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  • 1.
    Alderborn, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Kamali, Masood
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Schlingemann, Heidi
    Nilsson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    The hunt for cancer biomarkers: Proximity ligation – a new technology for ultra-sensitive protein analysis2006Other (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 2.
    Andersson, Sandra
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Sundberg, Mårten
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Pristovsek, Nusa
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Ibrahim, Ahmed
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Biotechnol, Div Prote & Nanotechnol, Sci Life Lab, S-17121 Solna, Sweden.;Natl Res Ctr, Div Pharmaceut Ind, Dokki 12622, Egypt..
    Jonsson, Philip
    Univ Houston, Dept Biol & Biochem, Houston, TX 77204 USA.;Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Human Oncol & Pathogenesis Program, New York, NY 10065 USA..
    Katona, Borbala
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Clausson, Carl-Magnus
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Zieba, Agata
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Ramström, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Williams, Cecilia
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Biotechnol, Div Prote & Nanotechnol, Sci Life Lab, S-17121 Solna, Sweden.;Univ Houston, Dept Biol & Biochem, Houston, TX 77204 USA.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Asplund, Anna
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Insufficient antibody validation challenges oestrogen receptor beta research2017In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, article id 15840Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The discovery of oestrogen receptor beta (ER beta/ESR2) was a landmark discovery. Its reported expression and homology with breast cancer pharmacological target ER alpha (ESR1) raised hopes for improved endocrine therapies. After 20 years of intense research, this has not materialized. We here perform a rigorous validation of 13 anti-ER beta antibodies, using well-characterized controls and a panel of validation methods. We conclude that only one antibody, the rarely used monoclonal PPZ0506, specifically targets ER beta in immunohistochemistry. Applying this antibody for protein expression profiling in 44 normal and 21 malignant human tissues, we detect ER beta protein in testis, ovary, lymphoid cells, granulosa cell tumours, and a subset of malignant melanoma and thyroid cancers. We do not find evidence of expression in normal or cancerous human breast. This expression pattern aligns well with RNA-seq data, but contradicts a multitude of studies. Our study highlights how inadequately validated antibodies can lead an exciting field astray.

  • 3. Arabi, Azadeh
    et al.
    Wu, Siqin
    Ridderstråle, Karin
    Bierhoff, Holger
    Shiue, Chiounan
    Fatyol, Karoly
    Fahlén, Sara
    Hydbring, Per
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Grummt, Ingrid
    Larsson, Lars-Gunnar
    Wright, Anthony P H
    c-Myc associates with ribosomal DNA and activates RNA polymerase I transcription.2005In: Nat Cell Biol, ISSN 1465-7392, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 303-10Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Beghini, A.
    et al.
    Univ Milan, Dept Hlth Sci, Milan, Italy..
    Lazzaroni, F.
    Univ Milan, Dept Hlth Sci, Milan, Italy..
    Del Giacco, L.
    Univ Milan, Dept Biosci, Milan, Italy..
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Biasci, D.
    Univ Cambridge, Cambridge Inst Med Res, Cambridge, England..
    Turrini, M.
    Valduce Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Como, Italy..
    Prosperi, L.
    Univ Milan, Dept Biosci, Milan, Italy..
    Brusamolino, R.
    Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Dept Pathol, Milan, Italy..
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Cairoli, R.
    Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Dept Oncol, Hematol Unit, Milan, Italy..
    Clinical Relevance Of Recurrent Allele-Specific Recombination Expressing The Wnt10Bivs1 Allele Variant In Acute Myeloid Leukemia2016In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 101, p. 668-669Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Berglund, Mattias
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Thunberg, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Fridberg, Marie
    Wingren, Anette Gjörloff
    Gullbo, Joachim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology.
    Leuchowius, Karl-Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Lagercrantz, Svetlana
    Horvat, Andrea
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Establishment of a cell line from a chemotherapy resistant diffuse large B-cell lymphoma2007In: Leukemia and Lymphoma, ISSN 1042-8194, E-ISSN 1029-2403, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 1038-1041Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Blokzijl, Andries
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. YUMAB GmbH, Rebenring 33, D-38106 Braunschweig, Germany..
    Zieba, Agata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Hust, Michael
    Tech Univ Carolo Wilhelmina Braunschweig, Inst Biochem Biotechnol & Bioinformat, Dept Biotechnol, Spielmannstr 7, D-38106 Braunschweig, Germany..
    Schirrmann, Thomas
    Tech Univ Carolo Wilhelmina Braunschweig, Inst Biochem Biotechnol & Bioinformat, Dept Biotechnol, Spielmannstr 7, D-38106 Braunschweig, Germany.;YUMAB GmbH, Rebenring 33, D-38106 Braunschweig, Germany..
    Helmsing, Saskia
    Tech Univ Carolo Wilhelmina Braunschweig, Inst Biochem Biotechnol & Bioinformat, Dept Biotechnol, Spielmannstr 7, D-38106 Braunschweig, Germany..
    Grannas, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Hertz, Ellen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Morén, Anita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Chen, Lei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Moustakas, Aristidis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Dubel, Stefan
    Tech Univ Carolo Wilhelmina Braunschweig, Inst Biochem Biotechnol & Bioinformat, Dept Biotechnol, Spielmannstr 7, D-38106 Braunschweig, Germany..
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Single Chain Antibodies as Tools to Study transforming growth factor--Regulated SMAD Proteins in Proximity Ligation-Based Pharmacological Screens2016In: Molecular & cellular proteomics (online), ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 1848-1856Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cellular heterogeneity seen in tumors, with subpopulations of cells capable of resisting different treatments, renders single-treatment regimens generally ineffective. Accordingly, there is a great need to increase the repertoire of drug treatments from which combinations may be selected to efficiently target sets of pathological processes, while suppressing the emergence of resistance mutations. In this regard, members of the TGF- signaling pathway may furnish new, valuable therapeutic targets. In the present work, we developed in situ proximity ligation assays (isPLA) to monitor the state of the TGF- signaling pathway. Moreover, we extended the range of suitable affinity reagents for this analysis by developing a set of in-vitro-derived human antibody fragments (single chain fragment variable, scFv) that bind SMAD2 (Mothers against decapentaplegic 2), 3, 4, and 7 using phage display. These four proteins are all intracellular mediators of TGF- signaling. We also developed an scFv specific for SMAD3 phosphorylated in the linker domain 3 (p179 SMAD3). This phosphorylation has been shown to inactivate the tumor suppressor function of SMAD3. The single chain affinity reagents developed in the study were fused tocrystallizable antibody fragments (Fc-portions) and expressed as dimeric IgG-like molecules having Fc domains (Yumabs), and we show that they represent valuable reagents for isPLA. Using these novel assays, we demonstrate that p179 SMAD3 forms a complex with SMAD4 at increased frequency during division and that pharmacological inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4)(1) reduces the levels of p179SMAD3 in tumor cells. We further show that the p179SMAD3-SMAD4 complex is bound for degradation by the proteasome. Finally, we developed a chemical screening strategy for compounds that reduce the levels of p179SMAD3 in tumor cells with isPLA as a read-out, using the p179SMAD3 scFv SH544-IIC4. The screen identified two kinase inhibitors, known inhibitors of the insulin receptor, which decreased levels of p179SMAD3/SMAD4 complexes, thereby demonstrating the suitability of the recombinant affinity reagents applied in isPLA in screening for inhibitors of cell signaling.

  • 7. Bohmer, Sylvia-Annette
    et al.
    Weibrecht, Irene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bohmer, Frank-D.
    Association of the Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase DEP-1 with Its Substrate FLT3 Visualized by In Situ Proximity Ligation Assay2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 5, p. e62871-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are important regulators of signal transduction processes. Essential for the functional characterization of PTPs is the identification of their physiological substrates, and an important step towards this goal is the demonstration of a physical interaction. The association of PTPs with their cellular substrates is, however, often transient and difficult to detect with unmodified proteins at endogenous levels. Density-enhanced phosphatase-1 (DEP-1/PTPRJ) is a regulator of hematopoietic cell functions, and a candidate tumor suppressor. However, association of DEP-1 with any of its proposed substrates at endogenous levels has not yet been shown. We have previously obtained functional and biochemical evidence for a direct interaction of DEP-1 with the hematopoietic receptor-tyrosine kinase Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3). In the current study we have used the method of in situ proximity ligation assay (in situ PLA) to validate this interaction at endogenous levels, and to further characterize it. In situ PLA readily detected association of endogenous DEP1 and FLT3 in the human acute monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1, which was enhanced by FLT3 ligand (FL) stimulation in a time-dependent manner. Association peaked between 10 and 20 min of stimulation and returned to basal levels at 30 min. This time course was similar to the time course of FLT3 autophosphorylation. FLT3 kinase inhibition and DEP-1 oxidation abrogated association. Consistent with a functional role of DEP-1-FLT3 interaction, stable knockdown of DEP-1 in THP-1 cells enhanced FL-induced ERK1/2 activation. These findings support that FLT3 is a bona fide substrate of DEP-1 and that interaction occurs mainly via an enzyme-substrate complex formation triggered by FLT3 ligand stimulation.

