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  • 1.
    Joelsson, Lana Salih
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Berglund, Anna
    Uppsala University, National Centre for Knowledge on Men.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Tydén, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Preconception Lifestyles And Lifestyle Modification Among Women Seeking For Infertility2015In: Fertility and Sterility, ISSN 0015-0282, E-ISSN 1556-5653, Vol. 104, no 3, p. E182-E183Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Salih Joelsson, Lana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Investigating the effect of lifestyle risk factors upon the number of aspirated and mature oocytes in in vitro fertilization cycles: interaction with antral follicle countManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Salih Joelsson, Lana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Lifestyle and Reproductive Health among Women prior to Conception2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Health and lifestyle is of great importance when women intend to become pregnant, as well as during pregnancy. It is crucial that people seeking for infertility are aware of which lifestyle changes they can undertake to enhance the likelihood of treatment success. The overall aim of this project was to investigate the extent to which women comply with recommendations for lifestyle changes during the time they try to conceive and during early pregnancy and the impact of lifestyle risk factors on treatment results in sub-fertile women. Lifestyle factors and mental health at baseline and lifestyle changes women made while they were trying to conceive were assessed by a study-specific questionnaire. Both pregnant women and non-pregnant sub-fertile women in the mid-Sweden region were included. The level of pregnancy planning was associated with planning behavior. Only one-third of all pregnant women took folic acid one month prior to conception, 17% used tobacco daily and 11% used alcohol weekly three months before conception. In the sub-fertile non-pregnant women cohort, 13.2% used tobacco daily, 13.6% drank more than three cups of coffee per day, and 11.6% consumed more than two glasses of alcohol weekly. Among sub-fertile women, one-third were overweight or obese. Pregnant women who conceived with Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) reported lower rates of anxiety and depression symptoms compared to sub-fertile women. They also showed no difference in depression and anxiety symptoms compared to women who conceived naturally. Among sub-fertile women undergoing their first IVF treatment cycle, an independent as well as a cumulative effect of smoking and BMI on the number of aspirated oocytes and the proportion of mature oocytes was observed, especially among women with low ovarian reserve. In conclusion, approximately half of the women in our studies retained habits with negative effects on fertility. This is worrying because the harmful consequences of negative lifestyle factors are well established. These negative lifestyle factors are easy to detect and adjust at an early stage in the assessment process and might allow for optimization of fertility treatment and pregnancy outcomes.

    List of papers
    1. Is pregnancy planning associated with background characteristics and pregnancy planning behavior?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is pregnancy planning associated with background characteristics and pregnancy planning behavior?
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 95, no 2, p. 182-189Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Prevalence of planned pregnancies varies between countries but is often measured in a dichotomous manner. The aim of this study was to investigate to what level pregnant women had planned their pregnancies and whether pregnancy planning was associated with background characteristics and pregnancy planning behavior.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study that utilized the baseline measurements from the Swedish Pregnancy Planning (SWEPP) study. Pregnant women (n= 3390) recruited at antenatal clinics answered a questionnaire. Data were analyzed with multinomial logistic regression, Kruskal-Wallis H and χ(2) tests.

    RESULTS: Three out of four pregnancies were very or fairly planned and 12 % fairly or very unplanned. Of women with very unplanned pregnancies, 32 % had considered an induced abortion. Women with planned pregnancies were more likely to have a higher level of education, higher household income, to be currently working ≥50 %, and to have longer relationships than women with unplanned pregnancies. The level of pregnancy planning was associated with planning behavior, such as information seeking and intake of folic acid, but without a reduction in alcohol consumption. One third of all women took folic acid one month prior to conception, 17 % used tobacco daily and 11 % used alcohol weekly three months before conception.

    CONCLUSIONS: A majority rated their pregnancy as very or fairly planned, with socio-economic factors as explanatory variables. The level of pregnancy planning should be queried routinely to enable individualized counselling, especially for women with unplanned pregnancies. Preconception recommendations need to be established and communicated to the public to increase health promoting planning behavior.

    Keywords
    Planned pregnancy; unplanned pregnancy; preconception care; folic acid; health behavior
    National Category
    Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-270500 (URN)10.1111/aogs.12816 (DOI)000368004300007 ()26566076 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2015-12-29 Created: 2015-12-29 Last updated: 2018-01-19Bibliographically approved
    2. Do subfertile women adjust their habits when trying to conceive?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do subfertile women adjust their habits when trying to conceive?
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 121, no 3, p. 184-191Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    AbstractAIM:

    The aim of this study was to investigate lifestyle habits and lifestyle adjustments among subfertile women trying to conceive.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS:

    Women (n = 747) were recruited consecutively at their first visit to fertility clinics in mid-Sweden. Participants completed a questionnaire. Data were analyzed using logistic regression, t tests, and chi-square tests.

