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  • 1.
    Branger, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jacobsson, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Andersson Sundén, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Comparison of prediction models for Cherenkov light emissions from nuclear fuel assemblies2017In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 12, article id P06007Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Digital Cherenkov Viewing Device (DCVD) is a tool used by nuclear safeguards inspectors to verify irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies in wet storage based on the Cherenkov light produced by the assembly. Verification that no rods have been substituted in the fuel, so-called partial-defect verification, is made by comparing the intensity measured with a DCVD with a predicted intensity, based on operator fuel declaration. The prediction model currently used by inspectors is based on simulations of Cherenkov light production in a BWR 8x8 geometry. This work investigates prediction models based on simulated Cherenkov light production in a BWR 8x8 and a PWR 17x17 assembly, as well as a simplified model based on a single rod in water. Cherenkov light caused by both fission product gamma and beta decays were considered.The simulations reveal that there are systematic differences between the models, most noticeably with respect to the fuel assembly cooling time. Consequently, a prediction model that is based on another fuel assembly configuration than the fuel type being measured, will result in systematic over or underestimation of short-cooled fuel as opposed to long-cooled fuel. While a simplified model may be accurate enough for fuel assemblies with fairly homogeneous cooling times, the prediction models may differ by up to 18 \,\% for more heterogeneous fuel. Accordingly, these investigations indicate that the currently used model may need to be exchanged with a set of more detailed, fuel-type specific models, in order minimize the model dependant systematic deviations.

  • 2.
    Branger, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jacobsson, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Andersson Sundén, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    On Cherenkov light production by irradiated nuclear fuel rods2017In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 12, article id T06001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Safeguards verification of irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies in wet storage is frequently done by measuring the Cherenkov light in the surrounding water produced due to radioactive decays of fission products in the fuel. This paper accounts for the physical processes behind the Cherenkov light production caused by a single fuel rod in wet storage, and simulations are presented that investigate to what extent various properties of the rod affect the Cherenkov light production. The results show that the fuel properties has a noticeable effect on the Cherenkov light production, and thus that the prediction models for Cherenkov light production which are used in the safeguards verifications could potentially be improved by considering these properties.It is concluded that the dominating source of the Cherenkov light is gamma-ray interactions with electrons in the surrounding water. Electrons created from beta decay may also exit the fuel and produce Cherenkov light, and e.g. Y-90 was identified as a possible contributor to significant levels of the measurable Cherenkov light in long-cooled fuel. The results also show that the cylindrical, elongated fuel rod geometry results in a non-isotropic Cherenkov light production, and the light component parallel to the rod's axis exhibits a dependence on gamma-ray energy that differs from the total intensity, which is of importance since the typical safeguards measurement situation observes the vertical light component. It is also concluded that the radial distributions of the radiation sources in a fuel rod will affect the Cherenkov light production.

  • 3.
    Branger, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Andersson Sundén, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Investigating the Cherenkov light production due to cross-talk in closely stored nuclear fuel assemblies in wet storage2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Digital Cherenkov Viewing Device (DCVD) is one of the tools available to a safeguards inspector performing verifications of irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies in wet storage. One of the main advantages of safeguards verification using Cherenkov light is that it can be performed without moving the fuel assemblies to an isolated measurement position, allowing for quick measurements. One disadvantage of this procedure is that irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies are often stored close to each other, and consequently gamma radiation from one assembly can enter a neighbouring assembly, and produce Cherenkov light in the neighbour. As a result, the measured Cherenkov light intensity of one assembly will include contributions from its neighbours, which may affect the safeguards conclusions drawn.

    In this paper, this so-called near-neighbour effect, is investigated and quantified through simulation. The simulations show that for two fuel assemblies with similar properties stored closely, the near-neighbour effect can cause a Cherenkov light intensity increase of up to 3% in a measurement. For one fuel assembly surrounded by identical neighbour assemblies, a total of up to 14% of the measured intensity may emanate from the neighbours. The relative contribution from the near-neighbour effect also depends on the fuel properties; for a long-cooled, low-burnup assembly, with low gamma and Cherenkov light emission, surrounded by short-cooled, high-burnup assemblies with high emission, the measured Cherenkov light intensity may be dominated by the contributions from its neighbours.

    When the DCVD is used for partial-defect verification, a 50% defect must be confidently detected. Previous studies have shown that a 50% defect will reduce the measured Cherenkov light intensity by 30% or more, and thus a threshold has been defined, where a ≥30% decrease in Cherenkov light indicates a partial defect. However, this work shows that the near-neighbour effect may also influence the measured intensity, calling either for a lowering of this threshold or for the intensity contributions from neighbouring assemblies to be corrected for. In this work, a method is proposed for assessing the near-neighbour effect based on declared fuel parameters, enabling the latter type of corrections.

