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  • 1.
    Csató, Éva Ágnes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Brendemoen, Bernt
    University of Oslo.
    Stein, Heidi
    University of Mainz.
    Römer, Claudia
    University of Vienna.
    The linguistic landscape of Istanbul in the seventeenth century2016In: Spoken Ottoman in Mediator Texts / [ed] Éva Á. Csató, Astrid Menz, Fikret Turan, Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2016, p. 1-31Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Csató, Éva Ágnes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Editorial note2016In: Turkic languages, ISSN 1431-4983, ISSN 1431-4983, Vol. 20, p. 1-3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Csató, Éva Ágnes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Explorations of Turkic languages and varieties2016In: Endangered Turkic languages: Theoretical and general approaches / [ed] Süer Eker and Ülkü Çelik Şavk, Ankara & Astana: Khoja Ahmet Yesevi International Turkish-Kazakh University, Ankara International Turkic Academy, Astana , 2016, 1, p. 189-198Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Csató, Éva Ágnes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology. University of Mainz.
    Grammaticalization in Turkic2018In: Grammaticalisation from a typological perspective / [ed] Heine, Bernd and Narrog, Heiko, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018, p. 146-165Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     This chapter represents the whole Northern Eurasian area, where Turkic languages are spoken in close contact with other Transeurasian languages, Mongolic and Tungusic. These three language families share signifi cant grammaticalization strategies and typological characteristics with each other as well as with Koreanic and Japonic. First, the distribution, classification, and some basic typological features of Turkic languages is briefly presented in comparison to other Transeurasian languages. The main focus will be on typically non-European grammaticalization processes that are representative for the whole family and recurring throughout the known history of Turkic. A detailed account of different grammaticalization strategies of so-called converb forms  complements the treatment of similar processes in other Transeurasian languages that are otherwise less elaborated in this volume. This account will highlight grammaticalized categories of actional modification and viewpoint aspect typical of Turkic. Finally, some theoretically interesting issues such as the lack of formal marking resulting in systematic ambiguity is addressed.

  • 5.
    Csató, Éva Ágnes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Johanson, Lars
    Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz.
    Kuzeybatı Karaycasında hece uyumu üzerine: On the syllabic harmony in North-West Karaim2009In: International Journal of Central Asian Studies, ISSN 1226-4490, p. 139-148Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Csató, Éva Ágnes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    On gerundial syntax in Turkic1993In: Acta Orientalia Hungarica, ISSN 0001-6446, Vol. 46, p. 133-141Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Csató, Éva Ágnes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Some phonological and morphological features of spoken Halich Karaim2016In: Central Eurasia in the Middle Ages: Studies in Honour of Peter B. Golden / [ed] István Zimonyi and Osman Karatay, Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2016, p. 57-68Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Csató, Éva Ágnes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology. Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz.
    The marking of future time reference in Turkish1992In: Eurotyp Working Papers, Series 6, Vol. 3, p. 60-70Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Csató, Éva Ágnes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    The Northwestern Turkic (Kipchak) languages2020In: The Oxford guide to the Transeurasian languages / [ed] Martine Robbeets, Alexander Savelyev, Nataliia Hübner, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter deals with the Northwestern (Kipchak) branch of the Turkic language family. Examples taken from this branch of Turkic illustrate phonological, morphological and syntactic features typical of Turkic languages. Reference is also made to special developments leading to the emergence of non-typical features in some Northwestern languages. Special emphasis is given to the description of the southern Kipchak language Kazakh in the middle of the Turkic speaking world and to the moribund western Kipchak language Lithuanian Karaim on its northwestern periphery. Moreover, the typical Turkic features are compared to the twenty core structures (CS) in Transeurasian languages evaluated in Robbeets (2017 and this volume).

  • 10.
    Csató, Éva Ágnes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Johanson, LarsUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    The Turkic Languages1998Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Turkic Languages is the first reference book for almost forty years to bring together detailed discussions of the historical development and specialised linguistic structures and features of the languages in the Turkic family.

