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  • 1. Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Var dag en kamp för skogssamisk framtid: Ett (drygt) år med Henrik Andersson,renskötare i Gällivare skogssameby2017In: Uppsala mitt i Sápmi – Sábme – Saepmie II.: En supradisciplinär antologi härrörande från vårsymposium organiserat av Uppsam –Föreningen for samiskrelaterad forskning i Uppsala, Uppsala universitet, 28–29 april 2014 / [ed] May-Britt Öhman, Cecilia Hedlund, Gunilla Larsson, Uppsala: Uppsam - föreningen för samiskrelaterad forskning i Uppsala , 2017, p. 51-62Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Every day struggles for Forest Sámi futures: A year with Henrik Andersson, reindeer herder in GällivareForest Sámi villageAt the UPPSAM spring symposium 2014 Henrik Andersson, reindeer herder in Gällivare Forest Sámi village(sameby), participated and presented along with film maker Petri Storlöpare the documentary “The LastGeneration?”. The film follows Henrik during a year 2012–2013, when he decided to live according to oldertradition. Henrik Andersson is besides working for the maintaining of Forest Sámi tradition and handicraftalso a frequent writer on Facebook and he is actively pursuing different issues of importance for the preservationof Sámi lands and waters for current reindeer herding and for future generations. May-Britt Öhmanhas with the approval of Henrik selected among his many Facebook updates over a year, starting fromJuly 7, 2014 until September 4, 2015. [facebook.com/henrik.andersson.982] The content in the updates isall from every day reflections, happy moments, to critique against the destructive exploitations of Sámi landsand waters. One recurrent theme is the struggle to safeguard reindeer grazing, calving and migration landsagainst wind power exploitations, at the moment pursued by the company Vasavind and also the state powercompany Vattenfall, on the lands of Gällivare forest Sámi village. The updates are most of the time written oncellphone and some smaller editing has been made for enhanced legibility. However, most of the text is thesame version as is available on Henrik’s open Facebook wall. The updates follows Facebook chronology,meaning that the latest are the first.

  • 2.
    Arai, Kaori
    Rikkyo University, Graduate School of Sociology.
    Öhman, May-Britt (Editor)
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Maruyama, Hiroshi (Editor)
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Subjectivity of the Ainu People Described in the Book ‘Nibutani’, Edited by Kaizawa Tadashi: A New Discovery and Approach to Ainu Research2014In: Re: Mindings: Co-Constituting Indigenous, Academic, Artistic Knowledges, Uppsala: The Hugo Valentin Centre, Uppsala University , 2014, p. 17-25Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ainu studies still lack an inside perspective from the Ainu themselves though the importance of such perspective has been recognized for a deeper understanding of the Ainu by a few Ainu and Wajin [ethnic Japanese] postmodern scholar. To begin with, Ainu “self telling history” have been considered by researchers of Ainu studies to be “non-existent.” In other words, it can be said that the very act of dealing with modern history in relation to the Ainu by those materials was under a taboo for both the Ainu and the Wajin.

    This article demonstrates that a history book of the Nibutani Community entitled “Nibutani” edited by Kaizawa Tadashi in cooperation with local residents is a rare ex- ample of modern Ainu history compiled by the Ainu themselves. The book covers all the details of each family with family trees though the Ainu hardly confessed them- selves as Ainu under severe discrimination at the time. Further most of its lifestories were collected through the interviewing of those families by Kaizawa himself. As far as the contents are concerned, some stories are related to the Ainu, whereas others are seemingly related to their personal life. Thus the book presented a variety of stories that represent the then lives of the local residents in the Nibutani Community.

    At the moment when ‘Nibutani’ was published the Ainu did not voluntari- ly talk about their own history, and neither were expected to do so. ‘Nibutani’, which was completed by Kaizawa, connected the individually divided histories to each other, and made clear the relationships between the individuals and the community. As a result, the local residents in the Nibutani Community have ap- preciated this book for highlighting their own perspectives on their local history.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               

  • 3.
    Elovaara, Pirjo
    et al.
    BTH.
    Sefyrin, JohannaMittuniversitetet, Institutionen för informationsteknologi och medier.Öhman, May-BrittUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.Björkman, Christina
    Travelling thoughtfulness: feminist technoscience stories2010Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 4. Gärdebo, Johan
    et al.
    Öhman, May-BrittUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.Maruyama, HiroshiUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    Re: Mindings: Co-Constituting Indigenous, Academic, Artistic Knowledges2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RE: Mindings brings together indigenous scholars, artists and activists, and indigenous allies to speak of whose positions, contexts and experiences it is that inform the construction of knowledges, histories and sciences. In short, whose experience counts? The purpose of RE:Mindings is to encourage its authors and readers to investigate what it means to resist exploitation of humans, non-humans and nature within the frames of modern nation states. Examples are provided from communities within or across the borders of existing nation states: Sámi and Saepmie/Sábme/Sápmi in Fenno-Scandinavia; Aboriginal-Martu in Australia; Ainu people in Japan, Dakota-Native Americans in USA and Mapuche in Chile. This publication originates from the supradisciplinary symposium RE: Mindings; Co-Constituting Indigenous/Academic/Artistic Knowledges and Understandings of Land-, Water-, Body-, and Lab-scapes, held at Uppsala University, 10-12 October 2012.

    The RE:Mindings publication has been funded through research projects financed by the Swedish Research Council (Vetenskapsrådet) and Formas - the Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning.

  • 5.
    Hammarström, Gunhild
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Berg, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Holmberg, Tora
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Malmberg, Denise
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Wahlström, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Verksamheten vid Centrum för Genusvetenskap: Framtidsgruppens överväganden och förslag2009Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6. Hoag, Heather J.
    et al.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    KTH, Teknik- och vetenskapshistoria.
    Turning water into power - Debates over the development of Tanzania's Rufiji River Basin, 1945-19852008In: Technology and culture, ISSN 0040-165X, E-ISSN 1097-3729, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 624-651Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Idenfors, Annika
    et al.
    Umeå Universitet.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå Universitet.
    Hanberger, Anders
    Umeå Universitet.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Thunqvist, Eva-Lotta
    KTH, Centrum för hälsa och byggande, CHB.
    När det brister: En studie av dammsäkehet och säkerhetsarbete mot översvämningar längs Skellefte- och Umeälven2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna rapport sammanfattar resultat från en studie om dammsäkerhet och säkerhetsarbete mot översvämningar längs två reglerade älvar i Västerbotten. Syftet med studien är att undersöka hur dammsäkerhetsarbetet, när det gäller dammbrott, säkerhetsarbete mot översvämningar och incidenter relaterade till nyttjandet av älvarna, är organiserat och fungerar längs Skellefte- och Umeälven. Övriga älvar i länet samt gruvdammar ingår inte i undersökningen. Det ansvar som Statens geotekniska institut (SGI), Sveriges meteorologiska och hydrologiska institut (SMHI), försvarsmakten, Boverket, Vägverket och polisen har för att förebygga och agera i samband med översvämningar behandlas inte heller i studien.

    Rapporten baseras på en litteraturöversikt rörande den senaste forskningen på området, dokumentstudier, intervjuer med säkerhetsansvariga vid Länsstyrelsen Västerbotten, Umeå, Vännäs, Lycksele och Skellefteå kommun, samt två vattenregleringsföretag.

    Studien tar sin utgångspunkt i begreppet mänsklig säkerhet och analyserar dammsäkerhet och säkerhetsarbete utifrån ett sociotekniskt perspektiv. Det innebär att varje teknisk konstruktion, varje tekniskt system, såsom vattenkraftverk och dammar, där olika tekniska instrument används för att kontrollera och reglera vattenflöden och producera elektricitet, också utgör sociala system. Det innebär att rapporten uppmärksammar deltagande och delaktighet som en central aspekt av säkerhetsarbetet.