  • 4.
    Branger, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Experimental evaluation of models for predicting Cherenkov light intensities from short-cooled nuclear fuel assemblies2018In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 13, article id P02022Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Digital Cherenkov Viewing Device (DCVD) is a tool used by nuclear safeguards inspectors to verify irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies in wet storage based on the recording of Cherenkov light produced by the assemblies. One type of verification involves comparing the measured light intensity from an assembly with a predicted intensity, based on assembly declarations. Crucial for such analyses is the performance of the prediction model used, and recently new modelling methods have been introduced to allow for enhanced prediction capabilities by taking the irradiation history into account, and by including the cross-talk radiation from neighbouring assemblies in the predictions.

    In this work, the performance of three models for Cherenkov-light intensity prediction is evaluated by applying them to a set of short-cooled PWR 17x17 assemblies for which experimental DCVD measurements and operator-declared irradiation data was available; (1) a two-parameter model, based on total burnup and cooling time, previously used by the safeguards inspectors, (2) a newly introduced gamma-spectrum-based model, which incorporates cycle-wise burnup histories, and (3) the latter gamma-spectrum-based model with the addition to account for contributions from neighbouring assemblies.

    The results show that the two gamma-spectrum-based models provide significantly higher precision for the measured inventory compared to the two-parameter model, lowering the standard deviation between relative measured and predicted intensities from 15.2% to 8.1% respectively 7.8%.

    The results show some systematic differences between assemblies of different designs (produced by different manufacturers) in spite of their similar PWR 17x17 geometries, and possible ways are discussed to address such differences, which may allow for even higher prediction capabilities. Still, it is concluded that the gamma-spectrum-based models enable confident verification of the fuel assembly inventory at the currently used detection limit for partial defects, being a 30% discrepancy between measured and predicted intensities, while some false detection occurs with the two-parameter model. The results also indicate that the gamma-spectrum-based prediction methods are accurate enough that the 30% discrepancy limit could potentially be lowered.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-03-01 15:24
  • 5.
    Branger, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Improving the prediction model for Cherenkov light generation by irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies in wet storage for enhanced partial-defect verification capability2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Branger, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Wernersson, Erik L. G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jacobsson, Staffan Svärd
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Image analysis as a tool for improved use of the Digital Cherenkov Viewing Device for inspection of irradiated PWR fuel assemblies.2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Digital Cherenkov Viewing Device (DCVD) is a tool used to measure the Cherenkov light emitted from irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies stored in water pools. It has been approved by the IAEA for attended gross defect verification, as well as for partial defect verification, where a fraction of the fuel material has been diverted. In this report, we have investigated the current procedures for recording images with the DCVD, and have looked into ways to improve these procedures. Using three different image sets of PWR fuel assemblies, we have analysed what information and results can be obtained using image analysis techniques. We have investigated several error sources that distort the images, and have shown how these errors affect the images. We have also described some of the errors mathematically, and have discussed how these error sources may be compensated for, if the character and magnitude of the errors are known. Resulting from our investigations are a few suggestions on how to improve the procedures and consequently the quality of the images recorded with the DCVD as well as suggestions on how to improve the analysis of collected images. Specifically, a few improvements that should be looked into in the short term are:

    • Images should be recorded with the fuel assembly perfectly centered in the image, and preferably without any tilt of the DCVD relative to the fuel in order to obtain accurate measurements of the light intensity. Image analysis procedures that may aid the alignment are presented.

    • To compensate for the distorting effect of the water surface and possible turbulence in the water, several images with short exposure time should be captured rather than one image with long exposure time. Using image analysis procedures, it is possible to sum the images resulting in a final image with less distortions and improved quality.

    • A reference image should be used to estimate device-related distortions, so that these distortions are compensated for. Ideally, this procedure can also be used to calibrate individual pixels.

    • The background should be carefully taken into account in order to separate the background level from diffuse signal components, allowing for the background to be subtracted. Accordingly, each measurement campaign should be accompanied by at least one background measurement, recorded from a section in the storage pool where no fuel assemblies are present. Furthermore, the background level should be determined from a larger region in the image and not from one individual pixel, as is currently done.

    • A database of measurements should be set up, containing DCVD images, information about the applied DCVD settings and the conditions that the DCVD was used in. Any partial defect verification procedure at any time could then be tested against as much data as possible. Accordingly, a database can aid in evaluating and improving partial defect verification methods using DCVD image analysis.

    Based on the findings and discussions in this report, some long-term improvements are also suggested.

