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  • 1.
    Jägerskog, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm Int Water Inst, Knowledge Serv, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kim, Kyungmee
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Land acquisition: a means to mitigate water scarcity and reduce conflict?2016In: Hydrological Sciences Journal, ISSN 0262-6667, E-ISSN 2150-3435, Vol. 61, no 7, 1338-1345 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years there has been a surge in land investments, primarily in the African continent, but also in Asia and Latin America. This increase in land investment was driven by the food pricing crisis of 2007-2008. Land investors can be identified from a variety of sectors, with actors ranging from hedge funds to national companies. Many water-scarce countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) are among these financiers, and primarily invest in Africa. Recognizing the potential for "outsourcing" their food security (and thereby also partly their water security), Middle Eastern countries such as Jordan, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates have invested in land for food production in Africa. The extent to which this is happening is still unclear, as many contracts are not yet official and the extent of the leases is vague. This paper investigates the land investments and acquisitions by Middle Eastern countries. It also seeks to analyse what effect, if any, these investments can have on the potential for conflict reduction and subsequent peacebuilding in the Middle East region as the activity removes pressure from transboundary water resources.

  • 2.
    Kim, Kyungmee
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Transboundary water politics in the developing world2016In: Water international, ISSN 0250-8060, E-ISSN 1941-1707, Vol. 41, no 5, 803-805 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Kim, Kyungmee
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Jägerskog, Anders
    World Bank.
    Overseas Investment in Land and Challenges in the Nile Basin: Evident Links from the Middle East and North Africa Investment2016In: Land and Hydropolitics in the Nile River Basin: Challenges and new investments / [ed] Emil Sandstrom , Anders Jagerskog and Terje Oestigaard, New York: Routledge, 2016, 36-52 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Kim, Kyungmee
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Swain, Ashok
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
    Crime, Corruption, Terrorism and Beyond: A Typology of Water Crime2017In: The Human Face of Water Security / [ed] David Devlaeminck, Zafar Adeel, Robert Sandford, Springer Publishing Company, 2017, 95-111 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water security is a multifaceted concept that spreads over political, social, economic and biophysical fields, becoming increasingly important in the age of looming global water crises. Previous research outcomes suggest that escalating global water crises are the results of governance failure not limited to physical shortages of freshwater resources. Water crime is defined in both procedural and moral terms as wrongdoings determined within the legal justice systems and social norms. This chapter explores water crimes in different dimensions with examples from the Global North and South and establishes typologies as follows: mismanagement of water resources causing significant social harms and environmental damage; corruption allowing allocation of water resources for a favoured party, using public office for private economic and political gains and adding payments for more effective service delivery; and, terrorism targeting water infrastructure and systems and affecting water security in water scarce regions. A broader framework to understand the multiple dimensions of water crime is an essential precondition for establishing a comprehensive strategy for achieving water security.

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