    Utifrån resultaten drar studien följande slutsatser:

    • Dammsäkerhetsarbetet och säkerhetsarbetet mot översvämningar längs Skellefte- och Umeälven uppvisar brister ifråga om resurser, kompetens och insyn.
    • Dammsäkerhetsarbetet inkluderar inte allmänhetens säkerhet vid och på dammar (public safety around dams).
    • Det finns oklarheter rörande vem som har ansvar för dammsäkerhet och för säkerhetsarbete mot översvämningar.
    • Dammsäkerhetsarbetet i Västerbotten inkluderar endast i begränsad omfattning sociala aspekter, lokal kunskap tas inte tillvara, och allmänhet och rättighetsinnehavare ignoreras i stor utsträckning i säkerhetsarbetet.
    • Det är generellt svårt att bedöma effekter av säkerhetsarbetet kring dammar och längs älvarna, men klart är att pågående säkerhetsarbete, i form av till exempel enskilda projekt och övningar, ökar kunskaperna om risker och ansvar, samt stärker samverkan mellan olika aktörer.
    • Dammsäkerhet uppfattas främst handla om tekniska konstruktioner medan människa-maskin- natur och mellanmänskliga och organisatoriska säkerhetsaspekter hamnar i skymundan.
  • 8.
    Larsson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research. Sámi Land Free University.
    Hög tid att rädda den samiska kulturhistorien från att skövlas och sprängas bort: Fallstudie från Kallak - Gállok2017In: Uppsala mitt i Sápmi – Sábme – Saepmie II: En supradisciplinär antologi härrörande från vårsymposium organiserat av Uppsam – Föreningen for samiskrelaterad forskning i Uppsala, Uppsala universitet, 28–29 april 2014 / [ed] May-Britt Öhman, Cecilia Hedlund, Gunilla Larsson, Uppsala: Uppsam/VulkanMedia , 2017, p. 37-50Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is discusses the problem concerning the lack of knowledge about Sámi archaeology and history.  One important base for our knowledge, the ancient monuments, have not been sufficiently surveyed, documented and analysed. This situation is a consequence of old Social Darwinist ideas of the Sámi as a people without history, as well as a remaining nationalistic bias where Swedish archaeology is the norm.

    The article deals with the threats to the Sámi cultural heritage, which, if not surveyed and registered, is likely to be destroyed by current forestry practices as well as other types of exploitations.

    While most of southern Sweden has been subject for both primary and secondary survey for ancient monuments by the National Board of Antiquities until it was mainly finished 1996 (2001), most of Sámi territories have not been surveyed at all.

     A case study from Gállok outside Jokkmokk, where a mine is planned in an earlier Forest Sámi ”skatteland” (‘ Lap/Sami tax land’ ), threatening the cultural heritage, illustrates the problems mentioned in detail. 

  • 9. Persson, Marie
    et al.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Visions for a Future at the Source: The Battle against the Rönnbäck Nickel Mining Project2014In: Re: Mindings: Co-Constituting Indigenous, Academic, Artistic Knowledges / [ed] Gördebo, Johan; Öhman, May-Britt; Maruyama, Hiroshi, Uppsala: The Hugo Valentin Centre , 2014, p. 103-119Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Silversparf, Agneta
    Silbonah Sámesijdda.
    Samisk släktforskning som motstånd och verktyg: mot etnisk rensning och för att återta vårt minne, vår historia och kultur2017In: Uppsala mitt i Sápmi – Sábme – Saepmie II: En supradisciplinär antologi härrörande från vårsymposium organiserat av Uppsam –Föreningen for samiskrelaterad forskning i Uppsala, Uppsala universitet, 28–29 april 2014 / [ed] May-Britt Öhman, Cecilia Hedlund, Gunilla Larsson, Uppsala: Uppsam - föreningen för samiskrelaterad forskning i Uppsala , 2017, p. 16-24Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article accounts for the history of Swedish state regulations against the Sami people in terms of numbers, heritage and decision-making. For instance, currently it is not the Sami People as People that are considered to be Sami. The current official number of Sami often referred to in official documents are based on Sami working in the profession of reindeer herding. The actual number of Sami persons is hidden by State-based regulations and categorizations. This is due to a century long racist policy called “Lap should be Lap” aiming at reducing the official number of Sami individuals, and thereby erasing the Sami cultures. The article discusses the work by Sami genealogist to counter this categorization. By doing the genealogy work and publishing it four times per year to the members of the Sami association Silbonah Sámesijdda, the genealogy work becomes both an act of resistance as well as an act of reclaiming Sami history and memory. The author also shares memories of her own family history, and how this is linked with her work to do genealogy and reclaim heritage of the Sami in general. Lastly, some reflections regarding the future of Sami genealogy are presented.

    The work with this article has partly been financed through the research project "Rivers, Resistance, Resilience: Sustainable Futures in Sápmi" led by Dr. May-Britt Öhman, and financed by Formas, 2012-2015.

  • 11.
    Svalastog, Anna Lydia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Öhman, May-Britt (Editor)
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Maruyama, Hiroshi (Editor)
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History, The Hugo Valentin Centre.
    On Teachers’ Education in Sweden, School Curriculums, and the Sámi People2014In: Re: Mindings: Co-Constituting Indigenous, Academic, Artistic Knowledges / [ed] Johan Gärdebo, May-Britt Öhman, Hiroshi Maruyama, Uppsala: The Hugo Valentin Centre, Uppsala University , 2014, p. 153-171Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the intersection of Teachers’ Education and the Swedish society with regards to Sámi religion, history and culture. It aims at a renewed understanding of present premises for construction of curriculums in courses on Sámi history, culture and religion. An important back drop is the Swedish State’s regulation of Teachers Education, their inclusion of indigenous peoples’ inte- rests, and the general demand for research based and reflexive academic teaching. I argue that Teachers’ Education and Swedish bookstores present research based knowledge on the Sámi People’s religion, history and culture in a weak and accidental manner. For a better understanding, I discuss Anthony Giddens’ description of society as regionalized into “back stage” and “front stage” regions structured by different rules – back stage rules being loosely structured and characterized by feelings, subjectivity and bodily activities, while front stage rules are strictly disciplined, and not characterized by personal feelings or bodily excursion. Universities and Colleges fit front stage characteristics, though Teachers’ Education, as well as Swedish bookstores, seems to be structured by back stage rules when it comes to the Sámi People. Giddens emphasizes how social encounters between people contribute to the construction of social institutions and  their organization. As such, the loose link between research based teaching and Teachers Education regarding the Sámi people, generates societal consequences. If reflexivity is a major feature of present academic life, we should expect universities to change present premises for research based new curriculums regarding Sámi history, culture and religion. The argument forwarded in this article is thus that, first of all, this situation needs to be made visible. The blind spot has to be identified and targeted. Qualified and reflexive knowledge and competence in Sámi religion, history and culture need to be integrated within all disciplines of academic education. Secondly, I argue that there is an urgent need for the (re-)establishment of the discipline of Native Studies – Indigenous Studies headed and fronted by Sámi scholars – which would have the responsibility of developing and renewing research-based curriculums on Sámi culture, history and religion. To be able to reach the full extent and depth of Sámi religion, culture and history, this discipline needs to be directed by Sámi scholars.

