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  • 1.
    Kugelberg, Clarissa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Trovalla, Eric
    Samverka och /eller styra: Att praktisera medborgarinflytande i planering och beslutsfattande2015Book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Ottoson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology.
    Containern och värdet av ovisshet2006In: Kulturella Perspektiv, ISSN 1102-7908, no 2Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 3.
    Ottoson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology.
    Söka sitt: Om möten mellan människor och föremål2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis brings into focus how individuals search for objects. It follows people through flea markets, refuse skips, shopping streets and malls. The aim of the thesis is to study the search for things and how it influences individuals and their relations to objects and the places in which they search.

    The thesis focuses on what is termed serendipitous searching – i.e. an activity of open browsing for anything that awakens the person’s interest. That means that the people in the study are not just looking for certain things – they are also seeking to come to terms with what they are actually looking for. Ideals of what is beautiful, useful and reasonable materialise in conjunction with the experience of what is available and what is absent or out of reach. It is suggested that this mode of looking for goods is not only about purchase deliberations, but more importantly is a specific way of interacting with the world and making places meaningful. It can be viewed as a way of creating and moderating anticipation, and thereby cultivating affect. Searching for things thus becomes an experiential horizon.

    Part I: “Searching and Space” deals with how searching for something becomes a specific way of engaging with the physical surroundings. The landscape becomes a taskscape, i.e. an array of physical structures linked together by a set of related activities. Part II, “Discoveries and Rubbish” explores how the activities of searching charges objects with qualities. Through two different environments, searching is analysed as a way of elevating things from the status of rubbish to one of discovery. Part III: “From the Horizon of Finding” focuses on how the searchers’ aims are transformed when they encounter the objects that really exist.

  • 4.
    Trovalla, Erik
    et al.
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Urban Dynamics.
    Trovalla, Ulrika
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Urban Dynamics.
    Infrastructure as a divination tool: Whispers from the grids in a Nigerian city2015In: City, ISSN 1360-4813, E-ISSN 1470-3629, Vol. 19, no 2-3, p. 332-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Nigerian city of Jos, everyday life is shaped by interlacing rhythms of disconnection and reconnection. Petrol, electricity, water, etc., come and go, and in order to gain access inhabitants constantly try to discern the logics behind these fluctuations. However, the unpredictable infrastructure also becomes a system of signs through which residents try to understand issues beyond those immediately at hand. Signals, pipes, wires and roads link individuals to larger wholes, and the character of these connections informs and transforms experiences of the social world. Not only an object, but also a means of divination, infrastructure is a harbinger of truths about elusive and mutable social entities?neighbourhoods, cities, nations and beyond. Through the materiality of infrastructure, its flows and glitches carefully read by the inhabitants, an increasingly disjointed city emerges. Through new experiences of differentiated modes of connectedness?of no longer sharing the same roads, pipes, electricity lines, etc.?narratives are formed around lost common trajectories. By focusing on how wires, pipes and roads are turned into a divination system?how the inhabitants of Jos try to divine the city's infrastructure and possible ways forward, as well as how they try, through the infrastructure, to predict a city, a nation and a world beyond?this paper strives to find ways to grasp a thickness of urban becomings?a cityness on the move according to its own unique logic.

  • 5.
    Trovalla, Ulrika
    et al.
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Urban Dynamics.
    Adetula, Victor
    University of Jos.
    Trovalla, Erik
    Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Urban Dynamics.
    Movement as Mediation: Envisioning a Divided Nigerian City2014In: Nordic Journal of African Studies, ISSN 1235-4481, E-ISSN 1459-9465, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 66-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since its establishment in the beginning of the twentieth century, the inhabitants of the ethnically and religiously diverse Nigerian city of Jos have inhabited very different places and travelled along opposite trails – patterns that in recent years, with an escalation of violence, have gained new dimensions. By bringing people’s movements into focus, this article highlights how movement comes in different ways to mediate between people and a city in flux. Brought to light is how movement in several different modalities – fast, slow, in total arrest; clothed in Christian or Muslim attires; by car, on foot, or on horseback; assertive or explorative, in triumph as well as in fear – by mediating between people and the city, brings forth a metaphysical landscape that otherwise is hard to get hold of. In this vein, movement as a medium has become a form of ‘social envisioning’ – a tool for understanding and foretelling the city.

  • 6.
    Trovalla, Ulrika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology. Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Urban Dynamics.
    Trovalla, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology. Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Urban Dynamics.
    Infrastructure turned suprastructure: unpredictable materialities and visions of a Nigerian nation2015In: Journal of material culture, ISSN 1359-1835, E-ISSN 1460-3586, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 43-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are signs hidden in the infrastructure. In the Nigerian city of Jos, the unpredictable availability of power, fuel, water, etc. becomes a vehicle of meaning. In many settings across the globe, infrastructure is often made invisible, and the centre stage that it takes in everyday life remains unrecognized. In Jos, however, as in many African cities, the constant need to predict its flows contradicts the prefix infra (below); rather than being hidden beneath the realm of experience it is brought to the surface as a puzzle to be figured out. These explorations in turn come to reveal matters beyond the infrastructure itself. Just as diviners infer the state of the world from the stones they have thrown, reading significance out of the seeming randomness of matter, the infrastructure turns intricate questions into tangible clues. It becomes a suprastructure - a divination tool giving clues about the past, present and future of the Nigerian nation.

  • 7.
    Trovalla, Ulrika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology.
    Trovalla, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology.
    Inverter, or, Vernacular Electricity and the Localized Inverter2017In: Cultural anthropology, ISSN 0886-7356, E-ISSN 1548-1360, Vol. December 19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Trovalla, Ulrika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology. Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Urban Dynamics.
    Trovalla, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology. Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Urban Dynamics.
    Suprastructure: A photo exhibition2013Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The photo exhibition ’Suprastructure’ was first displayed at Museum Gustavianum in Uppsala between 17 November 2012 and 5 March 2013. It was digitally published in March 2013 as part of a research project entitled ‘Infrastructure as Divination: Urban Life in the Postcolony,’ financed by the Swedish Research Council. The scholars behind the exhibition, Ulrika and Erik Trovalla, are researchers in cultural anthropology and ethnology. They are based at the Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, and Uppsala University. Drawing on their photographs from the million city Jos in central Nigeria, they here give a glimpse of their research into the meanings of infrastructure in everyday life.

1 - 8 of 8
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