  • 11.
    Csató, Éva Ágnes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Turkish1998In: The Turkic Languages / [ed] Lars Johanson and Éva Ágnes Csató, London & New York: Routledge , 1998, p. 203-235Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Csató, Éva Ágnes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Två karaimer i Uppsala1998In: Några hyll(nings)centimeter: Festskrift till Folke Sandgren / [ed] Anders Burius et al., Stockholm: Kungl. bibl. , 1998, p. 49-65Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Csató, Éva Ágnes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology. Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz.
    Zur Silbenharmonie des Nordwest-Karaimischen1995In: Acta Orientalia Hungarica, ISSN 0001-6446, Vol. 48, p. 329-337Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Csató, Éva Ágnes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Stein, Heidi
    Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany.
    Römer, Claudia
    University Vienna, Austria.
    Brendemoen, Bernt
    Universitetet i Oslo, Norway.
    The linguistic landscape of Istanbul in the seventeenth century2010In: The Urban Mind: Cultural and Environmental Dynamics / [ed] Paul Sinclair & Gullög Nordquist & Frands Herschend & Christian Isendahl, Uppsala: African and Comparative Archaeology Department of Archaeology and Ancient History Uppsala University , 2010, p. 415-439Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter studies the urban linguistic environments of Istanbul after the historicalshift brought about by the Ottoman conquest in 1453. The focus is on the seventeenthcentury, when the population doubled – assumedly because of climate changes inAnatolia – and Turkic-speaking groups became dominant. Nevertheless, the townaccommodated a multitude of interacting linguistic codes, that is, languages and dialects,both social and functional varieties. This multilayered linguistic ecological system wasmapped out on the topography of one of the largest urban centres of the time. Distinctivefeatures ensuring sustainability of the linguistic codes in this prenational urban setting areoutlined. For instance, the absence of normative measures implies that codes were usedin complementary functions and no single code was offered or claimed to be used in alldomains of communication.Urban settings call for encounters between speakers of different codes and therebytrigger cross-linguistic communicative habits, such as code copying, that is, copying ofelements or features of a model code into the speaker’s native variety. As a result ofcopying, new, levelled varieties arose. An urban variety of spoken Turkish emerged andserved as a lingua franca. This linguistic landscape of Istanbul ultimately became thebedrock from which modern standard Turkish evolved.Foreigners in urban settings may act as linguistic mediators. Our knowledge of thelinguistic landscape of seventeenth-century Istanbul is based to a high degree on dataprovided by travellers, interpreters (dragomans), and European Orientalists who wroteso-called transcription texts, texts documenting the spoken codes of Istanbul in non-Arabic scripts, mostly Latin. Some of these mediators and their contributions to thedocumentation of the linguistic landscape are presented in this chapter.

  • 15.
    Csató, Éva Ágnes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Johanson, LarsUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.Utas, BoUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.Róna-Tas, AndrásHungarian Academy of Sciences.
    Turks and Iranians: A common historical and linguistic heritage. The Gunnar Jarring Memorial Program at the Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The volume Turks and Iranians: Interactions in Language and History. The Gunnar Jarring Memorial Program at The Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study contains contributions written by an international group of eminent scholars who summoned in 2001 in Uppsala, Sweden, to engage in discussing old and modern Turkic and Iranian languages and their historical and cultural relations. The topics dealt with include how contacts of spoken and written languages from pre-Islamic times until various periods of the Islamic era, have influenced the emergence and development of Iranian and Turkic varieties. The studies contribute to a better understanding of the interrelations between cultural-historical contacts and linguistic processes and directs attention to the necessity of cooperation between experts of Turkic and Iranian studies. The international editorial group represents prominent scholarly traditions in Turkic and Iranian studies.

  • 16.
    Csató, Éva Ágnes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Turkic languages.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Turkic languages.
    Zal, Ünal
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Profesör Walther Björkman’in mirası2014In: Türkbilig, ISSN 1302-6011, Vol. 27, p. 137-153Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Gren-Eklund, Gunilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Isaksson, BoUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.Johanson, LarsUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.Utas, BoUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Orientalia Suecana: An International Journal of Indological. Iranian, Semitic and Turkic Studies2005Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Gren-Eklund, Gunilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Isaksson, BoUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.Utas, BoUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.Johanson, LarsUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology. University of Mainz.
    Orientalia Suecana: An International Journal of Indological, Iranian, Semitic and Turkic Studies2006Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Gren-Eklund, Gunilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology. Department of Oriental Studies, University Mainz, Germany.
    Utas, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology, Asian and African Languages and Cultures, Iranian languages.
    Editorial note2009In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 58, p. 5-7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Gren-Eklund, Gunilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Kronholm, TryggveJohanson, LarsUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.Utas, BoUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Orientalia Suecana: An International Journal of Indological, Iranian, Semitic and Turkic Studies: Volume 43-44 (1994-1995)1995Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    A new analysis of West and South Oghuz personal clitics2014In: Turkic language in Iran — past and present / [ed] Heidi Stein, Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2014, p. 121-133Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    A Yakut copy of a Tungusic viewpoint aspect paradigm2014In: Paradigm change in the Transeurasian languages and beyond / [ed] Robbeets, Martine and Bisang, Walter, Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2014, p. 235-242Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper deals with the morphological paradigm of the Yakut so-called “synthetic” imperfect. This paradigm is claimed to have been selectively copied in its entirety from a Tungusic language, most probably from Even, previously known as Lamut. If this is true, it is a highly remarkable phenomenon.

