uu.seUppsala universitets publikasjoner
Endre søk
Begrens søket
1 - 8 of 8
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Treff pr side
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
Merk
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Bengtsson, Caroline
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Öron-, näs- och halssjukdomar.
    Lindberg, Eva
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lungmedicin och allergologi.
    Jonsson, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Öron-, näs- och halssjukdomar.
    Holmström, Mats
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Div Ear Nose & Throat Dis, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Sundbom, Fredrik
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lungmedicin och allergologi.
    Hedner, Jan
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Sleep Med Resp Med & Allergol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Klinisk fysiologi.
    Middelveld, Roelinde
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Allergy Res, Stockholm, Sweden.; Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Occupat & Environm Med, Umea, Sweden.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lungmedicin och allergologi.
    Chronic rhinosinusitis impairs sleep quality: Results of the GA(2)LEN study2017Inngår i: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 40, nr 1, artikkel-id zsw021Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: To analyse the prevalence of sleep problems in subjects with CRS and to determine whether the disease severity of CRS affects sleep quality.

    METHODS: Questionnaires were sent to a random sample of 45 000 adults in four Swedish cities. Questions on CRS, asthma, allergic rhinitis, co-morbidities, tobacco use, educational level and physical activity were included. CRS was defined according to the European Position Paper on Rhinosinusitis and Nasal Polyps (EPOS) epidemiological criteria. The disease severity of CRS was defined by the number of reported CRS symptoms. Sleep quality was assessed using the Basic Nordic Sleep Questionnaire.

    RESULTS: Of the 26 647 subjects, 2249 (8.4%) had CRS. Reported sleep problems were 50-90% more common among subjects with CRS compared with those without or the total population. The prevalence of reported sleep problems increased in conjunction with the severity of CRS. After adjusting for gender, BMI, age, tobacco use, asthma, somatic diseases, physical activity level and educational level, participants with four symptoms of CRS (compared with subjects without CRS symptoms) displayed a higher risk of snoring (adj. OR (95% CI): 3.13 (2.22-4.41)), difficulties inducing sleep (3.98 (2.94-5.40)), difficulties maintaining sleep (3.44 (2.55-4.64)), early morning awakening (4.71 (3.47-6.38)) and excessive daytime sleepiness (4.56 (3.36-6.18)). The addition of persistent allergic rhinitis to CRS further increased the risk of sleep problems.

    CONCLUSIONS: Sleep problems are highly prevalent among subjects with CRS. The disease severity of CRS negatively affects sleep quality.

  • 2.
    Janson, Christer
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lung- allergi- och sömnforskning.
    Sundbom, Fredrik
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lung- allergi- och sömnforskning.
    Arvidsson, Peter
    Kämpe, Mary
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lung- allergi- och sömnforskning.
    Sublingual grass allergen specific immunotherapy: a retrospective study of clinical outcome and discontinuation2018Inngår i: Clinical and Molecular Allergy, ISSN 1476-7961, E-ISSN 1476-7961, Vol. 16, nr 14Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is effective, tolerable, and convenient for many allergic patients. Still, real-world evidence is scarce and the aim of this study is to assess the patient reported outcome of treatment with SLIT against grass pollen allergy in a consecutive patient population.

    Methods: Patients (n = 329) who were confirmed to be allergic to timothy grass and had been prescribed SLIT were consecutively enrolled in the study and completed a questionnaire online or in hard copy.

    Results: 207 (62.9%) patients responded to the questionnaire. The female/male ratio was 105/102 with a mean age of 39 ± 11 years (range 19-70 years). 113 (55%) patients reported they had completed the full 3-year treatment period, 49 (24%) were still on treatment, and 45 (22%) had discontinued treatment prematurely. Respondents who had completed the full treatment period reported that their allergy symptoms in the most recent grass pollen season had improved to a larger extent than subjects still on treatment or discontinuing the treatment prematurely. Improvement of asthma was twice as common among patients who completed compared to discontinued treatment (42 vs. 20%). Younger age (37 ± 12 vs. 41 ± 11 years, p < 0.001) and a higher prevalence of reported oral and/or gastrointestinal side effects (49 vs. 24%, p = 0.02) characterised the group that terminated SLIT. Forgetfulness was the most commonly reported specific reason.

    Conclusion: Treatment perseverance resulted in improved patient reported outcome. Forgetfulness was the most frequently reported reason for discontinuing SLIT treatment against grass pollen allergy.

