uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 26 of 26
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Aphasia and Communication in Everyday Life: Experiences of persons with aphasia, significant others, and speech-language pathologists2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this thesis were to describe the experiences of persons with aphasia and their significant others of their conversations and use of communication strategies, examine current practice of family-oriented speech-language pathology (SLP) services, and test a family-oriented intervention in the early phase of rehabilitation.

    The persons with aphasia valued having conversations despite perceiving their aphasia as a serious social disability. They acknowledged the importance of the communication partners’ knowledge and understanding of aphasia and their use of supporting conversation strategies. Their own use of communication strategies varied considerably. The persons with aphasia longed to regain language ability and to be active participants in society.

    A majority of the significant others perceived their conversations with the person with aphasia as being less stimulating and enjoyable than conversations before stroke onset. Aphasia was considered a serious problem. The significant others took on increased communicative responsibility, where two thirds had changed their communicative behaviour to facilitate conversations. Type and severity of aphasia were especially related to the communicative experiences of the significant others and their motivation to be involved in SLP services.

    Thirty percent of the speech-language pathologists worked with people with aphasia and typically met with their families. They considered the involvement of significant others in SLP services as very important, especially in providing information about aphasia and communication partner training (CPT). However, involvement of significant others was restricted because of a time shortage and perceived limited skills and knowledge. In addition, there were national differences regarding aphasia rehabilitation services.

    The intervention consisted of three sessions directed to significant others (primarily emotional support and information) and three directed to the dyads (a person with aphasia and a significant other) (primarily CPT). All six participants (three dyads) felt that their knowledge and understanding of aphasia had increased and that their conversations had improved. These improvements were also evident to some extent with formal assessments.

    These results suggest the following: CPT should be an integral part of SLP services, national clinical guidelines are needed, and further education of speech-language pathologists and implementation of new knowledge into clinical practice requires consideration.

    List of papers
    1. Communication difficulties and use of communication strategies: from the perspective of individuals with aphasia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Communication difficulties and use of communication strategies: from the perspective of individuals with aphasia
    2012 (English)In: International journal of language and communication disorders, ISSN 1368-2822, E-ISSN 1460-6984, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 144-155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    To enhance communicative ability and thereby the possibility of increased participation of persons with aphasia, the use of communication strategies has been proposed. However, little is known about how persons with aphasia experience having conversations and how they perceive their own and their conversation partner's use of communication strategies.

    Aims:

    To explore how people with aphasia experience having conversations, how they handle communication difficulties, and how they perceive their own and their communication partners’ use of communication strategies.

    Methods & Procedures:

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with four women and seven men with chronic aphasia (n = 11). Interviews were video-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed by qualitative content analysis.

    Outcomes & Results:

    Informants appreciated having conversations despite the fact that they perceived their aphasia as a serious hindrance. Different factors related to the informants, the conversation partners, the conversation itself and the physical environment were perceived to impact on conversations. The importance of the communication partners’ knowledge and understanding of aphasia and their use of supporting conversation strategies were acknowledged by the informants. The informants’ views on using communication aid devices or strategies varied considerably. Four themes that characterized the informants’ narratives were: loss and frustration, fear and uncertainty, shared responsibility based on knowledge, and longing for the past or moving forward.

    Conclusions & Implications:

    The informants longed to regain their former language ability and role as an active participant in society. To enhance participation of persons with aphasia, it is suggested that communication partner training should be an important and integral part of aphasia rehabilitation. Important elements of such training are reflecting on communication behaviours, training in real-life situations, and acknowledging each individual's special needs and preferences. To deal with the consequences of aphasia, counselling and psychological support may be needed.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-159493 (URN)10.1111/j.1460-6984.2011.00089.x (DOI)000300772000003 ()
    Available from: 2011-10-03 Created: 2011-10-03 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
    2. Communication changes and SLP-services according to significant others of persons with aphasia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Communication changes and SLP-services according to significant others of persons with aphasia
    2012 (English)In: Aphasiology, ISSN 0268-7038, E-ISSN 1464-5041, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 1005-1028Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Significant others are important to persons with aphasia. For several reasons they should be involved in speech-language pathology (SLP) services, including acquiring facilitating communicative strategies and receiving support. In order to further adapt SLP services there is a need to know the perceptions and views of the significant others. Little is known about how they perceive changes in communication as well as received SLP services and in what way they want to be involved in these services.