  • 23.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Bilateral Code Copying in Eastern Persian and South-Eastern Turkic2005In: Linguistic Convergence and Areal Diffusion: Case studies from Iranian, Semitic and Turkic, London and New York: RoutledgeCurzon, 2005, p. 205-214Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Case and contact linguistics2009In: The Oxford Handbook of Case / [ed] Andrej Malchukov and Andrew Spencer, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009, p. 494-501Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Discoveries on the Turkic Linguistic Map2001Book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Dissolving multilingual empires in the history of Europe: The Ottoman empire2011In: The languages and linguistics of Europe: A comprehensive guide / [ed] Kortmann, Bernd & van der Auwera, Johan, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2011, p. 729-744Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Editorial note2017In: Turkic languages, ISSN 1431-4983, Vol. 21, p. 157-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Evidentiality in Turkic2003In: Studies in Evidentiality / [ed] Alexandra Y. Aikhenvald and R. M. W. Dixon, Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2003, p. 273-290Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    From the intimate life of Turkic sonorant consonants2013In: Turkic languages, ISSN 1431-4983, Vol. 17, no 1,2, p. 176-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper discusses the roles of Turkic sonorant consonants in contact with certain ob­struents, arguing against an alleged sound law according to which Old Turkic obstruents became voiceless after stem-final n, l, r, as a result of dissimilation. It is assumed that original dental, velar and affricate stops had become weak fricatives in intervocalic posi­tion. With the loss of Proto-Turkic short final stem-vowels, the fricatives came into direct contact with the sonorants and assimilated to them, turning into weak stops. The weak cluster emerged in the same way as nd, ld, rg, etc.

  • 30.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Grammaticalization in Turkic languages2011In: The Oxford Handbook of Grammaticalization / [ed] Heiko Narrog and Bernd Heine, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011, p. 754-763Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Intimate family reunions: code-copying between Turkic relatives2014In: Congruence in contact-induced language change. Language families, typological resemblance, and perceived similiarity / [ed] Besters-Dilger, Juliane, Dermarkar, Cynthia, Pfänder, Stefan & Rabus, Achim, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2014, p. 137-145Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Johanson, lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Linguistic convergence in the Volga area2000In: Languages in Contact / [ed] Gilbers, Dicky & Nerbonne, John & Schaeken, Jos, Amsterdam and Atlanta: Rodopi , 2000Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Linguistische Beiträge zur Gesamtturkologie1991Book (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Mood meets mood: Turkic versus Indo-European2011In: Morphologies in contact / [ed] Stolz, Thomas & Vanhove, Martine & Urdze, Aina & Otsuka, Hitomi, Berlin: Akademie Verlag, 2011, p. 203-211Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many Turkic languages display non-canonical modal clause junction patterns that seem to be the result of long and intense contact with Indo-European languages. Their basic structure was not, however, alien to Turkic. Preexisting native combinational patterns made the languages in question receptive to Indo-European influence. The patterns gained ground and became less marked as a result of frequential copying.

  • 35.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Notes on Turkic stance particles2012In: Areal, historical and typological aspects of South Siberian Turkic / [ed] Marcel Erdal, Irina Nevskaya and Astrid Menz, Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2012, p. 51-58Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    On non-canonical modal clause junction in Turkic2013In: Diachronic and Typological Perspectives on Verbs / [ed] Folke Josephson and Ingmar Söhrman, Asterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2013, p. 159-171Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper deals with Turkic clause junction types that are considered to be non-canonical, i.e. not conforming to typically Altaic patterns. Their origin and development are commonly ascribed to Indo-European influence. It seems, however, that their basicstructure is not alien to Turkic and that their use may have been reinforced and expanded by foreign impact on preexisting patterns.