  • 3.
    Sundbom, Fredrik
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lung- allergi- och sömnforskning.
    Asthma and Sleep Disturbances: Associations to Comorbidities and Asthma Control2019Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis aimed to investigate the associations between asthma control, asthma-related comorbidity, and sleep. Insomnia symptoms with asthma are common, and have commonly been explained by poor asthma control and asthma symptoms during the night, which affect most asthmatics to some degree. The impact of asthma-related comorbidity, however, is not fully known. Further aims were to analyze the effects of asthma control and comorbidities on asthma-related quality of life, and to analyze the effects of co-existing asthma and obstructive sleep apnea on objective sleep quality. 

    Four different populations were investigated: the two large community-based cohorts GA2LEN (n=25,610) and LifeGene (n=23,875), a cohort of 369 young asthma patients (MIDAS), and a polysomnography study of 384 women (SHE).

    The GA2LEN study confirmed that insomnia symptoms remain a common problem among asthmatics. Poor asthma control and nasal congestion were important risk factors for insomnia symptoms. Smoking and obesity were other risk factors for insomnia symptoms among asthmatics.

    Asthma control, as assessed using the Asthma Control Test (ACT), was identified as the most important predictor of asthma-related quality of life in the MIDAS study. Combining the ACT score with data on insomnia, anxiety, and depression showed considerable additive effects of the conditions. 

    In the SHE study, co-existing asthma and OSA were associated with worse objective sleep quality and more profound nocturnal hypoxemia than either of the conditions alone. The group with both asthma and OSA had the highest levels of the markers of systemic inflammation CRP and IL-6.  

    Uncontrolled asthma was a risk factor for all insomnia symptoms in the LifeGene study. Asthma-related comorbidity had a great impact on sleep quality; in particular, the combination of uncontrolled asthma and any comorbidity was unfavorable. Chronic rhinosinusitis was a risk factor for both insomnia symptoms and uncontrolled asthma. 

    These findings have a high clinical relevance and underline the importance of structured evaluation of asthma control and attention to comorbidity in asthma care, as insomnia symptoms are common and affect quality of life. Optimizing asthma control is crucial for sleep quality, but treating asthma-related comorbidity must not be overlooked.

    Delarbeid
    1. Asthma symptoms and nasal congestion as independent risk factors for insomnia in a general population: Results from the GA 2 LEN survey
    Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Asthma symptoms and nasal congestion as independent risk factors for insomnia in a general population: Results from the GA 2 LEN survey
    Vise andre…
    2013 (engelsk)Inngår i: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 68, nr 2, s. 213-219Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background Asthma and rhinitis have been related to insomnia. The aim of this study was to further analyse the association between asthma, nasal symptoms and insomnia and to identify risk factors for sleep disturbance among patients with asthma, in a large population-based set of material. Method In 2008, a postal questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 45 000 adults in four Swedish cities. The questionnaire included questions on insomnia, asthma, rhinitis, weight, height, tobacco use and physical activity. Results Twenty-five thousand six hundred and ten subjects participated. Asthma was defined as either current medication for asthma or at least one attack of asthma during the last 12 months, and 1830 subjects (7.15%) were defined as asthmatics. The prevalence of insomnia symptoms was significantly higher among asthmatics than non-asthmatics (47.3% vs 37.2%, <0.0001). In the subgroup reporting both asthma and nasal congestion, 55.8% had insomnia symptoms compared with 35.3% in subjects without both asthma and nasal congestion. The risk of insomnia increased with the severity of asthma, and the adjusted OR for insomnia was 2.65 in asthmatics with three symptoms compared with asthmatics without symptoms. Nasal congestion (OR 1.50), obesity (OR 1.54) and smoking (OR 1.71) also increased the risk of insomnia. Conclusion Insomnia remains a common problem among asthmatics. Uncontrolled asthma and nasal congestion are important, treatable risk factors for insomnia. Lifestyle factors, such as smoking and obesity, are also risk factors for insomnia among asthmatics.

    Emneord
    asthma, epidemiology, rhinitis, sleep
    HSV kategori
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-194860 (URN)10.1111/all.12079 (DOI)000313727300010 ()
    Tilgjengelig fra: 2013-02-20 Laget: 2013-02-19 Sist oppdatert: 2019-03-13bibliografisk kontrollert
    2. Effects of poor asthma control, insomnia, anxiety and depression on quality of life in young asthmatics
    Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Effects of poor asthma control, insomnia, anxiety and depression on quality of life in young asthmatics
    Vise andre…
    2016 (engelsk)Inngår i: Journal of Asthma, ISSN 0277-0903, E-ISSN 1532-4303, Vol. 53, nr 4, s. 398-403Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Asthma-related quality of life has previously been shown to be associated with asthma control. The aims of the present study were to further analyze this correlation, identify other variables with impact on asthma-related quality of life, and investigate the covariance among these variables.

