% confidence interval) of AF was 0.96 (0.84-1.08) for the highest versus lowest category of coffee consumption, and 0.99 (0.94-1.03) per 2 cups/day increment of coffee consumption.

    CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence that coffee consumption is associated with increased risk of AF.

  • 33.
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Drca, Nikola
    Jensen-Urstad, Mats
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Combined impact of healthy lifestyle factors on risk of atrial fibrillation: Prospective study in men and women.2016In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 203, p. 46-9, article id S0167-5273(15)30664-1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The combined impact of multiple lifestyle factors on risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) remains unclear. We investigated the joint association of four modifiable lifestyle factors on incidence of AF in a prospective study of men and women.

    METHODS: The study cohort comprised 39 300 men in the Cohort of Swedish Men and 33 090 women in the Swedish Mammography Cohort who were 45-83 years of age and free from atrial fibrillation at baseline. Healthy lifestyle was defined as body mass index <25 kg/m(2), regular exercise for ≥ 20 min/day, no or light-to-moderate alcohol consumption (≤ 2 drinks/day for men and ≤ 1 drink/day for women), and not smoking. Incident AF cases were identified through linkage with the Swedish National Inpatient Register.

    RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 10.9 years, AF occurred in 4028 men and 2539 women. Compared with men and women with no healthy lifestyle factors, the multivariable relative risks (95% confidence interval) of AF were 0.83 (0.65-1.07) for one, 0.74 (0.58-0.94) for two, 0.62 (0.49-0.79) for three, and 0.50 (0.39-0.64) for four healthy lifestyle factors (P for trend <0.0001). The inverse association was similar in men and women.

    CONCLUSIONS: Four healthy lifestyle factors combined were associated with a halving of the risk of AF.

  • 34.
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Drca, Nikola
    Jensen-Urstad, Mats
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Incidence of atrial fibrillation in relation to birth weight and preterm birth2015In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 178, p. 149-152, article id S0167-5273(14)02075-0Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Hypertension, type 2 diabetes and other cardiovascular diseases, all risk factors for atrial fibrillation, are associated with birth weight. It remains unclear, however, whether risk of atrial fibrillation is also associated with birth weight. We investigated the associations of birth weight and preterm birth (i.e., born more than one month before term) with risk of atrial fibrillation (AF).

    METHODS: The study population comprised 29551 men and 23454 women who were free from AF at baseline. Information on birth weight, preterm birth, and risk factors for AF was obtained from a questionnaire. Incident AF cases were ascertained by linkage to the Swedish Inpatient Register.

    RESULTS: During 12years of follow-up, AF developed in 2711 men and 1491 women. High birth weight (≥5000g) was associated with an increased risk of AF after adjustment for age and other risk factors for AF, but the association did not persist after further adjustment for adult height. In men but not in women, low birth weight was associated with an increased risk of AF. Compared with men weighing 2500-3999g at birth, the multivariable RR was 1.86 (95% CI, 1.15 to 3.00) for those weighing <1500g. This association was stronger in men who were born full-term (RR 2.53; 95% CI, 1.35 to 4.73).

    CONCLUSIONS: Both high birth weight and low birth weight (in men), in particular in men born full-term, were associated with an increased risk of AF. The association with high birth weight appeared to be mediated through adult height.

  • 35.
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Giovannucci, Edward L
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Prospective Study of Glycemic Load, Glycemic Index, and Carbohydrate Intake in Relation to Risk of Biliary Tract Cancer2016In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0002-9270, E-ISSN 1572-0241, Vol. 111, no 6, p. 891-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Diets that induce a high glycemic response might increase the risk of biliary tract cancer (BTC). We evaluated the hypothesis that diets with high glycemic load (GL) and high glycemic index (GI), which are measures of the glycemic effect of foods, are associated with an increased incidence of BTC.

    METHODS: We used data from a population-based prospective study of 76,014 Swedish adults (age 45-83 years; 57% men) who were free of cancer and had completed a food-frequency questionnaire in the autumn of 1997. Incident cancer cases were ascertained by linkage with the Swedish Cancer Registry. Data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression models.

    RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 13.3 years (1,010,777 person-years), we identified 140 extrahepatic BTC cases (including 77 gallbladder cancers) and 23 intrahepatic BTC cases. A high dietary GL was associated with an increased risk of BTC. The multivariable relative risks for the highest versus lowest quartile of dietary GL were 1.63 (95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.01-2.63) for extrahepatic BTC, 2.14 (95% CI, 1.06-4.33) for gallbladder cancer, and 3.46 (95% CI, 1.22-9.84) for intrahepatic BTC. Dietary GI was statistically significantly positively associated with risk of extrahepatic BTC and gallbladder cancer. We observed no statistically significant association between carbohydrate intake and BTC risk, although all associations were positive.

    CONCLUSION: Although these data do not prove a causal relationship, they are consistent with the hypothesis that high-GL and high-GI diets are associated with an increased risk of BTC.

  • 36.
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Giovannucci, Edward L
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Sweetened Beverage Consumption and Risk of Biliary Tract and Gallbladder Cancer in a Prospective Study2016In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, ISSN 0027-8874, E-ISSN 1460-2105, Vol. 108, no 10, article id djw125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption raises blood glucose concentration and has been positively associated with weight gain and type 2 diabetes, all of which have been implicated in the development of biliary tract cancer (BTC). This study examined the hypothesis that sweetened beverage consumption is positively associated with risk of BTC in a prospective study.

    METHODS: The study population comprised 70 832 Swedish adults (55.9% men, age 45-83 years) from the Swedish Mammography Cohort and Cohort of Swedish Men who were free of cancer and diabetes and completed a food frequency questionnaire at baseline. Incident BTC case patients were ascertained through linkage with the Swedish Cancer Register. Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to analyze the data. All statistical tests were two-sided.

    RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 13.4 years, 127 extrahepatic BTC case patients (including 71 gallbladder cancers) and 21 intrahepatic BTC case patients were ascertained. After adjustment for other risk factors, women and men in the highest category of combined sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened beverage consumption had a statistically significantly increased risk of extrahepatic BTC and gallbladder cancer. The multivariable hazard ratios for two or more servings per day (200 mL/serving) of sweetened beverages compared with no consumption were 1.79 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.02 to 3.13) for extrahepatic BTC and 2.24 (95% CI = 1.02 to 4.89) for gallbladder cancer. The corresponding hazard ratio for intrahepatic BTC was 1.69 (95% CI = 0.41 to 7.03).

    CONCLUSIONS: These findings support the hypothesis that high consumption of sweetened beverages may increase the risk of BTC, particularly gallbladder cancer.

  • 37.
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Håkansson, Niclas
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Dietary cysteine and other amino acids and stroke incidence in women2015In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 922-926Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cysteine could potentially lower the risk of stroke through antihypertensive and antioxidant effects. Our aim was to evaluate the hypothesis that cysteine intake is inversely associated with stroke incidence.

    METHODS: We used data from the Swedish Mammography Cohort, a population-based prospective cohort of 34 250 women who were free of cardiovascular disease and cancer and had completed a food-frequency questionnaire about diet and other risk factors for stroke in the autumn of 1997. Stroke cases were identified by linkage of the study population with the Swedish Inpatient Register and the Swedish Cause of Death Register. Relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals, adjusted for potential confounders, were estimated by using Cox proportional hazards regression model.

    RESULTS: We ascertained 1751 incident cases of stroke during 10.4 years of follow-up. Dietary cysteine intake (mean, 635 mg/d) was inversely associated with stroke risk. The multivariable RR of total stroke comparing the highest with the lowest quintile of cysteine intake was 0.79 (95% confidence interval, 0.65-0.97; P for trend=0.04). The corresponding RR was 0.82 (95% confidence interval, 0.65-1.03; P for trend=0.12) for cerebral infarction and 0.54 (95% confidence interval, 0.29-1.03; P for trend=0.08) for intracerebral hemorrhage. Dietary intake of other amino acids showed no independent (after adjustment for cysteine intake) association with stroke risk.

    CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that dietary cysteine intake may be inversely associated with risk of stroke.

    CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01127698.