  • 8.
    Boström, Hans
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Leuchowius, Karl-Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Hallböök, Helene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Internal Medicine.
    Nordgren, Ann
    Thörn, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Thorselius, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Sundström, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    U-2973, a novel B-cell line established from a patient with a mature B-cell leukemia displaying concurrent t(14;18) and MYC translocation to a non-IG gene partner2008In: European Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0902-4441, E-ISSN 1600-0609, Vol. 81, no 3, p. 218-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    B-cell lymphomas/leukemias with simultaneous t(14;18)(q32;q21) and MYC rearrangements have recently been shown to constitute a separate diagnostic entity, presenting with a rapid clinical course and a very poor prognosis. We describe the establishment of an Epstein-Barr virus negative cell line, designated U-2973, from a male patient with a de novo aggressive B-cell lymphoma/leukemia and very high peripheral blast cell count. Flow cytometry of bone marrow cells and U-2973 displayed a mature B-cell phenotype, and immunostaining showed expression of MYC and BCL2. IG gene rearrangement data were consistent with a lymphoid neoplasm of germinal centre derivation. Cytogenetic studies using conventional G-banding, fluorescent in situ hybridization, spectral karyotyping and single nucleotide polymorphism array demonstrated a complex karyotype with both a t(14;18) and double translocations between MYC and a non-IG gene partner located at chromosome 12p12.1.

  • 9. Canedo, P.
    et al.
    Thorsélius, M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Thunberg, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Oncology.
    Sällström, J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Sundström, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Rosén, A.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    A follicular dendritic cell line promotes somatic hypermutations in Ramos cells in vitro2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 69, no 1, p. 70-71Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Clausson, Carl-Magnus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Allalou, Amin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Centre for Image Analysis. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Weibrecht, Irene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mahmoudi, Salah
    Farnebo, Marianne
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wählby, Carolina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Centre for Image Analysis. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Increasing the dynamic range of in situ PLA2011In: Nature Methods, ISSN 1548-7091, E-ISSN 1548-7105, Vol. 8, no 11, p. 892-893Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Clausson, Carl-Magnus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Arngården, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Ishaq, Omer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Klaesson, Axel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Kühnemund, Malte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Grannas, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Koos, Björn
    Qian, Xiaoyan
    Ranefall, Petter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Krzywkowski, Tomasz
    Brismar, Hjalmar
    Nilsson, Mats
    Wählby, Carolina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Compaction of rolling circle amplification products increases signal integrity and signal–to–noise ratio2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, p. 12317:1-10, article id 12317Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Clausson, Carl-Magnus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Grundberg, Ida
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Weibrecht, Irene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Methods for analysis of the cancer microenvironment and their potential for disease prediction, monitoring and personalized treatments2012In: The EPMA journal, ISSN 1878-5085, Vol. 3, no 7Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A tumor does not consist of a homogenous population of cancer cells. Therefore, to understand cancer, the tumor microenvironment and the interplay between the different cell types present in the tumor has to be taken into account, and how this regulates the growth and survival of the cancer cells. To achieve a full picture of this complex interplay, analysis of tumor tissue should ideally be performed with cellular resolution, providing activity status of individual cells in this heterogeneous population of different cell-types. In addition, in situ analysis provides information on the architecture of the tissue wherein the cancer cells thrive, providing information of the identity of neighboring cells that can be used to understand cell-cell communication. Herein we describe how padlock probes and in situ PLA can be used for visualization of nucleic acids and protein activity, respectively, directly in tissue sections, and their potential future role in personalized medicine.

  • 13.
    Clausson, Carl-Magnus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Arngården, Linda
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Ishaq, Omer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction.
    Wählby, Carolina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Krzywkowski, Tomasz
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Compaction of rolling circle amplification products increases signal strength and integrityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Conze, Tim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Carvalho, Ana Sofia
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Almeida, Raquel
    Reis, Celso A.
    David, Leonor
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    MUC2 mucin is a major carrier of the cancer-associated sialyl-Tn antigen in intestinal metaplasia and gastric carcinomas2010In: Glycobiology, ISSN 0959-6658, E-ISSN 1460-2423, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 199-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Changes in mucin protein expression and in glycosylation are common features in pre-neoplastic lesions and cancer and are therefore used as cancer-associated markers. De novo expression of intestinal mucin MUC2 and cancer-associated sialyl-Tn antigen are frequently observed in intestinal metaplasia (IM) and gastric cancer. However, despite that these antigens often co-localize, MUC2 has not been demonstrated to be a carrier of sialyl-Tn. By using the in situ proximity ligation assay (in situ PLA), we herein could show that MUC2 is a major carrier of the sialyl-Tn antigen in all IM cases and in most gastric carcinoma cases. The requirement by in situ PLA for the presence of both antigens in close proximity increases the selectivity compared to measurement of co-localization, as determined by immunohistochemistry. Identification of the mucin which is the carrier of a carbohydrate structure offers unique advantages for future development of more accurate diagnostic and prognostic markers.

  • 15.
    Conze, Tim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Shetye, Alysha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Tanaka, Yuki
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Gu, Jijuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Larsson, Chatarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Göransson, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Tavoosidana, Gholamreza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Analysis of Genes, Transcripts, and Proteins via DNA Ligation2009In: Annual review of analytical chemistry, ISSN 1936-1327, Vol. 2, p. 215-239Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analytical reactions in which short DNA strands are used in combination with DNA ligases have proven useful for measuring, decoding, and locating most classes of macromolecules. Given the need to accumulate large amounts of precise molecular information from biological systems in research and in diagnostics, ligation reactions will continue to offer valuable strategies for advanced analytical reactions. Here, we provide a basis for further development of methods by reviewing the history of analytical ligation reactions, discussing the properties of ligation reactions that render them suitable for engineering novel assays, describing a wide range of successful ligase-based assays, and briefly considering future directions.

  • 16.
    Dahl, Markus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Maturi, Varun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lönn, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Papoutsoglou, Panagiotis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zieba, Agata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Vanlandewijck, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    van der Heide, Lars P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Watanabe, Yukihide
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hottiger, Michael O
    Institute of Veterinary Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Moustakas, Aristidis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fine-Tuning of Smad Protein Function by Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerases and Poly(ADP-Ribose) Glycohydrolase during Transforming Growth Factor β Signaling2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 8, p. e103651-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Initiation, amplitude, duration and termination of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling via Smad proteins is regulated by post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, ubiquitination and acetylation. We previously reported that ADP-ribosylation of Smads by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) negatively influences Smad-mediated transcription. PARP-1 is known to functionally interact with PARP-2 in the nucleus and the enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) can remove poly(ADP-ribose) chains from target proteins. Here we aimed at analyzing possible cooperation between PARP-1, PARP-2 and PARG in regulation of TGFβ signaling.

    METHODS:

    A robust cell model of TGFβ signaling, i.e. human HaCaT keratinocytes, was used. Endogenous Smad3 ADP-ribosylation and protein complexes between Smads and PARPs were studied using proximity ligation assays and co-immunoprecipitation assays, which were complemented by in vitro ADP-ribosylation assays using recombinant proteins. Real-time RT-PCR analysis of mRNA levels and promoter-reporter assays provided quantitative analysis of gene expression in response to TGFβ stimulation and after genetic perturbations of PARP-1/-2 and PARG based on RNA interference.

    RESULTS:

    TGFβ signaling rapidly induces nuclear ADP-ribosylation of Smad3 that coincides with a relative enhancement of nuclear complexes of Smads with PARP-1 and PARP-2. Inversely, PARG interacts with Smads and can de-ADP-ribosylate Smad3 in vitro. PARP-1 and PARP-2 also form complexes with each other, and Smads interact and activate auto-ADP-ribosylation of both PARP-1 and PARP-2. PARP-2, similar to PARP-1, negatively regulates specific TGFβ target genes (fibronectin, Smad7) and Smad transcriptional responses, and PARG positively regulates these genes. Accordingly, inhibition of TGFβ-mediated transcription caused by silencing endogenous PARG expression could be relieved after simultaneous depletion of PARP-1.

    CONCLUSION:

    Nuclear Smad function is negatively regulated by PARP-1 that is assisted by PARP-2 and positively regulated by PARG during the course of TGFβ signaling.

  • 17.
    Dieterich, Lothar C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Mellberg, Sofie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Langenkamp, Elise
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Zhang, Lei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Zieba, Agata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Salomäki, Henriikka
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Teichert, M.
    Huang, Hua
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Edqvist, Per-Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Kraus, T.
    Augustin, H. G.
    Olofsson, Tommie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Larsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Molema, G.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Georgii-Hemming, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Genetics.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Dimberg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Transcriptional profiling of human glioblastoma vessels indicates a key role of VEGF-A and TGFβ2 in vascular abnormalization2012In: Journal of Pathology, ISSN 0022-3417, E-ISSN 1096-9896, Vol. 228, no 3, p. 378-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glioblastoma are aggressive astrocytic brain tumours characterized by microvascular proliferation and an abnormal vasculature, giving rise to brain oedema and increased patient morbidity. Here, we have characterized the transcriptome of tumour-associated blood vessels and describe a gene signature clearly associated with pleomorphic, pathologically altered vessels in human glioblastoma (grade IV glioma). We identified 95 genes differentially expressed in glioblastoma vessels, while no significant differences in gene expression were detected between vessels in non-malignant brain and grade II glioma. Differential vascular expression of ANGPT2, CD93, ESM1, ELTD1, FILIP1L and TENC1 in human glioblastoma was validated by immunohistochemistry, using a tissue microarray. Through qPCR analysis of gene induction in primary endothelial cells, we provide evidence that increased VEGF-A and TGFβ2 signalling in the tumour microenvironment is sufficient to invoke many of the changes in gene expression noted in glioblastoma vessels. Notably, we found an enrichment of Smad target genes within the distinct gene signature of glioblastoma vessels and a significant increase of Smad signalling complexes in the vasculature of human glioblastoma in situ. This indicates a key role of TGFβ signalling in regulating vascular phenotype and suggests that, in addition to VEGF-A, TGFβ2 may represent a new target for vascular normalization therapy.

  • 18. Eisterer, Wolfgang
    et al.
    Bechter, Oliver
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Nilsson, Kenneth
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Tedrol, Maria
    Greil, Richard
    Thaler, Josef
    Herold, Manfred
    Finke, Lothar
    Gunthert, Ursula
    Montserrat, Emilio
    Stauder, Reinhard
    Elevated levels of soluble CD44 are associated with advanced disease and in vitro proliferation of neoplastic lymphocytes in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia2004In: Leukemia Res, Vol. 28, p. 1043-1051Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19. Figueiredo, Joana
    et al.
    Simoes-Correia, Joana
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Suriano, Gianpaolo
    Seruca, Raquel
    ADP-Ribosylation Factor 6 Mediates E-Cadherin Recovery by Chemical Chaperones2011In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 8, p. e23188-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    E-cadherin plays a powerful tumor suppressor role. Germline E-cadherin mutations justify 30% of Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer (HDGC) and missense mutations are found in 30% of these families. We found possible to restore in vitro mutant E-cadherin associated to HDGC syndrome by using Chemical Chaperones (CCs). Herein, our aim was to disclose the molecular mechanisms underlying the CCs effects in E-cadherin regulation. Using cells stably expressing WT E-cadherin or two HDGC-associated missense mutations, we show that upon DMSO treatment, not only mutant E-cadherin is restored and stabilized at the plasma membrane (PM), but also Arf6 and PIPKI gamma expressions are altered. We show that modulation of Arf6 expression partially mimics the effect of CCs, suggesting that the cellular effects observed upon CCs treatment are mediated by Arf6. Further, we show that E-cadherin expression recovery is specifically linked to Arf6 due to its role on endocytosis and recycling pathways. Finally, we demonstrated that, as DMSO, several others CCs are able to modulate the trafficking machinery through an Arf6 dependent mechanism. Interestingly, the more effective compounds in E-cadherin recovery to PM are those that simultaneously inhibit Arf6 and stimulate PIPKI gamma expression and binding to E-cadherin. Here, we present the first evidence of a direct influence of CCs in cellular trafficking machinery and we show that this effect is of crucial importance in the context of juxtamembrane E-cadherin missense mutations associated to HDGC. We propose that this influence should be taken into account when exploring the therapeutic potential of this type of chemicals in genetic diseases associated to protein-misfolding.

  • 20. Figueiredo, Joana
    et al.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Simoes-Correia, Joana
    Grannas, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Suriano, Gianpaolo
    Seruca, Raquel
    The importance of E-cadherin binding partners to evaluate the pathogenicity of E-cadherin missense mutations associated to HDGC2013In: European Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 1018-4813, E-ISSN 1476-5438, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 301-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC), CDH1 germline gene alterations are causative events in 30% of the cases. In 20% of HDGC families, CDH1 germline mutations are of the missense type and the mutation carriers constitute a problem in terms of genetic counseling and surveillance. To access the pathogenic relevance of missense mutations, we have previously developed an in vitro method to functionally characterize them. Pathogenic E-cadherin missense mutants fail to aggregate and become more invasive, in comparison with cells expressing the wild-type (WT) protein. Herein, our aim was to develop a complementary method to unravel the pathogenic significance of E-cadherin missense mutations. We used cells stably expressing WT E-cadherin and seven HDGC-associated mutations (five intracellular and two extracellular) and studied by proximity ligation assays (PLA) how these mutants bind to fundamental regulators of E-cadherin function and trafficking. We focused our attention on the interaction with: p120, beta-catenin, PIPKI gamma and Hakai. We showed that cytoplasmic E-cadherin mutations affect the interaction of one or more binding partners, compromising the E-cadherin stability at the plasma membrane and likely affecting the adhesion complex competence. In the present work, we demonstrated that the study of the interplay between E-cadherin and its binding partners, using PLA, is an easy, rapid, quantitative and highly reproducible technique that can be applied in routine labs to verify the pathogenicity of E-cadherin missense mutants for HDGC diagnosis, especially those located in the intracellular domain of the protein.

  • 21. Fridberg, Marie
    et al.
    Servin, Anna
    Anagnostaki, Lola
    Linderoth, Johan
    Berglund, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Rosén, Anders
    Mustelin, Tomas
    Jerkeman, Mats
    Persson, Jenny L.
    Wingren, Anette Gjörloff
    Protein expression and cellular localization in two prognostic subgroups of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: higher expression of ZAP70 and PKC-beta II in the non-germinal center group and poor survival in patients deficient in nuclear PTEN2007In: Leukemia and Lymphoma, ISSN 1042-8194, E-ISSN 1029-2403, Vol. 48, no 11, p. 2221-2232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) show varying responses to conventional therapy, and this might be contributed to the differentiation stage of the tumor B-cells. The aim of the current study was to evaluate a panel of kinases (ZAP70, PKC-β I and II and phosphorylated PKB/Akt) and phosphatases (PTEN, SHP1 and SHP2) known to be frequently deregulated in lymphoid malignancies. De novo DLBCL cases were divided into two subgroups, the germinal center (GC) group (14/28) and the non-germinal center (non-GC) or activated B-cell (ABC) group (14/28). ZAP70 and PKC-β II were expressed in a significantly higher percentage of tumor cells in the clinically more aggressive non-GC group compared with the prognostically favourable GC group. Also, the subcellular localization of PKC-β I and II differed in DLBCL cells, with the PKC-β I isoform being expressed in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, while PKC-β II was found exclusively in the cytoplasm. Loss of nuclear PTEN correlated with poor survival in cases from both subgroups. In addition, five cell lines of DLBCL origin were analyzed for protein expression and for mRNA levels of PTEN and SHP1. For the first time, we show that ZAP70 is expressed in a higher percentage of tumor cells in the aggressive non-GC subgroup of DLBCL and that PKC-β I and II are differently distributed in the two prognostic subgroups of de novo DLBCL.

