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  • 1.
    Ahlgren, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Fondell, Amelie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science. Swedish Radiat Safety Author, Res Unit, Solna Strandvag 96, SE-17116 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Edwards, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    EGF-targeting lipodisks for specific delivery of poorly water-soluble anticancer agents to tumour cells2017In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 7, no 36, p. 22178-22186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Concerns regarding poor aqueous solubility, high toxicity and lack of specificity impede the translation of many hydrophobic anticancer agents into safe and effective anticancer drugs. The application of colloidal drug delivery systems, and in particular the use of lipid-based nanocarriers, has been identified as a promising means to overcome these issues. PEG-stabilized lipid nanodisks (lipodisks) have lately emerged as a novel type of biocompatible, nontoxic and adaptable drug nanocarrier. In this study we have explored the potential of lipodisks as a platform for formulation and tumour targeted delivery of hydrophobic anticancer agents. Using curcumin as a model compound, we show that lipodisks can be loaded with substantial amounts of hydrophobic drugs (curcumin/lipid molar ratio 0.15). We demonstrate moreover that by deliberate choice of preparation protocols the lipodisks can be provided with relevant amounts of targeting proteins, such as epidermal growth factor (EGF). Data from in vitro cell studies verify that such EGF-decorated curcumin-loaded lipodisks are capable of EGF-receptor specific targeting of human A-431 tumour cells, and strongly suggest that the interaction between the lipodisks and the tumour cells results in receptor-mediated internalization of the disks and their cargo.

  • 2.
    Bergstrand, Nill
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical Chemistry.
    Bohl, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Edwards, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical Chemistry.
    Ghaneolhosseine, Hadi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical Chemistry.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Jonsson, Markus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical Chemistry.
    Silvander, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical Chemistry.
    Sjöberg, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Physical Organic Chemistry.
    Stabilised Liposomes with Double Targeting for Use in BNCT2000In: Contemporary Boron Chemistry / [ed] Matthew Davidson, Cambridge, UK: Royal Society of Chemistry, 2000, p. 131-134Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract
  • 3.
    Billström, Gry Hulsart
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Piskounova, Sonya
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Polymer Chemistry.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Polymer Chemistry.
    Bowden, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Polymer Chemistry.
    Larsson, Sune
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Improved bone formation by altering surface area of hyaluronan-based hydrogel carrier for bone morphogenetic protein-22012In: Bone, ISSN 8756-3282, E-ISSN 1873-2763, Vol. 50, p. S114-S114Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Björkelund, Hanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Barta, Pavel
    Malmqvist, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Andersson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Gefitinib Induces Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Dimers Which Alters the Interaction Characteristics with (125)I-EGF2011In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 9, p. e24739-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib inhibits growth in some tumor types by targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Previous studies show that the affinity of the EGF-EGFR interaction varies between hosting cell line, and that gefitinib increases the affinity for some cell lines. In this paper, we investigate possible mechanisms behind these observations. Real-time interaction analysis in LigandTracer (R) Grey revealed that the HER2 dimerization preventing antibody pertuzumab clearly modified the binding of (125)I-EGF to EGFR on HER2 overexpressing SKOV3 cells in the presence of gefitinib. Pertuzumab did not affect the binding on A431 cells, which express low levels of HER2. Cross-linking measurements showed that gefitinib increased the amount of EGFR dimers 3.0-3.8 times in A431 cells in the absence of EGF. In EGF stimulated SKOV3 cells the amount of EGFR dimers increased 1.8-2.2 times by gefitinib, but this effect was cancelled by pertuzumab. Gefitinib treatment did not alter the number of EGFR or HER2 expressed in tumor cell lines A431, U343, SKOV3 and SKBR3. Real-time binding traces were further analyzed in a novel tool, Interaction Map, which deciphered the different components of the measured interaction and supports EGF binding to multiple binding sites. EGFR and HER2 expression affect the levels of EGFR monomers, homodimers and heterodimers and EGF binds to the various monomeric/dimeric forms of EGFR with unique binding properties. Taken together, we conclude that dimerization explains the varying affinity of EGF - EGFR in different cells, and we propose that gefitinib induces EGFR dimmers, which alters the interaction characteristics with (125)I-EGF.

  • 5.
    Björkelund, Hanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Malmqvist, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Andersson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Resolving the EGF-EGFR interaction characteristics through a multiple-temperature, multiple-inhibitor, real-time interaction analysis approach2013In: Molecular and Clinical Oncology, ISSN 2049-9469, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 343-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Overexpression and aberrant activity of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) have been observed in various cancer types, rendering it an important target in oncology research. The interaction between EGF and its receptor (EGFR), as well as subsequent internalization, is complex and may be affected by various factors including tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). By combining real‑time binding curves produced in LigandTracer® with internalization assays conducted at different temperatures and with different TKIs, the processes of ligand binding, internalization and excretion was visualized. SKOV3 cells had a slower excretion rate compared to A431 and U343 cells, and the tested TKIs (gefitinib, lapatinib, AG1478 and erlotinib) reduced the degree of internalization. The kinetic analysis of the binding curves further demonstrated TKI‑dependent balances of EGFR monomer and dimer populations, where lapatinib promoted the monomeric form, while the other TKIs induced dimers. The dimer levels were found to be associated with the apparent affinity of the EGF‑EGFR interaction, with EGF binding stronger to EGFR dimers compared to monomers. This study analyzed how real‑time molecular interaction analysis may be utilized in combination with perturbations in order to understand the kinetics of a ligand‑receptor interaction, as well as some of its associated intracellular processes. Our multiple‑temperature and ‑inhibitor assay setup renders it possible to follow the EGFR monomer, dimer and internalized populations in a detailed manner, allowing for a new perspective of the EGFR biology.

  • 6.
    Bohl Kullberg, E
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Edwards, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Physical Chemistry.
    Capala, J
    Sjöberg, S
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Introductory experiments on ligand liposomes as delivery agents for boronneutron capture therapy2003In: International Journal of Oncology, ISSN 1019-6439, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 461-467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Liposomes are, when coupled to receptor ligands, candidates for receptor mediated delivery of boron for tumour therapy since they have capacity to deliver large amounts of boron per receptor interaction. With EGF-liposomes we present a pegylated ligand liposome delivery vehicle, containing water soluble boronated phenanthridine, WSP1, or water soluble boronated acridine, WSA1, for EGFR targeting. In the case of WSA1 a ligand dependent uptake was obtained and the boron uptake was as good as if free WSA1 was given. No ligand dependent boron uptake was seen for WSP1 containing liposomes. Thus, WSA1 is a candidate for further studies. Approximately 10(5) boron atoms were in each liposome. A critical assessment indicates that after optimization up to 10(6) boron atoms can be loaded. Since it is known that, for therapeutic effect, approximately 10(8)-10(9) boron atoms are needed in a single tumour cell it is realized that 10(2)-10(3) receptor interactions are needed to meet the demand. Tests applying cultured glioma cells indicate, without optimization of the delivery conditions, a boron uptake in the ppm range, which is necessary for successful BNCT. Thus, it seems possible to kill micro-invasive tumour cells with targeted liposomes if the delivery conditions are optimal.