  • 38.
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Orsini, Nicola
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Alcohol consumption and risk of heart failure: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies2015In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 367-373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to conduct a meta-analysis of prospective studies assessing the relationship between alcohol consumption and risk of heart failure (HF).

    METHODS AND RESULTS: We searched the PubMed database from inception to September 2014 and reviewed the reference list of relevant articles to identify prospective studies assessing the association between alcohol consumption and risk of HF. Study-specific relative risk (RR) estimates were combined using a random-effects meta-analysis. The meta-analysis included eight prospective studies, with a total of 202 378 participants and 6211 cases of HF. The pooled adjusted RRs of HF were 0.85 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78-0.93] for light to moderate alcohol consumption (<14 drinks/week) and 0.90 (95% CI 0.72-1.13) for high alcohol consumption (≥14 drinks/week) compared with non-drinkers. In a dose-response meta-analysis, we observed a non-linear relationship between alcohol consumption and risk of HF (P for non-linearity = 0.001). Compared with non-drinkers, the RRs (95% CI) across levels of alcohol consumption were 0.90 (0.84-0.96) for 3 drinks/week, 0.83 (0.73-0.95) for 7 drinks/week, 0.84 (0.72-0.98) for 10 drinks/week, 0.90 (0.73-1.10) for 14 drinks/week, and 1.07 (0.77-1.48) for 21 drinks/week.

    CONCLUSION: Alcohol consumption in moderation is associated with a reduced risk of HF.

  • 39.
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Orsini, Nicola
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Urinary cadmium concentration and risk of breast cancer: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis2015In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 182, no 5, p. 375-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cadmium is a toxic and persistent heavy metal with estrogenic activities. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies of the association between urinary cadmium concentration, a biomarker of cadmium exposure, and breast cancer risk. Studies were identified by searching PubMed and Embase (to March 15, 2015) and by reviewing the reference lists of pertinent articles. Study-specific risk estimates were combined by using a random-effects model. We identified 2 cohort studies (with 67 breast cancer deaths) and 5 case-control studies and 1 cross-sectional study (with 1,416 cases and 5,083 controls) on urinary cadmium concentration in relation to breast cancer risk. The studies were published during the past 10 years (2006-2015). There was no consistent association between urinary cadmium and breast cancer mortality in the cohort studies. In case-control and cross-sectional studies, the pooled odds ratios were 2.24 (95% confidence interval: 1.50, 3.34; I(2) = 63.4%) for the highest versus lowest category of cadmium concentration and 1.66 (95% confidence interval: 1.23, 2.25) for each 0.5-µg/g creatinine increase of cadmium concentration. This meta-analysis suggests that a high cadmium exposure may be a risk factor for breast cancer, but large prospective studies are needed to confirm this finding.

  • 40.
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Tektonidis, Thanasis G
    Gigante, Bruna
    Åkesson, Agneta
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Healthy Lifestyle and Risk of Heart Failure: Results From 2 Prospective Cohort Studies2016In: Circulation Heart Failure, ISSN 1941-3289, E-ISSN 1941-3297, Vol. 9, no 4, article id e002855Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The joint impact of multiple healthy lifestyle factors on heart failure (HF) risk is unclear. We investigated the separate and collective associations of healthy lifestyle factors with HF incidence in 2 population-based prospective cohort studies.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: This study consisted of 33,966 men (Cohort of Swedish Men) and 30,713 women (Swedish Mammography Cohort) who were 45 to 83 years of age and free of HF and ischemic heart disease at baseline. A healthy lifestyle was defined as being a nonsmoker and physically active (≥150 min/wk), and having body mass index between 18.5 and 25 kg/m(2) and a healthy diet (defined as adherence to a modified Mediterranean diet). Incident HF cases were ascertained by linkage with the Swedish National Patient Register and the Swedish Cause of Death Register. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to analyze the data. During 13 years of follow-up, HF was diagnosed in 1488 men and 1096 women. Each healthy lifestyle factor was associated with a statistically significant lower risk of HF in both men and women, and the risk decreased with increasing number of healthy behaviors. The greatest reduction in HF risk was observed for combinations that included nonsmoking. Compared with men and women with none of the healthy lifestyle factors, the multivariable relative risks (95% confidence interval) of HF for those with all 4 healthy behaviors were 0.38 (0.28-0.53) in men and 0.28 (0.19-0.41) in women.