  • 22.
    Gavrilovic, Milan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Centre for Image Analysis. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Weibrecht, Irene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Conze, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wählby, Carolina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Centre for Image Analysis. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Automated Classification of Multicolored Rolling Circle Products in Dual-Channel Wide-Field Fluorescence Microscopy2011In: Cytometry Part A, ISSN 1552-4922, Vol. 79A, no 7, p. 518-527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Specific single-molecule detection opens new possibilities in genomics and proteomics, and automated image analysis is needed for accurate quantification. This work presents image analysis methods for the detection and classification of single molecules and single-molecule interactions detected using padlock probes or proximity ligation. We use simple, widespread, and cost-efficient wide-field microscopy and increase detection multiplexity by labeling detection events with combinations of fluorescence dyes. The mathematical model presented herein can classify the resulting point-like signals in dual-channel images by spectral angles without discriminating between low and high intensity. We evaluate the methods on experiments with known signal classes and compare to classical classification algorithms based on intensity thresholding. We also demonstrate how the methods can be used as tools to evaluate biochemical protocols by measuring detection probe quality and accuracy. Finally, the method is used to evaluate single-molecule detection events in situ.

  • 23.
    Grannas, Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Arngården, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Lönn, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala Univ, Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, Sci Life Lab, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Mazurkiewicz, Magdalena
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol Pathol, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Blokzij, Andries
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Zieba Wicher, Agata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Crosstalk between Hippo and TGF beta: Subcellular Localization of YAP/TAZ/Smad Complexes2015In: Journal of Molecular Biology, ISSN 0022-2836, E-ISSN 1089-8638, Vol. 427, no 21, p. 3407-3415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Hippo pathway plays a crucial role in growth control, proliferation and tumor suppression. Activity of the signaling pathway is associated with cell density sensing and tissue organization. Furthermore, the Hippo pathway helps to coordinate cellular processes through crosstalk with growth-factor-mediated signaling pathways such as TGF beta. Here we have examined the localization of interactions between proteins of the Hippo pathway (YAP/TAZ) and TGF beta (Smad2/3) signaling pathway by using in situ proximity ligation assays. We investigated the formation of protein complexes between YAP/TAZ and Smad2/3 and examined how these interactions were affected by TGF beta stimulation and cell density in HaCaT keratinocytes and in Smad4-deficient HT29 colon cancer cells. We demonstrate that TGF beta induces formation of YAP/TAZ-Smad2/3 complexes in HaCaT cells. Under sparse cell conditions, the complexes were detected to a higher degree and were predominantly located in the nucleus, while under dense culture conditions, the complexes were fewer and mainly located in the cytoplasm. Surprisingly, we could not detect any YAP/TAZ Smad2/3 complexes in HT29 cells. To examine if Smad4 deficiency was responsible for the absence of interactions, we treated HaCaT cells with siRNA targeting Smad4. However, we could still observe complex formation in the siRNA-treated cells, suggesting that Smad4 is not essential for the YAP Smad2/3 interaction. In conclusion, this study shows localized, density-dependent formation of YAP/TAZ Smad2/3 complexes in HaCaT cells and provides evidence supporting a crosstalk between the Hippo and the TGF beta signaling pathways.

  • 24.
    Gu, Gucci Jijuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Friedman, Mikaela
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Jost, Christian
    Johnsson, Kai
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Plückthun, Andreas
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Protein tag-mediated conjugation of oligonucleotides to recombinant affinity binders for proximity ligation2013In: New Biotechnology, ISSN 1871-6784, E-ISSN 1876-4347, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 144-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While antibodies currently play a dominant role as affinity reagents in biological research and for diagnostics, a broad range of recombinant proteins are emerging as promising alternative affinity reagents in detection assays and quantification. DNA-mediated affinity-based assays, such as immuno-PCR and proximity ligation assays (PLA), use oligonucleotides attached to affinity reagents as reporter molecules. Conjugation of oligonucleotides to affinity reagents generally employs chemistries that target primary amines or cysteines. Because of the random nature of these processes neither the number of oligonucleotides conjugated per molecule nor their sites of attachment can be accurately controlled for affinity reagents with several available amines and cysteines. Here, we present a straightforward and convenient approach to functionalize recombinant affinity reagents for PLA by expressing the reagents as fusion partners with SNAP protein tags. This allowed us to conjugate oligonucleotides in a site-specific fashion, yielding precisely one oligonucleotide per affinity reagent. We demonstrate this method using designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins) recognizing the tumor antigen HER2 and we apply the conjugates in different assay formats. We also show that SNAP or CLIP tags expressed as fusion partners of transfected genes, allow oligonucleotide conjugations to be performed in fixed cells, with no need for specific affinity reagents. The approach is used to demonstrate induced interactions between the fusion proteins FKBP and FRB by allowing the in situ conjugated oligonucleotides to direct the production of templates for localized rolling circle amplification reactions.

  • 25.
    Gustafsdottir, Sigrun M
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Schallmeiner, Edith
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Fredriksson, Simon
    Gullberg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Jarvius, Malin
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Jarvius, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Howell, Mathias
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Proximity ligation assays for sensitive and specific protein analyses.2005In: Anal Biochem, ISSN 0003-2697, Vol. 345, no 1, p. 2-9Article, review/survey (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 26.
    Huels, David J.
    et al.
    Canc Res UK Beatson Inst, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Ridgway, Rachel A.
    Canc Res UK Beatson Inst, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Radulescu, Sorina
    Canc Res UK Beatson Inst, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Leushacke, Marc
    ASTAR, Inst Med Biol, Singapore, Singapore..
    Campbell, Andrew D.
    Canc Res UK Beatson Inst, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Biswas, Sujata
    Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Gastrointestinal Stem Cell Biol Lab, Oxford, England.;John Radcliffe Hosp, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Div Expt Med, Translat Gastroenterol Unit, Oxford OX3 9DU, Headington, England..
    Leedham, Simon
    Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Gastrointestinal Stem Cell Biol Lab, Oxford, England.;John Radcliffe Hosp, Nuffield Dept Clin Med, Div Expt Med, Translat Gastroenterol Unit, Oxford OX3 9DU, Headington, England..
    Serra, Stefano
    Univ Hlth Network, Toronto Med Labs, Dept Pathol, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Chetty, Runjan
    Univ Hlth Network, Toronto Med Labs, Dept Pathol, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Moreaux, Guenievre
    Canc Res UK Beatson Inst, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Parry, Lee
    Cardiff Univ, European Canc Stem Cell Res Inst, Cardiff CF10 3AX, S Glam, Wales..
    Matthews, James
    Cardiff Univ, European Canc Stem Cell Res Inst, Cardiff CF10 3AX, S Glam, Wales..
    Song, Fei
    Univ Giessen, Inst Physiol, D-35390 Giessen, Germany..
    Hedley, Ann
    Canc Res UK Beatson Inst, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Kalna, Gabriela
    Canc Res UK Beatson Inst, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Ceteci, Fatih
    Canc Res UK Beatson Inst, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Reed, Karen R.
    Cardiff Univ, European Canc Stem Cell Res Inst, Cardiff CF10 3AX, S Glam, Wales..
    Meniel, Valerie S.
    Cardiff Univ, European Canc Stem Cell Res Inst, Cardiff CF10 3AX, S Glam, Wales..
    Maguire, Aoife
    St James Hosp, Trinity Coll Dublin, Dept Histopathol, Dublin 8, Ireland..
    Doyle, Brendan
    Canc Res UK Beatson Inst, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland.;St James Hosp, Trinity Coll Dublin, Dept Histopathol, Dublin 8, Ireland..
    Soderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Barker, Nick
    ASTAR, Inst Med Biol, Singapore, Singapore..
    Watson, Alastair
    Univ E Anglia, Norwich Med Sch, Norwich NR4 7TJ, Norfolk, England..
    Larue, Lionel
    Inst Curie, CNRS UMR3347, INSERM, U1021,Equipe Labellisee Ligue Natl Canc, F-91405 Orsay, France..
    Clarke, Alan R.
    Cardiff Univ, European Canc Stem Cell Res Inst, Cardiff CF10 3AX, S Glam, Wales..
    Sansom, Owen J.
    Canc Res UK Beatson Inst, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    E-cadherin can limit the transforming properties of activating beta-catenin mutations2015In: EMBO Journal, ISSN 0261-4189, E-ISSN 1460-2075, Vol. 34, no 18, p. 2321-2333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wnt pathway deregulation is a common characteristic of many cancers. Only colorectal cancer predominantly harbours mutations in APC, whereas other cancer types (hepatocellular carcinoma, solid pseudopapillary tumours of the pancreas) have activating mutations in beta-catenin (CTNNB1). We have compared the dynamics and the potency of beta-catenin mutations in vivo. Within the murine small intestine (SI), an activating mutation of beta-catenin took much longer to achieve Wnt deregulation and acquire a crypt-progenitor cell (CPC) phenotype than Apc or Gsk3 loss. Within the colon, a single activating mutation of beta-catenin was unable to drive Wnt deregulation or induce the CPC phenotype. This ability of beta-catenin mutation to differentially transform the SI versus the colon correlated with higher expression of E-cadherin and a higher number of E-cadherin: beta-catenin complexes at the membrane. Reduction in E-cadherin synergised with an activating mutation of beta-catenin resulting in a rapid CPC phenotype within the SI and colon. Thus, there is a threshold of beta-catenin that is required to drive transformation, and E-cadherin can act as a buffer to sequester mutated beta-catenin.