  • 7.
    Calen, Hans
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Physics, Department of Nuclear and Particle Physics. Kärnfysik.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Physics, Department of Nuclear and Particle Physics. Kärnfysik.
    Höistad, Bo
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Physics, Department of Nuclear and Particle Physics. Kärnfysik.
    Johansson, Tord
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Physics, Department of Nuclear and Particle Physics. Kärnfysik.
    Kupsc, Andrzej
    Kärnfysik.
    Marciniewski, Pawel
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Physics, Department of Nuclear and Particle Physics. Kärnfysik.
    Thome, Erik
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Physics, Department of Nuclear and Particle Physics. Kärnfysik.
    Zlomanczuk, Jozef
    Hadron physics experiments in antiproton proton reactions with the planned PANDA detector2007In: Int. J. Mod. Phys. A22: 9th International Workshop on Meson Production, Properties and Interaction (MESON 2006), Cracow, Poland, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Davour, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Andersson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics. OECD Halden Reactor Project, Halden, Norway.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Holcombe, Scott
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics. OECD Halden Reactor Project, Halden, Norway.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Troeng, Mats
    Applying image analysis techniques to tomographic images of irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies2016In: Annals of Nuclear Energy, ISSN 0306-4549, E-ISSN 1873-2100, Vol. 96, p. 223-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present a set of image analysis techniques used for extraction of information from cross-sectional images of nuclear fuel assemblies, achieved from gamma emission tomography measurements. These techniques are based on template matching, an established method for identifying objects with known properties in images.

    We demonstrate a rod template matching algorithm for identification and counting of the fuel rods present in the image. This technique may be applicable in nuclear safeguards inspections, because of the potential of verifying the presence of all fuel rods, or potentially discovering any that are missing.

    We also demonstrate the accurate determination of the position of a fuel assembly, or parts of the assembly, within the imaged area. Accurate knowledge of the assembly position enables detailed modelling of the gamma transport through the fuel, which in turn is needed to make tomographic reconstructions quantifying the activity in each fuel rod with high precision.

    Using the full gamma energy spectrum, details about the location of different gamma-emitting isotopes within the fuel assembly can be extracted. We also demonstrate the capability to determine the position of supporting parts of the nuclear fuel assembly through their attenuating effect on the gamma rays emitted from the fuel. Altogether this enhances the capabilities of non-destructive nuclear fuel characterization.

  • 9.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Basic facts and definitions related to measurement2015In: The new nuclear forensics: Analysis of nuclear materials for security purposes / [ed] Vitaly Fedchenko, Great Britain: Oxford University Press, 2015, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Gamma spectroscopy as a tool of non-destructive nuclear forensic analysis2015In: The new nuclear forensics: Analysis of nuclear materials for security purposes / [ed] Vitaly Fedchenko, Great Britain: Oxford University Press, 2015, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    PWO Crystal Measurements and Simulation Studies of Anti-Hyperon Polarisation for PANDA2008Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) facility in Darmstadt, Germany, will be upgraded to accommodate a new generation of physics experiments. The future accelerator facility will be called FAIR and one of the experimentsat the site will be PANDA, which aims at performing hadron physics investigations by colliding anti-protons with protons. The licentiate thesis consistsof three sections related to PANDA. The first contains energy resolutionstudies of PbWO4 crystals, the second light yield uniformity studies of PbWO4 crystals and the third reconstruction of the lambda-bar-polarisation in the PANDA experiment.

    Two measurements of the energy resolution were performed at MAX-Lab in Lund, Sweden, with an array of 3x3 PbWO4 crystals using a tagged photon beam with energies between 19 and 56 MeV. For the April measurement, the crystals were cooled down to -15 degrees C and for the September measurement down to -25 degrees C. The measured relative energy resolution, /E, is decreasing from approximately 12% at 20 MeV to 7% at 55 MeV. In the standard energy resolution expression /E = a/ b/E c, the three parameters a, b and c seem to be strongly correlated and thus difficult to determine independently over this relative small energy range. The value of a was therefore fixed to that one would expect from Poisson statistics of the light collection yield (50 phe/MeV) and the results from fits were /E=0.45%/ 0.18%/EGeV 8.63% and /E = 0.45%/0.21%/EGeV 6.12% for the April and September measurements, respectively. The data from the September measurement was also combined with previous data from MAMI for higher energies, ranging from approximately 64 to 715 MeV. The global fit over the whole range of energies gave an energy resolution expression of /E = 1.6%/ 0.095%/EGeV 2.1%.