  • 7.
    Bohl Kullberg, Erika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Bergstrand, Nill
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical Chemistry.
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Edwards, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical Chemistry.
    Johnsson, Markus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical Chemistry.
    Sjöberg, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Development of EGF-conjugated liposomes for targeted delivery of boronated DNA-binding agents2002In: Bioconjugate chemistry, ISSN 1043-1802, E-ISSN 1520-4812, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 737-743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Liposomes are of interest as drug delivery tools for therapy of cancer and infectious diseases. We investigated conjugation of epidermal growth factor, EGF, to liposomes using the micelle-transfer method. EGF was conjugated to the distal end of PEG−DSPE lipid molecules in a micellar solution and the EGF−PEG−DSPE lipids were then transferred to preformed liposomes, either empty or containing the DNA-binding compound, water soluble acridine, WSA. We found that the optimal transfer conditions were a 1-h incubation at 60 °C. The final conjugate, 125I-EGF−liposome−WSA, contained approximately 5 mol % PEG, 10−15 EGF molecules at the liposome surface, and 104 to 105 encapsulated WSA molecules could be loaded. The conjugate was shown to have EGF-receptor-specific cellular binding in cultured human glioma cells.

  • 8.
    Carlsson, J
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Bohl, E
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Edwards, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry.
    Nilsson, P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Sjöström, A
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Sjöberg, S
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Cellular spheroids as a micrometastasis model in preclinical tests of boron neutron capture therapy2001In: Frontiers in Neutron Capture Therapy, volume 1: Medicine and Physics / [ed] M. Frederick Hawthorne, Kenneth Shelly, Richard J Wiersema, 2001, p. 109-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract
  • 9.
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Blomquist, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Oncology.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Liljegren, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Malmström, Per-Uno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Sjöström, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Sundin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Westlin, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Oncology.
    Zhao, Qinghai
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Lundqvist, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Conjugate chemistry and cellular processing of EGF-dextran1999In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 313-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conjugates with specific binding to the epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFR, of interest for radionuclide based imaging and therapy were prepared using mouse epidermal growth factor, mEGF, and dextran. In one type of conjugate, mEGF was coupled to dextran by reductive amination in which the free amino group on the mEGF N-terminal reacted with the aldehyde group on the reductive end of dextran. The end-end coupled conjugate could be further activated by the cyanopyridinium agent CDAP, thereby introducing tyrosines to the dextran part. In the other type of conjugate, the cyanylating procedure using CDAP was applied, first to activate dextran and then allowing for the amino terminus of mEGF to randomly attach to the dextran. In the latter case, radionuclide-labelled tyrosines or glycines could be added in the same conjugation step. All types of mEGF-dextran conjugates had EGFR-specific binding since the binding could be displaced by an excess of non-radioactive mEGF. The conjugates were to a large extent internalized in the test cells and the associated radioactivity was retained intracellularly for different times depending on both the type of cells and conjugate applied. Different intracellular 'traffic routes' for the radionuclides are discussed as well as applications for both imaging and therapy.

  • 10.
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Bohl Kullberg, Erika
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry.
    Capala, Jacek
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Sjöberg, Stefan
    Edwards, Katarina
    Department of Physical Chemistry.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Ligand liposomes and boron neutron capture therapy2003In: Journal of Neuro-Oncology, Vol. 62, p. 47-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Edwards, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Ghaneolhosseini, H
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Johnsson, M
    Sjöberg, S
    Stabilised liposomes with double targeting intendent for use in BNCT2001In: Frontiers in Neutron Capture Therapy: Volume 1 / [ed] M Frederick Hawthorne, Kenneth Shelly, Richard J Wiersema, 2001, p. 184-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract
  • 12.
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. BMS.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. BMS.
    Penetration of tumor therapy interesting substances in non-vascularized metastases; Review of studies in cellular spheroids2006In: Current Cancer Therapy Reviews, Vol. 27, p. 293-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Penetration properties, studied in multicellular spheroids, of totally 23 radiolabeled or boronated substances are summarized. The spheroids were models for small non-vascularized metastases and there is special emphasis on results obtained with a freeze-drying method. The substances were detected using autoradiography or neutron capture radiography. Certain substances, e.g. 5-FU, glucose, BSH and one antibody type, penetrated efficiently while others, e.g. vinblastine, an epidermal growth factor derivative and two other types of antibodies, only penetrated into the outer periphery of the spheroids in spite of long incubation times. The molecular weight of the substances did not relate well with the penetration properties. Instead, those substances that bound extensively had in most cases limited penetration. This was, for example, clearly shown for the drug Ara-C when applied to two different types of spheroids, one type giving low binding and good penetration and one type giving extensive binding and less penetration. The penetration of an antibody and an EGF-derivative improved significantly when their binding sites were blocked. It is concluded that molecular weight is not a dominating determinant for penetration in the studied model, but that binding is. Such knowledge is valuable for the understanding of effects of chemotherapy, targeted radionuclide therapy and immunotherapy and for the development of new agents for such therapies.

  • 13.
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Penetration of tumor therapy interesting substances in non-vascularized metastases.: Review of studies in multicellular spheroids2006In: Current Cancer Therapy Reviews, ISSN 1573-3947, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 293-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Penetration properties, studied in multicellular spheroids, of totally 23 radiolabeled or boronated substances are summarized. The spheroids were models for small non-vascularized metastases, and there is special emphasis on results obtained with a freeze-drying method. The substances were detected using autoradiography or neutron capture radiography. Certain substances, e.g. 5-FU, glucose, BSH and one antibody , penetrated efficiently, while others, e.g. vinblastine, an epidermal growth factor derivative, and two other types of antibodies only penetrated into the outer periphery of the spheroids in spite of long incubation time. The molecular weight of the substances did not relate well with the penetration properties. Instead, those substances that bound extensively had in most cases limited penetration. This was, for example, clearly shown for the drug Ara-C when applied to two different types of spheroids, one type giving low binding and good penetration and one  giving extensive binding and less penetration. The penetration of an antibody and an EGF-derivative improved significantly when their binding sites were blocked. It is concluded that molecular weight is not a dominating determinant for penetration in the studied model, but that binding is. Such knowledge is valuable for the understanding of effects of chemotherapy, targeted radionuclide therapy and immunotherapy and for the development of new agents for such therapies.

  • 14.
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Grönvik, C
    Hartman, T
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Lindström, A
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Lundqvist, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Lovqvist, A
    Malmqvist, J
    Olsson, P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Pontén, J
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Sjöberg, S
    Sjöström, A
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Tilly, Nina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Tjarks, W
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Boron neutron capture therapy against tumor cells with overexpression of the EGF-receptor1996In: Cancer Neutron Capture Therapy / [ed] Yutaka Mishima, New York: Plenum Press , 1996, Vol. chapter 5, p. 49-56Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract
  • 15.
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Ren, Z. P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Wester, K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Sundberg, A. L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Heldin, Nils-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Hesselager, G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Persson, M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Lundqvist, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Blomquist, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Oncology.
    Nistér, M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Planning for intracavitary anti-EGFR radionuclide therapy of gliomas: Literature review and data on EGFR expression2006In: Journal of Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 0167-594X, E-ISSN 1573-7373, Vol. 77, no 1, p. 33-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Targeting with radionuclide labelled substances that bind specifically to the epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFR, is considered for intracavitary therapy of EGFR-positive glioblastoma multiforme, GBM. Relevant literature is reviewed and examples of EGFR expression in GBM are given. The therapeutical efforts made so far using intracavitary anti-tenascin radionuclide therapy of GBM have given limited effects, probably due to low radiation doses to the migrating glioma cells in the brain. Low radiation doses might be due to limited penetration of the targeting agents or heterogeneity in the expression of the target structure. In this article we focus on the possibilities to target EGFR on the tumour cells instead of an extracellular matrix component. There seems to be a lack of knowledge on the degree of intratumoral variation of EGFR expression in GBM, although the expression seemed rather homogeneous over large areas in most of the examples (n=16) presented from our laboratory. The observed homogeneity was surprising considering the genomic instability and heterogeneity that generally characterises highly malignant tumours. However, overexpression of EGFR is, at least in primary GBMs, one of the steps in the development of malignancy, and tumour cells that lose or downregulate EGFR will probably be outgrown in an expanding tumour cell population. Thus, loss of EGFR expression might not be the critical factor for successful intracavitary radionuclide therapy. Instead, it is likely that the penetration properties of the targeting agents are critical, and detailed studies on this are urgent.

  • 16.
    Ekerljung, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Lennartsson, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    The HER2-binding Affibody Molecule (ZHER2:342)2 Increases Radiosensitivity in SKBR-3 cells2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 11, p. e49579-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have previously shown that the HER2-specific affibody molecule (ZHER2:342)2 inhibits proliferation of SKBR-3 cells. Here, we continue to investigate its biological effects in vitro by studying receptor dimerization and clonogenic survival following irradiation. We found that (ZHER2:342)2 sensitizes the HER2-overexpressing cell line SKBR-3 to ionizing radiation. The survival after exposure to (ZHER2:342)2 and 8 Gy (S8Gy 0.006) was decreased by a factor of 4 compared to the untreated (S8Gy 0.023). The low HER2-expressing cell line MCF-7 was more radiosensitive than SKBR-3 but did not respond to (ZHER2:342)2. Treatment by (ZHER2:342)2 strongly increased the levels of dimerized and phosphorylated HER2 already after 5 minutes of stimulation. The monomeric ZHER2:342 does not seem to be able to induce receptor phosphorylation and dimerization or sensitize cells to irradiation.

  • 17.
    Ekerljung, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Lindborg, Malin
    Affibody AB, Stockholm.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Frejd, Fredrik Y.
    Affibody AB, Stockholm.
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Lennartsson, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Dimeric HER2-specific affibody molecules inhibit proliferation of the SKBR-3 breast cancer cell line2008In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 377, no 2, p. 489-494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    HER2-specific affibody molecules in different formats have previously been shown to be useful tumor targeting agents for radionuclide-based imaging and therapy applications, but their biological effect on tumor cells is not well known. In this study, two dimeric ((ZHER2:4)2 and (ZHER2:342)2) and one monomeric (ZHER2:342) HER2-specific affibody molecules are investigated with respect to biological activity. Both (ZHER2:4)2 and (ZHER2:342)2 were found to decrease the growth rate of SKBR-3 cells to the same extent as the antibody trastuzumab. When the substances were removed, the cells treated with the dimeric affibody molecules continued to be growth suppressed while the cells treated with trastuzumab immediately resumed normal proliferation. The effects of ZHER2:342 were minor on both proliferation and cell signaling. The dimeric (ZHER2:4)2 and (ZHER2:342)2 both reduced growth of SKBR-3 cells and may prove therapeutically useful either by themselves or as carriers of radionuclides or other cytotoxic agents.

  • 18.
    Ekerljung, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Wållberg, Helena
    Division of Molecular Biotechnology, School of Biotechnology, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH).
    Sohrabian, Azita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Andersson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Friedman, Mikaela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Frejd, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Ståhl, Stefan
    Division of Molecular Biotechnology, School of Biotechnology, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH).
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Generation and Evaluation of Bispecific Affibody Molecules for Simultaneous Targeting of EGFR and HER22012In: Bioconjugate chemistry, ISSN 1043-1802, E-ISSN 1520-4812, Vol. 23, no 9, p. 1802-1811Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Co-expression of several ErbB receptors has been found in many cancers and has been linked with increased aggressiveness of tumors and a worse patient prognosis. This makes the simultaneous targeting of two surface receptors by using bispecific constructs an increasingly appreciated strategy. Here we have generated six such bispecific targeting proteins, which each comprising two monomeric affibody molecules with specific binding to either of the two human epidermal growth factor receptors, EGFR and HER2, respectively. The bispecific constructs were designed with (i) alternative positioning (N- or C-terminal) of the different affibody molecules, (ii) two alternative peptide linkers (Gly4Ser)3 or (Ser4Gly)3, and (iii) affibody molecules with different affinity (nanomolar or picomolar) for HER2. Using both Biacore technology and cell binding assays it was demonstrated that all six constructs could bind simultaneously to both their target proteins. N-terminal positioning of the monomeric affibody molecules was favorable to promote the binding to respective target. Interestingly, bispecific constructs containing the novel (Ser4Gly)3 linker displayed a higher affinity in cell binding, as compared to constructs containing the more conventional linker, (Gly4Ser)3. It could further be concluded that bispecific constructs (but not the monomeric affibody molecules) induced dimerization and phosphorylation of EGFR in SKBR3 cells, which express fairly high levels of both receptors. It was also investigated whether the bispecific binding would influence cell growth or sensitize cells for ionizing radiation, but no such effects were observed.

  • 19.
    Essand, Magnus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    Vikman, Sofia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    Grawé, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Hellberg, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Tötterman, Thomas H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    Giandomenico, Valeria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    Identification and characterization of a novel splicing variant of vesicular monoamine transporter 12005In: Journal of Molecular Endocrinology, ISSN 0952-5041, E-ISSN 1479-6813, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 489-501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (VMAT1) is an integral protein in the membrane of secretory vesicles of neuroendocrine and endocrine cells that allows the transport of biogenic monoamines, such as serotonin, from the cytoplasm into the secretory vesicles. The full-length VMAT1 transcript is produced from 16 exons. We have identified and characterized an alternatively spliced form of VMAT1 that lacks exon 15, the next to last exon of VMAT1. The new form was therefore denoted VMAT1Delta15. Exon 15 does not contain an even multiple of three nucleotides. As a consequence, there is a shift of reading frame, and exon 16 is translated in an alternative reading frame, yielding a novel protein with a shorter and unrelated C-terminus compared with the native VMAT1 protein. VMAT1 and VMAT1Delta15 mRNAs are simultaneously expressed in normal and neoplastic neuroendocrine cells of the GI tract. However, VMAT1 expression is always higher than VMAT1Delta15 expression. We prove that VMAT1Delta15 is not localized in large, dense core vesicles as the native form but in the endoplasmic reticulum. Furthermore, while VMAT1 can take up serotonin, VMAT1Delta15 cannot, indicating different functions for the two forms of VMAT1.

  • 20.
    Fondell, Amelie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Edwards, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Physical Chemistry.
    Gustafsson, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Park, John
    Department of Medicine, Division of Haematology-Oncology, Cancer research institute, University of California San Fransisco, USA.
    Öhrngren, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Strand, Joanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Unga, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Physical Chemistry.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Influence of liposome composition on cellular drug delivery and therapeutic effect mediated by Nuclisome-particlesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract
  • 21.
    Fondell, Amelie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Edwards, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Physical Chemistry.
    Ickenstein, Ludger M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Physical Chemistry.
    Sjöberg, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry.
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Nuclisome: a novel concept for radionuclide therapy using targeting liposomes2010In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 114-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: For the treatment of cancer, the therapeutic potential of short-range, low-energy Auger-electron emitters, such as (125)I, is getting progressively wider recognition. The potency of Auger-electron emitters is strongly dependent on their location in close vicinity to DNA. We have developed a new two-step targeting strategy to transport (125)I into cancer-cell nuclei using PEG-stabilized tumour-cell targeting liposomes named "Nuclisome-particles". METHODS: In the present study, epidermal growth factor (EGF) was used as a tumour-cell-specific agent to target the EGF-receptor (EGFR) and the liposomes were loaded with (125)I-Comp1, a recently synthesized daunorubicin derivative. RESULTS: As analysed with cryo-TEM, the derivative precipitates inside liposomes at a drug-to-lipid molar ratio of 0.05:1. Receptor-specific uptake in cultured U-343MGaCl2:6 tumour cells of EGFR-targeting liposomes increased with time while non-specific and receptor-blocked uptake remained low. Nuclisome-particles were able to target single U-343MGaCl2:6 cells circulating in human blood during 4 h, with low uptake in white blood cells, as demonstrated in an ex vivo system using a Chandler loop. Autoradiography of targeted cells indicates that the grains from the radiolabelled drug are mainly co-localized with the cell nuclei. The successful targeting of the nucleus is shown to provide high-potency cell killing of cultured U-343MGaCl2:6 cells. At the concentration used, Nuclisome-particles were up to five orders of magnitude more effective in cell killing than EGFR-targeting liposomes loaded with doxorubicin. CONCLUSION: The results thus provide encouraging evidence that our two-step targeting strategy for tumour cell DNA has the potential to become an effective therapy against metastasizing cancer cells in the bloodstream.

  • 22.
    Fondell, Amelie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Edwards, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Physical Chemistry.
    Unga, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Physical Chemistry.
    Kullberg, Erika
    Park, John
    UCSF, USA.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    In vitro evaluation and biodistribution of HER2-targeted liposomes loaded with an 125I-labelled DNA-intercalator2011In: Journal of drug targeting (Print), ISSN 1061-186X, E-ISSN 1029-2330, Vol. 19, no 9, p. 846-855Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Increasing attention is currently focussed on the issue of finding strategies for the delivery of Auger-electron emitting radionuclides into tumour cell nuclei. Nuclear localisation is a prerequisite for these radionuclides, since their radiotoxic properties are functional only in close vicinity to DNA.

    Purpose: In this study we investigated tumour-cell uptake and cell killing ability in vitro, as well as in vivo biodistribution of an 125I-labelled anthracycline derivative administered by means of HER2-targeted liposomes.

    Methods: Anthracycline derivative Comp1 was radiolabelled with Auger-emitting 125I and encapsulated in liposomes (DSPC:Chol:DSPE-PEG) using pH-gradient loading. Single-chain fragment F5 was anchored to the liposomes as targeting device for HER2. Uptake and specificity of 125I-Comp1 delivered via targeting and non-targeting liposomes were analysed in cultured HER2-overexpressing SKOV3 and SKBR3 cells. Cell-killing efficacy was evaluated in SKOV3 cells and biodistribution for up to 48 hours was studied after intra-peritoneal injection in tumour-bearing female Balb/c nu/nu mice.

    Results: 125I-Comp1 was specifically taken up by the cultured cells when administered by means of HER2-targeted liposomes and a clear dose-effect correlation in survival of cells was seen with increasing specific activity. The biodistribution studies revealed that 125I-Comp1 accumulated in tumours when distributed using HER2-targeted liposomes and that this effect was absent when using non-targeting liposomes.

    Conclusion: The HER2-targeted liposomes possess the properties needed to bring about tumour-specific delivery and therapeutic effect of 125I-Comp1.

     

  • 23. Friedman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Lindstrom, Sara
    Ekerljung, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Andersson-Svahn, Helene
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Brismar, Hjalmar
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Frejd, Fredrik Y.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Ståhl, Stefan
    Engineering and characterization of a bispecific HER2 x EGFR-binding affibody molecule2009In: Biotechnology and applied biochemistry, ISSN 0885-4513, E-ISSN 1470-8744, Vol. 54, p. 121-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    HER2 (human epidermal-growth-factor receptor-2; ErbB2) and EGFR (epidermal-growth-factor receptor) are overexpressed in various forms of cancer, and the co-expression of both HER2 and EGFR has been reported in a number of studies. The simultaneous targeting of HER2 and EGFR has been discussed as a strategy with which to potentially increase efficiency and selectivity in molecular imaging and therapy of certain cancers. In an effort to generate a molecule capable of bispecifically targeting HER2 and EGFR, a gene fragment encoding a bivalent HER2-binding affibody molecule was genetically fused in-frame with a bivalent EGFR-binding affibody molecule via a (G(4)S)(3) [(Gly(4)-Ser)(3)]-encoding gene fragment. The encoded 30 kDa affibody construct (Z(HER2))(2)-(G(4)S)(3)-(Z(EGFR))(2), with potential for bs (bispecific) binding to HER2 and EGFR, was expressed in Escherichia coli and characterized in terms of its binding capabilities. The retained ability to bind HER2 and EGFR separately was demonstrated using both biosensor technology and flow-cytometric analysis, the latter using HER2- and EGFR-overexpressing cells. Furthermore, simultaneous binding to HER2 and EGFR was demonstrated in: (i) a sandwich format employing real-time biospecific interaction analysis where the bs affibody molecule bound immobilized EGFR and soluble HER2; (ii) immunofluorescence microscopy, where the bs affibody molecule bound EGFR-overexpressing cells and soluble HER2; and (iii) a cell-cell interaction analysis where the bs affibody molecule bound HER2-overexpressing SKBR-3 cells and EGFR-overexpressing A-431 cells. This is, to our knowledge, the first reported bs affinity protein with potential ability for the simultaneous targeting of HER2 and EGFR. The potential future use of this and similar constructs, capable of bs targeting of receptors to increase the efficacy and selectivity in imaging and therapy, is discussed.

  • 24.
    Gedda, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Björkelund, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Lebel, Lena
    Asplund, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Dubois, Louise
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Wester, Kenneth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Penagos, Nelly
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Malmqvist, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Andersson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Evaluation of Real-Time Immunohistochemistry and Interaction Map as an Alternative Objective Assessment of HER2 Expression in Human Breast Cancer Tissue2013In: Applied immunohistochemistry & molecular morphology (Print), ISSN 1541-2016, E-ISSN 1533-4058, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 497-505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Immunohistochemical study (IHC) is a critical tool in the clinical diagnosis of breast cancer. One common assessment is the expression level of the HER2 receptor in breast cancer tissue samples with the aim of stratifying patients for applicability of the therapeutic antibody Herceptin. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether a novel assay, real-time IHC combined with Interaction Map analysis, offers the possibility of objective assessment of HER2 expression. Interaction Map presents real-time interaction data as a collection of peaks on a surface, and it was performed on 20 patient tissue samples previously scored for HER2 expression. The result shows that the relative weight of the peaks in the maps contains novel information that could discriminate between high and low HER2 expression in an operator-independent manner (P<0.001). We conclude that the real-time IHC assay has a promising potential to complement conventional IHC and may improve the precision in the future clinical diagnostics of breast cancer.

  • 25.
    Gedda, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Bohl, E
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Edwards, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical Chemistry.
    Sjöberg, S
    Carlsson, J
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    SLT-particles for two-step targeting in boron neutron capture therapy2001In: Frontiers in Neutron Capture Therapy, Volume 1: Medicine and Physics / [ed] M Frederick Hawthorne, Kenneth Shelly, Richard J Wiersema, New York: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2001, p. 70-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract
  • 26.
    Gedda, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Edwards, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Nuclisome: targeting the tumor cell nucleus2012In: Tumor Biology, ISSN 1010-4283, E-ISSN 1423-0380, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 661-667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Nuclisome concept builds on a novel two-step targeting strategy with the aim to deliver short-range Auger-electron-emitting radionuclides to nuclear DNA of tumor cells. The concept is based on the use of Nuclisome-particles, i.e., tumor-targeted PEG-stabilized liposomes loaded with a unique DNA-intercalating compound that enables specific and effective delivery of radionuclides to DNA. The specific and potent two-step targeting leads to eradication of tumor cells while toxicity to normal organs is reduced to a minimum. Results of in vitro and in vivo studies point towards the Nuclisome concept as a promising strategy for the treatment of small tumor masses and, in particular, for the elimination of spread single cells and micrometastases.

  • 27.
    Gedda, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Fondell, Amelie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Lundqvist, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Park, John
    Department of medicine, Division of Haematology-Oncology, Cancer research institute, University of California San Fransisco, USA.
    Edwards, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Analytical Chemistry.
    Experimental radionuclide therapy of HER2-expressing xenografts using two-step targeting Nuclisome-particles2012In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine, ISSN 0161-5505, E-ISSN 1535-5667, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 480-487Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The therapeutic potential of Auger-electron emitting radionuclides is strongly dependent on their close vicinity to DNA, since the energy deposition is mainly localized within a few cubic nanometers around the site of decay. Thus, apart from specificity, successful tumor therapy relies on a nuclear delivery strategy. We recently presented a two-step targeting strategy to transport Auger-electron-emitting radionuclides into the cell nucleus by means of nuclide-filled liposomes (Nuclisome particles), that is, polyethylene glycol-stabilized, tumor-cell-targeting liposomes loaded with (125)I-labeled anthracyclines. In the present study, the survival of mice intraperitoneally inoculated with human HER2-expressing SKOV-3 tumor cells and treated with HER2-targeting Nuclisome particles was studied.

    METHODS:

    BALB/c nu/nu mice were inoculated with 10(7) SKOV-3 cells intraperitoneally and thereafter directly injected with Nuclisome particles with increasing specific radioactivity. Groups of 10-12 mice were treated with 0.01 MBq/mouse up to 2 MBq/mouse, and survival was monitored and compared with that in control groups (n = 33). Organs were analyzed for HER2 expression and radiotoxic effects histologically. Absorbed doses were estimated using dose factors from the online Radiation Dose Assessment Resource model.

    RESULTS:

    The results showed a clear correlation between administered radioactive dose and survival. No such dose-dependent survival was observed for mice treated with Nuclisome particles lacking HER2-targeting ability. With HER2-targeting Nuclisome particles, a significant increase in survival, compared with that of untreated control mice, could already be seen at an administered activity of 0.1 MBq/mouse (P = 0.0301). At the highest activity administered, 2 MBq/mouse (P < 0.0001), 70% of the mice survived the study and most were tumor-free. Neither macroscopic nor microscopic radiotoxic side effects were observed. Dosimetric calculations, assuming nonreceptor targeting, revealed that the radioactive doses to normal tissues were low.

    CONCLUSION:

    Taken together the results show that with successful targeting to the tumor-cell nucleus it is possible to obtain a therapeutic effect from Auger-electron-emitting radionuclides administered at radioactive doses low enough to spare normal tissue from radiotoxic side effects.

  • 28.
    Göstring, Lovisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Lindegren, Sture
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Radiat Phys, SE-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science. Swedish Radiat Safety Author, SE-17116 Stockholm, Sweden.
    17AAG-induced internalisation of HER2- specific Affibody molecules2016In: Oncology Reports, ISSN 1021-335X, E-ISSN 1791-2431, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 2574-2580Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The geldanamycin derivative 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) is known to induce internalisation and degradation of the otherwise internalisation-resistant human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) receptor. In the present study, 17-AAG was used to increase internalisation of the HER2-specific Affibody molecule ABY-025. The cellular redistribution of halogen-labelled At-211-ABY-025 and radiometal-labelled In-111-ABY-025 following treatment with 17-AAG was studied. 17-AAG treatment of SKOV-3 human ovarian carcinoma and SKBR-3 human breast carcinoma cells to some extent shifted the localisation of In-111-ABY-025 from the cell surface to intracellular compartments in the two cell lines. ABY-025 labelled with the high-linear energy transfer emitter At-211 was also internalised to a higher degree; however, due to its physiological properties, this nuclide was excreted faster. The results indicate that 17-AAG may be used to facilitate cell-specific intracellular localisation of a suitable cytotoxic or radioactive agent coupled to ABY-025 in HER2-overexpressing cells.

  • 29.
    Göstring, Lovisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Malm, Magdalena
    KTH, Skolan för bioteknologi, Avdelningen för molekylär bioteknologi.
    Höidén-Guthenberg, Ingmarie
    Affibody AB.
    Frejd, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Ståhl, Stefan
    KTH, Skolan för bioteknologi, Avdelningen för molekylär bioteknologi.
    Löfblom, John
    KTH, Skolan för bioteknologi, Avdelningen för molekylär bioteknologi.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Cellular effects of HER3-specific affibody molecules2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 6, p. e40023-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent discoveries have led to the recognition of the epidermal growth factor receptor HER3 as a key player in cancer, and consequently this receptor has gained increased interest as a target for cancer therapy. Although practically devoid of kinase activity, signaling via this receptor is often seen in tumours resistant to EGFR or HER2 therapy. Here, we show that two HER3-specific affibody molecules, Z5416 and Z5417, reduce heregulin-induced cell growth of the breast cancer cells MCF-7 and, to a lesser extent, SKBR‑3 cells. These affibody molecules have earlier been shown to block binding of the natural ligand heregulin (HRG) to HER3, which was confirmed here in cellular studies. Further, both Z5416 and Z5417 blocked HRG-induced HER3 and HER2 phosphorylation in MCF-7 cells, but only HER3 phosphorylation in SKBR-3 cells which have constantly active HER2.. These findings demonstrate that Z5416 and Z5417 exert an anti-proliferative effect on two breast cancer cells with either high or low HER2 expression, by inhibiting HRG-induced phosphorylation of HER3. The promising results presented in this study indicate that the HER3-binding affibody molecules may be suitable candidates for future therapy of cancers in which the interaction between HER3 and HRG plays an important role.

  • 30.
    Hulsart-Billström, Gry
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Piskounova, Sonya
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Polymer Chemistry.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Andersson, Britt-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Bergman, Kristoffer
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Polymer Chemistry.
    Larsson, Sune
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Bowden, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Polymer Chemistry.
    Morphological differences in BMP-2-induced ectopic bone between solid and crushed hyaluronan hydrogel templates2013In: Journal of materials science. Materials in medicine, ISSN 0957-4530, E-ISSN 1573-4838, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 1201-1209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possibility to affect bone formation by using crushed versus solid hydrogels as carriers for bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) was studied. Hydrogels, based on chemical crosslinking between hyaluronic acid and poly(vinyl alcohol) derivatives, were loaded with BMP-2 and hydroxyapatite. Crushed and solid forms of the gels were analyzed both in vitro via a release study using I-125 radioactive labeling of BMP-2, and in vivo in a subcutaneous ectopic bone model in rats. Dramatically different morphologies were observed for the ectopic bone formed in vivo in the two types of gels, even though virtually identical release profiles were observed in vitro. Solid hydrogels induced formation of a dense bone shell around non-degraded hydrogel, while crushed hydrogels demonstrated a uniform bone formation throughout the entire sample. These results suggest that by crushing the hydrogel, the construct's three-dimensional network becomes disrupted. This could expose unreacted functional groups, making the fragment's surfaces reactive and enable limited chemical fusion between the crushed hydrogel fragments, leading to similar in vitro release profiles. However, in vivo these interactions could be broken by enzymatic activity, creating a macroporous structure that allows easier cell infiltration, thus, facilitating bone formation.

  • 31.
    Hulsart-Billström, Gry
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Piskounova, Sonya
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science.
    Hilborn, Jöns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Andersson, Britt-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Bergman, Kristoffer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Larsson, Sune
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Bowden, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry.
    Improved bone formation through increased surface area of hyaluronan-based hydrogels when used as carriers for BMP-2Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract
  • 32.
    Ickenstein, Ludger M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry.
    Edwards, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry.
    Sjöberg, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry.
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    A novel I-125-labeled daunorubicin derivative for radionuclide-based cancer therapy2006In: Nuclear Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0969-8051, E-ISSN 1872-9614, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 773-783Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Auger electron emitters, such as (125)I, are getting increasingly wider recognition as alternatives to current anticancer treatments. The effectiveness of Auger electrons is strongly dependent on their proximity to DNA and is therefore considered as harmless outside the nucleus. METHODS: (125)I or (127)I was conjugated with Comp1, Comp2 or Comp3 - three derivatives of the chemotherapeutic drug daunorubicin. Their capacity factors, DNA-binding constants and exclusion parameters, and the degree of DNA fragmentation after incubating isolated DNA with our (127)I- or (125)I-conjugated daunorubicin derivatives were determined. Human breast adenocarcinoma (SK-BR-3) cells were incubated with the derivatives; fluorescent microscopy and autoradiography images were generated; and cell growth was monitored. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The capacity factor of (127)I-Comp1 was similar to those of daunorubicin and doxorubicin, whereas lower capacity factors of (127)I-Comp2 and (127)I-Comp3 suggested reduced interactions with lipid membranes. DNA exclusion parameters and binding constants of (127)I-Comp1 and (127)I-Comp2, but not of (127)I-Comp3, were similar to those of doxorubicin. Fluorescent microscopy and autoradiography images of SK-BR-3 cells revealed that (127)I-Comp1 and (125)I-Comp1 accumulated in tumor cell nuclei, whereas (127)I-Comp2 and (127)I-Comp3 were present predominantly in other cell compartments. The binding of (125)I-Comp1 to isolated chromosomal DNA led to major fragmentation. Incubation of SK-BR-3 cells with (125)I-Comp1 inhibited cell growth, whereas doxorubicin or (127)I-Comp1 administered at the same concentration had no effect on cell growth. Our results thus suggest that (125)I-Comp1 has the potential to become a new tool for anticancer therapy.

  • 33.
    Kareem, Heewa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Sandström, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Elia, Ronny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Anniko, Matti
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Lundqvist, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Nestor, Marika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Blocking EGFR in the liver improves the tumor-to-liver uptake ratio of radiolabeled EGF2010In: Tumor Biology, ISSN 1010-4283, E-ISSN 1423-0380, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 79-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in several types of malignant tumors correlates with disease progression. EGFR could, therefore, be an excellent candidate for targeted radionuclide diagnostics. However, the high natural expression of EGFR in the liver may be problematic. The aim of this study was to improve the tumor-to-liver ratio of radiolabeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) by blocking its uptake by the liver with a nonradiolabeled EGFR-targeting molecule in tumorbearing mice. Intraperitoneally injected nonradiolabeled EGF was first evaluated as a blocking agent, preadministered at various time intervals before intravenous injection of 125I-labeled EGF. The anti-EGFR Affibody molecule (ZEGFR:955)2 was then assessed as a blocking agent of 111In-labeled EGF in a dual isotope study (50, 100, and 200μg, preadministered 30 or 60 min before 111In-EGF). The 30-min preadministration of nonradiolabeled EGF significantly decreased 125I-EGF uptake in the liver, whereas uptake in the tumor remained unchanged. Furthermore, preadministration of only 50μg (ZEGFR:955)2 as a blocking agent 30 min before the 111In-EGF decreased the uptake of 111In-EGF by the liver and increased its uptake by the tumor, thereby increasing the tumor-to-liver ratio sixfold. We conclude that the Affibody molecule (ZEGFR:955)2 shows promise as a blocking agent that could enhance the outcome of radionuclide-based EGFRexpressing tumor diagnostics and imaging.

  • 34.
    Kullberg, Erika Bohl
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Nestor, Marika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Tumor-cell targeted EGF liposomes loaded with boronated acridine: Uptake and processing2003In: Pharmaceutical research, ISSN 0724-8741, E-ISSN 1573-904X, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 229-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    The aim of this work was to investigate the cellular binding and processing of polyethylene glycol-stabilized epidermal growth factor (EGF) liposomes. The liposomes were actively loaded with water-soluble boronated acridine (WSA), primarily developed for boron neutron capture therapy.

    METHODS:

    The uptake, internalization, and retention of EGF-liposome conjugates were studied in two cultured monolayer cell-lines, A-431 and U-343, with regard to the nuclide-label on the targeting agent, the carrier, and the load. The subcellular localization of WSA was studied using confocal microscopy.

    RESULTS:

    We found that the liposome complex was internalized after specific binding to the EGF receptor. After internalization in the tumor cells, WSA was distributed mainly in the cytoplasm and was shown to have long cellular retention, with 80% of the boron remaining after 48 h.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The long retention of the compound and the cellular boron concentration reached makes these targeted liposomes interesting for further development toward boron neutron capture therapy.

  • 35.
    Kullberg, Erika Bohl
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Ghirmai, Senait
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry.
    Lundqvist, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Malmström, Per-Uno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    An aminoacridine derivative for radionuclide therapy: DNA binding properties studied in a novel cell-free in vitro assay2005In: International Journal of Oncology, ISSN 1019-6439, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 1355-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radiolabelled DNA-binding compounds can be used to increase the efficiency of radionuclide cancer therapy of disseminated disease. In this work, the aminoacridine compound N-[3-(acridine-9-ylamino)-propyl]-3-iodobenzamide (A3) labelled with the Auger-emitting nuclide 125I using Chloramine-T was studied. Optimal labelling conditions of 125I-A3 were investigated and the interaction with DNA was studied using a novel cell-free in vitro assay with naked human genomic DNA in agarose plugs. This novel assay showed to be simple and reliable. The results verify that 125I-A3 specifically binds DNA with low dissociation and is potent in causing double-strand breaks, yielding 1.0-1.4 breaks per decay. In conclusion, 125I-A3 is a most suitable DNA-binding compound for future therapeutic studies of Auger-electron emitters like 125I.