    METHODS: Information was retrieved from a cohort of 369 patients, aged 12-35, with physician-diagnosed asthma requiring anti-inflammatory treatment for at least 3 months per year. Questionnaire data [including the mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (mAQLQ), Asthma Control Test (ACT), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS)], quality of sleep, lung function data and blood samples were analyzed. Linear regression models with the mAQLQ score as the dependent scalar variable were calculated.

    RESULTS: ACT was the single variable that had the highest explanatory value for the mAQLQ score (51.5%). High explanatory power was also observed for anxiety and depression (17.0%) and insomnia (14.1%). The population was divided into groups depending on presence of anxiety and depression, uncontrolled asthma, and insomnia. The group that reported none of these conditions had the highest mean mAQLQ score (6.3 units), whereas the group reporting all of these conditions had the lowest mAQLQ score (3.8 units).

    CONCLUSIONS: The ACT score was the single most important variable in predicting asthma-related quality of life. Combining the ACT score with the data on insomnia, anxiety and depression showed considerable additive effects of the conditions. Hence, we recommend the routine use of the ACT and careful attention to symptoms of insomnia, anxiety or depression in the clinical evaluation of asthma-related quality of life.

    Emneord
    Asthma; epidemiology; asthma control; ACT; mAQLQ; quality of life; sleep; HADS; anxiety; depression
    HSV kategori
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-270378 (URN)10.3109/02770903.2015.1126846 (DOI)000374991200009 ()26666333 (PubMedID)
    Forskningsfinansiär
    VINNOVA
    Tilgjengelig fra: 2015-12-27 Laget: 2015-12-27 Sist oppdatert: 2019-03-13bibliografisk kontrollert
    3. Effects of Coexisting Asthma and Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Sleep Architecture, Oxygen Saturation, and Systemic Inflammation in Women
    Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Effects of Coexisting Asthma and Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Sleep Architecture, Oxygen Saturation, and Systemic Inflammation in Women
    2018 (engelsk)Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine (JCSM), ISSN 1550-9389, E-ISSN 1550-9397, Vol. 14, nr 2, s. 253-259Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: Both asthma and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are strongly associated with poor sleep. Asthma and OSA also have several features in common, including airway obstruction, systemic inflammation, and an association with obesity. The aim was to analyze the effect of asthma, OSA, and the combination of asthma and OSA on objectively measured sleep quality and systemic inflammation.

    METHODS: Sleep and health in women is an ongoing community-based study in Uppsala, Sweden. Three hundred eighty-four women ages 20 to 70 years underwent overnight polysomnography and completed questionnaires on airway diseases and sleep complaints. C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor α were analyzed.

    RESULTS: = .04) than the group with OSA alone. The results were consistent after adjusting for age, body mass index, and smoking status. Asthma was independently associated with lower oxygen saturation, whereas OSA was not.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that coexisting asthma and OSA are associated with poorer sleep quality and more profound nocturnal hypoxemia than either of the conditions alone. The results are similar to earlier findings related to OSA and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but they have not previously been described for asthma.

    sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
    American Academy of Sleep Medicine, 2018
    Emneord
    OSA, asthma, inflammation, polysomnography
    HSV kategori
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-343517 (URN)10.5664/jcsm.6946 (DOI)000425136900013 ()29394961 (PubMedID)
    Tilgjengelig fra: 2018-02-27 Laget: 2018-02-27 Sist oppdatert: 2019-03-13bibliografisk kontrollert
    4. Insomnia symptoms and asthma control – interrelations and importance of comorbidities
    Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Insomnia symptoms and asthma control – interrelations and importance of comorbidities
    Vise andre…
    (engelsk)Manuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

     

    Insomnia symptoms are common with asthma. The aim of the study was to analyze the associations between insomnia symptoms and asthma control, asthma severity, and asthma-related comorbidity in a community-based population.

     

    Methods

    Adults (n=23,875, ages 18-45) from the community-based LifeGene study answered a questionnaire on insomnia symptoms, airway symptoms, asthma diagnosis, asthma medication, and asthma-related comorbidities (chronic rhinosinusitis, gastro-esophageal reflux, anxiety, depression, or obesity).

     

    Results

    Of the participants, 1,272 (5.3%) had asthma. The prevalence of any insomnia symptom was higher in participants with uncontrolled asthma (n=201) than with controlled or partially controlled asthma (32.2% vs. 19.9% and 20.1%, respectively, p<0.01). There was no significant difference in the prevalence of insomnia symptoms between subjects with controlled asthma and subjects without asthma. 

     

    Subjects with asthma and any asthma-related comorbidity reported more insomnia symptoms (29.0% vs. 22.4%, p<0.01) compared to asthmatics without comorbidity. Moreover, the prevalence was highest among subjects reporting both uncontrolled asthma and any asthma-related comorbidity (45.1%, p<0.01).

     

    Uncontrolled asthma remained significantly associated with insomnia symptoms (OR 1.72 (1.15-2.56)) after adjusting for age, sex, BMI, smoking history, comorbidities, physical activity, and educational level, while medication level was not. Among asthma-related comorbidities, chronic rhinosinusitis (OR 1.62 (1.20-2.19)), obesity (1.87 (1.07-3.25)), and depression (OR 1.85 (1.34-2.55)) were independently associated with insomnia symptoms. 

     

    Conclusion

     

    Uncontrolled asthma was significantly associated with insomnia symptoms, while controlled or partially controlled asthma was not. Asthma-related comorbidity is of great importance, and asthma control seems to be more important than asthma severity for sleep quality.

    HSV kategori
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-379139 (URN)
    Tilgjengelig fra: 2019-03-12 Laget: 2019-03-12 Sist oppdatert: 2019-03-13
  • 4.
    Sundbom, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lung- allergi- och sömnforskning.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lung- allergi- och sömnforskning.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Klinisk fysiologi.
    Lindberg, Eva
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lung- allergi- och sömnforskning.
    Effects of Coexisting Asthma and Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Sleep Architecture, Oxygen Saturation, and Systemic Inflammation in Women2018Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine (JCSM), ISSN 1550-9389, E-ISSN 1550-9397, Vol. 14, nr 2, s. 253-259Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: Both asthma and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are strongly associated with poor sleep. Asthma and OSA also have several features in common, including airway obstruction, systemic inflammation, and an association with obesity. The aim was to analyze the effect of asthma, OSA, and the combination of asthma and OSA on objectively measured sleep quality and systemic inflammation.

    METHODS: Sleep and health in women is an ongoing community-based study in Uppsala, Sweden. Three hundred eighty-four women ages 20 to 70 years underwent overnight polysomnography and completed questionnaires on airway diseases and sleep complaints. C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor α were analyzed.

    RESULTS: = .04) than the group with OSA alone. The results were consistent after adjusting for age, body mass index, and smoking status. Asthma was independently associated with lower oxygen saturation, whereas OSA was not.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that coexisting asthma and OSA are associated with poorer sleep quality and more profound nocturnal hypoxemia than either of the conditions alone. The results are similar to earlier findings related to OSA and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but they have not previously been described for asthma.

  • 5.
    Sundbom, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lungmedicin och allergologi.
    Lindberg, Eva
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lungmedicin och allergologi.
    Bjerg, A.
    Forsberg, B.
    Franklin, K.
    Gunnbjörnsdottir, Maria
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lungmedicin och allergologi.
    Middelveld, R.
    Torén, K.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lungmedicin och allergologi.
    Asthma symptoms and nasal congestion as independent risk factors for insomnia in a general population: Results from the GA 2 LEN survey2013Inngår i: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 68, nr 2, s. 213-219Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Asthma and rhinitis have been related to insomnia. The aim of this study was to further analyse the association between asthma, nasal symptoms and insomnia and to identify risk factors for sleep disturbance among patients with asthma, in a large population-based set of material. Method In 2008, a postal questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 45 000 adults in four Swedish cities. The questionnaire included questions on insomnia, asthma, rhinitis, weight, height, tobacco use and physical activity. Results Twenty-five thousand six hundred and ten subjects participated. Asthma was defined as either current medication for asthma or at least one attack of asthma during the last 12 months, and 1830 subjects (7.15%) were defined as asthmatics. The prevalence of insomnia symptoms was significantly higher among asthmatics than non-asthmatics (47.3% vs 37.2%, <0.0001). In the subgroup reporting both asthma and nasal congestion, 55.8% had insomnia symptoms compared with 35.3% in subjects without both asthma and nasal congestion. The risk of insomnia increased with the severity of asthma, and the adjusted OR for insomnia was 2.65 in asthmatics with three symptoms compared with asthmatics without symptoms. Nasal congestion (OR 1.50), obesity (OR 1.54) and smoking (OR 1.71) also increased the risk of insomnia. Conclusion Insomnia remains a common problem among asthmatics. Uncontrolled asthma and nasal congestion are important, treatable risk factors for insomnia. Lifestyle factors, such as smoking and obesity, are also risk factors for insomnia among asthmatics.