    Light yield uniformity studies of five PbWO4 crystals, three tapered and two non-tapered ones, have also been performed. The tapered crystals delivered a light output which increased with increasing distance from the Photo Multiplier Tube (PM tube). Black tape was put on different sides of one tapered crystals, far from the PM tube to try to get a more constant uniformity prole. It was seen that the light output profile depends on the position of the tape. Generally, the steep increase in light output at large distances from the PM tube could be damped.

    The third part of the thesis concerns the reconstruction of the lambdabar polarisation in the reaction . Events were generated using a modied generator from the PS185 experiment at LEAR. With a 100% polarisation perpendicular to the scattering plane, a polarisation of (99±1.8)% was reconstructed. Slight non-zero polarisations along the axis determined by the outgoing hyperon as well as the axis in the scattering plane, were also reconstructed. These were (4.1±2.1)% and (2.6±2.0)% respectively. From this investigation it was shown that the detector efficiency was not homogeneous and that slow pions are difficult to reconstruct.

  • 12.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Statistical grounds for determining the ability to detect partial defects using the Digital Cherenkov Viewing Device (DCVD)2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The DCVD (Digital Cherenkov Viewing Device), and its predecessor the CVD (CherenkovViewing Device), has been used by the IAEA to inspect gross defects in spent fuel. The time has now come to also write a report on the instrument’s ability to detect partial defects at the 50% level. Before this report can be finalized, the capabilities of the DCVD must of course be investigated and quantified. Discussions have arisen within the DCVD-group how this can and should be done.

  • 13.
    Grape, Sophie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan
    Recent modelling studies for analysing the partial-defect detection capability of the Digital Cherenkov Vieweing Device2014In: Esarda Bulletin, ISSN 0392-3029, no 51, p. 3-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Strong sources of radioactivity, such as spent nuclear fuel stored in water pools, give rise to Cherenkov light. This light originates from particles, in this case electrons released from gamma-ray interactions, which travel faster than the speed of light in the water. In nuclear safeguards, detection of the Cherenkov light intensity is used as a means for verifying gross and partial defect of irradiated fuel assemblies in wet storage.

     

    For spent nuclear fuel, the magnitude of the Cherenkov light emission depends on the initial fuel enrichment (IE), the power history (in particular the total fuel burnup (BU)) and the cooling time (CT). This paper presents recent results on the expected Cherenkov light emission intensity obtained from modelling a full 8x8 BWR fuel assembly with varying values of IE, BU and CT. These results are part of a larger effort to also investigate the Cherenkov light emission for fuels with varying irradiation history and other fuel geometries in order to increase the capability to predict the light intensity and thus lower the detection limits for the Digital Cherenkov Viewing Device (DCVD).

     

    The results show that there is a strong dependence of the Cherenkov light intensity on BU and CT, in accordance with previous studies. However, the dependences demonstrated previously are not fully repeated; the current study indicates a less steep decrease of the intensity with increasing CT. Accordingly, it is suggested to perform dedicated experimental studies on fuel with different BU and CT to resolve the differences and to enhance future predictive capability. In addition to this, the dependence of the Cherenkov light intensity on the IE has been investigated. Furthermore, the modelling of the Cherenkov light emission has been extended to CTs shorter than one year. The results indicate that high-accuracy predictions for short-cooled fuel may require more detailed information on the irradiation history.

  • 14.
    Grape, Sophie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Hellesen, Carl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Åberg Lindell, Matilda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    New perspectives on nuclear power - Generation IV nuclear energy systems to strengthen nuclear non-proliferation and support nuclear disarmament2014In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 73, p. 815-819Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, nuclear power has received support from environmental and climate researchers emphasizing the need to address factors of global importance such as climate change, peace and welfare. Here, we add to previous discussions on meeting future climate goals while securing safe supplies of energy by discussing future nuclear energy systems in the perspective of strengthening nuclear non-proliferation and aiding in the process of reducing stockpiles of nuclear weapons materials.

    New nuclear energy systems, currently under development within the Generation IV (Gen IV) framework, are being designed to offer passive safety and inherent means to mitigate consequences of nuclear accidents. Here, we describe how these systems may also be used to reduce or even eliminate stockpiles of civil and military plutonium—the former present in waste from today׳s reactors and the latter produced for weapons purposes. It is argued that large-scale implementation of Gen IV systems would impose needs for strong nuclear safeguards. The deployment of Safeguards-by-Design principles in the design and construction phases can avoid draining of IAEA resources by enabling more effective and cost-efficient nuclear safeguards, as compared to the current safeguards implementation, which was enforced decades after the first nuclear power plants started operation.