    CONCLUSIONS: Adhering to a healthy lifestyle is associated with a substantially lower HF risk.

    CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifiers: NCT01127698 and NCT01127711.

  • 41.
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wallin, Alice
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Håkansson, Niclas
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stackelberg, Otto
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm South Gen Hosp, Dept Surg, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bäck, Magnus
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Div Valvular & Coronary Dis, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus and incidence of seven cardiovascular diseases2018In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 262, p. 66-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The association between type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and specific cardiovascular diseases (CVD) is uncertain. Furthermore, data on type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in relation to risk of aortic valve stenosis, atrial fibrillation, abdominal aortic aneurysm, and intracerebral hemorrhage are scarce and inconclusive. We examined the associations of T1DM and T2DM with incidence of seven CVD outcomes.

    Methods: This study comprised 71,483 Swedish adults from two population-based prospective cohorts. T1DM and T2DM diagnosis and incident CVD cases were ascertained through linkage with the population-based registers.

    Results: T1DM was associated with myocardial infarction (hazard ratio [HR] 3.26; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.47-4.30), heart failure (HR 2.68; 95% CI 1.76-4.09), and ischemic stroke (HR 2.61; 95% CI 1.80-3.79). Increased risk of myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and heart failure was also observed in T2DM patients and the magnitude of the associations increased with longer T2DM duration. T2DM was also associated with an increased risk of aortic valve stenosis (HR 1.34; 95% CI 1.05-1.71) and with lower risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm (HR 0.57; 95% CI 0.40-0.82) and intracerebral hemorrhage (HR 0.51; 95% CI 0.30-0.88). Only long-term T2DM(>= 20 years) was associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation (HR 1.44; 95% CI 1.02-2.04).

    Conclusion: T1DM and T2DM are associated with increased risk of major CVD outcomes. Trial registration: The Cohort of Swedish Men and the Swedish Mammography Cohort are registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01127711 and NCT01127698, respectively.

  • 42.
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Wallin, Alice
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Diet and Incidence of Stroke: Results From 2 Prospective Cohorts2016In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 986-990Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: High adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet is associated with lower risk of hypertension, the major risk factor for stroke. We examined whether adherence to the DASH diet is inversely associated with the incidence of stroke.

    METHODS: The study population comprised 74 404 men and women (45-83 years of age), without stroke at baseline, from the Cohort of Swedish Men and the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Diet was assessed with a food-frequency questionnaire. A modified DASH diet score was created based on consumption of vegetables, fruits, legumes and nuts, whole grains, low-fat dairy, red meat and processed meat, and sweetened beverages. Stroke cases were identified through linkage to the Swedish National Patient and Cause of Death Registers. Relative risks and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression model.

    RESULTS: During 882 727 person-years (mean, 11.9 years) of follow-up, 3896 ischemic strokes, 560 intracerebral hemorrhages, and 176 subarachnoid hemorrhages were ascertained. The modified DASH diet score was statistically significantly inversely associated with the risk of ischemic stroke (P for trend=0.002), with a multivariable relative risk of 0.86 (95% confidence interval, 0.78-0.94) for the highest versus the lowest quartile of the score. The modified DASH diet score was nonsignificantly inversely associated with intracerebral hemorrhage (corresponding relative risk=0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.63-1.05) but was not associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that high adherence to the DASH diet is associated with a reduced risk of ischemic stroke.

    CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifiers: NCT01127698 and NCT01127711 for the Swedish Mammography Cohort and the Cohort of Swedish Men, respectively.

  • 43.
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Wallin, Alice
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Markus, Hugh S
    Differing association of alcohol consumption with different stroke types: a systematic review and meta-analysis.2016In: BMC Medicine, ISSN 1741-7015, E-ISSN 1741-7015, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Whether light-to-moderate alcohol consumption is protective against stroke, and whether any association differs by stroke type, is controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis to summarize the evidence from prospective studies on alcohol drinking and stroke types.