  • 6.
    Sundbom, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lung- allergi- och sömnforskning.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Klinisk fysiologi.
    Lindberg, Eva
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lung- allergi- och sömnforskning.
    Almqvist, Catarina
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lung- allergi- och sömnforskning.
    Asthma control and asthma severity in relation to sleep disturbances: Results of the LifeGene study2018Inngår i: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 52Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 7.
    Sundbom, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lung- allergi- och sömnforskning.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk cellbiologi, Integrativ Fysiologi. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Klinisk fysiologi.
    Lindberg, Eva
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lung- allergi- och sömnforskning.
    Almqvist, Catarina
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Arbets- och miljömedicin. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lung- allergi- och sömnforskning.
    Insomnia symptoms and asthma control – interrelations and importance of comorbiditiesManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

     

    Insomnia symptoms are common with asthma. The aim of the study was to analyze the associations between insomnia symptoms and asthma control, asthma severity, and asthma-related comorbidity in a community-based population.

     

    Methods

    Adults (n=23,875, ages 18-45) from the community-based LifeGene study answered a questionnaire on insomnia symptoms, airway symptoms, asthma diagnosis, asthma medication, and asthma-related comorbidities (chronic rhinosinusitis, gastro-esophageal reflux, anxiety, depression, or obesity).

     

    Results

    Of the participants, 1,272 (5.3%) had asthma. The prevalence of any insomnia symptom was higher in participants with uncontrolled asthma (n=201) than with controlled or partially controlled asthma (32.2% vs. 19.9% and 20.1%, respectively, p<0.01). There was no significant difference in the prevalence of insomnia symptoms between subjects with controlled asthma and subjects without asthma. 

     

    Subjects with asthma and any asthma-related comorbidity reported more insomnia symptoms (29.0% vs. 22.4%, p<0.01) compared to asthmatics without comorbidity. Moreover, the prevalence was highest among subjects reporting both uncontrolled asthma and any asthma-related comorbidity (45.1%, p<0.01).

     

    Uncontrolled asthma remained significantly associated with insomnia symptoms (OR 1.72 (1.15-2.56)) after adjusting for age, sex, BMI, smoking history, comorbidities, physical activity, and educational level, while medication level was not. Among asthma-related comorbidities, chronic rhinosinusitis (OR 1.62 (1.20-2.19)), obesity (1.87 (1.07-3.25)), and depression (OR 1.85 (1.34-2.55)) were independently associated with insomnia symptoms. 

     

    Conclusion

     

    Uncontrolled asthma was significantly associated with insomnia symptoms, while controlled or partially controlled asthma was not. Asthma-related comorbidity is of great importance, and asthma control seems to be more important than asthma severity for sleep quality.

  • 8.
    Sundbom, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lung- allergi- och sömnforskning.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Klinisk fysiologi.
    Lindberg, Eva
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lung- allergi- och sömnforskning.
    Alving, Kjell
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lung- allergi- och sömnforskning.
    Effects of poor asthma control, insomnia, anxiety and depression on quality of life in young asthmatics2016Inngår i: Journal of Asthma, ISSN 0277-0903, E-ISSN 1532-4303, Vol. 53, nr 4, s. 398-403Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Asthma-related quality of life has previously been shown to be associated with asthma control. The aims of the present study were to further analyze this correlation, identify other variables with impact on asthma-related quality of life, and investigate the covariance among these variables.

    METHODS: Information was retrieved from a cohort of 369 patients, aged 12-35, with physician-diagnosed asthma requiring anti-inflammatory treatment for at least 3 months per year. Questionnaire data [including the mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (mAQLQ), Asthma Control Test (ACT), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS)], quality of sleep, lung function data and blood samples were analyzed. Linear regression models with the mAQLQ score as the dependent scalar variable were calculated.

    RESULTS: ACT was the single variable that had the highest explanatory value for the mAQLQ score (51.5%). High explanatory power was also observed for anxiety and depression (17.0%) and insomnia (14.1%). The population was divided into groups depending on presence of anxiety and depression, uncontrolled asthma, and insomnia. The group that reported none of these conditions had the highest mean mAQLQ score (6.3 units), whereas the group reporting all of these conditions had the lowest mAQLQ score (3.8 units).

    CONCLUSIONS: The ACT score was the single most important variable in predicting asthma-related quality of life. Combining the ACT score with the data on insomnia, anxiety and depression showed considerable additive effects of the conditions. Hence, we recommend the routine use of the ACT and careful attention to symptoms of insomnia, anxiety or depression in the clinical evaluation of asthma-related quality of life.

1 - 8 of 8
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf