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  • 1.
    Ahlberg, Beth Maina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Skaraborg Institute for Research and Development, Skövde, Sweden.
    Hamed, Sarah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Thapar-Björkert, Suruchi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Invisibility of Racism in the Global Neoliberal Era: Implications for Researching Racism in Healthcare2019In: Frontiers in Sociology, ISSN 2297-7775, Vol. 4, article id 61Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the difficulties of researching racism in healthcare contexts as part of the wider issue of neoliberal reforms in welfare states in the age of global migration. In trying to understand the contradiction of a phenomenon that is historical and strongly felt by individuals and yet widely denied by both institutions and individuals, we consider the current political and socioeconomic context of healthcare provision. Despite decades of legislation against racism, its presence persists in healthcare settings, but data on these experiences is rarely gathered in Europe. National systems of healthcare provision have been subject to neoliberal reforms, where among others, cheaper forms of labor are sought to reduce the cost of producing healthcare, while the availability of services is rationed to contain demand. The restriction both on provision of and access to welfare, including healthcare, is unpopular among national populations. However, the explanations for restricted access to healthcare are assumed to be located outside the national context with immigrants being blamed. Even as migrants are used as a source of cheap labor in healthcare and other welfare sectors, the arrival of immigrants has been held responsible for restricted access to healthcare and welfare in general. One implication of (im)migration being blamed for healthcare restrictions, while racism is held to be a problem of the past, is the silencing of experiences of racism, which has dire consequences for ethnic minority populations. The implications of racism as a form of inequality within healthcare and the circumstances of researching racism in healthcare and its implication for the sociology of health in Sweden are described.

  • 2.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    A Fortunate Man: the story of a country doctor [book review]2017In: Cost of Living, , p. 3Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    I took John Berger’s book A Fortunate Man: the story of a country doctor to read over the New Year holiday. Berger’s account of a General Practitioner working in the Forest of Dean in the 1960s, illustrated with Jean Mohr’s photographs, was first published in 1967 and reissued by Canongate in 2015.

    The extended essay opens with vignettes of patients attended by an old-fashioned community physician in a rural area: a woodman trapped under a felled tree; a young woman’s asthma brought on by the stress of a failed affair; the hopeless grief of a widowed farmer; and the severe piles of a man who has long lived as a woman.

  • 3.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Warwick University.
    A review of research and policy documents on the international migration of physicians and nurses2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The international migration of skilled medical professionals has been documented as a ‘manpower’ issue for health service planning since the 1960s. This paper charts the way that the international travel of medical professionals, primarily physicians and nurses, has been understood and how its construction as a problematic or a positive feature of global migration has varied. Sketching out this literature is a prelude to further analysis that will interrogate the terms of the documentation, its translation into and consequences for public discourse concerning global equality and ethics.

  • 4.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Adventures in Human Being2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    'Akuten'2013Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Alan Kurdi2015Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Conceptualizing the ‘migrant crisis’ in Europe2015Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Counting the cost of heroic surgical intervention2013Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Cracked2015Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Deportation and despair in context2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Assessments of the health needs of refugees and asylum seekers in Europe tend to focus on trauma suffered prior to exile and during the flight to the host country. Less attention has been paid to the ill effects of the process of applying for asylum in the host country. An exception to this generalisation is the documentation of the devastating effects of being denied asylum for young people in Sweden.

    Some children whose asylum-applications are denied become withdrawn, and unable to eat, walk or communicate, are tube fed in bed, wearing nappies. The bed-bound young people have no obvious pathology causing their withdrawal from the world, except that their family’s application for asylum has been denied by the Swedish Migration Board.

  • 11.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Diversity and health care access: illness stories in four different European settings2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Ethnicity and health: The costs and benefits of conceptualising racism and ethnicity2012In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Papers that conceptualize ethnicity as an aspect of public health have increased in number over recent years in Social Science & Medicine, as elsewhere. This virtual special issue includes a selection of papers, mostly published in the last five years, to highlight recent developments in this area. The question of whether the risks associated with reifying ethnic categories in particular settings, thereby reinforcing racialised models of thinking, is addressed. The wisdom of seeking to construct ethnicity-type variables for the purpose of global cross-cultural comparison is queried.An unavoidable contradiction of studying ethnicity is the inevitable re-inscription of ethnic and racialised categories. Inequities in health outcome or quality of health service provision and uptake are injustices that have to be measured in order to be addressed. Whether research is qualitative or quantitative and whether or not an investigation finds inequalities, the definition of an ethnic group whether in terms of boundary or content, re-inscribes its existence as a cultural category. Furthermore, the familiar complexities of working with socio-demographic variables that relate to the individual and the population level, applies in the case of studying ethnicity and health.Ethnic groups exist because we behave as if they do: the social construction of ethnicity occurs as part of the definition of, and the search for, quantitatively and qualitatively significant differences between those groups. In appraising ethnicity, concomitant terms with over-lapping meanings are implied and, in the hope of avoiding terminological obfuscation, are briefly rehearsed below.

  • 13.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Ethnicity and health: The costs and benefits of conceptualising racism and ethnicity2012In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Exercise: how much is enough?2012Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    ‘Fatima’ Review: ‘Fatima': Philippe Faucon’s insightful account of an immigrant Muslim mother living in France2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Funny bodies2012Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Global Perspectives on War, Gender and Health2010Book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Health and discrimination: conceptualising the connection2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Healthcare heroes – Raed Arafat (#1 in an occasional series)2014Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Howling together alone: Scandi-noir2016Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Idiot’s guide to ethical publishing in a competitive world2012Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    (Imaginary) healthcare heroes – Ms Conscientious (#2 in an occasional series)2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    International medical migration: A critical conceptual review of the global movements of doctors and nurses2014In: Health, ISSN 1363-4593, E-ISSN 1461-7196, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 580-596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper critically appraises the discourse around international medical migration at the turn of the 21st century. A critical narrative review of a range of English-language sources, including grey literature, books and research reports, traces the development and spread of specific causative models. The attribution of causative relations between the movement of skilled medical workers, the provision of health care and population health outcomes illustrates how the global reach of biomedicine has to be understood in the context of local conditions. The need to understand migration as an aspect of uneven global development, rather than a delimited issue of manpower services management, is illustrated with reference to debates about ‘brain drain’ of Africa’s health-care professionals, task-shifting and the crisis in health-care human resources. The widespread presumed cause of shortages of skilled health-care staff in sub-Saharan Africa was overdetermined by a compelling narrative of rich countries stealing poor countries’ trained health-care professionals. This narrative promotes medical professional interests and ignores historical patterns of underinvestment in health-care systems and structures. Sociological theories of medicalization suggest that the international marketization of medical recruitment is a key site where the uneven global development of capital is at work. A radical reconfiguration of medical staffing along the lines of ‘task-shifting’ in rich and poor countries’ health-care systems alike offers one means of thinking about global equity in access to quality care.

  • 24.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    International medical migration: Global movements of doctors and nurses2019In: The Sociology of Health and Illness: Critical Perspectives / [ed] Peter Conrad and Valerie Leiter, Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 2019, 10, p. 737-750Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Intersections of race and class: Sociological perspective2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Margaret Stacey : The Sociology of Health and Healing 2015In: The Palgrave Handbook of Social Theory in Health, Illness and Medicine / [ed] Fran Collyer, Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, p. 262-272Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Margaret Stacey (1922-2004) played key roles in establishing sociology as a University-based discipline in Britain and in developing a sociology of medicine, health and illness as a distinct specialism. This chapter outlines her biography and career, during which she helped to consolidate a sociology of health and illness that attends to inequality of various forms, offers critical perspectives on orthodox medicine through a comparative approach and that is committed to theoretical and empirical development. Her interests in the gendered division of labour, her feminist commitment, and a concern to address suffering, are considered in assessing her influence on the discipline.

  • 27.
    Bradby, Hannah
    University of Essex, UK.
    Medicine, health and illness2012In: Key articles: British Sociological Association 60th Anniversary Special EditionArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Medicine, Health and Society: A Critical Sociology2012Book (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Much ado about nothing?2012Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Pathways through health care: the role of the navigator in stories from four different European Settings2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Pathways to care2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Placebo, participation and surgery2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    A therapeutic effect that cannot be attributed to an active ingredient of medication is termed ‘placebo’. The ‘placebo effect’ is far from a neutral description of the effect of ‘inert drugs’, being associated with the quackery and deception of sugar pills and snake oil. For example, upon launching a current consultation on prescribed items, NHS England’s chief executive described homeopathy as “at best a placebo and a misuse of scarce NHS funds”. Therapy harnessing the placebo effect is described as a waste of money. But given the relative cheapness of homeopathy and the ubiquity of the placebo effect, the opposite might be true and it could represent money well spent.

  • 33.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Refugee Migration and Health: Challenges for Germany and Europe2019In: Refugee and Migrant Health: A Perspective from Sweden / [ed] Alexander Krämer; Florian Fischer, Switzerland: Springer Publishing Company, 2019, p. 185-193Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter describes healthcare access and uptake in Sweden, with particular reference to a peak in asylum seekers arrivals at the end of 2015. The influence of healthcare organisation and of the politics of migration governance are described. The chapter ends by suggesting what challenges lie ahead and the potential solutions which could be adopted.

  • 34.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Research Agenda in Medical Sociology: Specialty Grand Challenge Article2016In: Frontiers in Sociology, E-ISSN 2297-7775, Vol. 1, article id 14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sociology queries taken for granted understandings of the world and especially those that claim universal applicability, but that in fact support particular interests. In showing up the hidden workings of power – the interests of institutions, professions, corporations, and capital – the complex set of interests that make up modern medicine can be explored to disrupt simplistic accounts of its beneficence. By seeing health and illness as social as well as individual bodily processes, and conceptualizing medicine as a practice and profession that is entangled with governance and speculative capital, sociology offers critical insights to medicine’s curative and therapeutic benefits (Bradby, 2012). The challenge for a progressive sociology of medicine is to critique the range of interests that make up medicine (as profession, discipline, business, statutory, and non-governmental institution across the world) while holding a sense of medicine’s benefits and deficits at individual and population level in balance with other knowledge systems and moralities of healing.

  • 35.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Review: La Fille Inconnue (The Unknown Girl)2017In: Cost of LivingArticle, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Review of The Unknown Girl or La Fille Inconnue a film by the Dardenne brothers. The review considers the portrayal of the practice of community medicine, as played out by the main protaganist, Dr Jenny Davin, played by Adele Haenel.

  • 36.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Scarred for life2016Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 37.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Screening, stigma and risk: FGM in Norrköping2014Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Surgery for breakfast2013Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 39.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Taking Story Seriously2017In: Social Theory & Health, ISSN 1477-8211, E-ISSN 1477-822X, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 206-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In narrative approaches to health and illness, a distinction between narrative and story has been Lost or occluded. This paper considers how the terms narrative and story are defined and how they are used in practice in order to focus on rehearsed or 'worked up' stories, including fiction, rather than minimally defined narrative fragments. Story - written, spoken and shared - is a powerful way of contextualising health and illness in a wider landscape of human values and interests and, as a form of enchantment in the face of scientific rationalisation, a human necessity. Some reasons why sociology, and particularly medical sociology, has avoided defining fictional stories as part of its material and its method are explored. The reasons why a sociology of health, illness and medicine might want to include fictionalised story are sketched. Complex moments of human experience, including sick physicians' experience of alienation from both themselves and their medical treatment, necessitate metaphor laden and sometimes fictionalised writing to represent the subjective contradictions. Story, including fictionalised story, represents a means of including imaginative elements of human Life in sociological view.

  • 40.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Therapeutic itineraries and politics of belonging in the context of superdiversity2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Trouble in social democratic paradise: The Swedish model crumbles?2014Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 42.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Understanding and apprehending institutional racism in mental health services: compromised conceptualization2010In: Sociological research online, ISSN 1360-7804, E-ISSN 1360-7804, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 8-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Unequal Health: The scandal of our times by Danny Dorling, 2013, Policy Press2013Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 44.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Universalism, diversity and norms: gratitude, healthcare and welfare chauvinism2018In: Critical Public Health, ISSN 0958-1596, E-ISSN 1469-3682Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Access to universal healthcare is a normative expectation of citizens in European welfare states. As part of a comparative study of healthcare in diverse European neighbourhoods, we met women who described failures of the public healthcare system, together with gratitude for that system. Challenges to European welfare states of ageing populations, the retraction of resources available for healthcare, and globalised migration streams have been linked to xenophobic ‘welfarist’ attempts to restrict access to services for new arrivals and those seen as failing to contribute sufficiently. Stories of healthcare systems’ failure to treat symptoms, pain, and suffering in a timely and caring fashion came from eight women of non-European migrant backgrounds as part of a wider interview study in four European cities (Birmingham, Uppsala, Lisbon, Bremen). These accounts suggest that a normative aspect of welfare provision has been reproduced – that is, the expression of gratitude – despite inadequate services. Where welfarist attitudes to migration meet normative aspects of healthcare, suffering may be compounded by an expectation of gratitude. The regrettable unmet healthcare need of the eight women whose cases are presented suggests that other marginalised healthcare users may also be under-served in apparently universal healthcare systems.

  • 45.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Waiting for the Xenografts...2012Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    ‘What do we mean by ‘racism’?: Conceptualising the range of what we call racism in health care settings: a commentary on Peek et al.2010In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 71, p. 10-12Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Bradby, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    What is the point of hospitals?2015Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 48.
    Bradby, Hannah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Ahlberg, Beth Maina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Holiday parasites and furry friends2014Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 49.
    Bradby, Hannah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Brand, Tilman
    Dimensions of Diversity: Terminology in health research2015Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This short review considers how ‘ethnicity’ and ‘superdiversity’ are used alongside ‘diversity’ in health research in a sample of recent journal articles. Diversity appears regularly in health inequalities research where the term is used to justify a focus on particular minorities presented as especially vulnerable to ill health or to being in receipt of inadequate services. Given the complexity of what is covered by ‘diversity’ there is a tendency to focus on a single dimension for intervention, such as language or ‘health literacy’. The development of cultural competency or cultural safety is a common response to diversity in health service provision. The review considers gaps in how diversity is treated and the way that superdiversity is largely being used as yet another synonym of diversity. The translation of terms into English, as the dominant language in the political economy of academic publishing, introduces further uncertainty in pinpointing the local dimension of diversity that is under research. The ways that ‘superdiversity’ is gradually appearing does not (yet) undo such uncertainty.

    Highlights

    • Diversity appears regularly in health inequality literature but is poorly defined
    • Diversity used synonymously with other terms (culture, ethnicity, race, language)
    • Superdiversity used as an amplifier
    • Language or ‘health literacy’ often nominate as aspect of diversity for intervention
    • Cultural competence or cultural safety encompass progressive aspirations but less often specific practical responses to the challenges of diversifying diversity
    • Health professionals do not see responding to diversity as their responsibility

    Gaps

    • Specified relationships between inequality, inequity and diversity
    • Positive effects of diversity on health outcomes and on inequality
    • Evaluation of effect of increased workforce diversity on health equality
    • Evaluation of effectiveness of cultural competency/safety programmes
    • Professional structures and culture rarely included as part of the problem
    • Effects of political and economic context, especially austerity and globalisation, on health services’ response to diversity
    • How dimensions of diversity relate to one another across locations
    • How vocabulary of superdiversity relates to that of ethnicity, racism and multiculturalism
  • 50.
    Bradby, Hannah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Frenz, Margret
    Univ Oxford, Ctr Global Hist, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, St Cross Coll, Oxford, England..
    Snow, Stephanie
    Univ Manchester, Ctr Hist Sci Technol & Med, Manchester, Lancs, England..
    Migration and danger: ethnicity and health2016In: Ethnicity and Health, ISSN 1355-7858, E-ISSN 1465-3419, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 333-339Article in journal (Other academic)
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