  • 27.
    Jarvius, Malin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Paulsson, Janna
    Weibrecht, Irene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Leuchowius, Karl-Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Andersson, Ann-Catrin
    Wählby, Carolina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Centre for Image Analysis.
    Gullberg, Mats
    Botling, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Sjöblom, Tobias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Markova, Boyka
    Östman, Arne
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    In situ detection of phosphorylated platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta using a generalized proximity ligation method2007In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 6, no 9, p. 1500-1509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improved methods are needed for in situ characterization of post-translational modifications in cell lines and tissues. For example, it is desirable to monitor the phosphorylation status of individual receptor tyrosine kinases in samples from human tumors treated with inhibitors to evaluate therapeutic responses. Unfortunately the leading methods for observing the dynamics of tissue post-translational modifications in situ, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence, exhibit limited sensitivity and selectivity. Proximity ligation assay is a novel method that offers improved selectivity through the requirement of dual recognition and increased sensitivity by including DNA amplification as a component of detection of the target molecule. Here we therefore established a generalized in situ proximity ligation assay to investigate phosphorylation of platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) in cells stimulated with platelet-derived growth factor BB. Antibodies specific for immunoglobulins from different species, modified by attachment of DNA strands, were used as secondary proximity probes together with a pair of primary antibodies from the corresponding species. Dual recognition of receptors and phosphorylated sites by the primary antibodies in combination with the secondary proximity probes was used to generate circular DNA strands; this was followed by signal amplification by replicating the DNA circles via rolling circle amplification. We detected tyrosine phosphorylated PDGFRβ in human embryonic kidney cells stably overexpressing human influenza hemagglutinin-tagged human PDGFRβ in porcine aortic endothelial cells transfected with the β-receptor, but not in cells transfected with the α-receptor, and also in immortalized human foreskin fibroblasts, BJ hTert, endogenously expressing the PDGFRβ. We furthermore visualized tyrosine phosphorylated PDGFRβ in tissue sections from fresh frozen human scar tissue undergoing wound healing. The method should be of great value to study signal transduction, screen for effects of pharmacological agents, and enhance the diagnostic potential in histopathology.

  • 28. Johansson Wensman, Jonas
    et al.
    Leuchowius, Karl-Johan
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Australia .
    Yan, Jiting
    Berg, Anna-Lena
    Bode, Liv
    Ludwig, Hanns
    Belák, Sándor
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Berg, Mikael
    Visualization of Borna Disease Virus Protein Interactions with Host Proteins using in situ Proximity Ligation Assay2016In: British journal of virology, ISSN 2055-6128, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 11-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Borna disease virus type 1 (BDV) comprises highly conserved neurotropic non-segmented negative strand RNA-virus variants causing neurological and behavioral disorders in a wide range of mammalian animals, possibly including humans. Viral persistence in the brain has been frequently observed, however, the exact mechanisms behind BDV’s ability to establish persistence despite a prominent immune response are not known. Here we have used in situ proximity ligation assay (in situ PLA), a selective tool for studying virus-host protein-protein interactions. BDV P (phosphoprotein) and N (nucleoprotein) have previously been reported to interact with several host proteins, thereby interfering with various signaling pathways. In this study, we focused on some of these interactions (BDV P-HMGB1, BDV N/P-Cdc2). First, we used rat glioma cell cultures persistently infected with a laboratory strain of BDV (C6BV) to establish the assay. Next, in situ PLA was applied to detect BDV P in brain tissues of infected animals. Finally, protein-protein interactions were visualized in both C6BV and brain tissues of experimentally as well as naturally infected animals (rat and horse, respectively). BDV proteins and their interactions with host proteins could be shown in cell cultures (HMGB1, Cdc2) and in brain tissues of rat (HMGB1, Cdc2) and horse (Cdc2 only) infected with BDV. In this study, we have for the first time directly visualized protein-protein interactions between BDV and its host, and thereby confirmed previous data to demonstrate findings in cell cultures to be applicable also in experimentally and naturally infected animals.

  • 29.
    Kashyap, Abhishek S.
    et al.
    Queensland Univ Technol, Tissue Repair & Regenerat Program, Inst Hlth & Biomed Innovat, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.;Univ Basel Hosp, Dept Biomed, Canc Immunol, Basel, Switzerland..
    Shooter, Gary K.
    Queensland Univ Technol, Tissue Repair & Regenerat Program, Inst Hlth & Biomed Innovat, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Shokoohmand, Ali
    Queensland Univ Technol, Tissue Repair & Regenerat Program, Inst Hlth & Biomed Innovat, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    McGovern, Jacqui
    Queensland Univ Technol, Tissue Repair & Regenerat Program, Inst Hlth & Biomed Innovat, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Sivaramakrishnan, Manaswini
    Roche Innovat Ctr, Pharma Res & Early Dev, Basel, Switzerland..
    Croll, Tristan I.
    Queensland Univ Technol, Tissue Repair & Regenerat Program, Inst Hlth & Biomed Innovat, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Cane, Gaelle
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, Sci Life Lab, BMC, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Leavesley, David I.
    Queensland Univ Technol, Tissue Repair & Regenerat Program, Inst Hlth & Biomed Innovat, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Upton, Zee
    Queensland Univ Technol, Tissue Repair & Regenerat Program, Inst Hlth & Biomed Innovat, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Hollier, Brett G.
    Queensland Univ Technol, Tissue Repair & Regenerat Program, Inst Hlth & Biomed Innovat, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.;Australian Prostate Canc Res Ctr Queensland, Inst Hlth & Biomed Innovat, Translat Res Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Antagonists of IGF: Vitronectin Interactions Inhibit IGF-I-Induced Breast Cancer Cell Functions2016In: Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, ISSN 1535-7163, E-ISSN 1538-8514, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 1602-1613Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We provide proof-of-concept evidence for a new class of therapeutics that target growth factor: extracellular matrix (GF: ECM) interactions for the management of breast cancer. Insulinlike growth factor-I (IGF-I) forms multiprotein complexes with IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP) and the ECM protein vitronectin (VN), and stimulates the survival, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. For the first time we provide physical evidence for IGFBP-3: VN interactions in breast cancer patient tissues; these interactions were predominantly localized to tumor cell clusters and in stroma surrounding tumor cells. We show that disruption of IGF-I: IGFBP: VN complexes with L27-IGF-II inhibits IGF-I: IGFBP: VN-stimulated breast cancer cell migration and proliferation in two-and three-dimensional assay systems. Peptide arrays screened to identify regions critical for the IGFBP-3/-5: VN and IGF-II: VN interactions demonstrated IGFBP-3/-5 and IGF-II binds VN through the hemopexin-2 domain, and VN binds IGFBP-3 at residues not involved in the binding of IGF-I to IGFBP-3. IGFBP-interacting VN peptides identified from these peptide arrays disrupted the IGF-I: IGFBP: VN complex, impeded the growth of primary tumor-like spheroids and, more importantly, inhibited the invasion of metastatic breast cancer cells in 3D assay systems. These studies provide first-in-field evidence for the utility of small peptides in antagonizing GF: ECM-mediated biologic functions and present data demonstrating the potential of these peptide antagonists as novel therapeutics.

  • 30.
    Klaesson, Axel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Grannas, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Ebai, Tonge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Heldin, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Koos, Björn
    Department of Systemic Cell Biology, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology, Dortmund, Germany.
    Leino, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Raykova, Doroteya
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Oelrich, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Arngården, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Improved efficiency of in situ protein analysis by proximity ligation using UnFold probes2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 5400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have redesigned probes for in situ proximity ligation assay (PLA), resulting in more efficient localized detection of target proteins. In situ PLA depends on recognition of target proteins by pairs of antibody-oligonucleotide conjugates (PLA probes), which jointly give rise to DNA circles that template localized rolling circle amplification reactions. The requirement for dual recognition of the target proteins improves selectivity by ignoring any cross-reactivity not shared by the antibodies, and it allows detection of protein-protein interactions and post-translational modifications. We herein describe an improved design of the PLA probes -UnFold probes - where all elements required for formation of circular DNA strands are incorporated in the probes. Premature interactions between the UnFold probes are prevented by including an enzymatic "unfolding" step in the detection reactions. This allows DNA circles to form by pairs of reagents only after excess reagents have been removed. We demonstrate the performance of UnFold probes for detection of protein-protein interactions and post-translational modifications in fixed cells and tissues, revealing considerably more efficient signal generation. We also apply the UnFold probes to detect IL-6 in solution phase after capture on solid supports, demonstrating increased sensitivity over both normal sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and conventional PLA assays.

  • 31.
    Koos, Björn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Andersson, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Clausson, Carl-Magnus
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Grannas, Karin
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Klaesson, Axel
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Cane, Gaëlle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Analysis of protein interactions in situ by proximity ligation assays2014In: High-Dimensional Single Cell Analysis: Mass Cytometry, Multi-parametric Flow Cytometry and Bioinformatic Techniques / [ed] Fienberg, Harris G., Nolan, Garry P., Springer, 2014, Vol. 377, p. 111-26Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fate of the cell is governed by interactions among proteins, nucleic acids, and other biomolecules. It is vital to look at these interactions in a cellular environment if we want to increase our understanding of cellular processes. Herein we will describe how the in situ proximity ligation assay (in situ PLA) can be used to visualize protein interactions in fixed cells and tissues. In situ PLA is a novel technique that uses DNA, together with DNA modifying processes such as ligation, cleavage, and polymerization, as tools to create surrogate markers for protein interactions of interest. Different in situ PLA designs make it possible not only to detect protein-protein interactions but also post-translational modifications and interactions of proteins with nucleic acids. Flexibility in DNA probe design and the multitude of different DNA modifying enzymes provide the basis for modifications of the method to make it suitable to use in many applications. Furthermore, examples of how in situ PLA can be combined with other methods for a comprehensive view of the cellular activity status are discussed.

  • 32.
    Koos, Björn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Cane, Gaëlle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Grannas, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Clausson, Carl-Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Arngården, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Klaesson, Axel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Proximity Depended Initiation of Hybridization Chain ReactionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Sensitive detection of protein interactions and post-translational modifications of native proteins is a challenge for research and diagnostic purposes. A method for this, which could be used in point of care devices should be cheap and robust.

    Results: Building on hybridization chain reaction, we designed a four hairpin system which is metastable in solution at 37°C for several hours and undergoes rapid signal amplification upon introduction of an initiator oligonucleotide. When the proximity hairpins are conjugated to antibodies these proximity probes in combination with the HCR hairpins and the initiator oligonucleotide provide a specific, enzyme free method to detect HIF-1α/HIF-1β and potentially other protein interactions and PTMs in situ. Furthermore it was possible to detect single proteins in the different compartments of the cell, further proving the specificity of this technique.

    Conclusion: In this study we present proximity dependent HCR, which is a cheap and robust method to detect protein interactions and post-translational modifications. Because of its independence from enzymes the technique has only low demands on storage and handling which makes it interesting for point of care devices.

  • 33.
    Koos, Björn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Cane, Gaëlle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Grannas, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Löf, Liza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Arngården, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Heldin, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Clausson, Carl-Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Klaesson, Axel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hirvonen, M Karoliina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    de Oliveira, Felipe Marques Souza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Talibov, Vladimir O
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Biochemistry.
    Pham, Nhan T
    School of Biological Sciences and School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Auer, Manfred
    School of Biological Sciences and School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Danielson, U Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Biochemistry.
    Haybaeck, Johannes
    Institute of Pathology, Medical University of Graz, Austria.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Proximity-dependent initiation of hybridization chain reaction2015In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 6, article id 7294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sensitive detection of protein interactions and post-translational modifications of native proteins is a challenge for research and diagnostic purposes. A method for this, which could be used in point-of-care devices and high-throughput screening, should be reliable, cost effective and robust. To achieve this, here we design a method (proxHCR) that combines the need for proximal binding with hybridization chain reaction (HCR) for signal amplification. When two oligonucleotide hairpins conjugated to antibodies bind in close proximity, they can be activated to reveal an initiator sequence. This starts a chain reaction of hybridization events between a pair of fluorophore-labelled oligonucleotide hairpins, generating a fluorescent product. In conclusion, we show the applicability of the proxHCR method for the detection of protein interactions and posttranslational modifications in microscopy and flow cytometry. As no enzymes are needed, proxHCR may be an inexpensive and robust alternative to proximity ligation assays.

  • 34.
    Koos, Björn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    David, Leonor
    Sobrinho-Simoes, Manuel
    Dimberg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Wählby, Carolina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Next-Generation Pathology: Surveillance of Tumor Microecology2015In: Journal of Molecular Biology, ISSN 0022-2836, E-ISSN 1089-8638, Vol. 427, no 11, p. 2013-2022Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A tumor is a heterogeneous population of cells that provides an environment in which every cell resides in a microenvironmental niche. Microscopic evaluation of tissue sections, based on histology and immunohistochemistry, has been a cornerstone in pathology for decades. However, the dawn of novel technologies to investigate genetic aberrations is currently adopted in routine molecular pathology. We herein describe our view on how recent developments in molecular technologies, focusing on proximity ligation assay and padlock probes, can be applied to merge the two branches of pathology, allowing molecular profiling under histologic observation. We also discuss how the use of image analysis will be pivotal to obtain information at a cellular level and to interpret holistic images of tissue sections. By understanding the cellular communications in the microecology of tumors, we will be at a better position to predict disease progression and response to therapy.

  • 35. Koos, Björn
    et al.
    Paulsson, Janna
    Jarvius, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Sanchez, Betzabe Chavez
    Wrede, Brigitte
    Mertsch, Sonja
    Jeibmann, Astrid
    Kruse, Anne
    Peters, Ove
    Wolff, Johannes E. A.
    Galla, Hans-Joachim
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Paulus, Werner
    Östman, Arne
    Hasselblatt, Martin
    Platelet-derived growth factor receptor expression and activation in choroid plexus tumors2009In: American Journal of Pathology, ISSN 0002-9440, E-ISSN 1525-2191, Vol. 175, no 4, p. 1631-1637Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Choroid plexus tumors are intraventricular neoplasms predominantly affecting young children. In contrast to choroid plexus papillomas, choroid plexus carcinomas progress frequently, necessitating the development of adjuvant treatment concepts. Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) signaling has been shown to support growth in a variety of tumors. The finding of PDGF receptor expression in choroid plexus tumors prompted us to elucidate PDGF receptor activation state using a novel method, in situ proximity ligation assay, on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, archival samples of 19 choroid plexus tumors. As assessed by in situ proximity ligation assay, the proportion of phosphorylated PDGF receptor alpha was low in choroid plexus papillomas and choroid plexus carcinomas, whereas phosphorylated PDGF receptor beta was found to be significantly higher in choroid plexus carcinomas. In the immortalized choroid plexus epithelial cell line Z310 expressing PDGF receptor beta, PDGF-BB exhibited a time- and dose-dependent proliferative response, which was significantly attenuated by imatinib (gleevec). In conclusion, our findings suggest that PDGF receptor beta is functionally involved in the biology of choroid plexus tumors and may represent a molecular target for therapy. In addition, this study demonstrates the feasibility and usefulness of in situ proximity ligation assay for monitoring receptor tyrosine kinase activation in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, archival tissues.