    RESULTS:

    The response rate was 62% (n = 466). Mean duration of infertility was 1.9 years. During this time 13.2% used tobacco daily, 13.6% drank more than three cups of coffee per day, and 11.6% consumed more than two glasses of alcohol weekly. In this sample, 23.9% of the women were overweight (body mass index, BMI 25-29.9 kg/m(2)), and 12.5% were obese (BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)). Obese women exercised more and changed to healthy diets more frequently than normal-weight women (odds ratio 7.43; 95% confidence interval 3.7-14.9). Six out of ten women (n = 266) took folic acid when they started trying to conceive, but 11% stopped taking folic acid after some time. Taking folic acid was associated with a higher level of education (p < 0.001).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Among subfertile women, one-third were overweight or obese, and some had other lifestyle factors with known adverse effects on fertility such as use of tobacco. Overweight and obese women adjusted their habits but did not reduce their body mass index. Women of fertile age would benefit from preconception counseling, and the treatment of infertility should routinely offer interventions for lifestyle changes.

    KEYWORDS:

    Alcohol consumption; assisted reproduction; diet; infertility; lifestyle; obesity; pregnancy; tobacco use

    Keywords
    Alcohol consumption; assisted reproduction; diet; infertility; lifestyle; obesity; pregnancy; tobacco use
    National Category
    Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-301385 (URN)10.1080/03009734.2016.1176094 (DOI)000381958400006 ()
    Available from: 2016-08-22 Created: 2016-08-22 Last updated: 2018-06-04Bibliographically approved
    3. Anxiety and depression symptoms among sub-fertile women, women pregnant after infertility treatment, and naturally pregnant women
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anxiety and depression symptoms among sub-fertile women, women pregnant after infertility treatment, and naturally pregnant women
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 45, p. 212-219Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Infertility has been associated with psychological distress, but whether these symptoms persist after achieving pregnancy via assisted reproductive technology (ART) remains unclear. We compared the prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms between women seeking for infertility treatment and women who conceived after ART or naturally.

    Methods

    Four hundred and sixty-eight sub-fertile non-pregnant women, 2972 naturally pregnant women and 143 women pregnant after ART completed a questionnaire in this cross-sectional study. The Anxiety subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-A≥8) and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS≥12) were used for assessing anxiety and depressive symptoms, respectively. Multivariate Poisson regression models with robust variance were applied to explore associations with anxiety and depressive symptoms.

    Results

    The prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms among sub-fertile, non-pregnant women (57.6% and 15.7%, respectively) were significantly higher compared to women pregnant after ART (21.1% and 8.5%, respectively) and naturally pregnant women (18.8% and 10.3%, respectively). History of psychiatric diagnosis was identified as an independent risk factor for both anxiety and depressive symptoms. The presence of at least one unhealthy lifestyle behavior (daily tobacco smoking, weekly alcohol consumption, BMI≥25, and regular physical exercise < 2 h/week) was also associated with anxiety (Prevalence Ratio, PR: 1.24; 95%CI: 1.09–1.40) and depressive symptoms (PR: 1.25; 95%CI: 1.04–1.49).

    Conclusions

    Women pregnant after ART showed no difference in anxiety and depressive symptoms compared to naturally pregnant women. However, early psychological counseling and management of unhealthy lifestyle behaviors for sub-fertile women may be advisable, particularly for women with a previous history of psychiatric diagnosis.

    Keywords
    anxiety, depression, infertility, assisted reproductive technology, pregnancy
    National Category
    Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
    Research subject
    Obstetrics and Gynaecology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-338378 (URN)10.1016/j.eurpsy.2017.07.004 (DOI)000414461300029 ()28957789 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council
    Available from: 2018-01-08 Created: 2018-01-08 Last updated: 2018-06-04Bibliographically approved
    4. Investigating the effect of lifestyle risk factors upon the number of aspirated and mature oocytes in in vitro fertilization cycles: interaction with antral follicle count
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigating the effect of lifestyle risk factors upon the number of aspirated and mature oocytes in in vitro fertilization cycles: interaction with antral follicle count
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Keywords
    infertility, oocytes, lifestyle, obesity, alcohol, in vitro fertilization, nicotine use, smoking
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Research subject
    Obstetrics and Gynaecology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-338379 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-01-08 Created: 2018-01-08 Last updated: 2018-06-04
  • 4.
    Salih Joelsson, Lana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Berglund, Anna
    Uppsala University, National Centre for Knowledge on Men.
    Wånggren, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lood, Mikael
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Fertil Unit, Dept Womens Hlth, Orebro, Sweden.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Tydén, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Do subfertile women adjust their habits when trying to conceive?2016In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 121, no 3, p. 184-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AbstractAIM:

    The aim of this study was to investigate lifestyle habits and lifestyle adjustments among subfertile women trying to conceive.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS:

    Women (n = 747) were recruited consecutively at their first visit to fertility clinics in mid-Sweden. Participants completed a questionnaire. Data were analyzed using logistic regression, t tests, and chi-square tests.