    Aims: The study aimed to investigate which communicative changes significant others of persons with aphasia had experienced after a stroke event and to what extent these changes were experienced. A further aim was to describe the significant others’ experiences of SLP services and their motivation to participate in these services. Finally, the significant others’ experiences were compared in terms of sex, age, type of relationship, time since stroke onset, and type and severity of aphasia.

    Methods & Procedures: An 80-item study-specific questionnaire was answered by 173 significant others of persons with aphasia living throughout Sweden (response rate 69%). Of these, 33% were male and 67% female. Mean age was 64.2 years (range 33–87 years) and 85.5% of the participants were a cohabiting partner to a person with aphasia.

    Outcomes & Results: A total of 64% of participants perceived their conversations as being less stimulating and enjoyable compared with conversations before stroke onset. Aphasia was considered a substantial or very substantial problem by 64%. The participants took on an increased communicative responsibility, and 70% had changed their communicative behaviour in order to facilitate conversations. A total of 75% (n = 130) had met with the SLP of the person with aphasia. Of those, 63% perceived their own support from SLP services to be adequate; 87% considered language ability training as the most important SLP service. Type and severity of aphasia were especially related to the communicative experiences of the participants and their motivation to be involved in SLP services.

    Conclusions: The substantial decrease from pre- to post-stroke regarding enjoyment and meaningfulness of conversations suggests the need to further improve SLP services in order to help the people in question communicate at an optimal level. We suggest that clinicians should put more emphasis on explaining the benefits and availability of different kinds of aphasia rehabilitation services, such as functional communication training and communication partner training in addition to language ability training.

    Keywords
    Aphasia, Significant others, Interpersonal communication, Communication strategies, Speech-language pathology services
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-170408 (URN)10.1080/02687038.2012.671927 (DOI)000306607000003 ()
    Available from: 2012-03-12 Created: 2012-03-12 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    3. Working with families of persons with aphasia: a survey of Swedish speech and language pathologists
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Working with families of persons with aphasia: a survey of Swedish speech and language pathologists
    2011 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 51-62Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose:The overall aim was to investigate how speech and language pathologists (SLPs), in Sweden are working with people with aphasia and their families and what their professional experiences are.

    Method:A cross-sectional study with a descriptive and comparative design. An 84-item study-specific questionnaire was sent to all Swedish SLPs, affiliated to SLOF (the Swedish professional association and trade union).

    Results:The response rate was 72.5% (n = 758). Thirty per cent worked with people with aphasia and typically met with their families. The participants considered the involvement of families as very important, especially concerning providing information of aphasia and training of communication strategies. However, involvement of families was limited due to a shortage of time, but also to perceived limited skill and knowledge.

    Conclusions:There was an evident discrepancy between what the participants claimed to be an important part of their work, and their actual practice. It is suggested that to facilitate family intervention, this should be explicitly expressed in both local and national guidelines. The content of the SLP education, and the need of further education and implementation of new knowledge into clinical practice also requires consideration.

    Keywords
    Aphasia services, speech-language pathology, family
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-134771 (URN)10.3109/09638288.2010.486465 (DOI)000284695100006 ()20455706 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2010-12-01 Created: 2010-12-01 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    4. A multiple-case study of a family-oriented intervention practice in the early rehabilitation phase of persons with aphasia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A multiple-case study of a family-oriented intervention practice in the early rehabilitation phase of persons with aphasia
    2013 (English)In: Aphasiology, ISSN 0268-7038, E-ISSN 1464-5041, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 201-226Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Having a family member with aphasia severely affects the everyday life of the significant others, resulting in their need for support and information. Family-oriented intervention programmes typically consist of support, information, and skill training, such as communication partner training (CPT). However, because of time constraints and perceived lack of skills and routines, such programmes, especially CPT, are not common practice among speech-language pathologists (SLPs).

    Aims:

    To design and evaluate an early family-oriented intervention of persons with stroke-induced moderate to severe aphasia and their significant others in dyads. The intervention was designed to be flexible to meet the needs of each participant, to emotionally support the significant others and supply them with information needed, to include CPT that is easy to learn and conduct for SLPs, and to be able to provide CPT when the persons with aphasia still have access to SLP services.

    Methods & Procedures:

    An evaluative multiple-case study, involving three dyads, was conducted no more than 2 months after the onset of aphasia. The intervention consisted of six sessions: three sessions directed to the significant other (primarily support and information) and three to the dyad (primarily CPT). The intervention was evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively based on video recordings of conversations and self-assessment questionnaires.