    METHODS: Studies were identified by searching PubMed to September 1, 2016, and reference lists of retrieved articles. Additional data from 73,587 Swedish adults in two prospective studies were included. Study-specific results were combined in a random-effects model.

    RESULTS: The meta-analysis included 27 prospective studies with data on ischemic stroke (25 studies), intracerebral hemorrhage (11 studies), and/or subarachnoid hemorrhage (11 studies). Light and moderate alcohol consumption was associated with a lower risk of ischemic stroke, whereas high and heavy drinking was associated with an increased risk; the overall RRs were 0.90 (95 % CI, 0.85-0.95) for less than 1 drink/day, 0.92 (95 % CI, 0.87-0.97) for 1-2 drinks/day, 1.08 (95 % CI, 1.01-1.15) for more than 2-4 drinks/day, and 1.14 (95 % CI, 1.02-1.28) for more than 4 drinks/day. Light and moderate alcohol drinking was not associated with any hemorrhagic stroke subtype. High alcohol consumption (>2-4 drinks/day) was associated with a non-significant increased risk of both hemorrhagic stroke subtypes, and the relative risk for heavy drinking (>4 drinks/day) were 1.67 (95 % CI, 1.25-2.23) for intracerebral hemorrhage and 1.82 (95 % CI, 1.18-2.82) for subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    CONCLUSION: Light and moderate alcohol consumption was inversely associated only with ischemic stroke, whereas heavy drinking was associated with increased risk of all stroke types with a stronger association for hemorrhagic strokes.

  • 44.
    Larsson, Susanna C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Fish, long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid intake and incidence of atrial fibrillation: A pooled analysis of two prospective studies2017In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 537-541, article id S0261-5614(16)00046-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Whether high intakes of fish and long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) reduce the risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) remains uncertain. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the associations of total fish, types of fish, and omega-3 PUFA intake with AF incidence in a large prospective study.

    METHODS: We used data from the Cohort of Swedish Men and the Swedish Mammography Cohort to examine the associations of fish consumption and long-chain omega-3 PUFA intake with AF incidence. At baseline, information on fish and omega-3 PUFA intakes was available from 72,984 men and women, aged 45-83 years, without cardiac disease. Cases of AF were identified through linkage with the Swedish National Patient Register. Multivariable-adjusted relative risks were estimated with the use of Cox proportional hazards models.

    RESULTS: Over a follow-up period of 12 years, 6095 participants (3595 men and 2500 women) developed AF. Intakes of total fish, fatty fish (herring/mackerel and salmon/whitefish/char), and long-chain omega-3 PUFAs were not associated with AF incidence after adjustment for other risk factors. However, high consumption of lean fish (cod/saithe/fish fingers) was associated with a lower risk; multivariable relative risk of AF for ≥3 servings/week compared with never consumption was 0.79 (95% confidence interval, 0.65-0.95).

    CONCLUSIONS: These findings do not support a beneficial association of fatty fish or omega-3 PUFA intake with incident AF. The association between lean fish consumption and AF risk warrants further investigation.

  • 45.
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Potato consumption and risk of cardiovascular disease: 2 prospective cohort studies2016In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 104, no 5, p. 1245-1252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Whether consumption of potatoes, which are rich in potassium and have a high glycemic index and glycemic load, is associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is unknown.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to examine the association between potato consumption and risk of total and specific CVD events as well as mortality from CVD in 2 prospective cohorts of Swedish adults, a population with a high consumption of potatoes.

    DESIGN: Information on potato consumption was available from 69,313 men and women, free of CVD and diabetes, in the Cohort of Swedish Men and the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Nonfatal and fatal cases of CVD diagnosed over 13 y of follow-up were identified by linkage with the Swedish National Patient and Cause of Death Registers. Analyses were conducted by using a Cox proportional hazards regression model, controlled for potential confounders.

    RESULTS: We ascertained 10,147 major CVD events [myocardial infarction (MI), heart failure (HF), and stroke] and 4003 deaths due to CVD. Total potato consumption was not associated with the risk of major CVD events, specific CVD endpoints, or CVD mortality in either men or women. Multivariable HRs (95% CIs) per an increment of 3 servings/wk of total potato consumption (boiled potatoes, fried potatoes, and French fries) were 1.00 (0.97, 1.02) for major CVD events, 1.01 (0.97, 1.04) for MI, 0.97 (0.93, 1.02) for HF, 1.01 (0.97, 1.05) for stroke, and 0.99 (0.95, 1.03) for CVD mortality. There were no significant trends between the consumption of boiled potatoes, fried potatoes, or French fries and risk of any CVD outcome.

    CONCLUSION: Potato consumption was not associated with the risk of CVD in this population. The Swedish Mammography Cohort and the Cohort of Swedish Men are registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01127698 and NCT01127711, respectively.

  • 46.
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sedentary leisure-time in relation to mortality and survival time2019In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, ISSN 1440-2440, E-ISSN 1878-1861, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 562-567Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine the association between sedentary leisure-time and all-cause mortality and differences in survival time.

    Design: Prospective cohort study.

    Methods: Information on sedentary leisure-time, defined as TV viewing and/or sitting reading, was collected from 72 003 Swedish adults who were 45-83 (median 60) years of age and completed a self-administered questionnaire at baseline and were followed up for 17 years through linkage with the Swedish Death Register.

    Results: The association between sedentary leisure-time and all-cause mortality was modified by age with a more pronounced association in middle-aged (<60 years of age) than in older adults (>= 60 years of age) (p-interaction <0.001). During follow-up, 3358 and 15 217 deaths occurred in the middle-aged and older age group, respectively. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for the highest (>6 h/day) versus lowest category (<1 h/day) of sedentary leisure-time were 1.72 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.29-2.30) in middle-aged adults and 1.19 (95% CI 1.05-1.36) in older adults. This corresponded to a difference in survival time of respectively 2.4 (95% CI -4.1 to -0.8) years and 1.5 (95% CI -2.2 to -0.7) years.

    Conclusions: Prolonged sedentary leisure-time was associated with a significantly decreased survival time up to 2.4 years in middle-aged adults. 

  • 47.
    Larsson, Susanna C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    The Role of Lifestyle Factors and Sleep Duration for Late-Onset Dementia: A Cohort Study2018In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 66, no 2, p. 579-586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The role of lifestyle factors and sleep for dementia is uncertain.

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the associations of major lifestyle factors and sleep duration with risk of late-onset dementia.

    METHODS: We used data from a population-based cohort of 28,775 Swedish adults who were ≥65 years of age and completed a questionnaire about lifestyle and other modifiable factors in the autumn of 1997. Dementia cases were ascertained by linkage with the Swedish National Patient Register.

    RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 12.6 years, dementia was diagnosed among 3,755 participants (mean age at diagnosis 83.2±5.1 years). There were no associations of an overall healthy diet (defined by a modified Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Diet score or a Mediterranean diet score), alcohol and coffee consumption, or physical activity with dementia incidence. Compared with never smokers, dementia risk was increased in former and current smokers (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval] = 1.13 [1.04-1.23] and 1.10 [1.00-1.21], respectively). Extended time of sleep (>9 h per night) was associated with an increased risk of dementia. However, this association appeared to be related to a reverse causation effect since the association did not remain after exclusion of cases diagnosed within the first five or ten years of follow-up.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study found no evidence that major lifestyle factors, aside from smoking, or sleep duration influence the risk of dementia.

  • 48.
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Urinary cadmium and mortality from all causes, cancer and cardiovascular disease in the general population: systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies2016In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 782-791Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Cadmium is a toxic heavy metal distributed in the environment. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the association between urinary cadmium concentration and mortality from all causes, cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the general population.

    METHODS: Studies were identified by searching PubMed and Embase (to 30 March 2015) and the reference lists of retrieved articles. We included prospective studies that reported hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between urinary cadmium concentration and all-cause, cancer or CVD mortality. A random-effects model was used to combine study-specific results.