  • 12. TallBear, Kim
    Öhman, May-Britt (Editor)
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Maruyama, Hiroshi (Editor)
    Indigenous Bioscientists Constitute Knowledge across Cultures of Expertise and Tradition: An Indigenous Standpoint Research Project2014In: Re:Mindings: Co-Constituting Indigenous, Academic, Artistic Knowledges, Uppsala: The Hugo Valentin Centre, Uppsala University , 2014, p. 173-191Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     This talk explains my recent Indigenous Science Studies research project – an ethnography of Indigenous bioscientists in the U.S. – as it is informed by two key Feminist Science Studies frames, “feminist objectivity” and “feminist standpoint theory.” Most often, anthropological projects focused on Native Americans derive from outside the Native American community and often turn Native American social and cultural practices into anthropological curiosities and sites of difference from the non-Indigenous observer.

    However, from my longstanding location within U.S. Native American social, cultural, educational, and professional circles, this Indigenous standpoint project examines cultural and social conditions that lead U.S. Native Americans to work as bioscientific researchers. The Indigenous standpoint in this research is not mainly concerned with assessing Native American social or cultural difference from the mainstream. Rather, this research investigates how Indigenous participation in bioscience can help make Western bioscience more multi-cultural and democratic, while also serving Native American community capacity-building and self-governance.

    This talk also advocates that Indigenous Studies scholars pay greater attention to the role of science and technology as they seek to do research that supports Indigenous sovereignty. Both Nation States and Indigenous Nations increasingly govern through science. However, in its U.S. formation, Indigenous Studies is more focused in humanities fields. It engages too little with the physical and bio- logical sciences and with technology fields. If Indigenous Studies scholars ignore the role of technoscience in both limiting and facilitating Indigenous sovereignty, they limit their relevance for Indigenous communities.

  • 13.
    Thunqvist, Eva-Lotta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Investigating Bombshells Contaminations of the Waters of the Lule River Catchment Area: Some Conclusions from a Pilot Study made with Supradisciplinary Research Methodologies (Nausta, Udtja and Neat)2014In: Re: Mindings: Co-Constituting Indigenous, Academic, Artistic Knowledges / [ed] Johan Gärdebo, May-Britt Öhman, Hiroshi Maruyama, Uppsala: Uppsala University, 2014, p. 193-199Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This articel is based on the presentation made at the RE-Mindings symposium 2012 with the aim to raise the understanding of the importance of the cumulative effects of industrial activities and military activities on water quality in Sápmi. The investigations which it is based upon were made in a supradisciplinary collaboration with local inhabitants in Udtja, Vidsel and Jokkmokk.

  • 14. Tunón, Håkan
    et al.
    Frändén, MäritUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, The Hugo Valentin Centre.Ojala, Carl-GöstaUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.Öhman, May-BrittUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Uppsala mitt i Sápmi: Rapport från ett symposium arrangerat av Föreningen för samiskrelaterad forskning i Uppsala, Upplandsmuseet 4-5 maj 20112012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Tuorda, Tor L.
    Sámi Land Free University.
    Uppsala universitet och ärkebiskopens rikedomar: Laxfisket vid Luossamuorkke, Edeforsen2017In: Uppsala mitt i Sápmi – Sábme – Saepmie: En supradisciplinär antologi härrörande från vårsymposium organiserat av Uppsam –Föreningen for samiskrelaterad forskning i Uppsala, Uppsala universitet, 28–29 april 2014 / [ed] May-Britt Öhman, Cecilia Hedlund, Gunilla Larsson, Vulkanmedia , 2017, p. 120-130Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The article is combining historical facts with fiction to tell the history of salmon fishing and natural resources in the land of the Indigenous Sámi, Sábme. Sábme was and still is the core territory for the natural resource extractions providing the wealth of the colonial Swedish state since the establishment of the state in the 16th century. The silver, iron ore, the forest, hydropower, taken from here has made the state and its elites rich and wealthy. It is a colonial process, as much as any colonial project elsewhere in the world, yet the word “colonisation” has until recently seldom been used for analysing the relationships between the Swedish state and the Sámi territories.  Salmon fishing was an important source of livelihood for the Sámi in the area. The fishing rights was as early as in the 14th century transferred to colonialist from the south and came to play a major importance in the creation of the wealth of Swedish noblemen, as well as of Uppsala University and the Church of Sweden. In 1960 the salmon fishing ended with the hydropower exploitations. Today there are no more any salmon here, they are stopped at the first hydropower station at Boden, close to the coast.   

    Photo archival research work has been made by May-Britt Öhman. Work with the article has been supported by the research project Rivers, Resistance, Resilience: Sustainable Futures in Sápmi and in Other Indigenous Peoples’ Territories, led by Dr. May-Britt Öhman and financed by Formas, 2012-2015.

  • 16. Wajstedt, Liselotte
    ”Jag vill högt och ljudligt tala om tystnaden”: JORINDAS RESA, stormarna och vägarna vidare2017In: Uppsala mitt i Sápmi – Sábme – Saepmie II: En supradisciplinär antologi härrörande från vårsymposium organiserat av Uppsam –Föreningen for samiskrelaterad forskning i Uppsala, Uppsala universitet, 28–29 april 2014 / [ed] May-Britt Öhman, Cecilia Hedlund, Gunilla Larsson, Uppsala: Uppsam - föreningen för samiskrelaterad forskning i Uppsala , 2017, p. 89-98Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Jorinda’s Journey (2014) is a tender film about a young woman, just at the break between being a child and an adult. The film is set in a magnificent landscape with high mountains. During her journey Jorinda encounters obstacles in the guise of a snow storm and she nearly freezes to death. But the real enemy is within Jorinda herself. She has to find her own inner strength.At the seminar HUKSO! (which means care or concern in Lule Sámi), connected to the Uppsam spring symposium in 2014, Jorinda’s Journey was screened for the first time in Uppsala.

    This article describes the movie, how it was created and about the storms that the movie and I myself have gone through and keep going through. I also discuss my continued work on the theme of the Silence, the things that I want to speak loud and clear about. The quote in the title of the article is from my current movie project, Silence in Sápmi. This is a documentary which continues the process started with the fictional movie Jorinda’s Journey.The focus continues to be the question of what is behind the violence, the suicides and the mental health problems of youth in Sápmi and what can be done to make a change.

    Wajstedts participation at HUKSO! and part of work with the article was financed by the research project Rivers, Resistance, Resilience: Sustainable futures in Sápmi, led by Dr. May-Britt Öhman, financed by FORMAS, 2012–2015.

  • 17.
    Zachrisson, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. Statens historiska museum.
    Hedlund, Cecilia (Editor)
    Uppsam - föreningen/nätverket för samiskrelaterad forskning i Uppsala.
    Larsson, Gunilla (Editor)
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research. Uppsam - föreningen/nätverket för samiskrelaterad forskning i Uppsala.
    Samiskt och nordiskt: Dalvedhs performance, vikingatida kvinnor, arkeologioch förhistoria i Norge och Sverige… En rapport2017In: Uppsala mitt i Sápmi – Sábme – Saepmie II: En supradisciplinär antologi härrörande från Uppsams vårsymposium, Uppsala universitet, 28–29 april 2014 / [ed] Öhman, May-Britt; Hedlund, Cecilia; Larsson, Gunilla, Uppsam - föreningen för samiskrelaterad forskning i Uppsala , 2017, p. 63-68Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Saami and Nordic… is a report over what I have worked with since the first UppSam symposium in 2011,first the participation in two Norwegian projects about South Saami and Nordic identity, today and yesterday. Then I comment upon the struggle to improve the parts about the Saami and their contacts with Nordic people in the exhibition about the Vikings at the Swedish History Museum in Stockholm. Some articles have been published, such as one about Saami and Nordic women during the Viking Age. At last I inform about my personal archive about Saami archaeology newly formed at ATA, the archive of the Swedish National Heritage Board and the Swedish History Museum, Stockholm.