    Outcomes & Results:

    The importance of emotional support as well as information about stroke/aphasia was clearly acknowledged, especially by the significant others. All significant others perceived increased knowledge and understanding of aphasia and related issues.

    Communicative skills (as manifested in the video recordings) showed improvements from pre- to post-intervention.

    Conclusions:

    The results corroborate the need for individualised and flexible family-oriented SLP services that are broad in content. Furthermore, the results support the early initiation of such services with recurrent contact. The usefulness of CPT this early in the rehabilitation process was indicated but is yet to be proved.

    Keywords
    aphasia, significant others, interpersonal communication, communication strategies, communication partner training, speech-language pathology services
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Research subject
    Medical Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-173128 (URN)10.1080/02687038.2012.744808 (DOI)000316048700005 ()
    Available from: 2012-04-19 Created: 2012-04-19 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
  • 2.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Aphasia: as experienced by significant others2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Enheten för logopedi och foniatri, Karolinska Institutet..
    Hur är det att leva med en person som får afasi "mitt i livet"?2006Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 4.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Habilitation and Disability.
    Kommunikation vid afasi – finns det några hinder och var finns de i så fall?2010In: FORSKNING PÅGÅR...om funktionshinder: Miljö, människa eller mitt emellan?, Uppsala, 20 april,  2010, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Habilitation and Disability.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Habilitation and Disability.
    Beskrivning av den svenska logopedkårens sammansättning samt av "afasilogopeders" arbetsmässiga förutsättningar - resultat från en enkätstudie2011In: Logopednytt, ISSN 1102-500X, no 2, p. 14-19Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Communication aid devices in Swedish aphasia rehabilitation: the experiences of speech-language pathologists2011In: 3rd Nordic Aphasia Conference, 2011, Helsinki, Finland: Aphasia rehabilitation today and in the future, Helsinki, Finland, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Communication difficulties and use of communication strategies: from the perspective of individuals with aphasia2012In: International journal of language and communication disorders, ISSN 1368-2822, E-ISSN 1460-6984, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 144-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    To enhance communicative ability and thereby the possibility of increased participation of persons with aphasia, the use of communication strategies has been proposed. However, little is known about how persons with aphasia experience having conversations and how they perceive their own and their conversation partner's use of communication strategies.

    Aims:

    To explore how people with aphasia experience having conversations, how they handle communication difficulties, and how they perceive their own and their communication partners’ use of communication strategies.

    Methods & Procedures:

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with four women and seven men with chronic aphasia (n = 11). Interviews were video-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed by qualitative content analysis.

    Outcomes & Results:

    Informants appreciated having conversations despite the fact that they perceived their aphasia as a serious hindrance. Different factors related to the informants, the conversation partners, the conversation itself and the physical environment were perceived to impact on conversations. The importance of the communication partners’ knowledge and understanding of aphasia and their use of supporting conversation strategies were acknowledged by the informants. The informants’ views on using communication aid devices or strategies varied considerably. Four themes that characterized the informants’ narratives were: loss and frustration, fear and uncertainty, shared responsibility based on knowledge, and longing for the past or moving forward.

    Conclusions & Implications:

    The informants longed to regain their former language ability and role as an active participant in society. To enhance participation of persons with aphasia, it is suggested that communication partner training should be an important and integral part of aphasia rehabilitation. Important elements of such training are reflecting on communication behaviours, training in real-life situations, and acknowledging each individual's special needs and preferences. To deal with the consequences of aphasia, counselling and psychological support may be needed.

  • 8.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Habilitation and Disability.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Habilitation and Disability.
    How do we work with persons with aphasia and their relatives?: Preliminary results from a survey of Swedish speech and language pathologists2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Habilitation and Disability.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Habilitation and Disability.
    Svenska logopeders insatser till personer med afasi2011In: Logopednytt, ISSN 1102-500X, no 3, p. 18-23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Habilitation and Disability.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Habilitation and Disability.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Habilitation and Disability.
    Working with families of persons with aphasia: a survey of Swedish speech and language pathologists2011In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 51-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose:The overall aim was to investigate how speech and language pathologists (SLPs), in Sweden are working with people with aphasia and their families and what their professional experiences are.

    Method:A cross-sectional study with a descriptive and comparative design. An 84-item study-specific questionnaire was sent to all Swedish SLPs, affiliated to SLOF (the Swedish professional association and trade union).

    Results:The response rate was 72.5% (n = 758). Thirty per cent worked with people with aphasia and typically met with their families. The participants considered the involvement of families as very important, especially concerning providing information of aphasia and training of communication strategies. However, involvement of families was limited due to a shortage of time, but also to perceived limited skill and knowledge.

    Conclusions:There was an evident discrepancy between what the participants claimed to be an important part of their work, and their actual practice. It is suggested that to facilitate family intervention, this should be explicitly expressed in both local and national guidelines. The content of the SLP education, and the need of further education and implementation of new knowledge into clinical practice also requires consideration.

  • 11.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Östberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    A multiple-case study of a family-oriented intervention practice in the early rehabilitation phase of persons with aphasia2013In: Aphasiology, ISSN 0268-7038, E-ISSN 1464-5041, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 201-226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Having a family member with aphasia severely affects the everyday life of the significant others, resulting in their need for support and information. Family-oriented intervention programmes typically consist of support, information, and skill training, such as communication partner training (CPT). However, because of time constraints and perceived lack of skills and routines, such programmes, especially CPT, are not common practice among speech-language pathologists (SLPs).

    Aims:

    To design and evaluate an early family-oriented intervention of persons with stroke-induced moderate to severe aphasia and their significant others in dyads. The intervention was designed to be flexible to meet the needs of each participant, to emotionally support the significant others and supply them with information needed, to include CPT that is easy to learn and conduct for SLPs, and to be able to provide CPT when the persons with aphasia still have access to SLP services.

    Methods & Procedures:

    An evaluative multiple-case study, involving three dyads, was conducted no more than 2 months after the onset of aphasia. The intervention consisted of six sessions: three sessions directed to the significant other (primarily support and information) and three to the dyad (primarily CPT). The intervention was evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively based on video recordings of conversations and self-assessment questionnaires.

    Outcomes & Results:

    The importance of emotional support as well as information about stroke/aphasia was clearly acknowledged, especially by the significant others. All significant others perceived increased knowledge and understanding of aphasia and related issues.

    Communicative skills (as manifested in the video recordings) showed improvements from pre- to post-intervention.

    Conclusions:

    The results corroborate the need for individualised and flexible family-oriented SLP services that are broad in content. Furthermore, the results support the early initiation of such services with recurrent contact. The usefulness of CPT this early in the rehabilitation process was indicated but is yet to be proved.

  • 12.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Östberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Communication changes and SLP-services according to significant others of persons with aphasia2012In: Aphasiology, ISSN 0268-7038, E-ISSN 1464-5041, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 1005-1028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Significant others are important to persons with aphasia. For several reasons they should be involved in speech-language pathology (SLP) services, including acquiring facilitating communicative strategies and receiving support. In order to further adapt SLP services there is a need to know the perceptions and views of the significant others. Little is known about how they perceive changes in communication as well as received SLP services and in what way they want to be involved in these services.

    Aims: The study aimed to investigate which communicative changes significant others of persons with aphasia had experienced after a stroke event and to what extent these changes were experienced. A further aim was to describe the significant others’ experiences of SLP services and their motivation to participate in these services. Finally, the significant others’ experiences were compared in terms of sex, age, type of relationship, time since stroke onset, and type and severity of aphasia.

    Methods & Procedures: An 80-item study-specific questionnaire was answered by 173 significant others of persons with aphasia living throughout Sweden (response rate 69%). Of these, 33% were male and 67% female. Mean age was 64.2 years (range 33–87 years) and 85.5% of the participants were a cohabiting partner to a person with aphasia.

    Outcomes & Results: A total of 64% of participants perceived their conversations as being less stimulating and enjoyable compared with conversations before stroke onset. Aphasia was considered a substantial or very substantial problem by 64%. The participants took on an increased communicative responsibility, and 70% had changed their communicative behaviour in order to facilitate conversations. A total of 75% (n = 130) had met with the SLP of the person with aphasia. Of those, 63% perceived their own support from SLP services to be adequate; 87% considered language ability training as the most important SLP service. Type and severity of aphasia were especially related to the communicative experiences of the participants and their motivation to be involved in SLP services.

