uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bahram, Mohammad
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology. Univ Tartu, Inst Ecol & Earth Sci, Dept Bot, 40 Lai St, EE-51005 Tartu, Estonia;Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Ecol, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Vanderpool, Dan
    Univ Montana, Div Biol Sci, 32 Campus Dr, Missoula, MT 59812 USA.
    Pent, Mari
    Univ Tartu, Inst Ecol & Earth Sci, Dept Bot, 40 Lai St, EE-51005 Tartu, Estonia.
    Hiltunen, Markus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Ryberg, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    The genome and microbiome of a dikaryotic fungus (Inocybe terrigena, Inocybaceae) revealed by metagenomics2018In: Environmental Microbiology Reports, ISSN 1758-2229, E-ISSN 1758-2229, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 155-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent advances in molecular methods have increased our understanding of various fungal symbioses. However, little is known about genomic and microbiome features of most uncultured symbiotic fungal clades. Here, we analysed the genome and microbiome of Inocybaceae (Agaricales, Basidiomycota), a largely uncultured ectomycorrhizal clade known to form symbiotic associations with a wide variety of plant species. We used metagenomic sequencing and assembly of dikaryotic fruiting-body tissues from Inocybe terrigena (Fr.) Kuyper, to classify fungal and bacterial genomic sequences, and obtained a nearly complete fungal genome containing 93% of core eukaryotic genes. Comparative genomics reveals that I. terrigena is more similar to ectomycorrhizal and brown rot fungi than to white rot fungi. The reduction in lignin degradation capacity has been independent from and significantly faster than in closely related ectomycorrhizal clades supporting that ectomycorrhizal symbiosis evolved independently in Inocybe. The microbiome of I. terrigena fruiting-bodies includes bacteria with known symbiotic functions in other fungal and non-fungal host environments, suggesting potential symbiotic functions of these bacteria in fungal tissues regardless of habitat conditions. Our study demonstrates the usefulness of direct metagenomics analysis of fruiting-body tissues for characterizing fungal genomes and microbiome.

  • 2.
    Hiltunen, Markus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Grudzinska-Sterno, Magdalena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Wallerman, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Ryberg, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Johannesson, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Maintenance of High Genome Integrity over Vegetative Growth in the Fairy-Ring Mushroom Marasmius oreades2019In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 29, no 16, p. 2758-2765Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most mutations in coding regions of the genome are deleterious, causing selection to favor mechanisms that minimize the mutational load over time [1-5]. DNA replication during cell division is a major source of new mutations. It is therefore important to limit the number of cell divisions between generations, particularly for large and long-lived organisms [6-9]. The germline cells of animals and the slowly dividing cells in plant meristems are adaptations to control the number of mutations that accumulate over generations [9-11]. Fungi lack a separated germline while harboring species with very large and long-lived individuals that appear to maintain highly stable genomes within their mycelia [8, 12, 13]. Here, we studied genomic mutation accumulation in the fairy-ring mushroom Marasmius oreades. We generated a chromosome-level genome assembly using a combination of cutting-edge DNA sequencing technologies and resequenced 40 samples originating from six individuals of this fungus. The low number of mutations recovered in the sequencing data suggests the presence of an unknown mechanism that works to maintain extraordinary genome integrity over vegetative growth in M. oreades. The highly structured growth pattern of M. oreades allowed us to estimate the number of cell divisions leading up to each sample [14, 15], and from this data, we infer an incredibly low per mitosis mutation rate (3.8 x 10(-12) mutations per site and cell division) as one of several possible explanations for the low number of identified mutations.

  • 3.
    Pent, Mari
    et al.
    Univ Tartu, Inst Ecol & Earth Sci, Tartu, Estonia.
    Hiltunen, Markus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Poldmaa, Kadri
    Univ Tartu, Inst Ecol & Earth Sci, Tartu, Estonia.
    Furneaux, Brendan R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Hildebrand, Falk
    European Mol Biol Lab, Struct & Computat Biol, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Johannesson, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Ryberg, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Bahram, Mohammad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology. Univ Tartu, Inst Ecol & Earth Sci, Tartu, Estonia.
    Host genetic variation strongly influences the microbiome structure and function in fungal fruiting-bodies2018In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 1641-1650Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite increasing knowledge on host-associated microbiomes, little is known about mechanisms underlying fungus-microbiome interactions. This study aimed to examine the relative importance of host genetic, geographic and environmental variations in structuring fungus-associated microbiomes. We analyzed the taxonomic composition and function of microbiomes inhabiting fungal fruiting-bodies in relation to host genetic variation, soil pH and geographic distance between samples. For this, we sequenced the metagenomes of 40 fruiting-bodies collected from six fairy rings (i.e., genets) of a sapro-trophic fungus Marasmius oreades. Our analyses revealed that fine genetic variations between host fungi could strongly affect their associated microbiome, explaining, respectively, 25% and 37% of the variation in microbiome structure and function, whereas geographic distance and soil pH remained of secondary importance. These results, together with the smaller genome size of fungi compared to other eukaryotes, suggest that fruiting-bodies are suitable for further genome-centric studies on hostmicrobiome interactions.

  • 4.
    Sun, Yu
    et al.
    South China Agr Univ, Coll Life Sci, Guangdong Prov Key Lab Prot Funct & Regulat Agr O, Guangzhou 510642, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Svedberg, Jesper
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Hiltunen, Markus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Corcoran, Padraic
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Anim & Plant Sci, Sheffield S10 2TN, S Yorkshire, England..
    Johannesson, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Large-scale suppression of recombination predates genomic rearrangements in Neurospora tetrasperma2017In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, article id 1140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common feature of eukaryote genomes is large chromosomal regions where recombination is absent or strongly reduced, but the factors that cause this reduction are not well understood. Genomic rearrangements have often been implicated, but they may also be a consequence of recombination suppression rather than a cause. In this study, we generate eight high-quality genomic data sets of the filamentous ascomycete Neurospora tetrasperma, a fungus that lacks recombination over most of its largest chromosome. The genomes surprisingly reveal collinearity of the non-recombining regions and although large inversions are enriched in these regions, we conclude these inversions to be derived and not the cause of the suppression. To our knowledge, this is the first time that non-recombining, genic regions as large as 86% of a full chromosome (or 8 Mbp), are shown to be collinear. These findings are of significant interest for our understanding of the evolution of sex chromosomes and other supergene complexes.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf