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  • 1.
    Molinder, Jakob
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Söderhäll, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Did industrialisation lead to segregation in cities of the nineteenth century?: The case of Uppsala 1880-19002019In: Scandinavian Economic History Review, Vol. 0, no 0, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACTHow did industrialisation affect land use and residential patterns in cities of the nineteenth century? We use census data and GIS mapping techniques to analyse class segregation and changes to the spatial structure using the case of Uppsala, Sweden between 1880 and 1900. We find that there was a clear concentration of business activity in the central district and in proximity to the transportation hubs. Since these activities became more numerous but remained concentrated, they likely increased land values in the central areas of the city, inducing the lowest social classes to locate away from the centre. However, while these households were pushed out, it did not result in the type of class segregation we observe in many twentieth-century cities. Before the widespread use of transport technologies allowing populations to sprawl, city expansion in the type of middle-sized city that we study led instead to increased density and mixed uses in the central areas.

  • 2.
    Morell, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Söderhäll, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Smallholders' and large estates' reaction to changed market conditions 1860–19102019In: Scandinavian Economic History Review, ISSN 0358-5522, E-ISSN 1750-2837, Vol. 67, no 3, p. 312-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reduced transport costs and income growth in industrialising European countries changed the market conditions for European farmers in the late nineteenth century. Grain prices fell while dairy prices rose. It has been claimed that these price changes hit large grain farmers with vested interests in grain trade particularly hard, while owner-occupiers and smallholders fared better and with help of developing cooperative associations, came out as successful commercial agriculturalists by switching to intensive branches, foremost dairying. Recent research on the Danish case, shows, however, that change was initiated on large elite estates with long-term dairy traditions. The literature on the Swedish case indicates, that larger farms switched to intensified fodder production quicker than smaller farms did, while in the early twentieth century smaller farms played an un-proportionally large role on the dairy market. Using individual farm data from two East-central Swedish parishes in 1878/80, 1895/96 and 1910/11, it is shown, that larger farms tended to modernise crop rotations and switch towards dairy production earlier than small farms did. Smaller farms caught up, and by 1910 their land use was about as strongly adapted to commercial dairy production as larger farms' land use was.

  • 3.
    Söderhäll, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Planering och placering: Den modernistiska stadsplaneringen och restaurangnäringens geografi i Stockholm 1930–20172018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Inspired by the debate on the effects of large scale urban planning on the localization of small- and medium-sized businesses, this thesis focuses on the impact of modernist urban planning on the localization of restaurant outlets in Stockholm during the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. The thesis is related to several literatures, including economic geography, urban history and to some extent the twentieth century history of the restaurant business in Sweden as well as urban food consumption. It is shown that the restaurant industry has mainly been located in urban environments characterized by an urban form, deriving from planning ideals that occurred before the advent of modernist urban planning. Furthermore, it is argued that modernist urban planning ideals has affected the restaurant industry in the younger parts of Stockholm in two directions. It helped to create conditions for cluster formation of restaurant companies around planned centers, and it contributed to the lack of cohesive urban street landscapes, for both walking consumers and consumers traveling by car. In the long run this has affected the supply of restaurant companies in these urban environments. It is also argued that both the number of restaurants and the degree of differentiation in the older (central) parts of Stockholm, have been adversely affected by interventions in the urban environment associated with modernist planning.

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