    Conclusions: The substantial decrease from pre- to post-stroke regarding enjoyment and meaningfulness of conversations suggests the need to further improve SLP services in order to help the people in question communicate at an optimal level. We suggest that clinicians should put more emphasis on explaining the benefits and availability of different kinds of aphasia rehabilitation services, such as functional communication training and communication partner training in addition to language ability training.

  • 13.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Hartelius, Lena
    Institutionen för neurovetenskap och fysiologi, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Svensson, Per
    Språk, tal och kommunikation samt sväljning2015In: Rehabiliteringsmedicin: Teori och praktik / [ed] Jörgen Borg, Kristian Borg, Björn Gerdle, Katharina Stibrant Sunnerhagen, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2015, 1:1, p. 273-286Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Cruice, Madeline
    et al.
    Division of Language and Communication Science, School of Health Sciences, City University London, London, United Kingdom.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Isaksen, Jytte
    Department of Language and Communication, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Horton, Simon
    School of Health Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom.
    Reporting Interventions in Communication Partner Training: A Critical Review and Narrative Synthesis of the LiteratureIn: Aphasiology, ISSN 0268-7038, E-ISSN 1464-5041Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Gonzalez Lindh, Margareta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Jennische, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Koyi, Hirsh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Gavle Cent Hosp, Dept Resp Med, Gavle, Sweden.
    Prevalence of swallowing dysfunction screened in Swedish cohort of COPD patients2017In: The International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, ISSN 1176-9106, E-ISSN 1178-2005, Vol. 12, p. 331-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: COPD is a common problem associated with morbidity and mortality. COPD may also affect the dynamics and coordination of functions such as swallowing. A misdirected swallow may, in turn, result in the bolus entering the airway. A growing body of evidence suggests that a subgroup of people with COPD is prone to oropharyngeal dysphagia. The aim of this study was to evaluate swallowing dysfunction in patients with stable COPD and to determine the relation between signs and symptoms of swallowing dysfunction and lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second percent predicted). Methods: Fifty-one patients with COPD in a stable phase participated in a questionnaire survey, swallowing tests, and spirometry. A post-bronchodilator ratio of the forced expiratory volume in 1 second/best of forced vital capacity and vital capacity,0.7 was used to define COPD. Swallowing function was assessed by a questionnaire and two swallowing tests (water and cookie swallow tests). Results: Sixty-five percent of the patients reported subjective signs and symptoms of swallowing dysfunction in the questionnaire and 49% showed measurable ones in the swallowing tests. For the combined subjective and objective findings, 78% had a coexisting swallowing dysfunction. No significant difference was found between male and female patients. Conclusion: Swallowing function is affected in COPD patients with moderate to severe airflow limitation, and the signs and symptoms of this swallowing dysfunction were subjective, objective, or both.