  • 36.
    Kullberg, Erika Bohl
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Wei, Qichun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Capala, Jacek
    NCI / NIH USA.
    Giusti, Valerio
    Malmström, Per-Uno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    EGF-receptor targeted liposomes with boronated acridine: growth inhibition of cultured glioma cells after neutron irradiation2005In: International Journal of Radiation Biology, ISSN 0955-3002, E-ISSN 1362-3095, Vol. 81, no 8, p. 621-629Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To study survival of cultured U-343MGaCl 2:6 glioma cells after incubation with boron-containing liposomes targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor following neutron irradiation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Epidermal growth factor-tagged liposomes were loaded with water-soluble boronated acridine developed for boron neutron capture therapy, (BNCT). Cellular uptake and distribution were studied. Further, cells were placed at 3 cm depth in a phantom and exposed to an epithermal neutron beam to study clonogenic cell survival. RESULTS: The cellular uptake of boron reached 90 ppm and it was determined by subcellular fractionation that most of the cell-associated boron was located outside of the nucleus. For clonogenic survival, the cells were incubated with epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted liposomes for 4 hours resulting in a cellular concentration of 55 ppm boron (11 ppm 10B). At a fluence of 3 x 10(12) neutrons/cm2 the cell killing effect of the boron-containing epidermal growth factor-liposomes was about ten times higher than for neutrons only. Furthermore, theoretical calculation of the survival by enriched compound (55 ppm 10B), using the parameters from non-enriched compound (11 ppm 10B), shows that the killing effect in this case would be approximately five orders of magnitude higher than for neutrons only. CONCLUSION: The results in this study show that epidermal growth factor-receptor targeted liposomes are suitable as tumor-cell delivery agents of boron for BNCT and support further studies to demonstrate their effectiveness in vivo.

  • 37.
    Leja, Justyna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Yu, Di
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Berith
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Zieba, Agata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hakkarainen, Tanja
    University of Helsinki, Finnish Institute for Molecular Medicine.
    Åkerström, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Giandomenico, Valeria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Oncolytic adenovirus modified with somatostatin motifs for selective infection of neuroendocrine tumor cells2011In: Gene Therapy, ISSN 0969-7128, E-ISSN 1476-5462, Vol. 18, no 11, p. 1052-1062Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have previously described the oncolytic adenovirus, Ad(CgA-E1A-miR122), herein denoted Ad5(CgA-E1A-miR122) that selectively replicates in and kills neuroendocrine cells, including freshly isolated midgut carcinoid cells from liver metastases. Ad5(CgA-E1A-miR122) is based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) and infects target cells by binding to the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR) and integrins on the cell surface. Some neuroendocrine tumor (NET) and neuroblastoma cells express low levels of CAR and are therefore poorly transduced by Ad5. However, they often express high levels of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs). Therefore, we introduced cyclic peptides, which contain four amino acids (FWKT) and mimic the binding site for SSTRs in the virus fiber knob. We show that FWKT-modified Ad5 binds to SSTR2 on NET cells and transduces midgut carcinoid cells from liver metastases about 3-4 times better than non-modified Ad5 while it transduces normal hepatocytes at about 50% of Ad5. Moreover, FWKT-modified Ad5 overcomes neutralization in an ex vivo human blood loop model to greater extent than Ad5, indicating that fiber knob modification may prolong the systematic circulation time. We conclude that modification of adenovirus with the FWKT motif may be beneficial for NET therapy.

  • 38.
    Leuchowius, Karl-Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Weibrecht, Irene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Flow cytometric in situ proximity ligation analyses of protein interactions and post-translational modification of the epidermal growth factor receptor family2009In: Cytometry: Part A, ISSN 1552-4922, Vol. 75A, no 10, p. 833-839Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interactions between members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family mediates cellular responses to ligand stimulation. Measurement of these interactions could provide important information and may prove useful as prognostic markers in malignancy. Therefore, to develop methods to study these interactions in genetically unmodified cells, such as clinical samples, in a sensitive and selective way, with good statistical accuracy, is important. The in situ proximity ligation assay (in situ PLA) was used to quantify homo- and heteromeric interactions between EGFR and HER2 in cultured cells, using flow cytometry as the readout method. Cells were monitored for changes in dimerization patterns and phosphorylation status upon stimulation. The different cell lines displayed varying amounts of interactions between EGFR and HER2, but the amount of dimerization was not found to be affected significantly upon stimulation by EGF. Activation of EGFR could be visualized by in situ PLA, but not by immunofluorescence staining. In situ PLA was successfully used to study receptor dimerization and activation of the EGF-receptor family with high selectivity and sensitivity. The combination of in situ PLA and flow cytometry provided a statistically powerful way of analyzing protein-protein interactions and post-translational modifications on a single-cell basis.

  • 39.
    Liljegren Sundberg, Åsa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Bruskin, Alexander
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    [111In]-DTPA-hEGF and [111In]-Bz-DTPA-hEGF: preparation and in vitro studies of two anti- glioblastoma conjugates with residualising labels2002In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 1084-9785, E-ISSN 1557-8852, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 354-354Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract
  • 40.
    Lundqvist, Hans
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Garske, Ulrike
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Kairemo, Kalevi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Radionuklidterapi - möjlig väg mot bättre behandling av cancer: Hindret är bristen på kommersiellt tillgängliga nuklider i kliniken2004In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 101, no 11, p. 1000-1006Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    About one third of all cancer develops into a spread disease that is difficult to treat. Radioimmunotherapy has during the last years proven to be of help when other therapy modalities fail in e.g. lymphomas. The development in this area is fast mainly due to substantial improvements in molecular biology and in our increasing understanding of specific receptor expressions in cancer cells. However, radionuclides used today, 131I and 90Y, are not optimal in that sense that they emit radiation mainly suitable to treat the bulk tumor and not the single cell and micrometastases present in spread disease. The article stresses the importance that radionuclides with more suitable emission of particles like 177Lu and 211At are made available for clinical research and routine.

  • 41.
    Nilsson, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Sjöstrom, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Zhao, Qinghai
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Penetration and Binding of EGF-Dextran Conjugates in Cultured-Cell Spheroids1997In: European Journal of Cell Biology, ISSN 0171-9335, E-ISSN 1618-1298, Vol. 74, no suppl. 47, p. 118-118Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Orlova, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Bohl, E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Ghaneolhosseino, H.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Lebeda, Ondrej
    Sjöberg, S.
    Lundqvist, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Synthesis of [211At] N-[8-(acridin-9-ylamino)-octyl]-3- astatobenzamide, an astatinated DNA intercalator2000In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine, ISSN 0340-6997, E-ISSN 1432-105X, Vol. 27, no 8, p. 317-Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract
  • 43.
    Orlova, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Bruskin, Alexander
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Sjöström, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Lundqvist, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Cellular processing of (125)I- and (111)in-labeled epidermal growth factor(EGF) bound to cultured A431 tumor cells2000In: Nuclear Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0969-8051, E-ISSN 1872-9614, Vol. 27, no 8, p. 827-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low molecular weight of epidermal growth factor (EGF) enables better intratumoral penetration in comparison with larger targeting proteins, but the cellular retention of EGF-associated radioactivity is poor for directly iodinated EGF. An attempt was made to improve intracellular retention by the use of metal-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid or nonphenolic linker (N-succinimidyl-para-iodobenzoate) as labeling agents. The use of nonphenolic linker did not improve retention of the radioactivity in A431 carcinoma cell line. The use of the radiometal label provided an appreciable prolongation of radioactivity residence inside the cell.

  • 44.
    Orlova, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Bruskin, Alexander
    Sjöström, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Lundqvist, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Tolmavhev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Cellular processing of 125I- and 111in-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) bound to cultured A431 tumor cells2000In: Nuclear Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0969-8051, E-ISSN 1872-9614, Vol. 27, no 8, p. 827-835Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Low molecular weight of epidermal growth factor (EGF) enables better intratumoral penetration in comparison with larger targeting proteins, but the cellular retention of EGF-associated radioactivity is poor for directly iodinated EGF. An attempt was made to improve intracellular retention by the use of metal-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid or nonphenolic linker (N-succinimidyl-para-iodobenzoate) as labeling agents. The use of nonphenolic linker did not improve retention of the radioactivity in A431 carcinoma cell line. The use of the radiometal label provided an appreciable prolongation of radioactivity residence inside the cell.

  • 45.
    Orlova, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Höglund, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Lebeda, Ondrej
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Lundqvist, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Sundin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Comparative biodistribution of the radiohalogenated (Br, I and At) antibody A33: Implications for in vivo dosimetry2002In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 1084-9785, E-ISSN 1557-8852, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 385-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The alpha-emitter astatine-211 (T(1/2) = 7.2 h) has great potential for use in targeted radionuclide therapy. Its potent alpha-radiation makes (211)At unsuitable for dose planning. Its x-rays can be used for gamma-camera monitoring of the radioactivity distribution during therapy but not for accurate estimation of absorbed dose in critical organs. This study was intended to establish whether the absorbed dose delivered by astatinated antibody could be accurately determined by analogue labeling with radiohalogens, better suited for quantitative measurements in vivo. PET facilitates quantitative pharmacokinetics; possible halogen labels are, e.g., (76)Br (T(1/2) = 16.2 h) and (124)I (T(1/2) = 4.18 d). Antibody A33 was labeled with (76)Br, (125)I and (211)At using N-succinimidyl-p-halobenzoates. The conjugates were co-injected into Sprague-Dawley rats. Radioactivity concentrations in different organs and tissues were measured at three time points. Pharmacokinetic data were used to calculate absorbed doses. (125)I and (76)Br reflected the biokinetics of astatine reasonably well. The absorbed doses in bladder, kidney, pancreas, liver, bone and brain were determined with 10% accuracy. The absorbed doses in stomach, spleen and thyroid were underestimated by a factor 2-3. Positron-emitting analogues can be used to predict the astatine-derived dose in critical organs. Correction factors should be used for stomach, spleen and thyroid.

  • 46.
    Orlova, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Sundberg, Å.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Bruskin, Alexander
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    [111In] benzyl-DTPA-EGF, a new potential radiopeptide for targeting of glioma2002In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine, ISSN 0340-6997, E-ISSN 1432-105X, Vol. 29, p. S367-Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract
  • 47.
    Persson, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Lundqvist, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Nordgren, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Malmström, Per-Uno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    [Lu-177]pertuzumab: Experimental therapy of HER-2-expressing xenografts2007In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 67, no 1, p. 326-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pertuzumab (Omnitarg) is a novel antibody against HER-2, domain II. HER-2 is a tyrosine kinase receptor that is overexpressed in several carcinomas, especially breast cancer. Pertuzumab, labeled with the low-energy beta emitter Lu-177, might be a candidate for targeted radiotherapy of disseminated HER-2-positive micrometastases. The radiolabeled antibody [Lu-177]pertuzumab showed favorable targeting properties in BALB/c (nu/nu) mice with HER-2-overexpressing xenografts. The absorbed dose in tumors was more than five times higher than the absorbed dose in blood and more than seven times the absorbed dose in any other normal organ. Experimental therapy showed that [Lu-177]pertuzumab delayed tumor progression compared with controls (no treatment, P < 0.0001; nonlabeled pertuzumab antibody, P < 0.0001; and Lu-177-labeled irrelevant antibody, P < 0.01). No adverse side effects of the treatment could be detected. Thus, the experimental results support the planning of clinical studies applying [Lu-177]pertuzumab for therapy.

  • 48.
    Persson, Mikael I.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Jensen, H. J.
    Danmark.
    Lundqvist, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Malmström, Per-Uno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Astatinated trastuzumab, a putative agent for radionuclide immunotherapy of ErbB2-expressing tumours2006In: Oncology Reports, ISSN 1021-335X, E-ISSN 1791-2431, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 673-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The anti-ErbB2 antibody trastuzumab is used for the treatment of patients with advanced breast cancer, resulting in a response rate of 40-60%. Coupling with a cytotoxic nuclide, e.g. alpha-emitting 211At, may further increase tumour response. The tumour-targeting properties of trastuzumab, astatinated using N-succinimidyl-para-(tri-n-methylstannyl)-benzoate, were evaluated and compared with those of radioiodinated trastuzumab in this study. We found that astatinated trastuzumab retains high specificity towards ErbB2. While the immunoreactive fraction of radioiodinated trastuzumab was higher than that of astatinated trastuzumab (76+/-9% versus 54+/-28%), both radioconjugates showed high affinity (KD 0.75+/-0.16 nM versus 1.8+/-0.3 nM). A growth inhibition study indicated a dose-dependent cell deactivation, in which approximately 74 cell-associated astatine decays per cell gave a survival fraction of 4.5+/-0.8x10(-4). Results of a comparative animal study on normal mice gave no indication that astatination would have any adverse effects on the biodistribution of the antibody. In conclusion, the results of the study suggest that astatinated trastuzumab is a promising candidate for treating ErbB2-expressing tumours.

  • 49.
    Persson, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Cellular processing of iodinated and astatinated trastuzumab in cultured SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells2002In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 1084-9785, E-ISSN 1557-8852, Vol. 17, p. 353-354Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract
  • 50.
    Persson, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Sivaev, Igor
    Winberg, Karl-Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Malmström, Per-Uno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    In vitro evaluation of two polyhedral boron anion derivatives as linkers for attachment of radioiodine to the anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody trastuzumab2007In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 1084-9785, E-ISSN 1557-8852, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 585-596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improving intracellular retention is important for the use of radiohalogens in radionuclide therapy usinginternalizing antibodies. Two putative linkers for residualization of radioiodine labels, 7-(4-isothiocyanato-phenyl)undecahydro-7,8-dicarba-nido-undecaborate(1Ϫ) ion (NBI) and (4-isothiocyanato-benzylammo-nio)undecahydro-closo-dodecaborate(1Ϫ) (DABI), were analyzed. The anti-HER-2 antibody, trastuzumab,was labeled with iodine-125 using NBI and DABI linkers, and, for comparison, with the para-[125I]iodoben-zoate (PIB), and Chloramine-T (CAT) methods. The different labels were tested for residualizing prop-erties using the HER-2 overexpressing SKBR-3 cells. The cellular radioactivity retention showed thatDABI provided a 55% better retention than CAT and was 42% better than PIB after 20 hours. NBI didnot improve retention. Accumulation tests up to 21 hours showed that the HER-2-specific accumulationof radioactivity delivered with DABI was, on average, 33% higher than with the use of PIB. These DABI-dependent improvements could, with high probability, be attributed to the good residualizing propertiesof DABI. The affinity of DABI-labeled trastuzumab to SKBR-3 cells was not better than the affinity of thePIB labeled (3.2 Ϯ 1.9 nM and 0.77 Ϯ 0.39 nM, respectively). In conclusion, the use of the DABI linkerimproved intracellular retention in vitro in comparison with the other labeling methods.

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