  • 15.
    Grape, Sophie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Hellesen, Carl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Branger, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Forskning inom teknisk kärnämneskontroll vid Uppsala universitet under 2014–20152016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Uppsala universitet har inom ramen för olika avtal med SSM under 2014-2015 bedrivit ett omfattande forskningsprogram inom kärnämneskontroll. Forskningsprogrammet har under denna tid innefattat 3 doktorander med dedikerade forskningsprojekt och ett flertal seniora forskare som helt eller delvis har varit engagerade inom kärnämneskontroll.

    Denna rapport uppmärksammar särskilt fyra forskningsområden av hög relevans för den globala kärnämneskontrollen, vilka benämns; DCVD, Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, verifiering av atypiska bränsleobjekt och Generation IV kärnkraftsystem. Även andra forskningsaktiviteter har genomförts inom ramen för forskningsprogrammet, vilka dock ligger utanför redovisningen i denna rapport.

    Under perioden 2014-2015 producerades inom forskningsprogrammet 9 artiklar som skickats till vetenskapliga tidskrifter med peer-review-granskning. Därutöver gjordes medvetna satsningar på att lyfta fram forskningen på de arenor som är av störst betydelse för det internationella kärnämneskontrollarbetet, d.v.s. på de symposier och möten som arrangeras av FN:s internationella atomenergiorgan (IAEA), det europeiska samarbetsorganet ESARDA och den amerikanska organisationen INMM. Vid dessa internationella konferenser publicerades ytterligare 15 vetenskapliga artiklar med unikt innehåll under perioden. En publikationslista med samtliga forskningsarbeten som producerats under perioden redovisas i denna rapport.

  • 16.
    Grape, Sophie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Österlund, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Students’ approaches to learning from other students’ oral presentations2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A phenomenographic study has been performed in order to investigate students’ approaches to learning from other students’ oral presentations in the context of a compulsory seminar on nuclear accidents in the third year of the nuclear engineering programme at Uppsala University.

  • 17.
    Grape, Sophie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Lindberg, Bo
    Recent modelling studies for analysing the partial-defect detection capability of theDigital Cherenkov Viewing Device2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Digital Cherenkov Viewing Device (DCVD) is an instrument available to IAEA inspectors forverifying spent nuclear fuel in wet storage at nuclear facilities. The instrument records the Cherenkovlight that is emitted in the water surrounding the highly radioactive fuel. The light intensity is largelydependent on the amount of nuclear material in the fuel as well as its burnup and cooling time and can beused by the inspector as a measure for verifying the properties of the fuel.To aid in the analysis of the Cherenkov light intensity, a simulation toolkit has been developed, whichmodels the emission, transport and detection of Cherenkov light. This toolkit is particularly useful forinvestigating the response of the DCVD for fuel assemblies subject to different types of partial defects,where fuel rods might have been removed or substituted with non-irradiated material. Variousconfigurations of partial defects may be simulated in order to evaluate the detection capabilities of theDCVD.Here, we present how the light intensity recorded by the DCVD is affected by the fuel history and by thepartial defect scenario. We present a methodology for how the analysis and interpretation of recordedintensities may be performed to result in confidence-supported statements of different levels of partialdefect. Finally, we suggest topics for further studies to accomplish an automated inspection system based on this methodology.

  • 18.
    Grape, Sophie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Lindberg, Bo
    Verifying nuclear fuel assemblies in wet storages on a partial defect level: A software simulation tool for evaluating the capabilities of the Digital Cherenkov Viewing Device2013In: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, ISSN 0168-9002, E-ISSN 1872-9576, Vol. 698, p. 66-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Digital Cherenkov Viewing Device (DCVD) is an instrument that records the Cherenkov light emitted from irradiated nuclear fuels in wet storages. The presence, intensity and pattern of the Cherenkov light can be used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors to verify that the fuel properties comply with declarations. The DCVD is since several years approved by the IAEA for gross defect verification, i.e. to control whether an item in a storage pool is a nuclear fuel assembly or a non-fuel item [1]. Recently, it has also been endorsed as a tool for partial defect verification, i.e. to identify if a fraction of the fuel rods in an assembly have been removed or replaced. The latter recognition was based on investigations of experimental studies on authentic fuel assemblies and of simulation studies on hypothetic cases of partial defects [2]. This paper describes the simulation methodology and software which was used in the partial defect capability evaluations. The developed simulation procedure uses three stand-alone software packages: the ORIGEN-ARP code [3] used to obtain the gamma-ray spectrum from the fission products in the fuel, the Monte Carlo toolkit Geant4 [4] for simulating the gamma-ray transport in and around the fuel and the emission of Cherenkov light, and the ray-tracing programme Zemax [5] used to model the light transport through the assembly geometry to the DCVD and to mimic the behaviour of its lens system. Furthermore, the software allows for detailed information from the plant operator on power and/or burnup distributions to be taken into account to enhance the authenticity of the simulated images. To demonstrate the results of the combined software packages, simulated and measured DCVD images are presented. A short discussion on the usefulness of the simulation tool is also included