  • 16.
    Gonzalez Lindh, Margareta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Koyi, Hirsh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Högman, Marieann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Bendrik, Regina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Lisspers, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Ställberg, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Prevalence of subjective swallowing dysfunction in patients with stable COPD: Results from the TIE-study2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Gonzalez Lindh, Margareta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Koyi, Hirsh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Högman, Marieann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Ställberg, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Bröms, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Swallowing dysfunction in COPD: Is it more related to burden of disease than lung function: Results from the TIE-study2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Gonzalez Lindh, Margareta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi. Centrum för klinisk forskning, Gävleborg.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Högman, Marieann
    Lisspers, Karin
    Ställberg, Björn
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Hirsch, Koyi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Prevalence of subjective swallowing dysfunction in patients with stable COPD: The TIE-study2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Isaksen, Jytte
    et al.
    aDepartment of Language and Communication, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Cruice, Madeline
    Division of Language and Communication Science, School of Health Sciences, City University London, London, United Kingdom.
    Horton, Simon
    School of Health Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK.
    Essential elements of communication partner training – can they be identified using the TIDieR checklist?2018In: Aphasiology, ISSN 0268-7038, E-ISSN 1464-5041, Vol. 32, no S1, p. 99-100Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Jennische, Margareta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Hartelius, Lena
    Institutionen för neurovetenskap och fysiologi, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Svensson, Per
    Språk och kommunikation, tal och sväljning2006In: Rehabiliteringsmedicin: Teori och praktik / [ed] Borg, Gerdle, Grimby, Stibrandt-Sunnerhagen, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2006, p. 219-231Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Lind, Marianne
    et al.
    University of Oslo, Norge; Statped, Norge.
    Fyndanis, Valantis
    University of Oslo, Norge.
    Balciuniene, Ingrida
    Bjekic, Jovana
    University of Belgrad, Serbien.
    Ceder, Klaudia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Gavarró, Anna
    Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spanien.
    Grohmann, Kleanthes K
    Haaland-Johansen, Line
    Jacquemot, Charlotte
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    Kambanaros, Maria
    Kovacevic, Melita
    Kuvac, Jelena
    University of Zagreb, Kroatien.
    Martínez-Ferreiro, Silvia
    University of Groningen, Nederländerna; University of Novi Sad, Serbien.
    Méndez-Orellana, Carolina
    Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile.
    Rofes, Adrìa
    Trinity College Dublin, Irland.
    Röste, Ingvild
    Hernández Sacristán, Carlos
    Universitat de Calència, Spanien.
    Salmons, Io
    Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spanien.
    Gram Simonsen, Hanne
    University of Oslo, Norge.
    Soroli, Efstathia
    Sör, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Varlokosta, Spyridola
    University of Athens, Grekland.
    Zakariás, Lilla
    University of Potsdam, Tyskland.
    Howard, David
    University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Storbritannien.
    Cross-linguistic adaptations of The Comprehensive Aphasia Test: Challenges and solutions2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Lohmander, Anette
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Hansson, Kristina
    Lunds universitet.
    Hartelius, Lena
    Institutionen för neurovetenskap och fysiologi, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Logopedi..
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköpings universitet.
    Schalling, Ellika
    Karolinska institutet.
    Södersten, Maria
    Karolinska institutet.
    Östberg, Per
    Institutionen för Klinisk vetenskap, Intervention och Teknik (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet.
    van Doorn, Jan
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Logopedi..
    Kommunikations- och sväljstörningar genom hela livet: ett logopediskt ståndpunktsdokument2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den forskning som bedrivs inom logopedi i Sverige idag spänner över ett brett spektrum av medfödda, utvecklingsrelaterade och förvärvade kommunikationsstörningar på grund av röst-, tal- och språksvårigheter samt sväljstörningar. Precis som i andra länder pågår en snabb utveckling både mot en breddning av det urval av områden som det forskas kring och ett ökat fokus på nationellt samarbete. Även om de framsteg som görs inom respektive fält kan mätas genom de forskningsrapporter som publiceras av respektive forskargrupper, finns det ett behov av att granska vilka forskningsinsatser som bedrivs jämte det demografiska sammanhanget. I detta ståndpunktsdokument ger vi en översikt över logopediämnet och den forskning som bedrivs i Sverige. I en kubmodell illustreras hur kommunikations- och sväljstörningar kan beskrivas. Stratifierade (per åldersintervall) uppskattningar av prevalensen av kommunikations- och sväljstörningar ges baserat på 2016 års befolkningsstruktur. Genom att presentera dessa två komponenter identifieras forskningsområden och riktningar inom logopedi som behöver ges ökad uppmärksamhet i det kommande forskningsarbetet.