  • 37.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    On the roles of Turkic in the Caucasus area2006In: Linguistic areas: Convergence in historical and typological perspective / [ed] Matras, Yaron & McMahon, April and Vincent, Nigel, Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan , 2006, p. 160-181Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology. University of Mainz.
    Prospectives and proximatives2017In: Prospective and proximative in Turkic, Iranian and beyond / [ed] Agnes Korn, Irina Nevskaya, Wiesbaden: Dr. Ludwig Reichert Verlag, 2017, p. 29-33Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Pyramids of spatial relators in Northeastern Turkic and its neighbors2012In: Argument structure and grammatical relations: A crosslinguistic typology / [ed] Suihkonen, Pirkko & Comrie, Bernard & Solovyev, Valery, Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2012, p. 191-210Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Review of R. M. W. Dixon & Alexandra Y. Aikhenvald (eds.): The semantics of clause linking: A cross-linguistic typology2011In: Language, Journal of the Linguistic Society of America, ISSN 1535-0665, no 87, p. 189-192Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Structural factors in Turkic Language Contacts2002Book (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    The decline of the Ottoman optative2014In: Turcology and Linguistics. Éva Ágnes Csató Festschrift / Éva Csató Armağanı / [ed] Demir, Nurettin, Karakoç, Birsel and Menz, Astrid, Ankara: Hacettepe University , 2014, p. 253-260Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Three kinds of clause junctors2010In: Aspects of co- and subordination: Case studies from African, Slavonic, and Turkic languages / [ed] Ziegelmeyer, Georg and Cyffer, Norbert, Köln: Rüdiger Köppe Verlag, 2010, p. 9-14Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article deals with a specific model of classification of clause junctors intended for cross-linguistic and typological purposes. It was first presented and applied to Turkic data in Johanson (1993, 1996). Detailed discussions, e.g. at the Workshop “Typology of Co- and Subordination in Languages” (Gumpoldskirchen, 26–29 May 2008), suggest that it can be applied to languages of various types, including different African languages. Some main points of the classification are recapitulated and illustrated with simple examples of English, French, German and Turkish clause junctors.

  • 44.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Turcological research projects in Mainz2014In: Turkic language in Iran — past and present / [ed] Heidi Stein, Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2014, p. 1-2Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Turkic Focal Present Tense Markers and Their Absence in Cypriot Turkish2009In: Bilig, ISSN 1301 0549, Vol. 49, p. 93-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study deals with Turkic focal present markers and the possible reasons for the absence of this marker in Cypriot Turkish.

  • 46.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Turkic indirectives2000In: Evidentials: Turkic, Iranian and Neighbouring Languages / [ed] Lars Johanson and Bo Utas, Berlin, New York: Mouton de Gruyter, 2000, p. 61-87Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology. University of Mainz.
    Turkic indirectivity2018In: The Oxford Handbook of Evidentiality / [ed] Alexander Y. Aikhenvald, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018, p. 510-524Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Two approaches to specificity2006In: Case, valency and transitivity / [ed] Kulikov, Leonid & Malchukov, Andrej & de Swart, Peter, Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2006, p. 225-247Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Türkçede görünüş [Viewpoint aspect in Turkish]2016Book (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Johanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Why don’t they meet face to face? On hiatus-preventing allomorphy in Turkish and its relatives2011In: Puzzles of language: Essays in honour of Karl Zimmer / [ed] Erguvanli Taylan, Eser & Rona, Bengisu, Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2011, p. 23-36Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Turkish and most of its Turkic relatives are known for their regular and transparent morphology. One of the unsolved problems relating to this domain is why vowels cannot occur next to each other across morpheme boundaries. Turkic disallows hiatus between two adjacent morphemes, i.e. sequences of a stem-final vowel and an initial vowel of a following bound marker. Allomorphy, alternation in complementary distribution, regulates the phonotactics. The shape of numerous bound markers, i.e. suffixes and clitics, varies according to whether the stem ends in a vowel or in a consonant. Vowel-final stems occur with consonant-initial markers, and consonant-final stems occur with vowel-initial inarkers. Thus the vowels do not come into adjacency, do not meet "face to face".

12 1 - 50 of 54
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