  • 19.
    Grape, Sophie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Sundkvist, Erik
    Parcey, Dennis
    Chen, Dennis
    Larsson, Mats
    Dahlberg, Joakim
    Axell, Kåre
    Lindberg, Bo
    Kosierb, Rick
    Partial defect verification using the DCVD: a capability evaluation approach2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Digital Cherenkov Viewing Device (DCVD) is a non-intrusive instrument available to theInternational Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for verifying spent nuclear fuel in storage pools. It iscurrently used for gross-defect evaluations, i.e. to verify that an item in a storage pool is anirradiated fuel assembly and not a fresh assembly or a dummy. This is done by recording images ofthe Cherenkov light emitted in the water surrounding the fuel. Currently, the instrument’s ability toalso detect partial defects at the 50% level or even lower is under study. Here, experimental work iscomplimented by modeling and simulations due to the limited availability of assemblies with partialdefects.Ideally, an IAEA inspector should be able to use the DCVD at e.g. a fuel storage site andimmediately after scanning obtain information on (1) whether an item is an irradiated fuel assemblyor not, and (2) whether the assembly is intact or suffers from a partial defect. This paper discusses adecision-making methodology intended for the latter purpose with the objective to implement it inthe DCVD software in order to facilitate smooth inspection procedures. Inspectors will thus not berequired to possess any expertise in the decision-making methodology.The paper also describes measurements performed during spring 2011 at the CLAB interim spentfuel storage in Sweden. The measurements were carried out with the objective to optimize theequipment handling and work flow during this type of measurement campaigns and to form a basisfor the evaluation of the DCVD’s ability to detect partial defects.

  • 20.
    Grape, Sophie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jacobsson SVärd, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Österlund, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Students’ Approaches to Learning from Other Students’ Oral Presentations2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Grape, Sophie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jonter, Thomas
    Stockholm University.
    Report on the 8th ESARDA course on nuclear safeguards and non-proliferation2011Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Grape, Sophie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Persson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Andersson Sundén, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Building a Strategy for ESARDA - Education, Training and Knowledge Management2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This document proposes a new strategy for how the ESARDA organization could work with education, training and knowledge management in nuclear safeguards. With this document we want to anchor these ideas within the organization and its management, in order to have a broad support for this initiative. We propose to activate all ESARDA working groups in the process of identifying, selecting and preparing material for module based education and training. ESARDA could then more effectively broaden its education and training activities and strengthen the connections with academia. In this way, we would also create a way to export knowledge on nuclear safeguards to nuclear education programs on the European level.

     

    We propose to create a task force that addresses a set of identified questions; examples are how to implement the new strategy, how to interact with academia and young professionals and how to develop, maintain, and structure the educational modules. By the end of 2015, the findings of the task force should be presented to the ESARDA management in order to be able to make a more informed decision on how to proceed with the new strategy.

  • 23.
    Grape, Sophie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Svärd, Staffan Jacobsson
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Lindberg, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy.
    Partial Defect Evaluation Methodology for Nuclear Safeguards Inspections of Used Nuclear Fuel Using the Digital Cherenkov Viewing Device2014In: Nuclear Technology, ISSN 0029-5450, E-ISSN 1943-7471, Vol. 186, no 1, p. 90-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes possible ways of analyzing and interpreting data obtained using the digital Cherenkov viewing device on spent nuclear fuel assemblies for the identification of partial defects in the fuel. According to the terminology of the International Atomic Energy Agency, partial defects refer to items, for instance, fuel assemblies, that are manipulated to the extent that a fraction of the fuel material is diverted or substituted. Analysis can be performed either by using a measure of the total light intensity or by identifying the light distribution pattern emanating from the spent nuclear fuel, the goal of either type of analysis being a quantitative measure that can be used in the data interpretation step. Two possible data interpretation alternatives are presented here: the threshold method and the hypothesis testing method. This paper summarizes some of the simulation studies and results that have been obtained, related to the two analysis and data interpretation methodologies.

  • 24.
    Hellesen, Carl
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Håkansson, Ane
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Improved proliferation resistance of fast reactor blankets manufactured from spent nuclear fuel2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we investigate how a blanket manufactured from recycled light water reactor (LWR)waste, instead of depleted uranium (DU), could potentially improve the non- proliferationcharacteristics. The blanket made from LWR waste would from the start of operation contain a fractionof plutonium isotopes unsuitable for weapons production. As 239Pu is bred in the blanket it istherefore always mixed with the plutonium already present.

    We use a Monte Carlo model of the advanced burner test reactor (ABTR) as reference design, andthe proliferation resistance of the blanket material is evaluated for two criteria, spontaneous neutronemission and decay heat. We show that it is possible to achieve a production of plutonium withproliferation resistance comparable to light water reactor waste with a burnup of 50MWd/kg.

  • 25.
    Hellesen, Carl
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Håkansson, Ane
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Improving the proliferation resistance of generation IV fast reactor fuel cycles using blankets manufactured from spent nuclear fuel.2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Hellesen, Carl
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jacobsson, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Åberg Lindell, Matilda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Andersson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Nuclear Spent Fuel Parameter Determination using Multivariate Analysis of Fission Product Gamma Spectra2017In: Annals of Nuclear Energy, ISSN 0306-4549, E-ISSN 1873-2100, Vol. 110, p. 886-895Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we investigate the application of multivariate data analysis methods to the analysis of gamma spectroscopy measurements of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Using a simulated irradiation and cooling of nuclear fuel over a wide range of cooling times (CT), total burnup at discharge (BU) and initial enrichments (IE) we investigate the possibilities of using a multivariate data analysis of the gamma ray emission signatures from the fuel to determine these fuel parameters. This is accomplished by training a multivariate analysis method on simulated data and then applying the method to simulated, but perturbed, data.

    We find that for SNF with CT less than about 20 years, a single gamma spectrum from a high resolution gamma spectrometer, such as a high-purity germanium spectrometer, allows for the determination of the above mentioned fuel parameters.

    Further, using measured gamma spectra from real SNF from Swedish pressurized light water reactors we were able to confirm the operator declared fuel parameters. In this case, a multivariate analysis trained on simulated data and applied to real data was used.

  • 27.
    Håkansson, Ane
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Ottosson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Qvist, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Hellesen, Carl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Lantz, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Pomp, Stephan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    IPCC förordar kärnkraft för att minska utsläppen2014In: Svenska Dagbladet (SvD), Vol. 11 novArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Jacobsson, Staffan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Smith, Eric
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA.
    White, Timothy A.
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA.
    Mozin, Vladimir
    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, USA.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Andersson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Davour, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Trellue, Holly
    Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, USA.
    Deshmukh, Nikhil
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA.
    Miller, Erin
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, USA.
    Wittman, Richard
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, USA.
    Honkamaa, Tapani
    STUK – Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority,Helsinki, Finland.
    Vaccaro, Stefano
    European Commission, DG Energy, Euratom Safeguards Luxemburg, Luxemburg.
    Ely, James
    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna, Austria.
    Outcomes of the JNT 1955 Phase I Viability Study of Gamma Emission Tomography for Spent Fuel Verification2017In: ESARDA Bulletin, ISSN 1977-5296, no 55, p. 10-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential for gamma emission tomography (GET) to detect partial defects within a spent nuclear fuel assembly has been assessed within the IAEA Support Program project JNT 1955, phase I, which was completed and reported to the IAEA in October 2016. Two safeguards verification objectives were identified in the project; (1) independent determination of the number of active pins that are present in a measured assembly, in the absence of a priori information about the assembly; and (2) quantitative assessment of pin-by-pin properties, for example the activity of key isotopes or pin attributes such as cooling time and relative burnup, under the assumption that basic fuel parameters (e.g., assembly type and nominal fuel composition) are known. The efficacy of GET to meet these two verification objectives was evaluated across a range of fuel types, burnups and cooling times, while targeting a total interrogation time of less than 60 minutes.

    The evaluations were founded on a modelling and analysis framework applied to existing and emerging GET instrument designs. Monte Carlo models of different fuel types were used to produce simulated tomographer responses to large populations of "virtual" fuel assemblies. The simulated instrument response data were then processed using a variety of tomographic-reconstruction and image- processing methods, and scoring metrics were defined and used to evaluate the performance of the methods.

    This paper describes the analysis framework and metrics used to predict tomographer performance. It also presents the design of a "universal" GET (UGET) instrument intended to support the full range of verification scenarios envisioned by the IAEA. Finally, it gives examples of the expected partial-defect detection capabilities for some fuels and diversion scenarios, and it provides a comparison of predicted performance for the notional UGET design and an optimized variant of an existing IAEA instrument.