  • 23.
    Rofes, Adrìa
    et al.
    Trinity College Dublin, Irland.
    Zakariás, Lilla
    University of Potsdam, Tyskland.
    Ceder, Klaudia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Lind, Marianne
    University of Oslo, Norge; Statped, Norge.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    Bjekic, Jovana
    University of Belgrad, Serbien.
    Fyndanis, Valantis
    University of Oslo, Norge.
    Gavarró, Anna
    Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spanien.
    Gram Simonsen, Hanne
    University of Oslo, Norge.
    Hernández Sacristán, Carlos
    Universitat de València, Spanien.
    Kuvac, Jelena
    University of Zagreb, Kroatien.
    Martínez-Ferreiro, Silvia
    University of Groningen, Nederländerna; University of Novi Sad, Serbien.
    Mavis, Ilknur
    Anadolu University, Turkiet.
    Méndez Orellana, Carolina
    Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile.
    Meteyard, Lotte
    University of reading, Storbritannien.
    Salmons, Io
    Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spanien.
    Sör, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Tuncer, Müge
    Anadolu University, Turkiet.
    Vuksanovic, Jasmina
    State University of Novi Pazar, Serbien.
    Varlokosta, Spyridola
    University of Athens, Grekland.
    Howard, David
    University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Storbritannien.
    Word imageability from a cross-linguistic perspective2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Rofes, Adrìa
    et al.
    Trinity College Dublin, Irland.
    Zakariás, Lilla
    University of Potsdam, Tyskland.
    Ceder, Klaudia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Lind, Marianne
    University of Oslo, Norge; Statped, Norge.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    de Aguiar, Vânia
    Trinity College DublinDublinIreland.
    Bjekic, Jovana
    University of Belgrad, Serbien.
    Fyndanis, Valantis
    University of Oslo, Norge.
    Gavarró, Anna
    Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spanien.
    Gram Simonsen, Hanne
    University of Oslo, Norge.
    Hernández Sacristán, Carlos
    Universitat de València, Spanien.
    Kambanaros, Maria
    Cyprus University of TechnologyLimassolCyprus.
    Kraljević, Jelena Kuvač
    University of ZagrebZagrebCroatia.
    Martínez-Ferreiro, Silvia
    University of Groningen, Nederländerna; University of Novi Sad, Serbien.
    Mavis, Ilknur
    Anadolu University, Turkiet.
    Orellana, Carolina Méndez
    Universidad Católica de ChileSantiagoChile.
    Sör, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Lukács, Ágnes
    Budapest University of Technology and EconomicsBudapestHungary.
    Tuncer, Müge
    Anadolu University, Turkiet.
    Vuksanovic, Jasmina
    State University of Novi Pazar, Serbien.
    Ibarrola, Amaia Munarriz
    University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHULeioaSpain.
    Pourquie, Marie
    Basque Center on Cognition Brain and LanguageDonostia–San SebastiánSpain.
    Varlokosta, Spyridola
    University of Athens, Grekland.
    Howard, David
    University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Storbritannien.
    Imageability ratings across languages2018In: Behavior Research Methods, ISSN 1554-351X, E-ISSN 1554-3528, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 1187-1197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Imageability is a psycholinguistic variable that indicates how well a word gives rise to a mental image or sensory experience. Imageability ratings are used extensively in psycholinguistic, neuropsychological, and aphasiological studies. However, little formal knowledge exists about whether and how these ratings are associated between and within languages. Fifteen imageability databases were cross-correlated using nonparametric statistics. Some of these corresponded to unpublished data collected within a European research network—the Collaboration of Aphasia Trialists (COST IS1208). All but four of the correlations were significant. The average strength of the correlations (rho = .68) and the variance explained (R2 = 46%) were moderate. This implies that factors other than imageability may explain 54% of the results. Imageability ratings often correlate across languages. Different possibly interacting factors may explain the moderate strength and variance explained in the correlations: (1) linguistic and cultural factors; (2) intrinsic differences between the databases; (3) range effects; (4) small numbers of words in each database, equivalent words, and participants; and (5) mean age of the participants. The results suggest that imageability ratings may be used cross-linguistically. However, further understanding of the factors explaining the variance in the correlations will be needed before research and practical recommendations can be made.

  • 25.
    Saldert, Charlotta
    et al.
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Speech-Language Pathology Unit, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Randrup Jensen, Lise
    Department of Nordic Studies and Linguistics, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Simmons-Mackie, Nina
    Department of Health and Human Sciences, Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, LA, USA.
    Complexity in measuring outcomes after communication partner training: Alignment between goals of intervention and methods of evaluation2018In: Aphasiology, ISSN 0268-7038, E-ISSN 1464-5041Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Tegler, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Lifestyle and rehabilitation in long term illness. Uppsala County Council.
    Pless, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Logopedi.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation.
    Speech and language pathologists’ perceptions and practises of communication partner training to support children’s communication with high-tech speech generating devices2018In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study examined speech and language pathologists’ (SLPs’) perceptions and practices of communication partner training with high-tech speech generating devices (SGDs).

    Method: Fifteen SLPs were recruited throughout Sweden. The SLPs answered a study-specific questionnaire on communication partner training in relation to communication partners to children with severe cerebral palsy and intellectual disability. The results were analysed with descriptive statistics (closed-ended questions, responses on Likert scales) and content analysis (open-ended question) using ICF-CY.

    Results: Twelve SLPs completed the survey. Half had no or one training session with communication partners in the last year. One-third never used documents for goal-setting. Half seldom or never taught communication partner strategies. Three quarters only used verbal instructions. The main obstacles were environmental factors.

    Conclusions: This study contributes valuable knowledge about high-tech SGD interventions targeting communication partners. The high-tech SGD intervention may benefit from goal-setting, extended number of training sessions and a range of instructional approaches.

1 - 26 of 26
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf