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  • 1.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Between Insanity and Love2015In: Computers & Society: The Newsletter of the ACM Special Interest Group on Computers and Society Special Issue on 20 Years of ETHICOMP / [ed] Mark Coeckelbergh, Bernd Stahl, and Catherine Flick, 2015, 154-158 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology has opened up more opportunities to find bet- ter partners, especially via online dating sites . In addition, technology related to love and sex currently goes far beyond online dating sites. Technology influences our intimate life more and more. Media started to pick up romantic rela- tionship between human beings and digital characters of- ten. Furthermore, today, many wearable devices to experi- ence virtual sex have come into the market. And also robots designed for having a sex with human beings are being de- veloped rapidly. Some might claim having a sex without love or without reproduction is just totally pointless. Or, having a sex with robots is totally “insane”. But apparently there are big market needs, and modern technology seems to be able to satisfy them. This paper explores how it is possible for us to feeling love or sexual desire for non-organic objects by conducting the interview survey, and also considers why people want to have technology for satisfying sexual desire from a philosophical perspective. 

  • 2.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Designing "Open Education": How does the ICT-based system function as a new medium of participation for sustainability?2013In: The possibilities of ethical ICT, Kolding: University of Southern Denmark , 2013, 33-36 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information and communication technology (ICT) has developed and deployed rapidly since 1980’s. Until now ICT has been considered as one of the most important infrastructures in living in the present globalized society. Along with diffusion of personal computers and highly leveraging information on the web, the way of learning has been changing gradually. Hundreds universities, institutes and companies constructs and releases the “open education” platform based on ICT, for example iTunes U, TakingITGlobal and so on. These open education platforms are basically open for everyone who wants to learn by using contents on the website for free in so far as they can access the Internet. And the movement toward the construction and use of ICT-based education platform is supported by international organizations, such as the Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI) in OECD and UNESCO’s project “the Virtual University and e-learning”.

  • 3.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Globalization and the change of employment system2011In: Management systems / [ed] Japanese Association of Management Systems, Tokyo: Nippon Hyoronsha , 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    ICT professionalism and gender2011In: Management quality science / [ed] Hiroshi Yamashita, Tokyo: Chuokeizaisha , 2011, 181-184 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    New form of social ties through communicating in social media (Sosharu media ga tukuru atarashii kizuna no katachi)2012In: Information and Management  64th Conferenceedings Spring / [ed] Japan Society for Information and Management, 2012, 141-144 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Research in Computer/Information Ethics: A Gender Gap Analysis and Consequences2013In: Ambiguous Technologies: Philosophical Issues, Practical Solutions, Human Nature, Lisbon: Universidade Autonoma de Lisboa , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology democratization enforces a never-ending process of risk/responsibility harmonization through with ethical assumptions. However, it is crucial to debate the gender gap within our community (reasons) and explore the potential “outcome” of female contribution. This panel does not promote a direct hit with the sessions, although the intention is to be controversial and influencer concerning a latent problem inside our community. 

  • 7.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Rethinking ICT's contribution to sustainability and education2012In: New technologies, education for sustainable development and critical pedagogy / [ed] Vassilios Makrakis and Nelly Kostoulas-Makrakis, Rethymnon, Greece: ICTeESD, University of Crete , 2012, 232-235 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The open education system based on Information and communication technology (ICT) can provide great opportunities for people to learn regardless of resident area, language, gender, age and so on. Currently people use it actively and build up new social networks as learning communities or study groups on the Internet. Shared knowledge and the process of sharing knowledge established through online communication are considered as key elements in the context of strengthen the individual and the country. In other words, creating the open education platform and content plays a role of designing a culture and society. However, it is not easy to realize the ideal concept of “open education” because people have many differences in language, culture, political system, ideology, thought, deployment of ICT et cetera. In order to create the open education system, which has a high degree of usability and effectiveness, we need to closely examine social roles and difficulties of the ICT-based education system in designing sustainable societies. And also the ICT-based educational system is established through the continuous human-computer interaction. Therefore, all participants get involved with developing the open education and each of them assumes a responsibility for making the open educational contents more abundant.

  • 8.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Social Influence on Cooperation and Coordination2013In: ICT-ethics: Sweden and Japan, Linköping: LiU Tryck , 2013, 24-30 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information and Communication Technology (ICT) creates novel products and services and promotes innovation in the whole of global society, and the amount of data, which we can gather and use, or even just see, is increasing dramatically. Searching and checking information on the Internet is our ordinary way of doing, people enjoy online shopping commonly and sometime look for their partners through the Internet. Internet, mobile networks and social media have flourished greatly in our daily lives, ICT has developed and deployed very dynamic and diverse as well. Particulary our communication patterns are greatly affected by permeation of social media into our daily life.

  • 9.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Social media as a tool for change2011In: The social impact of social computing / [ed] A. Bisset et al., Sheffield, UK: Sheffield Hallam University , 2011, 44-50 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Social Media as Informal Public Spheres2012In: Creating and applying socially, ethically and professionally acceptable ICT systems: Current challenges and what is next? / [ed] Diane Whitehouse, 2012, 3- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Do social media generate social capital beyond borders between the real and virtual spaces? If so, how do social media function in forming and maintaining social capital? From the beginning of 2011, a huge number of people have seen political turmoil stimulated by use of social media and felt the inner stirrings of people’s cooperative networks via social media. Thus, some people strongly stressed that social media has a great power to change authoritarian regimes from the global political issues perspective. On the other hand, we recognized how social media worked effectively from the local issues perspective, for example in the case of the massive disaster in Japan. Existing media such as TV and newspapers didn’t work well, the Japanese got and exchanged information through social media and in fact some victims were rescued based on information via social media. Both cases, political changes and massive disasters, show information transaction process has been supported by thin trust, generalized reciprocity and loosely tied people’s network, regardless of geographical borders or real/virtual spaces. And some users opened their opinions about governments’ policies or their discontent with the government through social media and discuss with others online. Through this discussing process, it seems that social media plays an important role in fostering a social network leading to social capital. This study reconsiders characteristics of social capital and its role in improving people’s lives through social media. It also examines how social media affects social capital processes, by giving a few examples of using social media under critical social situations.

  • 11.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Social Media Supporting Democratic Dialogue2013In: Ambiguous Technologies: Philosophical Issues, Practical Solutions, Human Nature, Lisbon: Autónoma University , 2013, 36-43 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The term of “social media” appears in newspapers and magazines everyday and the huge number of people use social media actively in daily life. Nowadays, in the highly Information and Communication Technology (ICT) developed country Japan, Japanese people enroll in social media and evolve a new way of communicating with others based on the “virtual” social distance between them. Among social media, Twitter has been focusing on its strong power as the tool for political change recent years. While Twitter has of-expressed problems as well as the “traditional” social media, it is characterized by the limited number of characters, strong propagation and optional reciprocity. Those characteristics stimulate people’s communication online and bring about opportunities for social interaction and democratic dialogue. On the other hand, in the deluge of information, we need to nurture skills to utilize critical and rational way of thinking through dialogue not only between others also between themselves internally. This study explores characteristics of social media and differences between “traditional” social media and Twitter, and how the difference affects people’s information behavior in Japan.

  • 12.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Technology as Mask2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    情報倫理研究におけるジェンダーの射程 (The range of gender perspective in computer ethics research)2014In: 経営情報学会誌 (The Japan Society of Management Information (JASMIN) Journal), ISSN 0918-7324, Vol. 23, no 2, 158-161 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [ja]

    情報通信技術(Information and CommunicationTechnology: ICT)は現代社会において必要不可欠なものであり,ICT なくしては私達の日常生活は成り立たない.一方で,ICT を利用するがゆえにかつては予想されなかった新たな社会的問題ないし社会的リスクが引き起こされている.顕著な例としては,監視社会,ソーシャル・エンジニアリングあるいはサイバーセキュリティなどが挙げられよう.これらの問題は互いに複雑に入り組み合い,より大きな社会的問題へと発展してきた.またICT が普及し人々のライフスタイルが変化するなかでは,セックスやジェンダーといった性にまつわる事象もICT からの影響を免れることは難しく,性別に基づくデジタル・デバイドや,サイバーストーキング,ポルノグラフィ,出会い系サイトなどICT と性との関係性における倫理的問題が議論されるに至る.本稿では,ICT が性に与える影響と,その影響をジェンダーの視角からどのように考察することが可能かについて検討する.

  • 14.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    男女共同参画社会って何だろう? (What is "gender equal society"?): 日本とスウェーデンの現状から 考える私たちの「ライフスタイル」 (Think about our life-style together)2013Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [ja]

    世界有数の福祉国家として知られ、また、ワーク・ライフ・バランスの実現度が高い国としても知られているスウェーデン。セミナー講師が住むスウェーデンでは、育児休業中の所得保障を受けるため、両親がともに育児休業を取らなければならないといった制度が整っています。福祉を実現するため高い税金が課税されていることは有名な話ですが、その税金によって全ての福祉施策 を充実させているわけではないことなど、さまざまな日本との違いを学びます。

  • 15.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Balancing between the conflicting interests of different stakeholders in research2017In: European Business Ethics Network: Research / [ed] Ioannis Filos, Athens: Deree, American College of Greece College , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We in academia produce a lot of research in the form of papers, technologies, methods, medicines and so on. All those outcomes are of great importance for society and people. On the other hand, there are many stakeholders in the process of producing research outcomes nowadays. Researchers themselves are of course the main stakeholders because their career is dependent on research. However, when research projects are connected to various political goals or affect profits for industries, many other stakeholders like politicians and business people get involved to research activities as well. Especially industries offer a lot of research funds to academic projects, and actually today many collaborative research projects between industry and academia are in progress. Thus, research environments are very complex and morally challenging since many different and conflicting interests interfere. Many academic researchers believe that what they produce belongs to society, and that their work is there mainly to satisfy the interests and needs of society and people. But, at the same time, they need to fulfill the demands coming from research supporters who offer funds and research opportunities. In producing research of good quality, it is unavoidable and very important for researchers to make a fair choice between the quality of scientific research and the satisfaction of stakeholders’ demands. This paper explores how researchers make justice between these conflicting interests, what kind of ethical dilemmas and problems they face in their daily research activities, and how they solve the ethical problems. This study is the first step of a research project that focuses on how scientific research activities and outcomes become 'social' and 'valuable'.

  • 16.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Human-Computer Interaction.
    Diversity in the construction of organization value2010In: Which values for which organisations / [ed] Rusconi et al., G., 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Do social media generate social capital?2012In: ICT, society and human beings / [ed] Gunilla Bradley, Diane Whitehouse and Angela Lin, Lisbon: IADIS Press , 2012, 133-136 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Do social media generate social capital beyond borders between the real and virtual spaces? If so, how do social media function in forming and maintaining social capital? This study is triggered by those simple questions. From the beginning of 2011, a huge number of people have seen political turmoil stimulated by use of social media and felt the inner stirrings of people’s cooperative network via social media. Thus, some people strongly stressed that social media has a great power to change authoritarian regimes from the global political issues perspective. On the other hand, we recognized how social media worked effectively from the local issues perspective, for example in the case of the massive disaster in Japan. Under the critical situation, where existing traditional media like phones, TV, radio and newspapers didn’t work, the Japanese got and exchanged information through social media and in fact some victims were rescued based on information via social media. Both cases, political changes and massive disasters, show information transaction process has been supported by thin trust, generalized reciprocity and loosely tied people’s network, regardless of geographical borders or real/virtual spaces. Therefore it seems that social media plays an important role in fostering a social network leading to social capital. This paper reconsiders characteristics of social capital and its role in improving people’s lives through social media. It also examines how social media influences social capital by giving a few examples of social media and social issues, more specifically, the political turmoil in Tunisia and big earthquake disasters in Japan.

  • 18.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Ethical Competence and Social Responsibility in Scientific Research using ICT Tools2015In: Computers & Society: The Newsletter of the ACM Special Interest Group on Computers and Society Special Issue on 20 Years of ETHICOMP / [ed] Mark Coeckelbergh, Bernd Stahl, and Catherine Flick; Vaibhav Garg and Dee Weikle, ACM Digital Library, 2015, 345-347 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how to improve and support researchers'ethical competence in scientic research and how to conduct research ethically, especially in research activities using Information and Communication Technology (ICT). Refining research ethics relating to ICT is unavoidable in the highly technological society of today, for example big data is used in different scientic research activities, and systems which support our daily lives are constructed based on the existing systems. In other words, technology reproduces technology itself. And almost all research activities need to use ICT through the whole research process. Moreover, researchers are required to be able to participate and react sensibly in ethical dialogues with society and citizens. Seen in that light, this study could be applicable not only to computer science and technology but also to a broad spectrum of research areas as the constructive notions of ethics, liberty and responsibility in research activity.

  • 19.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    ICT supported crisis communication and dialog2013In: The possibilities of ethical ICT, Kolding: University of Southern Denmark , 2013, 37-41 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how people use social media under serious social conditions, and how social media affects people’s behavior after a disaster based on the case of the March 2011 disaster in Japan. In this critical situation, where existing traditional media like phones, television, radio and newspapers did not work well, the Japanese exchanged and received information through social media. In fact some victims were rescued based on information via social media. Corresponding to people’s need, social media provided various services to support people immediately after the disaster. Therefore it seems that social media plays an important role in fostering a social network leading to horizontal communication, critical thinking, dialog; supporting social capital. This study reconsiders characteristics of social capital and its role in improving people’s lives and supporting democratic communication as well as the difficulties in people bonding together through social media.

  • 20.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Regulation of potentially harmful contents on minors2012In: Equity, integrity and beauty in information law and ethics / [ed] Maria Botti, Kerkyra, Greece: Ionian Academy , 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In democratic societies, freedom of expression is the indispensable right and duty of citizens. Although there are a few exceptions, it is generally considered that governments should not intervene and regulate this right. Both in digital and analog environments, sexual and violent descriptions are usually regulated by self-censorship of participants. However, trying to protect minors from potentially harmful contents by controlling and regulating them is very difficult. The definition of what is “potentially harmful contents on minors” varies depending on the values and on the culture of each social group. Moreover, along with the rapid spread of mobile phones and smartphones, it becomes more difficult for parents and teachers to control children’s access to harmful contents; something that might have been easier regarding the use of personal computers. Access to the Internet provides huge opportunities not only of visiting websites but also of participating in online communication such as Social Networking Service (SNS). An incredible surge of SNS evokes some issues in considering juvenile access to SNS, categorized roughly into three types. One is the very old and new problem in accessing the Internet, which is how to shield minors from harmful contents. Second is how to block inappropriate contact with a pedophile. Third is cyber bullying. SNS is a very new medium and its market and technology are evolving drastically and are constantly changing. Thus the agent of taking the lead in making and enforcing rules or self-regulation is still absent. Additionally, SNS services utilize the function of social graph actively, and third parties can provide contents and applications using open API. In response to these situations, European Commission implemented Safer Social Networking Principle for the EU, and United States released the guideline for SNS users and worked on SNS companies and users to promote voluntary efforts for using SNS properly. In Japan, mobile contents companies built the Content Evaluation and Monitoring Association (EMA) as a voluntary reviewing entity. However those measures don’t include any severe legal penalty. Those remain self-regulation relying on voluntary activities of private sectors. On the other hand, self-regulation itself is regulated by laws, social norms, market conditions and technological architectures. In this paper we discuss the conditions of regulation and self-regulation, and we explore some ideas about what would be the best way to regulate SNS.

  • 21.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Responsibility and Competence in Political Ethics2014In: Proceedings International Political Science Association, 23rd World Congress of Political Science, 2014: Challenges of contemporay governance, Montreal, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At present, our society is globalized, chaotic, changing, and also highly affected by individualization. That is, it is more difficult for out society to reach goals or conclusions collectively as one nation or one society. Under the situation, society needs political leaders to gather individual values, interests and opinions, and to take a lead in making collective decisions in the proper manner. Political leaders are required to have ability of making decisions and acting in the best way for society. Their responsibility is high even for future generations. According to Weber there are two categories of ethics pertaining to politics and to political leaders. One is the "ethic of ultimate ends" and the other is the "ethic of responsibility". "Ethic of responsibility" of political leaders is considered as a critical element. It is perceived as a kind of ability to consider possible social options and their impact, and also to take responsibility of their consequences in the future. In this context, it is very well compatible to the idea of ethical competence. It binds together philosophy and modern empirical research on ethical decision making, opening up for interventions like training and education for political leaders. 

  • 22.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Robots as companions in feelings and discussions2017In: Retfærdighed – Justice, Robophilosophy / [ed] Martin Mose Bentzen, Copenhagen, 2017, 42-42 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Robots are used in emotional relationships. On the other hand, it is not very common to think that robots can be used as partners in a philosophical dialog. It would be challenging to find the conditions under which a robot can be one of the parts in an emotional relationship or in a Socratic dialog. Robots usable as emotional or philosophical companions need probably to function well at both dimensions, providing continuous and interchanging support for feelings and reasoning. Our aim here is not to investigate the technical possibilities for such a machine but the theoretical requirements and ethical conditions for its creation and use.

  • 23.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Social movement and social media2012In: Critique, democracy and philosophy in 21st century information society: Towards critical theories of social media / [ed] Christian Fuchs, 2012, 76-77 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do social media affect the process of building a democratic society? Information and communication technology (ICT) made it possible for people to communicate beyond national borders and other obstacles. Social media in particular play an important role in creating a place where people communicate with each other, for example Facebook, MySpace, YouTube and so on. In other words, under these circumstances, social media function as the third place in addition to home and workplaces, which contributes not only to unite people in commu- nities but also to the resolution of various problems and crises. Therefore, the third place nurtures relationships and mutual trust under internet access conditions, and it is open for free discussions, and becomes a ground for democracy.

    In face-to-face communication, participants’ behavior is affected by social context cues, and users let their behavior adjust to particular communication manners. However, in online communicati- on, it is more difficult for participants to understand static and dynamic cues surrounding other participants compared to face-to-face communication. Because, in many cases, whereas social media makes it possible for users to communicate with others easily regardless of physical dis- tance, national boundaries and time difference, it limits the number of characters and the amount of data that they can post and use. However, participation in online communication, especially in social media, is seen as the key element in the recent trend toward democratization. In fact, millions of users send and receive a huge amount of information via social media in order to cultivate a relationship with others and strengthen mutual exchange beyond borders. Generally it is recognized that social media advance participation through exchanging information with minimal social context cues.

    However, communication through social media has some problems. Firstly, exchanged informa- tion via social media minimizes social context cues under severe restricted or censored internet access conditions; because simplified messages can be more understandable and impressive for other users in communicating. Therefore information tends to be extreme, and it could evoke a risk of group polarization. Secondly, in social media, information receivers gather fragmented information in borderless cyberspace, for any purpose. Following this they try to transform infor- mation into something they can understand, something closer to their own experience, or they try to perceive the feelings and experience of the senders of information. Through this process, users develop a sense of solidarity and share expectations and norms, which bring them together as one community. Therefore, social norms have a considerable influence on users in particular communities and advance self-stereotyping among them as solidarity and social identity are en- hanced. This situation carries the social risk of exclusion of others. Some people call Middle-east political change “Facebook revolution” or “twitter revolution” on the internet. Is this naming really pertinent? Indeed, social media has played an important role as “hub for information” and as the third place in political change. Still, social media has to contribute to the development of skills for dialog in order to achieve a really democratic society. 

  • 24.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    The paradoxical nature of privacy2012In: Privacy in the social networked world / [ed] Andrew A. Adams, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Privacy appears to be a very important issue today when ICT permeates more and more aspects of our life. Mainly this is understood as a risk of breaking the privacy of persons, and possibly the privacy of groups, organizations, corporations and states. It is therefore interesting to investigate the main definitions of privacy, try to grasp its nature and to discern its features, and to discuss the possible ways of suitable and needed activities.

     

    There are essentially two types if definitions. One is focused on the protection of information and on the rules that govern openness and protection. Moor (1997), defines privacy like “the expression of a core value, viz., the value of security” or “sometimes used to designate a situation in which people are protected from intrusion or observation by natural or physical circumstances.... In addition to natural privacy there is normative privacy. A normatively private situation is a situation protected by ethical, legal, or conventional norms.” A similar definition is given by Edmund Byrne (1998): Privacy as a “zone of inaccessibility”.

     

    A different approach to the definition of privacy is focused on the control of information, and the main example of this kind of definition is given by Charles Fried (1968): “Privacy is not simply an absence of information about us in the minds of others, rather it is the control we have over information about ourselves”. In the same wavelength we find the definition given by Quinn (2011): “Privacy is a social arrangement that allows individuals to have some level of control over who is able to gain access to their physical selves and their personal information”.

     

    Which of the two lines of definitions is more accurate and fruitful, regarding its power to guide our activities toward the achievement of desired goals? If we make an effort to describe the nature of privacy we can easily and rather fast come to the conclusion that privacy is not only something that has to be protected. Although this is important, underlined by both lines of definitions, it seems that privacy sometimes has to be diminished or invaded in order to satisfy important interests and values. One is to create a bond to another person, group or organization. To achieve this one has to give access to private information, or even to give up part or all limitations toward this special person or organization. It is a matter of trust between each other. The other situation, which is the most common one, is that a person, group or organization, which we may call a separate entity, has always another important interest added to the interest of protecting its own privacy: To break, diminish or invade the privacy of any other entity that is a prospective or actual partner in any sense. It is very important for any entity to acquire access to the information about any other entity that is of some interest.

     

    If we now go back to the definitions of privacy, and look upon them through the glasses of our observations of its nature we may have good arguments to maintain that a definition focused on the control of information is more plausible. Given the controversial nature of privacy (protect it and break it at the same time) and the clashes arising constantly between all entities in a social interaction, the focus cannot be on normative solutions which if they work are always limited to a certain situation, but on the ways skills, methods and tools we use to create, revise and apply policies, guidelines, rules and principles to manage the issues of privacy.

     

    References

    Byrne, E. F. (1998). “Privacy”. Encyclopedia of Applied Ethics, 3, 649-659.

    Fried, C. (1968). “Privacy: A moral analysis”. Yale Law Journal, 77, 475-493.

    Moor, J. (1997). “Towards a theory of privacy in the information age”. Computer and Society, 27, 27-32.

    Quinn, M. J. (2011). Ethics for the Information Age. Boston: Pearson.

  • 25.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Virtue as ethical competence2011In: EBEN Annual Conference 2011 / [ed] Luc Van Liedekerke, Antwerp: Universiteit Antwerpen , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizations active in an environment of increasing internal and external diversity and change need the guidance of suitable moral values. This implies many challenges. However, focus on processes is unavoidable and necessary. Particularly, regarding ethical aspects this is the only possible way for the construction and applicationof right values. In achieving that, skills and processes are very helpful because they provide a good base for the promotion of personal and organizational ethical competence, a competence referring to the ability using the right ways to handle ethical issues and which is not constrained by normative aspects. Since it is not possible to create moral values once and for all, in the diverse and changing conditions of today, continuous moral value creation and interpretation is the only way. Consequently, the focus must be on the process itself, and on the skills and structures behind this process, i.e. on personal and organizational ethical competence. Ethical competence is therefore a virtue.

  • 26.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Laaksoharju, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    The revival of natural and cultural identity through social media2011In: The computational turn: Past, presents, futures? / [ed] Charles Ess and Ruth Hagengruber, Münster: MV-Wissenschaft , 2011, 329-331 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social media has played an important role as hub for information in political change. It can contribute to the development och psychological and social preconditions for dialog and democracy.

  • 27.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Murata, Kiyoshi
    The holding function of robots in highly technological society2015In: Proceedings of Japan Society for Infomation and Management 70th Annual Conference, 2015, Vol. 70, 65-68 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Adams, Andrew A.
    Cantre for Business Ethics, Meiji University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Murata, Kiyoshi
    School of Commerce, Meiji University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Snowden’s revelations and the attitudes of students at Swedish universities2017In: Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, ISSN 1477-996X, E-ISSN 1758-8871, Vol. 15, no 3, 247-264 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This study aims to map Swedish students’ attitudes towards Snowden’s revelations and their effects in the political and socio-cultural environment of Sweden.

    Design/methodology/approach – A questionnaire was answered by 190 Swedish university students. The quantitative responses to the survey and qualitative considerations of free text answers were statistically analysed.

    Findings – Swedish students had a high level of knowledge about the Snowden revelations; they actively searched for information, gave a positive judgement of Snowden’s actions and were willing to follow his example in Sweden, although not in the USA. They trusted their country and most of its institutions and authorities except for secret service agencies and the internet and computer software companies.

    Practical implications – This study could be used as a design of education for university students, especially in information technology programmes.

    Social implications – The study can be used for developing and applying policies on privacy, surveillance and whistle-blowing.

    Originality/value – This study is part of a bigger international study to map students’ attitudes towards Snowden’s revelations and their opinions about privacy, surveillance and whistle-blowing opening up for cross-cultural analyses.

  • 29.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Can machines make ethical decisions?2013In: Artificial Intelligence Applications and Innovations, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, 693-699 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    IT security and sustainability2013In: ICT for Sustainability: Sustainability, Social Accountability and Computing / [ed] Diane Whitehouse, Zurich: ETH , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systems security is of paramount importance. However, security levels and parameters are defined in a social context and are closely related to values, beliefs and interests. Security of systems is mainly related to people and society. Therefore, the focus of research in this area has to be on developing and testing practically applicable methods and tools to assure the security or IT systems critical to societal and environmental sustainability. Here present our theoretical and methodological work on how to construct tools for the achievement of the above goals as well as the results of testing our tools empirically.

  • 31.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Judging the complexity of privacy, openness and loyalty issues2015In: Computers & Society: The Newsletter of the ACM Special Interest Group on Computers and Society Special Issue on 20 Years of ETHICOMP / [ed] Mark Coeckelbergh, Bernd Stahl, and Catherine Flick; Vaibhav Garg and Dee Weikle, ACM Digital Library, 2015, 416-419 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Privacy protection and whistle-blowing are controversial issues. Privacy has to be protected but it hinders access to correct information. Whistle-blowing is necessary for correct decision-making, neutralizing wrong beliefs and preventing crime but it may destabilize groups, institutions and societies, and cause conicts. The question investigated here was whether people judging the controversial issues of privacy and whistle-blowing take a moralistic or a philosophical approach. The hypothesis was that homogeneous responses point to a philosophical approach whereas responses correlated with cultural background point to a moralistic approach. Participants' responses to a questionnaire on Manning and Snowden cases did not produce an unambiguous picture, and this result did not lead to a decisive answer to our hypothesis question.

  • 32.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Methods for IT security and privacy2013In: ICT, society and human beings / [ed] P. Kommers and C. Gauzente, Prague: IADIS Press, 2013, 155-158 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The similar nature of IT security, privacy and ethics, and the difficulty to find ready-made answers, put the focus on theway one handles the problems in these areas. Philosophy has analyzed this issue in depth and it has given us thephilosophical method as the means to find satisfying solutions. Psychology has shown in empirical research what skillsare necessary for this purpose. Since the issues of IT security, privacy and ethics are very important for us today, we needto create and use tools and methods to take care of them.

  • 33.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Philosophical method and the conflict liberty-security2014In: Proceedings ETHICOMP 2014Li: berty and security in an age of ICTs, Paris: UPMC - Sorbonne Universités , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ICT both supports and controls our lives, but today it is necessary and unavoidable for our way of living. In the present paper different ways to approach security are critically examined. The main question is how we may able to handle these issues in real life and how to create suitable and working system designs and policies. We need to consider the controversial nature of security, and base our efforts on classical philosophical theory and psychological research. By that we can develop suitable skills, methods and tools to be adopted in a democratic and deliberative process in order to create, revise and apply policies, guidelines, designs, rules and principles.

  • 34.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Laaksoharju, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Tools and methods for security: Stimulating the skill to philosophize2013In: European Intelligence and Security Informatics Conference: 2013, IEEE Computer Society, 2013, 163-165 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Finding optimal solutions to security issues is verydifficult or impossible. Conflicting interests and values decidewhat has to be done. Every thinkable answer contains both risksand possibilities. I our effort to find solutions we have always tonegotiate and make compromises. A dialectic process is necessaryin security in order to identify significant interests and values,and to formulate principles and policies. Handling security issuesand working for secure IT systems demand continuousadjustment to relevant values as well as the necessary personalskills and suitable group processes. Focusing on the method andmaking sure that the right way of proceeding has been adopted isthe way to get satisfactory answers to the problems of IT security.The philosophical method of deliberative thinking seems to be thebasis of such methods.

  • 35.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Coghill, Ken
    Mohash University.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Supporting politicians’ skill to handle moral issues2014In: Proceedings of IPSA 23rd Congress on Political Science, 2014: Challenges of contemporay governance, Montreal: The International Political Science Association , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In politics it is necessary, for leaders as well as for political parties, to have the ability to handle all kinds of moral problems that may arise during any political activity. Failure to address moral issues properly has significant impact on a political organization’s influence on society, affecting election results, image, and public relations as well as internal processes. It may have a detrimental effect on the morality of citizens and society. Competence in handling moral problems in a satisfying way is therefore very important for any political leader and political organization. Education in ethics should equip politicians for difficult decisions, and ethical competence is therefore the most important goal of training programs. We need reliable and effective methods to stimulate and support political leaders’ ethical competence. In order to achieve ethical competence for political leaders we need to describe and assess psychological processes aimed at the handling of moral problems: How political leaders reason in front of moral problems, how they solve these problems, and how they make their decisions. Ethical skill in psychology, and in accordance to the classical philosophical position, is understood as the basis and the aim of ethical competence of leaders. Politicians’ ethical competence and confidence is defined as the use of a problem-solving and decision-making cognitive ability, independent of particular political, ideological or moral values. Based on that, we can construct valid assessment tools and training programs that support the acquisition and use of ethical competence and skills.

  • 36.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Lennerfors, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Laaksoharju, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Asai, Ryoko
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Björk, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Etikutbildning för ingenjörer: Övningar, verktyg, metoder2015In: 5:e utvecklingskonferensen för Sveriges Ingenjörsutbildningar / [ed] Stefan Pålsson, Uppsala universitet, 2015, 30-31 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    En utbildning i etik som ska träna studenter att själva hantera etiska problem måste utgå ifrån klassisk filosofi och från etikpsykologisk forskning i problemlösning och beslutsfattande. Utbildningen ska koncentrera sig på praktiskt arbete och seminarier med egna verkliga etiska dilemman. Målet är utveckling av förmågan att lösa etiska problem, tolka och tillämpa viktiga principer och regler, och delta aktivt i dialog med andra intressenter. I workshopen kommer vi att visa metoder, verktyg och övningar som vi använder i våra etikkurser för ingenjörer och teknologer.

1 - 36 of 36
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