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  • 1.
    Bean, Christopher
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. School of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Chur-Hansen, Anna
    Tran, Jason
    Strodl, Esben
    Smith, Bethany
    Australian psychology student perceptions and experiences of health psychology2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Bean, Christopher G.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health.
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University.
    Berg, Noora
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health.
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health.
    Group activity participation at age 21 and depressive symptoms during boom and recession in Sweden: a 20-year follow-up2019In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 475-481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Organized group activities (e.g. sports or arts clubs) have long been noted as important developmental settings for youth, yet previous studies on the relationships between participation and mental health outcomes have focused on short-term effects among school-aged adolescents. The subsequent period of life, emerging adulthood, has been largely overlooked despite being another important life stage where individuals face new existential challenges and may benefit from group activity participation. The potential for macroeconomic conditions to modify these relationships has also not been considered.

    Methods: Participants (n = 1654) comprise two cohorts, born in either 1965 (n = 968) or 1973 (n = 686), from the same middle-sized industrial town in Northern Sweden. Both cohorts completed detailed questionnaires at age 21 (macroeconomic boom for Cohort 65, recession for Cohort 73) and approximately 20 years follow-up (age 43 for Cohort 65, age 39 for Cohort 73). General linear models were used to assess concurrent and prospective associations between regular group activity participation and depressive symptoms, as well as the potential interaction with boom/recession.

    Results: After controlling for sociodemographic factors, regular group activity participation at age 21 was associated with lower depressive symptoms, both concurrently and at follow-up. Those exposed to recession at age 21 reported higher depressive symptoms at the time but there was no interaction between cohort (boom/recession) and group activity participation.

    Conclusions: Regular group activity participation during emerging adulthood is associated with lower depressive symptoms uniformly in times of boom and recession. Beneficial effects of such participation may contribute to better mental health over 20 years.

  • 3.
    Bean, Christopher G.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Winefield, Helen
    School of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Sargent, Charli
    Appleton Institute for Behavioural Science, Central Queensland University, Australia.
    Hutchinson, Amanda
    School of Psychology, Social Work and Social Policy, University of South Australia, Australia.
    Differential associations of job control components with both waist circumference and body mass index2015In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION:The Job Demand-Control-Support (JDCS) model is commonly used to investigate associations between psychosocial work factors and employee health, yet research considering obesity using the JDCS model remains inconclusive.

    OBJECTIVE:This study investigates which parts of the JDCS model are associated with measures of obesity and provides a comparison between waist circumference (higher values imply central obesity) and body mass index (BMI, higher values imply overall obesity).

    METHODS:Contrary to common practice, in this study the JDCS components are not reduced into composite or global scores. In light of emerging evidence that the two components of job control (skill discretion and decision authority) could have differential associations with related health outcomes, components of the JDCS model were analysed at the subscale level. A cross-sectional design with a South Australian cohort (N = 450) combined computer-assisted telephone interview data and clinic-measured height, weight and waist circumference.

    RESULTS:After controlling for sex, age, household income, work hours and job nature (blue vs. white-collar), the two components of job control were the only parts of the JDCS model to hold significant associations with measures of obesity. Notably, the associations between skill discretion and waist circumference (b = -.502, p = .001), and skill discretion and BMI (b = -.163, p = .005) were negative. Conversely, the association between decision authority and waist circumference (b = .282, p = .022) was positive.

    CONCLUSION:These findings are significant since skill discretion and decision authority are typically combined into a composite measure of job control or decision latitude. Our findings suggest skill discretion and decision authority should be treated separately since combining these theoretically distinct components may conceal their differential associations with measures of obesity, masking their individual importance. Psychosocial work factors displayed stronger associations and explained greater variance in waist circumference compared with BMI, and possible reasons for this are discussed.