    RESULTS: Nine cohort studies, including 5600 deaths from all causes, 1332 deaths from cancer and 1715 deaths from CVD, were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis. The overall HRs for the highest vs lowest category of urinary cadmium were1.44 (95% CI, 1.25-1.64; I(2 )= 40.5%) for all-cause mortality (six studies), 1.39 (95% CI, 0.96-1.99; I(2 )= 75.9%) for cancer mortality (four studies) and 1.57 (95% CI, 1.27-1.95; I(2 )= 34.0%) for CVD mortality (five studies). In an analysis restricted to six cohort studies conducted in populations with a mean urinary cadmium concentration of ≤1 µg/g creatinine, the HRs were 1.38 (95% CI, 1.17-1.63; I(2 )= 48.3%) for all-cause mortality, 1.56 (95% CI, 0.98-2.47; I(2 )= 81.0%) for cancer mortality and 1.50 (95% CI, 1.18-1.91; I(2 )= 38.2%) for CVD mortality.

    CONCLUSIONS: Even at low-level exposure, cadmium appears to be associated with increased mortality. Further large prospective studies of cadmium exposure and mortality are warranted.

  • 49.
    Larsson, Susanna C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bäck, Magnus
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Div Valvular & Coronary Dis, Heart & Vasc Theme, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dietary patterns, food groups, and incidence of aortic valve stenosis: A prospective cohort study.2019In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 283, p. 184-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The role of diet in the development of aortic valve stenosis (AVS) is unknown. We therefore examined the associations of two dietary patterns, including a modified Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (mDASH) diet and a modified Mediterranean (mMED) diet, and the food items included in these dietary patterns with incidence of aortic valve stenosis (AVS) in a population-based cohort study.

    METHODS: The study cohort comprised 74,401 Swedish adults (54% men) who were free of cardiovascular disease at the time of completion of a baseline questionnaire about habitual diet and other risk factors for chronic diseases. Participants were followed-up through linkage with nationwide registers on hospitalization and causes of death.

    RESULTS: During 1,132,617 person-years (mean 15.2 years) of follow-up, 1338 incident AVS cases (801 in men and 537 in women) were ascertained. We found no significant associations of the mDASH and mMED dietary patterns or the food groups and beverages included in these diets (i.e., fruit, vegetables, legumes and nuts, whole grains, fish, low-fat dairy foods, full-fat dairy foods, red and processed meat, and sweetened beverages) with risk of AVS. The hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of AVS per one standard deviation increase in the mDASH and mMED diet scores were respectively 1.02 (0.96-1.07) and 1.00 (0.95-1.06).

    CONCLUSION: This study found no evidence that diet plays a role in the development of AVS.

  • 50.
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Åkesson, Agneta
    Gigante, Bruna
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Chocolate consumption and risk of myocardial infarction: a prospective study and meta-analysis.2016In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 102, no 13, p. 1017-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether chocolate consumption is associated with a reduced risk of ischaemic heart disease, we used data from a prospective study of Swedish adults and we performed a meta-analysis of available prospective data.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: The Swedish prospective study included 67 640 women and men from the Cohort of Swedish Men and the Swedish Mammography Cohort who had completed a food-frequency questionnaire and were free of cardiovascular disease at baseline. Myocardial infarction (MI) cases were ascertained through linkage with the Swedish National Patient and Cause of Death Registers. PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched from inception until 4 February 2016 to identify prospective studies on chocolate consumption and risk of ischaemic heart disease.

    RESULTS: The results from eligible studies were combined using a random-effects model. During follow-up (1998-2010), 4417 MI cases were ascertained in the Swedish study. Chocolate consumption was inversely associated with MI risk. Compared with non-consumers, the multivariable relative risk for those who consumed ≥3-4 servings/week of chocolate was 0.87 (95% CI 0.77 to 0.98; p for trend =0.04). Five prospective studies on chocolate consumption and ischaemic heart disease were identified. Together with the Swedish study, the meta-analysis included six studies with a total of 6851 ischaemic heart disease cases. The overall relative risk for the highest versus lowest category of chocolate consumption was 0.90 (95% CI 0.82 to 0.97), with little heterogeneity among studies (I(2)=24.3%).

    CONCLUSIONS: Chocolate consumption is associated with lower risk of MI and ischaemic heart disease.

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