  • 36.
    Koos, Björn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Closing in on life - proximity dependent methods for life sciences2015In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 6, no 20, p. 17867-17868Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Landegren, Ulf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Dahl, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Fredriksson, Simon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Banér, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Gullberg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Jarvius, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Gustafsdottir, Sigrun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Ericsson, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Stenberg, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Schallmeiner, Edith
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Padlock and proximity probes for in situ and array-based analyses: tools for the post genomic era2003In: Comparative and functional genomics, ISSN 1531-6912, E-ISSN 1532-6268, Vol. 4, no 5, p. 525-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Highly specific high-throughput assays will be required to take full advantage of the accumulating information about the macromolecular composition of cells and tissues, in order to characterize biological systems in health and disease. We discuss the general problem of detection specificity and present the approach our group has taken, involving the reformatting of analogue biological information to digital reporter segments of genetic information via a series of DNA ligation assays. The assays enable extensive, coordinated analyses of the numbers and locations of genes, transcripts and protein.

  • 38.
    Landegren, Ulf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Schallmeiner, Edith
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Fredriksson, Simon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Banér, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Gullberg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Jarvius, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Gustafsdottir, Sigrun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Dahl, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Ericsson, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Stenberg, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Molecular tools for a molecular medicine: analyzing genes, transcripts and proteins using padlock and proximity probes2004In: Journal of Molecular Recognition, ISSN 0952-3499, E-ISSN 1099-1352, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 194-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Procedures and reagents are needed to specifically detect all the macromolecules that are being identified in the course of genome projects. We discuss how this challenge may be met using a set of ligation-based reagents termed padlock probes and proximity ligation probes. These probes include elements with affinity for specific nucleic acid and protein molecules, respectively, along with unique identifier DNA sequence elements that encode the identity of the recognized target molecules. The information content of DNA strands that form in the detection reactions are recorded after amplification, allowing the recognized target molecules to be identified. The procedures permit highly specific solution-phase or localized analyses of large sets of target molecules as required in future molecular analyses.

  • 39. Lanemo Myhrinder, Anna
    et al.
    Hellqvist, Eva
    Sidorova, Ekaterina
    Söderberg, Anita
    Baxendale, Helen
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Willander, Kerstin
    Tobin, Gerard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Bäckman, Eva
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Hörkkö, Sohvi
    Rosén, Anders
    A new perspective: molecular motifs on oxidized LDL, apoptotic cells, and bacteria are targets for chronic lymphocytic leukemia antibodies2008In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 111, no 7, p. 3838-3848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The restricted immunoglobulin (Ig) repertoire found in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) implies a role for antigen(s) in the leukemogenesis. The nature of the antigens has, however, not been characterized, although examples of autoantigens have been demonstrated. We have analyzed a panel of 28 CLL cell lines and primary cultures, producing monoclonal Ig with different Ig heavy-chain variable region gene usage and mutational status, including several complementarity determining region 3 homology subset members. Using mass-spectrometry, immunoassays, or protein macroarrays, we have discovered novel antigens binding to CLL Igs. These antigens included cytoskeletal proteins vimentin, filamin B, and cofilin-1, but also phosphorylcholine-containing antigens (eg, Streptococcus pneumoniae polysaccharides and oxidized low-density lipoprotein [oxLDL]). Additional new antigens identified were cardiolipin and proline-rich acidic protein-1. Remarkably, these antigens represent molecular motifs exposed on apoptotic cells/blebs and bacteria, and several CLL Igs bound to apoptotic Jurkat cells. In conclusion, these intriguing data, showing a limited target structure recognition, indicate that CD5(+) CLL B cells are derived from a cell compartment that produces "natural antibodies," which may be instrumental in elimination and scavenging of apoptotic cells and pathogenic bacteria.

  • 40.
    Larsson, Chatarina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Grundberg, Ida
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    In situ detection and genotyping of individual mRNA molecules2010In: Nature Methods, ISSN 1548-7091, E-ISSN 1548-7105, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 395-397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing knowledge about the heterogeneity of mRNA expression within cell populations highlights the need to study transcripts at the level of single cells. We present a method for detection and genotyping of individual transcripts based on padlock probes and in situ target-primed rolling-circle amplification. We detect a somatic point mutation, differentiate between members of a gene family and perform multiplex detection of transcripts in human and mouse cells and tissue.

  • 41.
    Le Jan, Sébastien
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hayashi, Makoto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Kasza, Zsolt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Eriksson, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bishop, Joseph R
    Weibrecht, Irene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Heldin, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Holmborn, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jakobsson, Lars
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Spillmann, Dorothe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Esko, Jeffrey D
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Kjellén, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kreuger, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Functional Overlap Between Chondroitin and Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans During VEGF-Induced Sprouting Angiogenesis2012In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 1255-1263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Heparan sulfate proteoglycans regulate key steps of blood vessel formation. The present study was undertaken to investigate if there is a functional overlap between heparan sulfate proteoglycans and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans during sprouting angiogenesis.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: Using cultures of genetically engineered mouse embryonic stem cells, we show that angiogenic sprouting occurs also in the absence of heparan sulfate biosynthesis. Cells unable to produce heparan sulfate instead increase their production of chondroitin sulfate that binds key angiogenic growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor A, TGFβ, and platelet-derived growth factor B. Lack of heparan sulfate proteoglycan production however leads to increased pericyte numbers and reduced adhesion of pericytes to nascent sprouts, likely due to dysregulation of TGFβ and platelet-derived growth factor B signal transduction.

    CONCLUSIONS: The present study provides direct evidence for a previously undefined functional overlap between chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans and heparan sulfate proteoglycans during sprouting angiogenesis. Our findings provide information relevant for potential future drug design efforts that involve targeting of proteoglycans in the vasculature.

  • 42.
    Leuchowius, Karl Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Weibrecht, Irene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    In situ proximity ligation assay for microscopy and flow cytometry2011In: Current Protocols in Cytometry, ISSN 1934-9297, Vol. Suppl 56, p. Unit 9.36-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to study proteins and protein interactions inside cells and tissues is important for elucidating how cells function in health and disease. The in situ proximity ligation assay (in situ PLA) presented here can be used to visualize proteins, protein-protein interactions, and post-translational modifications in cells and tissues. The method is based upon the use of antibodies that target the proteins involved in an interaction; hence, the method has the advantage that it can be used in clinical specimens, providing localized, quantifiable single molecule detection in single cells. This unit describes how in situ PLA can be used with fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry to study proteins (obtaining high sensitivity and specificity of detection) and protein interactions. It also includes information on expected results and information on how to troubleshoot the assay.

  • 43.
    Leuchowius, Karl-Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Clausson, Carl-Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Grannas, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Erbilgin, Yücel
    Botling, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zieba, Agata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Parallel Visualization of Multiple Protein Complexes in Individual Cells in Tumor Tissue2013In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 1563-1571Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellular functions are regulated and executed by complex protein interaction networks. Accordingly, it is essential to understand the interplay between proteins in determining the activity status of signaling cascades. New methods are therefore required to provide information on different protein interaction events at the single cell level in heterogeneous cell populations such as in tissue sections. Here, we describe a multiplex proximity ligation assay for simultaneous visualization of multiple protein complexes in situ. The assay is an enhancement of the original proximity ligation assay, and it is based on using proximity probes labeled with unique tag sequences that can be used to read out which probes, from a pool of probes, have bound a certain protein complex. Using this approach, it is possible to gain information on the constituents of different protein complexes, the subcellular location of the complexes, and how the balance between different complex constituents can change between normal and malignant cells, for example. As a proof of concept, we used the assay to simultaneously visualize multiple protein complexes involving EGFR, HER2, and HER3 homo- and heterodimers on a single-cell level in breast cancer tissue sections. The ability to study several protein complex formations concurrently at single cell resolution could be of great potential for a systems understanding, paving the way for improved disease diagnostics and possibilities for drug development.

  • 44.
    Leuchowius, Karl-Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Jarvius, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Wickström, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology.
    Rickardson, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology.
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Larsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Fryknäs, Mårten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology.
    Jarvius, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    High content screening for inhibitors of protein interactions and post-translational modifications in primary cells by proximity ligation2010In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 178-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cost of developing new drugs is a major obstacle for pharmaceutical companies and academia with many drugs identified in the drug discovery process failing approval for clinical use due to lack of intended effect or because of severe side effects. Since the early 1990 s, high throughput screening of drug compounds has increased enormously in capacity but has not resulted in a higher success rate of the identified drugs. Thus, there is a need for methods that can identify biologically relevant compounds and more accurately predict in vivo effects early in the drug discovery process. To address this, we developed a proximity ligation-based assay for high content screening of drug effects on signaling pathways. As a proof of concept, we used the assay to screen through a library of previously identified kinase inhibitors, including six clinically used tyrosine kinase inhibitors, to identify compounds that inhibited the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor beta signaling pathway in stimulated primary human fibroblasts. Thirteen of the 80 compounds were identified as hits, and the dose responses of these compounds were measured. The assay exhibited a very high Z' factor (0.71) and signal to noise ratio (11.7), demonstrating excellent ability to identify compounds interfering with the specific signaling event. A comparison with regular immunofluorescence detection of phosphorylated PDGF receptor demonstrated a far superior ability by the in situ proximity ligation assay to reveal inhibition of receptor phosphorylation. In addition, inhibitor-induced perturbation of protein-protein interactions of the PDGF signaling pathway could be quantified, further demonstrating the usefulness of the assay in drug discovery.

  • 45.
    Leuchowius, Karl-Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Jarvius, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Weibrecht, Irene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Pardali, Katerina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Protein diagnostics by proximity ligation: Combining multiple recognition and DNA amplification for improved protein analysis2010In: Molecular Diagnostics / [ed] George P. Patrinos & Wilhelm J. Ansorge, Amsterdam, Boston: Elsevier/Academic Press , 2010, 2, p. 299-306Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Leuchowius, Karl-Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Weibrecht, Irene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Gedda, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Flow cytometric in situ proximity ligation analyses of protein interactions and post-translational modification of the epidermal growth factor receptor family2009In: Cytometry: Part A, ISSN 1552-4922, Vol. 75A, no 10, p. 833-839Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interactions between members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family mediates cellular responses to ligand stimulation. Measurement of these interactions could provide important information and may prove useful as prognostic markers in malignancy. Therefore, to develop methods to study these interactions in genetically unmodified cells, such as clinical samples, in a sensitive and selective way, with good statistical accuracy, is important. The in situ proximity ligation assay (in situ PLA) was used to quantify homo- and heteromeric interactions between EGFR and HER2 in cultured cells, using flow cytometry as the readout method. Cells were monitored for changes in dimerization patterns and phosphorylation status upon stimulation. The different cell lines displayed varying amounts of interactions between EGFR and HER2, but the amount of dimerization was not found to be affected significantly upon stimulation by EGF. Activation of EGFR could be visualized by in situ PLA, but not by immunofluorescence staining. In situ PLA was successfully used to study receptor dimerization and activation of the EGF-receptor family with high selectivity and sensitivity. The combination of in situ PLA and flow cytometry provided a statistically powerful way of analyzing protein-protein interactions and post-translational modifications on a single-cell basis.

  • 47.
    Liu, Yanling
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gu, Jijuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hagner-McWhirter, Asa
    Sathiyanarayanan, Poojahrau
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gullberg, Mats
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Johansson, Johan
    Hammond, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ivansson, Daniel
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Western Blotting via Proximity Ligation for High Performance Protein Analysis2011In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 10, no 11, p. O111.011031-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Western blotting is a powerful and widely used method, but limitations in detection sensitivity and specificity, and dependence upon high quality antibodies to detect targeted proteins, are hurdles to overcome. The in situ proximity ligation assay, based on dual antibody recognition and powerful localized signal amplification, offers increased detection sensitivity and specificity, along with an ability to identify complex targets such as phosphorylated or interacting proteins. Here we have applied the in situ proximity ligation assay mechanism in Western blotting. This combination allowed the use of isothermal rolling circle amplification of DNA molecules formed in target-specific ligation reaction, for 16-fold or greater increase in detection sensitivity. The increased specificity because of dual antibody recognition ensured highly selective assays, detecting the specific band when combinations of two cross-reactive antitubulin antibodies were used (i.e. both producing distinct nonspecific bands in traditional Western blotting). We also demonstrated detection of phosphorylated platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta by proximity ligation with one antibody directed against the receptor and another directed against the phosphorylated tyrosine residue. This avoided the need for stripping and re-probing the membrane or aligning two separate traditional blots. We demonstrate that the high-performance in situ proximity ligation-based Western blotting described herein is compatible with detection via enhanced chemiluminescence and fluorescence detection systems, and can thus be readily employed in any laboratory.

  • 48.
    Löf, Liza
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Arngården, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Olsson-Strömberg, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Siart, Benjamin
    Jansson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Dahlin, Joakim S
    Thörn, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Christiansson, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hermansson, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Ahlstrand, Erik
    Wålinder, Göran
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Flow Cytometric Measurement of Blood Cells with BCR-ABL1 Fusion Protein in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, p. 1-9, article id 623Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is characterized in the majority of cases by a t(9;22)(q34;q11) translocation, also called the Philadelphia chromosome, giving rise to the BCR-ABL1 fusion protein. Current treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors is directed against the constitutively active ABL1 domain of the fusion protein, and minimal residual disease (MRD) after therapy is monitored by real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) of the fusion transcript. Here, we describe a novel approach to detect and enumerate cells positive for the BCR-ABL1 fusion protein by combining the in situ proximity ligation assay with flow cytometry as readout (PLA-flow). By targeting of the BCR and ABL1 parts of the fusion protein with one antibody each, and creating strong fluorescent signals through rolling circle amplification, PLA-flow allowed sensitive detection of cells positive for the BCR-ABL1 fusion at frequencies as low as one in 10,000. Importantly, the flow cytometric results correlated strongly to those of RQ-PCR, both in diagnostic testing and for MRD measurements over time. In summary, we believe this flow cytometry-based method can serve as an attractive approach for routine measurement of cells harboring BCR-ABL1 fusions, also allowing simultaneously assessment of other cell surface markers as well as sensitive longitudinal follow-up.

  • 49.
    Löf, Liza
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ebai, Tonge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Dubois, Louise
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Wik, Lotta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ronquist, K. Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Nolander, Olivia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundin, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Detecting individual extracellular vesicles using a multicolor in situ proximity ligation assay with flow cytometric readout2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 34358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flow cytometry is a powerful method for quantitative and qualitative analysis of individual cells. However, flow cytometric analysis of extracellular vesicles (EVs), and the proteins present on their surfaces has been hampered by the small size of the EVs - in particular for the smallest EVs, which can be as little as 40 nm in diameter, the limited number of antigens present, and their low refractive index. We addressed these limitations for detection and characterization of EV by flow cytometry through the use of multiplex and multicolor in situ proximity ligation assays (in situ PLA), allowing each detected EV to be easily recorded over background noise using a conventional flow cytometer. By targeting sets of proteins on the surface that are specific for distinct classes of EVs, the method allows for selective recognition of populations of EVs in samples containing more than one type of EVs. The method presented herein opens up for analyses of EVs using flow cytometry for their characterization and quantification.

  • 50.
    Mansouri, Larry
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Sutton, Lesley-Ann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Ljungström, Viktor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Bondza, Sina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Arngården, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Bhoi, Sujata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Larsson, Jimmy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology.
    Cortese, Diego
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Kalushkova, Antonia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Gunnarsson, Rebeqa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Young, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Falk-Sörqvist, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Plevova, Karla
    Muggen, Alice
    Yan, Xiao-Jie
    Sander, Birgitta
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Smedby, Karin E.
    Juliusson, Gunnar
    Belessi, Chrysoula
    Chiorazzi, Nicholas
    Strefford, Jonathan C.
    Langerak, Anton W.
    Pospisilova, Sarka
    Davi, Frederic
    Hellström, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Wiklund, Helena Jernberg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Ghia, Paolo
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools.
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Recurrent Mutations within the Nfkbie gene: A Novel Mechanism for NF-kappa B Deregulation in Aggressive Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia2014In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 124, no 21Article in journal (Other academic)
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