  • 4.
    Bean, Christopher
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. School of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Heath, Georgina
    Kosmadopoulos, Anastasi
    Lauren, Holloway
    Rowley, Paul
    Bugg, Jasmine
    Sargent, Charli
    Does less sleep lead to unhealthy food choices? The effect of severe sleep restriction on food appraisal and food choice2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Bean, Christopher
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health.
    Kosmadopoulos, Anastasi
    Centre for Study and Treatment of Circadian Rhythms, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada.
    Hutchinson, Amanda
    School of Psychology, Social Work and Social Policy, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
    Matthews, Raymond
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sargent, Charli
    Appleton Institute for Behavioural Science, Central Queensland University, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
    Stengård, Johanna
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Berg, Noora
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Lifestyle and rehabilitation in long term illness.
    Winefield, Helen
    School of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
    Adams, Robert
    The Health Observatory, Discipline of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
    Short sleep, psychosocial work stressors, and measures of obesity: results from an Australian cohort study2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Short sleep and workplace stress are both established risk factors for overweight and obesity, yet few studies have considered how these two factors may intersect. The aim of this study was to establish the associations between these two exposures and their relative associations with body mass index (kg/m2 ) and waist circumference (cm).

    Methods: A cross-sectional design sampled current employees (N=423) from an Australian cohort using a computer-assisted telephone interview and clinic-measured height, weight, and waist circumference. Short sleep (≤6h/ night) was reported by 25.8% of the participants. Psychosocial work stressors were defined using the Job Demand-ControlSupport (JDCS) model and calculated at the subscale level (psychological demands; skill discretion; decision authority; coworker support; supervisor support). General linear models were used to assess associations between short sleep, the JDCS subscales (split at median), and BMI and waist circumference.

    Results: Separate analyses identified short sleep and a lack of skill discretion at work as predictors of both BMI and waist circumference. Furthermore, when both predictors were entered in the same model, each was associated with elevated BMI (b=1.79, p=.003; b=1.08, p=.045) and waist circumference (b=4.20, p=.005; b=2.97, p=.028). Short sleep was also associated with high perceived psychological demands at work (b=1.81, p=.003). All models were adjusted for gender, age, work hours, blue vs. white collar job, and household income.

    Discussion: These findings indicate the importance of considering the interplay between short sleep and psychosocial work stressors, and their respective associations with measures of overweight Sleep Sci. 2019;12(Supl.3):1-75 26 and obesity. Further research using longitudinal data is needed to model potential mechanisms (e.g., behavioral and physiological). A novel feature was the subscale consideration of the prominent JDCS model of work stress. Advocacy for both improved habitual sleep (e.g., ≥7h/night) and job redesign to increase skill discretion at work may promote lower levels of overweight and obesity for employees.

  • 6.
    Bean, Christopher
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. School of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Linehan, Karen
    Prichard, Ivanka
    Hutchinson, Amanda
    Wilson, Carlene
    Who, how and why do people contact a cancer telephone information and support service?2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Bean, Christopher
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. School of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Pingel, Ronnie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Berg, Noora
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health.
    A 4-way decomposition analysis of poor social relations and depressive symptoms over the life-course2017In: European Journal of Public Health, Volume 27, Issue Suppl 3, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Bean, Christopher
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health.
    Pingel, Ronnie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Berg, Noora
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health.
    Poor peer relations in adolescence, social support in early adulthood, and depressive symptoms in later adulthood: evaluating mediation and interaction using four-way decomposition analysis2019In: Annals of Epidemiology, ISSN 1047-2797, E-ISSN 1873-2585, Vol. 29, p. 52-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Supportive social relations are associated with good mental health, yet few studies have considered the prospective importance of adolescent peer relations for adult mental health and the potential mechanisms involved.

    Methods: Participants (n=941) were sourced from the Northern Swedish Cohort, a prospective study comprising school students aged 16 in 1981. Integrating life course epidemiology with four-way decomposition analysis, this paper considers the controlled direct effect of poor peer relations at age 16 on depressive symptoms at age 43, the pure indirect effect mediated by the availability of social support at age 30, and potential interactions between the exposure and the mediator.

    Results: After controlling for gender, baseline depressive symptoms and parental socioeconomic position, poor peer relations at age 16 were associated with depressive symptoms at age 43, largely irrespective of social support at age 30. Nonetheless, poor peer relations in adolescence were associated with poorer social support at age 30, and mediation accounted for a modest proportion (pure indirect effect 10%) of the association between poor peer relations and depressive symptoms at age 43.

    Conclusions: Policies to foster constructive peer relations for adolescents at school are encouraged; such policies may promote both the availability of social support and better mental health across the life course.

  • 9.
    Bean, Christopher
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health.
    Virtanen, Pekka
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health.
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health.
    Berg, Noora
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Lifestyle and rehabilitation in long term illness.
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Preventive Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health.
    Youth participation in Active Labour Market Programs (ALMPs) during boom/recession and mental health: a 20-year follow-up2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10. Bean, Christopher
    et al.
    Winefield, Helen
    Hutchinson, Amanda
    Sargent, Charli
    McCallum, Stacey
    A systematic review of the association between work stress and energy balance-related behaviours2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Bean, Christopher
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Winefield, Helen
    School of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Hutchinson, Amanda
    School of Psychology, Social Work and Social Policy, University of South Australia, Australia.
    Sargent, Charli
    Appleton Institute for Behavioural Science, Central Queensland University, Australia.
    Shi, Zumin
    Human Nutrition Department, College of Health Sciences, Qatar University, Qatar.
    Unique associations of the Job Demand-Control-Support model subscales with leisure-time physical activity and dietary energy intake.2019In: Industrial Health, ISSN 0019-8366, E-ISSN 1880-8026, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 99-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) and dietary energy intake are two important health behaviours, which at too low or high levels respectively, are associated with overweight and obesity. This study explores associations between subscales of the Job Demand-Control-Support (JDCS) model, LTPA and dietary energy intake. A cross-sectional design sampled current employees (N=433) from a South Australian cohort using a computer-assisted telephone interview and a self-completed food frequency questionnaire. In analyses adjusted for sex, age, and sociodemographic variables, higher levels of skill discretion were associated with increased odds for attaining sufficient physical activity (OR=2.45; 95% CI=1.10-5.47). Higher levels of decision authority were associated with reduced odds (OR=0.43; 95% CI=0.20-0.93) for being in the highest tertile of daily energy intake. Higher scores for coworker support were associated with increased odds (OR=2.20; 95% CI=1.15-4.23) for being in the highest tertile of daily energy intake. These findings support the consideration of the individual JDCS subscales, since this practice may reveal novel associations with health behaviour outcomes, thereby presenting new opportunities to improve employee health and wellbeing.

  • 12.
    Bean, Christopher
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. School of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Winefield, Helen
    Sargent, Charli
    Gender differences in the association between job strain and BMI when moderated by work/life balance, and quality of life2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Bean, Christopher
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. School of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Winefield, Helen
    Sargent, Charli
    Hutchinson, Amanda
    How might work stress contribute to obesity? A systematic review: work stress and energy balance-related behaviors2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Bean, Christopher
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. School of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Winefield, Helen
    Sargent, Charli
    Hutchinson, Amanda
    The Demand-Control-Support model and measures of obesity in South Australian employees2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Bean, Christopher
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. School of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Winefield, Helen
    Sargent, Charli
    Hutchinson, Amanda
    The psychosocial work environment and measures of obesity in South Australian employees2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Bean, Christopher
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. School of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Winefield, Helen
    Sargent, Charli
    Hutchinson, Amanda
    Which psychosocial work factors are associated with waist circumference in South Australian employees?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Bean, Christopher
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. School of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Winefield, Helen
    Sargent, Charli
    Hutchinson, Amanda
    Shi, Zumin
    Work Stress, Dietary Energy Intake, and Leisure-Time Physical Activity: Considering Job Demand-Control-Support model subscales2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Berg, Noora
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health. National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kiviruusu, Olli
    National Insitute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Bean, Christopher
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health.
    Huurre, Taina
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lintonen, Tomi
    Finnish Foundation for Alcohol studies, Helsinki, Finland.; University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health.
    Social relationships in adolescence and heavy episodic drinking from youth to midlife in Finland and Sweden: examining the role of individual, contextual and temporal factors2018In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 18, article id 1000Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Applying the Process-Person-Context-Time (PPCT) model of the bioecological theory, this study considers whether proximal processes between the individual and the microsystem (social relationships within family, peer group and school) during adolescence are associated with heavy episodic drinking (HED), from youth to midlife, and whether the macro level context (country) plays a role in these associations.