  • 18. Öhberg, Emilia
    Becoming An Ally: Beginning to Decolonise My Mind2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this project is to investigate howdecolonial research can be conducted in practice whenthe researcher is a member of the majority population.I ask: what does it mean to be an ally as well as anacademic? Through autoethnography and ParticipatoryAction Research (PAR) I am attempting to “decolonisemy mind” in order to unlearn oppressive systems ofknowledge and I am using academic disobedience asan intentional strategy to disrupt colonial epistemichegemonies. Following feminist and other criticaltheory traditions and using decolonial and indigenousresearch ethics I am criticising the remnants of positivistresearch structures that exists within the social sciencesand the colonising, racialised, gendered and classed wayin which knowledge is traditionally constructed.I am also attempting to position PAR as adecolonising research methodology. Because a PARanimator does not have an automatic right to writeup and disseminate the knowledge that has beencollectively constructed by the co-researchers, however,I am inserting myself into the narrative in order toAbstractdisrupt the traditional academic voice. I attempt toquestion critically how I (auto) act in relation to myown culture and Sámi culture (ethno) through theprocess of reflective writing and analysis (graphy) – inother words, autoethnograpy.I set out to conduct a PAR project within a Sámiorganisation in Stockholm but despite my efforts theproject never really got off the ground. So apart fromexploring my own positionality relative to the Sámi,and apart from constructing an argument for decolonialresearch and allyship, this essay also offers my thoughtson why the project didn’t happen and my journey intolearning how to be a better academic ally.

  • 19.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Being May-Britt Öhman: Or, Reflections on my own Colonized Mind Regarding Hydropower Constructions in Sápmi2010In: Travelling thoughtfulness: Feminist technoscience stories / [ed] Pirjo Elovaara, Johanna Sefyrin, May-Britt Öhman, Christina Björkman Elovaara, Umeå: Umeå University Department of Informatics , 2010, p. 269-292Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Confronted by new knowledge of her own past, her own family history and a Sámi heritage, the author in this essay navigates on a familiar but now suddenly at the same time unknown Lule River, through familiar land- and waterscapes, now altering before her eyes. The essay is a postcolonial feminist search for the past, attempting at translating it to the present, and pondering on who the author, with this new knowledge, her self actually is. Or want to be. It is a reflection over what parts of her past that has been hidden to her, why it was concealed, and what those acts, by other people – contributing to hiding her past - means to her, today, for her academic research on large scale hydropower exploitations in Sápmi, Sweden.

  • 20.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Bortom gruvTäringen:: Hållbara framtider i Jokkmokk genom samverkan mellan forskning, kultur, näringsliv, samiska traditioner och kunskap2014Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund och syfte: Jokkmokk är en kommun där man har en stark framåtanda inom näringar som anknyter till samiska traditioner och kunskap. Trots detta återkommer beskrivningar av Jokkmokk som en döende ort och gruvindustri framhålls som något av en ”sista utväg” för att orten inte ska dö ut. Detta seminarium/workshop tar avstamp i utgångspunkten att Jokkmokks kommun är en högst levande kommun med livskraftig småskaliga näringar vilka har fast förankring i samisk kultur och tradition. Det finns 193 rennäringsföretag, ett flertal hantverksföretag, Ájtte fjäll och samemuseum , samisk slöjd och konst - duodji, Samernas utbildningscentrum  med utbildning inom samisk kultur och näring, turism och ekoturism och inte minst världskulturarvet Laponia.  Återkommande omfattande kultur- och näringsevenemang är Jokkmokks vintermarknad, en samisk utomhusmarknad sedan drygt 400 år förlagd till början av februari. Denna lockar mellan 30-40 000 besökare till en kommun som har drygt 5000 invånare.

    Kommunen inrymmer dessutom ett flertal storskaliga vattenkraftverk och producerar elkraft för hela Sverige. De prospekteringar för gruvindustri som genomförts av främst utländska bolag de senaste åren har inneburit att konflikter uppstått lokalt mellan motståndare och förespråkare samt att osäkerhet uppstått vad gäller framtiden för de existerande näringarna. Rennäringen – en av de viktigaste grunderna i samisk kultur och tradition i området – riskerar att helt slås ut i kommunen. Ekoturismen likaså, liksom att Laponia riskerar att förlora sin världsarvsstatus.

    Dessutom innebär etablerande av gruvindustri –beräknad livslängd på 30 år - med självklarhet giftiga utsläpp i marker och vatten samt stora risker för dammhaverier i existerande vattenkraftdammar och magasin där konsekvenserna blir katastrof i hela Lule älvdal med såväl tusentals dödsoffer som långtidsevakuering av både Boden och Luleå.

     

    Vid seminariet är syftet därför att dels visa på styrkorna i Jokkmokks kommun i de olika nu existerande sektorerna, dels visualisera och presentera faktiska konsekvenser av gruvetableringar inom kommunen – med hjälp av existerande forskning – samt att diskutera möjligheter för existerande hållbara näringar och verksamheter inom kommunen att stärkas genom samverkan med forskning.

    Målet är att under dagen, genom mötet och presentationerna, så frön till möjliga samverkansprojekt och att inleda diskussioner om nödvändigt arbete för att söka finansiering för dessa.

    Långsiktigt mål

    På sikt hoppas vi kunna bidra till stärka det lokala småskaliga och hållbara företagandet i Jokkmokks kommun, och använda denna samverkan som en modell för liknande satsningar i andra glesbygdskommuner i Sápmi - Sameland, där de samiska traditionerna och kunskaperna kan stärkas och synliggöras på olika sätt.

    Med olika visualiseringsmetoder som exempelvis GIS kan de omfattande negativa konsekvenser av stora miljöförstörande industriella ingrepp göras synliga för lokala invånare och beslutsfattare, så väl som på nationell nivå. Tanken är även att lägga grunden för en samisk forskningspolicy, för samisk medverkan och ökat antal samer som forskar om samiska angelägenheter. Samt att utveckla etiska riktlinjer för forskning om och med samer och samiska traditioner och kunskap.

     

  • 21.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Building a Sami Academy of Sciences: Science, Research, and Education for Decolonization2015In: Indigenous Knowledge Sovereignties and Scientific Research / [ed] Sandra Harding/Kyle Powys Whyte, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    May-Britt Öhman, Uppsala University (may-britt.ohman@gender.uu.se)

     

    Building a Sami Academy of Sciences: Science, Research, and Education for Decolonization

     

    The production of technological modern identities within Scandinavia rests on the dispossession of Sámi people from our traditional lands, and thus our identities related to land and water. Technoscientific language and imagery continue to shape and reflect power relations which favor the modern nation states and dis-favor Sámi rights. Meanwhile there is currently a void of Sámi research platforms available, especially within Sweden. The vast majority of scholars doing research on Sámi territory and Sámi people are themselves non-Sámi. The current situation is highly problematic. It contributes to the creation of epistemological contexts which support increasing colonial exploitation and destruction of Sámi traditional territories. This paper describes an ongoing project to establish important structures and platforms to accommodate research initiated and led by Sámi in order to promote decolonization of technoscience for the benefit of the Sámi and Sámi society. The project includes a Sámi academy of sciences and a Sámi university. The presentation discusses collaborations with Sámi organisations, the Sámi parliament, individual reindeer herders, Sámi artists and film makers and other Sámi scholars. Important points of departure are to enable Sami peoples' continuance, healing and regeneration and to apply Sami knowledges and experiences as a basis for them to develop ecological innovations and technologies to facilitate the everyday life of reindeer herding.