    RESULTS:

    The response rate was 62% (n = 466). Mean duration of infertility was 1.9 years. During this time 13.2% used tobacco daily, 13.6% drank more than three cups of coffee per day, and 11.6% consumed more than two glasses of alcohol weekly. In this sample, 23.9% of the women were overweight (body mass index, BMI 25-29.9 kg/m(2)), and 12.5% were obese (BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)). Obese women exercised more and changed to healthy diets more frequently than normal-weight women (odds ratio 7.43; 95% confidence interval 3.7-14.9). Six out of ten women (n = 266) took folic acid when they started trying to conceive, but 11% stopped taking folic acid after some time. Taking folic acid was associated with a higher level of education (p < 0.001).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Among subfertile women, one-third were overweight or obese, and some had other lifestyle factors with known adverse effects on fertility such as use of tobacco. Overweight and obese women adjusted their habits but did not reduce their body mass index. Women of fertile age would benefit from preconception counseling, and the treatment of infertility should routinely offer interventions for lifestyle changes.

    KEYWORDS:

    Alcohol consumption; assisted reproduction; diet; infertility; lifestyle; obesity; pregnancy; tobacco use

  • 5.
    Salih Joelsson, Lana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Tydén, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Wanggren, K
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Georgakis, M K
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens,Greece.
    Stern, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research. Department of Health Promotion, Sophiahemmet University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Berglund, Anna
    Uppsala University, National Centre for Knowledge on Men.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Anxiety and depression symptoms among sub-fertile women, women pregnant after infertility treatment, and naturally pregnant women2017In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 45, p. 212-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Infertility has been associated with psychological distress, but whether these symptoms persist after achieving pregnancy via assisted reproductive technology (ART) remains unclear. We compared the prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms between women seeking for infertility treatment and women who conceived after ART or naturally.

    Methods

    Four hundred and sixty-eight sub-fertile non-pregnant women, 2972 naturally pregnant women and 143 women pregnant after ART completed a questionnaire in this cross-sectional study. The Anxiety subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-A≥8) and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS≥12) were used for assessing anxiety and depressive symptoms, respectively. Multivariate Poisson regression models with robust variance were applied to explore associations with anxiety and depressive symptoms.

    Results

    The prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms among sub-fertile, non-pregnant women (57.6% and 15.7%, respectively) were significantly higher compared to women pregnant after ART (21.1% and 8.5%, respectively) and naturally pregnant women (18.8% and 10.3%, respectively). History of psychiatric diagnosis was identified as an independent risk factor for both anxiety and depressive symptoms. The presence of at least one unhealthy lifestyle behavior (daily tobacco smoking, weekly alcohol consumption, BMI≥25, and regular physical exercise < 2 h/week) was also associated with anxiety (Prevalence Ratio, PR: 1.24; 95%CI: 1.09–1.40) and depressive symptoms (PR: 1.25; 95%CI: 1.04–1.49).

    Conclusions

    Women pregnant after ART showed no difference in anxiety and depressive symptoms compared to naturally pregnant women. However, early psychological counseling and management of unhealthy lifestyle behaviors for sub-fertile women may be advisable, particularly for women with a previous history of psychiatric diagnosis.

  • 6.
    Stern, Jenny
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Salih Joelsson, Lana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Tydén, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Berglund, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Ekstrand, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Hegaard, Hanne
    Aarts, Clara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Kristiansson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Is pregnancy planning associated with background characteristics and pregnancy planning behavior?2016In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 95, no 2, p. 182-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Prevalence of planned pregnancies varies between countries but is often measured in a dichotomous manner. The aim of this study was to investigate to what level pregnant women had planned their pregnancies and whether pregnancy planning was associated with background characteristics and pregnancy planning behavior.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study that utilized the baseline measurements from the Swedish Pregnancy Planning (SWEPP) study. Pregnant women (n= 3390) recruited at antenatal clinics answered a questionnaire. Data were analyzed with multinomial logistic regression, Kruskal-Wallis H and χ(2) tests.

    RESULTS: Three out of four pregnancies were very or fairly planned and 12 % fairly or very unplanned. Of women with very unplanned pregnancies, 32 % had considered an induced abortion. Women with planned pregnancies were more likely to have a higher level of education, higher household income, to be currently working ≥50 %, and to have longer relationships than women with unplanned pregnancies. The level of pregnancy planning was associated with planning behavior, such as information seeking and intake of folic acid, but without a reduction in alcohol consumption. One third of all women took folic acid one month prior to conception, 17 % used tobacco daily and 11 % used alcohol weekly three months before conception.

    CONCLUSIONS: A majority rated their pregnancy as very or fairly planned, with socio-economic factors as explanatory variables. The level of pregnancy planning should be queried routinely to enable individualized counselling, especially for women with unplanned pregnancies. Preconception recommendations need to be established and communicated to the public to increase health promoting planning behavior.

  • 7.
    Stern, Jenny
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Salih Joelsson, Lana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Tydén, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Berglund, Anna
    Uppsala University, National Centre for Knowledge on Men.
    Ekstrand, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Hegaard, Hanne
    The Research Unit Women’s and Children’s Health, The Juliane Marie Centre for Women, Children and Reproduction, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen; The Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Aarts, Clara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Kristiansson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Is pregnancy planning associated with background characteristics and pregnancy planning behavior?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
1 - 7 of 7
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