    Methods

    Participants of two prospective cohort studies from Finland and Sweden, recruited in 1983/1981 at age 16 (n = 2194/1080), were followed-up until their forties using postal questionnaires. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine associations between social relationships at age 16 and HED (at least monthly intoxication or having six or more units of alcohol in one occasion) at ages 22/21, 32/30 and 42/43. Additive interactions between microsystem settings, as well as between settings and country, were also considered.

    Results

    Consistent with the PPCT model, we found individual, contextual and temporal aspects to be associated with drinking habits. Higher levels of poor family relationships were associated with an increased likelihood of HED (ages 22/21 and 32/30) in both Finnish women and men and Swedish men. Higher levels of peer contact were associated with an increased likelihood of HED in both Finnish women (ages 32 and 42) and men (ages 22 and 32), and Swedish men (age 21). In contrast with the other groups, poorer relationships with classmates were associated with an increased likelihood of HED (age 30) for Swedish women only. For women, the combined effect of having both daily peer contact and living in Finland for HED at age 42/43 was statistically distinguishable from a pure additive effect.

    Conclusions

    Micro and to a lesser extent macro level contexts are associated with heavy episodic drinking well into adulthood. The most relevant processes in the adolescent microsystem occur in family and peer settings. However, long-lasting protective or risk-raising effects between different settings and later HED were not found. Promoting good relationships across different contexts during adolescence may reduce the incidence of HED in adulthood.

  • 19.
    Berg, Noora
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Lifestyle and rehabilitation in long term illness.
    Virtanen, Pekka
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health.
    Bean, Christopher
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Lifestyle and rehabilitation in long term illness. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health.
    Lintonen, Tomi
    Nummi, Tapio
    Hammarström, Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health.
    The relevance of macroeconomic conditions on concurrent and subsequent alcohol use – results from two Northern Swedish cohorts2020In: Addiction Research and Theory, ISSN 1606-6359, E-ISSN 1476-7392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study is to examine the relevance of macroeconomic conditions (boom vs. recession) and own labor market status on alcohol use in youth and midlife.

    Method: Two Northern Swedish cohorts, born in either 1965 (boom at age 21 years) or 1973 (recession at age 21 years), included all pupils attending the last grade of compulsory school in Luleå, in 1981 (n = 990) or 1989 (n = 686), respectively. Questionnaires were completed at ages 21 and 43/39 years. Alcohol use was measured as volume of consumption (cl/year) and heavy episodic drinking (HED).

    Results: Women aged 21 years during the boom (Cohort65) consumed less alcohol and were less likely to be heavy episodic drinkers at age 21 years compared to those who were exposed to recession at the same age (Cohort73). In men there were no such cohort differences. Women, and to some extent men, in Cohort65 increased their consumption at midlife, whereas this decreased for those in Cohort73. HED decreased in both cohorts, but the decrease was steeper in the recession cohort. Analyses stratified by labor market status revealed between-cohort differences in consumption among women who were either employed or students at baseline; but not for men. Alcohol use for those unemployed did not differ between the cohorts.

    Conclusions: In our study, comparing two cohorts that experienced either macroeconomic boom (1986) or recession (1994) at age 21 years in Sweden, the association between individual alcohol use and concurrent unemployment in youth was not affected by macroeconomic conditions.

  • 20. Heath, Georgina
    et al.
    Bean, Christopher
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. School of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Dorrian, Jill
    Sargent, Charli
    Does mood play a role in food choice when sleep is restricted?2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21. Heath, Georgina
    et al.
    Dorrian, Jill
    Kosmadopoulos, Anastasi
    Bugg, Jasmine
    Bean, Christopher
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Centre for Sleep Research, University of South Australia.
    Holloway, Laruen
    Rowley, Paul
    Sargent, Charli
    Food consumption and choice following a week of sleep restriction: A pilot study2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22. Kosmadopoulos, Anastasi
    et al.
    Heath, Georgina
    Bean, Christopher
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. School of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Holloway, Lauren
    Bugg, Jasmine
    Sargent, Charli
    Sleep restriction and the daily trajectory of pre-diabetes indicators2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23. Linehan, Karen
    et al.
    Bean, Christopher
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. School of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Prichard, Ivanka
    Hutchinson, Amanda
    Wilson, Carlene
    Cancer telephone information and support service staff views on the distress thermometer: barriers, facilitating factors and implications for practice2015Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 23 of 23
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