     

     

  • 22.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Dammsäkerhet: Hur länge lever en damm och vad får den att brista?2013Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Desires, obedient and disobedient bodies in conflict: The struggle to preserve or exploit Gállok (Kallak) and the human bodies involved2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Desires, Obedient and Disobedient bodies in conflict: The struggle to preserve or exploit Gállok (Kallak) and the human bodies involved

    This presentation discusses a contemporary  conflict or rebellion at Gállok (Kallak), Jokkmokk, Sápmi-the land of the indigenous Sámi, Sweden. In 2006 the British prospecting company Beowulf Mining Plc. was granted rights to prospect for iron ore in the area. Worried local inhabitants started following the process, and by 2011, a local resistance group started its work to question the project. The resistance was fuelled by the prospecting company CEO describing the area as without inhabitants, without human bodies, as he showed an image of an empty (of human bodies) landscape answering the question – of what does the local inhabitants say, with the rhetoric question “ I ask ‘what local inhabitants?!’. The local resistance responded by a manifestation showing their faces on a wall at the annual Jokkmokk Winter Market of 2012.

    Summer 2013, a test mining on the by the prospecting company and its shareholders desired iron ore body was scheduled. From June, different persons travelled here to protest on location, to provide support to the local inhabitants. Activists that had been protecting the Ojnare forest at Gotland (an island south east of Stockholm) in 2012, came on the invitation by the Gállok local resistance and offered their own bodies to protect the Gállok. They climbed machines and erected blockades. Although the prospecting company, JIMAB, had been reported to the police for illegal actions since 2012, the police forces came only on the request by the very same prospecting company to evict the protesters. There are numerous films and photos from those five police interventions, where human bodies – as well as animals (dogs) are involved. I have followed these events, both on site, through direct more or less live reporting on social media (mainly Facebook) and also by collaboration with some of the activists who have reported to me through diaries and notes. This presentation is a first attempt to formulate an analysis of the conflicting bodies involved, human and non-human, postures, voices, fear and desires involved. 

  • 24.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Embodied Vulnerability in Large-Scale Technical Systems: Vulnerable Dam Bodies, Water Bodies, and Human Bodies2016In: Bodies, Boundaries and Vulnerabilities: Interrogating Social, Cultural and Political Aspects of Embodiment / [ed] Folkmarson Käll, Lisa, Switzerland: Springer, 2016, p. 47-79Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Challenging the modern ideal of human bodies as being in control both of bodies of nature and of the bodies of technology made to control nature, this chapter considers the vulnerability of large-scale hydropower dams and the intimate interdependencies between dam bodies, water bodies, and human bodies. It proposes a water-centered, rather than human-centered, reading of rivers and in particular of dammed rivers, through an understanding of hydropower dams as vulnerable bodies. Once constructed by human beings, hydropower dams take on a life of their own and become living organisms as they age, interact with land and rivers, and withstand and react to changing environmental conditions. This chapter also discusses processes of knowledge production in which different bodies of knowledge come to be perceived as embodied or disembodied and are granted status as primitive or scientific. Taking her point of departure in her own embodied history, the author seeks to retrace indigenous Sámi understandings of human cultural interconnectedness with nature. With a focus on the specific river Julevädno running through Sápmi in the north of Sweden, the chapter draws attention to the unpredictable agency of water and the porosity of human bodies, emphasizing risk and vulnerability as essential elements of their interrelation.

  • 25.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Erinran angående Jokkmokk Iron Mines AB:s  Miljökonsekvensbeskrivning Umeå 2013-04-24 revidering 2014-04-152016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Erinran angående Jokkmokk Iron Mines AB:s  Miljökonsekvensbeskrivning Umeå 2013-04-24 revidering 2014-04-15, här omnämnd som MKB, inlämnad som bilaga till samma bolags ansökan om bearbetningskoncession för området Kallak K nr 1.

     

    Erinran bygger på observationer och forskning utförd inom forskningsprojekt placerade vid Uppsala universitet och finansierad av de statliga forskningsfinansiärerna Vetenskapsrådet och FORMAS. Forskningsprojekten är Dammed: Security, risk and resilience around the dams in Sub-Arctica, Vetenskapsrådet 2010-2012; Rivers resistance resilience, FORMAS 2012-2015. Jag är forskningsledare för båda projekten.

  • 26.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Centre for Multidisciplinary Studies on Racism. LTU history.
    Flooding Luleå city: Perspectives on hydropower, mining, dam safety and flood risk governance2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Luleå city is located downstream of 18 hydropower dams of which the majority are classified as high consequence, meaning that if there is a dam failure, there will be severe consequences downstream. The highest risk for dam failure is when the dams are full, October to about end January each year, i.e. the coldest part of the year. In a worst case scenario water (and ice) levels may rise up to 5-6 meters in the central parts, within less than 48 hours.  Dam safety work entered the international dam sector agenda in the 1970s, after the Teton dam failure in the US. In Sweden, attention to and work with the risk of dam failure began the 1980s, as the hydropower construction era ended.

    The recent tailing dam failure in Brasil has drawn public attention to the risks with the dams used to store waste from mines. While a major tailing dam failed in Finland (Talvivaara) in 2013, so far Sweden has been spared from major disasters.

    What is so far unknown of in Sweden, and rarely discussed, is the combination of the two systems; tailing dams and hydropower dams in the same river, as well as and the risks and governance complexities thereto associated. Yet this is of importance to Luleå, as since 2011 there are plans for a mine within the Lule River, at Kallak/Gállok. This would bring two high consequence systems together, with two different main responsible actors – Vattenfall on the one hand, and the owner of the mine on the other. The public and decision makers have so far had little knowledge/understanding of the risks of such combination. Based on interviews and participatory observations within four research projects funded by the Swedish research council (VR) and FORMAS (since 2008) I will discuss the complexities for flood governance.

     

  • 27.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    "Grön el" och kolonisationen av Sápmi2009In: Genus i norrsken, ISSN 1654-7640, Vol. 2, p. 3-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Julevädno ja mån: Lule älv och jag - tystnad, minnesförlust och jojka älven som samisk-svensk vattenkraftshistoria2015In: Med varm hand: texter tillägnade Arne Kaijser / [ed] Kaiserfeld, Thomas och Wormbs, Nina, Stockholm: Kungliga Tekniska högskolan, 2015, p. 105-137Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Kautokeino - Alta - Gállok: Civil disobedience and indigenous peoples struggle for ‘human security’ and the right to a sustainable future2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summer of 2012, attention was drawn to the protests against mining on the island Gotland – near Stockholm -, where a large number of people protected the Ojnare forest with their bodies. The summer of 2013, protests against another mining project started on site in Gállok (Kallak) , Jokkmokk–  which is traditional Sámi territory and reindeer  grazing lands.  Protesters from Ojnare came to support the local Sámi reindeer herders as well as other local Sámi and non-Sámi inhabitants  who had fought without much  success through legal procedures and manifestations. Since then the protests have continued, in different forms and different actions. It is likely that more protests will take place, as the current mineral policies in Sweden (as well as Norway and Finland) is challenged by an increasing number of organizations.

    The common denominator of  Ojnare and Gállok is a struggle for the protection of lands and water against destructive mining exploitations  and also are intimately linked through its actors involved. The case of Gállok also continues a tradition of Sámi agency and resistance against colonization. This tradition has come to the forefront in different ways, where rebellions form one important part of Sámi history and memory. I will discuss the Kautokeino rebellion in 1852, via the protests against hydropower exploitation in Alta in the 1970s and 80s, to Gállok. I argue that these rebellions – where civil disobedience is an important ingredient – is a strategy for the creation of  ‘human security’ and enables the vision of sustainable futures in Sábme – the land of Sámi.

  • 30. Öhman, May-Britt
    Kidatu vattenkraftverk i Tanzania: vatten och elektricitet från kolonialtid till biståndsepok2003Book (Other academic)
  • 31. Öhman, May-Britt
    Kidatu vattenkraftverk i Tanzania: vatten och elektricitet från kolonialtid till biståndsepok2004In: Artefakter: industrin, vetenskapen och de tekniska nätverken / [ed] Sven Widmalm, Hjalmar Fors, Hedemora: Gidlunds förlag, 2004, Vol. S. 61-116 : ill., p. 61-116Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research. Samelands fria universitet.
    Kolonisationen, rasismen och intergenerationella trauman: Analys, reflektioner och förslag utifrån ett skriande behov av samiskLEDD forskning och undervisning2017In: Uppsala mitt i Sápmi – Sábme – Saepmie II: En supradisciplinär antologi härrörande från vårsymposium organiserat av Uppsam –Föreningen for samiskrelaterad forskning i Uppsala, Uppsala universitet, 28–29 april 2014 / [ed] May-Britt Öhman, Cecilia Hedlund, Gunilla Larsson, Uppsala: Uppsam - föreningen för samiskrelaterad forskning i Uppsala , 2017, p. 99-113Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I argue that there is a desperate need of Sámi LED research and education. I discuss Swedenand Swedish academia from a decolonial perspective. The question regarding Sámi representationin academia – in research and education – or rather the void of representation and its consequences isdiscussed along with the colonial scientific paradigm of continued exploitation. The article ends with a sketchof a Manifesto for Sámi related and Sámi led research. The article is based on my own experiences andconversations with others in Swedish and international academia, Indigenous scholars and activists, as wellas interviews and conversations from 2004 and until today. Methodological and theoretical approaches aretaken from Indigenous Methodologies/Theories/Studies, Feminist Technoscience and a historical researchtradition called “ego-histoire”.

  • 33.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Centre for Multidisciplinary Studies on Racism. LTU history.
    Land Based Knowledge and Indigenous Feminist Technoscience promoting actual innovative technical designs2019In: NORA conference 2019, May 22-24: Border Regimes, Territorial Discourses and Feminist Politics, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing call for countering climate change along with increasing demands for so called “environmentally friendly” – “renewable” - energy production modes continues and increases the dispossession of Indigenous (including Sámi) peoples from our traditional lands and waters.

    What is commonly referred to as “environmental friendly” technoscientific language and imagery continue to shape and reflect racist power relations which favor the colonial nation states and dis-favor/abuses/displaces Indigenous rights and peoples. While challenging this rhetoric is important, another important task is to enter into the very technologies and propose solutions regarding design and development.

    I will elaborate on the potentials and possibilities of Sámi land based knowledge as a basis for innovative designs of energy production technologies, in collaboration with the field of fluid mechanics.

    Current “renewable” energy productions modes are in fact actually major environmental destructors and are outdated designs: Nuclear power plants are but steam engines, a billion times more environmentally hazardous systems. Design of the current windpower plants gigantic windmills, demanding immense natural resources for their construction while claiming massive areas to be erected and cause the death of whales, insects, bats and birds. Current designs of hydropower kill fish and destroy entire bio systems.

    Departing from Sámi /Indigenous Feminist Technoscience, this paper engages with the socio-material, innovative thoughts within fluid mechanics and discusses Sámi perspectives and proposals for sustainable and non-colonial non-racist energy production and consumption - for a good life for all, humans and non-humans and forms part of a research proposal to the Swedish research council.

  • 34. Öhman, May-Britt
    On visible places and invisible peoples in Sweden and in Tanzania2005In: African water histories: transdisciplinary discourses / [ed] Tempelhoff, Johann W. N., Vanderbijlpark, South Africa: Vaal Triangle Faculty, North-West University , 2005, p. 185-224Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Places and peoples: Sámi feminist technoscience and supradisciplinary research methods2017In: Sources and Methods inIndigenous Studies: Routledge Guides to Using Historical Sources / [ed] Jean M O'Brien ; Chris Andersen, New York: Routledge , 2017, p. 152-159Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Remissvar avseende Vattenverksamhetsutredningens slutbetänkande”I vått och torrt – förslag till ändrade vattenrättsliga regler” SOU 2014:35, Remiss 2014-06-16, M2014/1451/Nm2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 37.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Some perspectives from Sápmi as a Sámi and a scholar: Opening Plenary Panel Session at COCE 20132013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Supradisciplinary conversations on security, safety and resilience in the river valleys of Sábme – land of the Sámi2015In: Community-based Science in the Arctic: UCI Program on Arctic Governance with session on Community-Based Science in the Arctic- 1/30 and 1/31 2015, UC Irvine: Youtube , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Video link of presentation January 31st, 2015. Photos and videos are approved of those that are on the images/videos. All rights reserved! For any kind of publishing beyond this link, please contact may-britt.ohman@gender.uu.se.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZsLK6Avr0FY

    Conference link: http://newkirkcenter.uci.edu/2015/01/

    Supradisciplinary conversations on security, safety and resilience in the river valleys of Sábme – land of the Sámi

     

    Since 2008 I combine the study of the (perceived) control of rivers through hydropower and the impacts of the hydropower exploitations during the 20th century within Sábme, the land of the indigenous Sámi people.

    I apply a methodology which I refer to as supradisciplinarity. My own academic field being History of Science and Technology, the method involves collaboration with different academic disciplines, inviting co-researchers from other academic disciplines; amongst other water resource management, political science, and archeology. Furthermore, I integrate knowledges and people outside academia. This approach goes along with the argument by scholar Haraway, about “situated knowledges” and “partial perspectives” in regard to the production of scientific knowledge.[1]  In my interpretation, it also includes the necessity for me as a researcher, and Sámi, to take a stance and not pretend to be “neutral” in front of colonial destructive natural resource exploitation of Indigenous Peoples water- and landscapes. I will describe parts of this work, and the challenges it involves, along with the important work of healing that I find equally important.

    [1] Donna Haraway, ”Situated knowledges: The Science question in Feminism and the privilege of partial perspective”, Haraway Simians, Cyborgs and Women: The reinvention of Nature (New York, Routledge, 1991), 183-201.

     

  • 39.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Institut d' Études Politiques de Paris .
    Suède1998In: Les Partis Politiques En Europe de L'Ouest / [ed] Guy Hermet, Julian Thomas Hottinger, Daniel-Louis Seiler, Paris: Economica , 1998, p. 427-445Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    "Sverige hjälper": att fostra svenska folket till medvetenhet om sin egen storhet och andras litenhet2008In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, Vol. 2008:1, s. 59-76Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    ‘Sweden Helps’: Efforts to Formulate the White Man’s Burden for the Wealthy and Modern Swede2010In: Kult 7 - Special Issue. Nordic Colonial Mind, ISSN 1904-1594, Vol. 7, p. 122-142Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Dept. of History of Science and Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.
    Taming exotic beauties: Swedish hydropower constructions in Tanzania in the era of development assistance, 1960s-1990s2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyses the history of a large hydroelectric scheme – the Great Ruaha power project in Tanzania. The objective is to establish why and how this specific scheme came about, and as part of this to identify the key actors involved in the decision-making process, including the ideological contexts within which they acted. Although the Tanzanian actors and the World Bank (IBRD) are discussed, main focus is on the Swedish actors on project level.Kidatu, the first phase of the Great Ruaha power project (constructed between1970-1975), became the first large-scale hydropower station in Tanzania. As such, it paved the way for Tanzanian entrance into the Big Dam Era and significant changes within the Tanzanian landscape. As well as the dry river bed at Kidatu, and the small reservoir that precedes it, the Great Ruaha power project also involved the creation of a huge artificial lake, the Mtera reservoir. The Kidatu hydropower station was the first large undertaking within Swedish bilateral aid, and implied the takeover of control of hydropower construction in Tanzania by Swedish enterprises, replacing the enterprises of the former colonial power. A hydropower plant is a complex technoscientific artefact. The construction of a hydropower plant is preceded by a large number of technological choices, scientific prestudies and estimations of costs and revenues. A hydropower plant is also a complex social creation, and is as such filled with social actors engaged in conflicts, compromises and power structures. The decision to construct Kidatu hydropower station was a result of negotiations and activities within what is called “development assistance”. This brings in yet another dimension, the political one, involving export and import of technology, foreign capital, and foreign influence in decision-making processes, as well as ideas about how to bring development and progress to a people supposed to be living in “poverty and misery”. The study is divided into three main parts. The first part analyses the context of Swedish development assistance in the support to the construction of hydropower plants. This part discusses Swedish state-supported hydropower exploitation of indigenous people’s territory within Sweden’s borders in the 20th century and the background of Swedish development assistance, from the 1950s to the early 1960s. The second part analyses the event of Swedish development assistance entering Tanzania and the Great Ruaha power project, with the main focus being on the period 1965 – 1970. The third part is an analysis of the technoscientific basis for the decisions taken to implement the Great Ruaha hydropower scheme. Main focus is on the period 1969-1974, discussed against the backdrop of precolonial and colonial studies. While focus is on the 1960s and 1970s, in both part two and three events in the 1980s and 1990s are discussed. The study shows that although Sweden was not a colonial power in Tanzania, colonial imagery, and relations to the colonial era, as well as Sweden’s background of internal colonialisation, exerted an influence on the decision-making process and the actors involved in the Great Ruaha power project.The study is mainly based on archival sources, complemented with oral sources from Tanzania and Sweden. Recognizing the complexity of large-scale hydropower and the attempts to control watercourses that large scale hydropower necessitates, in the specific context of decolonisation and development assistance that the decision-making process behind the Great Ruaha hydropower scheme reveals, the analysis of the actors involved is based on feminist and postcolonial perspectives.

  • 43.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Techno fantasies of a Sámi cyborg: re-claiming Sámi body-, land- and waterscapes after a century of colonial exploitations in Sápmi2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Techno fantasies of a Sámi cyborg: re-claiming Sámi body-, land- and waterscapes after a century of colonial exploitations in Sápmi

    The state-led hydropower constructions, along with other natural resource exploitations, conducted during the last century within the Sámi traditional territory – Sápmi – in Sweden have seriously disrupted culture, economy and internal relations between inhabitants.  Departing from ongoing research and earlier literature, this paper presents a critical analysis of the designs of modern large scale technical systems leading to the displacement of indigenous traditional practices, knowledges and cultures. It draws particularly on feminist technoscience approaches, including Donna Haraway and Sandra Harding’s notions of feminist objectivity that seek to make objectivity non-synonymous with neutrality and distance. Rather both scholars and their followers suggest clear analyses of how knowledge production is situated within particular histories and in closer relation to the needs and desires of some in our societies, often western men. In addition, methods of feminist objectivity would suggest increasing the array of standpoints from which knowledge is produced in order to maximize or produce “strong objectivity.” In this paper the author, herself being Sámi, discusses how her own heritage – in terms of situated knowledges and understandings -  form part of her academic research in regard to these designs and their impacts on Sámi culture and contexts. The paper is based on research within the project “Situated perspectives on the hydropower exploitation in Sápmi: Swedish technological expansion in the 20th century and its impact on the indigenous population” (Swedish Research Council, 2009-2010) and is to be published within the forthcoming anthology “Ill-disciplined Gender: Nature/Culture Transgressive encounters”, the Centre for Gender Research, Uppsala University.

  • 44.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    TechnoVisions of a Sámi cyborg: Re-claiming Sámi body-, land- and waterscapes after a century of colonial exploitations in Sábme2016In: Illdisciplined Gender: Engaging Questions of Nature/Culture and Transgressive Encounters / [ed] Bull, Jacob; Fahlgren, Margaretha, Rotterdam: Springer , 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Vattenregleringar på liv och död i Lule älv: Postkoloniala och feministiska teknovetenskapliga perspektiv2012In: Uppsala mitt i Sápmi: Rapport från ett symposium arrangerat av Föreningen för samiskrelateradforskning i Uppsala, Upplandsmuseet 4–5 maj 2011 / [ed] Håkan Tunón, Märit Frändén, Carl-Gösta Ojala & May-Britt Öhman, Uppsala: Naptek, Centrum för biologisk mångfald , 2012, p. 28-34Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the title “Water regulations on life and death in the Lule River: Postcolonial and feminist technoscience perspectives” this article describes parts of my work within my postdoctoral research as well as the current project DAMMED: Security, Risk and Resilience around the Dams of Sub Arctica. (Swedish Research Council 2009–10 & 2010–12). I draw on examples from my study of the Lule River valley in Sápmi (Sweden), displaying voices by local inhabitants – mainly Sámi - on the one hand, and actors within the Swedish hydropower sector, on the other. I discuss the apparent conflicts over the usage of the water courses, currently and historically,between the local inhabitants – and the state powercompany, Vattenfall, and how these conflicts can be read from a context of earlier and ongoing colonization of Sápmi by the Swedish state. In particular I addressthe fatal dangers that local inhabitants face on, along,and below the hydropower plants and reservoirs.

  • 46.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Válkav: Färdvägar för att vända blicken och skapa alternativ2015In: Vardagens antirasism : om rörelsens villkor och framväxt i Sverige / [ed] Groglopo, Adrián; Allelin, Majsa; Mulinari, Diana; Diaz, Carlos, Stockholm: Antirasistiska akademin , 2015Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Writing and teaching to re-claim and heal my own Sámi body and our Sámi history, culture, traditions and rights to live2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Writing and teaching to re-claim and heal my own Sámi body and our Sámi history, culture, traditions and rights to live

     

     

    Sábme, the land of the Sámi, stretches across the borders of the nation states of Sweden, Norway, Finland and Russia. Sábme has been inhabited by the Sámi people for as long as any human can remember. There are major Sámi languages which are totally different to those of the Nation states, nine different major Sámi languages. Until early 16th century, the Sámi was part of the Swedish elite, and Swedish regional chiefs – kings – would be proud to claim Sámi heritage. With the establishment of the modern Swedish nation state in the 1520s Sábme became a territory to conquer and control, as the Sámi people. However, the major and most extensive industrial colonization started from late 19th century. From this point racism, amongst other racial biology projects with skull and body measurements  - went hand in hand with aggressive industrial colonization.

    The colonization and racist projects have caused severe traumas in the Sámi community. Furthermore our Sámi history, culture and tradition being completely invisibilised within Swedish – and Nordic – education systems. We as Sámi deal with the consequences of this earlier and ongoing situation, both as a community and individuals.

    The paper deals with all these aspects, the traumas of racism and colonization in the past as well as the current reinforced industrial colonization through amongst other mining projects – as they cannot be separated from how I today, as Sámi and academic and feminist activist, work with healing and reclaiming my, our, rights to live as Sámi, within our traditional territories. Placing myself and my family history at the center of the study, the paper draws upon feminist technoscience approaches, epistemology and methodologies as well as Indigenous, Sámi, methodologies and thinking.

    .

  • 48.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research. History, Dept of economics, technology and social sciences, Luleå university of technology.
    Yttrande: Remiss av promemoria vattenmiljö och vattenkraft Diarienummer: M2017/01639/R Sammanfattning2017Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Sammanfattning

    Jag instämmer i stort i promemorians förslag om uppdatering till moderna miljövillkor för vattenkraftselproduktion och dess genomförande.Dock saknas vissa aspekter som behöver täckas in bättre genom att särskilt uppmärksammas, förslagsvis genom den föreslagna nationella planen och genom att berörda grupper, och inte enbart myndigheter här ges tillfälle att yttra sig samt att det bör anslås medel till organisationer och forskningsinsatser för förstärkt uppföljning.Däribland bör samiska organisationer och Sametinget, samt bygdeföreningar och andra berörda föreningar vid reglerade vattendrag och nedströms dammar ges anslag för att kunna bevaka frågeställningarna på ett kontinuerligt sätt.

    Myndigheter – kommuner och länsstyrelser – saknar i stor utsträckning resurser för nödvändig uppföljning, vilket behöver ses över. Dessutom är det nödvändigt att bygga upp stärkt kompetens i dessa frågor genom såväl forskning som kontinuerlig informationsförmedling och uppdatering. För detta krävs särskilda anslag och insatser, med samhällsvetenskapliga och sociotekniska perspektiv som bygger på redan genomförd forskning samt fortsatta forskningsinsatser.Yttrandet bygger på ett flertal forskningsprojekt (se uppställning i slutet av dokumentet) utförda vid Uppsala universitet, Umeå universitet och Luleå tekniska universitet om dammsäkerhet – såväl allmänhetens säkerhet vid dammar, som säkerhetsfrågor i förhållande till dammbrott – dess förebyggande samt förberedelser för situationer med dammbrott. Aspekterna ifråga som ytterligare behöver uppmärksammas är följande:

    1. Människors hälsa och säkerhet vid normal drift, dvs ej vid dammbrott eller risk för dammbrott – även kallat ”allmänhetens säkerhet vid dammar” – ”public safety around dams”.

    2. Djurs hälsa och säkerhet vid normal drift, dvs ej vid dammbrott eller risk för dammbrott.

    3. Avsaknad av perspektiv på ansvarsfördelning för och säkerhetsåtgärder när två aktörer som båda använder sig samma älv och har dammar som innebär risker för människors hälsa samt miljön, dvs vattenkraftsföretag och gruvföretag i samma älvsystem.

    4. Avsaknad av perspektiv på nedströms konsekvenser och förberedelser för dammbrott i stora dammar utifrån sociotekniska hänsynstaganden.

  • 49.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Åvdåsvásstádus: Ansvar, avkolonialisering, helande: Ett symposium om rasbiologi, rasism, avbildade samer, samiskakvarlevor och vägar till upprättelse och självförtroende 21- 23 januari 2015, Uppsala2015Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Videofilmade föredrag och diskussioner vid symposiet "Åvdåsvásstádus: Ansvar, avkolonialisering, helande. Ett symposium om rasbiologi, rasism, avbildade samer, samiskakvarlevor och vägar till upprättelse och självförtroende 21- 23 januari 2015, Uppsala (den 22a januari).

    Förmiddagssession: Moderator: Gunilla Larsson, Teknovetenskapliga forskargruppen, Centrum för Genusvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.

    09.00 Öppningsjojk, Ylva Gustafsson 09.05 Stefan Mikaelsson, Sametingets ordförande och Teknovetenskapliga forskargruppen, Centrum för Genusvetenskap (CfG): Öppnande och inledningsanförande ”Rahpat, Báze dearvan - Mana Dearvan: Bli kvar med hälsan och gå med hälsan: Perspektiv på försoningsprocesser för två folk i samma nationalstat där stigarna blivit trängre 09.20 Välkomnanden o öppningsanföranden: Malin Ah-King, Centrum för Genusvetenskap; Satu Gröndahl, NAMIS, Hugo Valentin Centrum; NAPTEK, Agneta Silversparf, Silbonah Samesijdda, Carola Grahn, Sameföreningen i Stockholm 09.30 Peter Rodhe, SameÄtnam

    09.40 May-Britt Öhman Tuohea Rim, UPPSAM, Teknovetenskapliga forskargruppen, CfG, och Mind and Nature ” Rievsak sjläsjkoj ja Biekkaid Biellocizáš” Dalripans skratt, stormsparven och örnen på lugna uppåtvindar : Feministiska teknovetenskapliga och kritiska urfolksstudie- perspektiv på den samiska Förintelsen, dekolonisering och helande” 09.50-09.55 Jojkpaus.

    09.55-11.05 Maja Hagerman, historiker, vetenskapsjournalist och filmmakare: ” Filmen och boken om Herman Lundborg, chef för Rasbiologiska institutet: Etik, möjligheter och nödvändigheter” (Presentation och diskussion)

    11.05- 11.10 Introduktion – samiska markrättigheter och rasbiologi (May-Britt Öhman - Lars-Anders Baer, jurist, Sametingspolitiker och ordförande Luokta Mavas sameby) skulle ha medverkat men kan ej delta pga renskiljning.

    11.10-11.30 Bertil Bengtsson, Professor i civilrätt, ”Skattefjällsmålet och diskrimineringsfrågan”

    13.10-15.00 Eftermiddagssession del 1: Moderator: Malin Ah-King, Centrum för Genusvetenskap, Uppsala universitet 13.10- 13.15 Öppen jojkscen. 13.15-15.00 Torsdagsseminarium öppet för allmänheten, arr. Centrum för Genusvetenskap, Aulan, Universitetshuset, Biskopsgatan 3. Katarina Pirak Sikku, konstnär ” Vi var generade över att vara lappar. Det var fult.”: Elsas vittnesmål om Rasbiologiska Institutets undersökningar av samiska barn vid nomadskolan i Vaikijaur, Jokkmokk” Kommentator: Ylva Gustafsson Torsdagsseminariets upplägg är presentation ca 30 minuter, därefter kommentators frågor med diskussion ca 15 minuter, och slutligen allmän diskussion ca 45 minuter.

    15.30-17.30 Eftermiddagssession del två: Moderator/Samtalsledare: Stefan Mikaelsson, Sametingets ordförande och Teknovetenskapliga forskargruppen, Centrum för Genusvetenskap, Uppsala universitet 15.30-16.00 Gunnar Hauk Gjengset "Med skjeletter i skapet", en kort oversikt over hvordan norsk medisinsk forskning etter press i mer enn 150 år, endelig måtte gi fra seg skjelettrester etter forskning på samefolket, og især hodeskallene etter lederne av Kautokeino-opprøret i 1852” 16.00-16.10 Astri Dankert; ”En samisk dekoloniseringsprosess: Melankoli, tap og forsoning” 16.10-16.20 Anne Heith, Institutionen för kultur- och medievetenskaper, Umeå universitet ”EN ANNAN HISTORIA: Åtta samiska konstnärer på Bildmuseet i Umeå under kulturhuvudstadsåret” 16.20-16.45 Korta presentationer - reflektioner och funderingar: Lilian Mikaelsson, SameÄtnam; Lena Kroik, Svenska Samernas Riksförbund (SSR) o Glesbygdsmedicinskt centrum i Storuman; Nils-Axel Heikka (medlem i QueerSámit); Tomas Cramér; Rikard Engblom 16.45 -17.30 Paneldiskussion och allmän diskussion med deltagarna Företrädare för medarrangörer, Sametinget, samiska organisationer, Uppsala universitet mfl

  • 50.
    Öhman, May-Britt
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Blomqvist, Åsa
    Colbengtson, Tomas
    Dankertsen, Astri
    Forsgren, Eva
    Tuorda, Tor L.
    Gustafsson, Ylva
    Kristoffersson, Mathias
    Larsson, Gunilla
    Lindström, Li
    Marakatt, Moa-Sara
    Mikaelsson, Stefan
    Rodhe, Peter
    Sandberg McGuinne, Johan
    Aslaksen Somby, Niillas
    Storfjell, Troy
    Silversparf, Agneta
    Lundberg Tuorda, Tor
    Wajstedt, Liselotte
    Samer talar för sig själva -behovet av strategiska satsningar för inkludering av och satsning på samiska röster, erfarenheter och vetenskaplig kompetens: synpunkter inför arbetet med forskningspropositionen2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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