  • 29.
    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Holcombe, Scott
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Applicability of a set of tomographic reconstruction algorithms for quantitative SPECT on irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies2015In: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, ISSN 0168-9002, E-ISSN 1872-9576, Vol. 783, p. 128-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A fuel assembly operated in a nuclear power plant typically contains 100–300 fuel rods, depending on fuel type, which become strongly radioactive during irradiation in the reactor core. For operational and security reasons, it is of interest to experimentally deduce rod-wise information from the fuel, preferably by means of non-destructive measurements. The tomographic SPECT technique offers such possibilities through its two-step application; (1) recording the gamma-ray flux distribution around the fuel assembly, and (2) reconstructing the assembly׳s internal source distribution, based on the recorded radiation field. In this paper, algorithms for performing the latter step and extracting quantitative relative rod-by-rod data are accounted for.

    As compared to application of SPECT in nuclear medicine, nuclear fuel assemblies present a much more heterogeneous distribution of internal attenuation to gamma radiation than the human body, typically with rods containing pellets of heavy uranium dioxide surrounded by cladding of a zirconium alloy placed in water or air. This inhomogeneity severely complicates the tomographic quantification of the rod-wise relative source content, and the deduction of conclusive data requires detailed modelling of the attenuation to be introduced in the reconstructions. However, as shown in this paper, simplified models may still produce valuable information about the fuel.

    Here, a set of reconstruction algorithms for SPECT on nuclear fuel assemblies are described and discussed in terms of their quantitative performance for two applications; verification of fuel assemblies׳ completeness in nuclear safeguards, and rod-wise fuel characterization. It is argued that a request not to base the former assessment on any a priori information brings constraints to which reconstruction methods that may be used in that case, whereas the use of a priori information on geometry and material content enables highly accurate quantitative assessment, which may be particularly useful in the latter application.

    Two main classes of algorithms are covered; (1) analytic filtered back-projection algorithms, and (2) a group of model-based or algebraic algorithms. For the former class, a basic algorithm has been implemented, which does not take attenuation in the materials of the fuel assemblies into account and which assumes an idealized imaging geometry. In addition, a novel methodology has been presented for introducing a first-order correction to the obtained images for these deficits; in particular, the effects of attenuation are taken into account by modelling the response for an object with a homogeneous mix of fuel materials in the image area. Neither the basic algorithm, nor the correction method requires prior knowledge of the fuel geometry, but they result in images of the assembly׳s internal activity distribution. Image analysis is then applied to deduce quantitative information.

    Two algebraic algorithms are also presented, which model attenuation in the fuel assemblies to different degrees; either assuming a homogenous mix of materials in the image area without a priori information or utilizing known information of the assembly geometry and of its position in the measuring setup for modelling the gamma-ray attenuation in detail. Both algorithms model the detection system in detail. The former algorithm returns an image of the cross-section of the object, from which quantitative information is extracted, whereas the latter returns conclusive relative rod-by-rod data.

    Here, all reconstruction methods are demonstrated on simulated data of a 96-rod fuel assembly in a tomographic measurement setup. The assembly was simulated with the same activity content in all rods for evaluation purposes. Based on the results, it is argued that the choice of algorithm to a large degree depends on application, and also that a combination of reconstruction methods may be useful. A discussion on alternative analysis methods is also included.

  • 30.
    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Smith, Eric
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA.
    White, Timothy A.
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA.
    Mozin, Vladimir
    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, USA.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Andersson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Davour, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Trellue, Holly
    Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, USA.
    Deshmukh, Nikhil
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA.
    Wittman, Richard
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA.
    Honkamaa, Tapani
    STUK – Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Finland.
    Vaccaro, Stefano
    European Commission, DG Energy, Euratom Safeguards Luxemburg, Luxemburg.
    Ely, James
    International Atomic Energy Agency.
    Outcomes of the JNT 1955 Phase I Viability Study of Gamma EmissionTomography for Spent Fuel Verification2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential for gamma emission tomography (GET) to detect partial defectswithin a spent nuclear fuel assembly has been assessed within the IAEA SupportProgram project JNT 1955, phase I, which was completed and reported to theIAEA in October 2016. Two safeguards verification objectives were identified inthe project; (1) independent determination of the number of active pins that arepresent in a measured assembly, in the absence of a priori information about theassembly, and; (2) quantitative assessment of pin-by-pin properties, for examplethe activity of key isotopes or pin attributes such as cooling time and relativeburnup, under the assumption that basic fuel parameters (e.g., assembly typeand nominal fuel composition) are known. The efficacy of GET to meet these twoverification objectives was evaluated across a range of fuel types, burnups andcooling times, while targeting a total interrogation time of less than 60 minutes.The evaluations were founded on a modelling and analysis framework applied toexisting and emerging GET instrument designs. Monte Carlo models of differentfuel types were used to produce simulated tomographer responses to largepopulations of “virtual” fuel assemblies. The simulated instrument response datawere then processed using a variety of tomographic-reconstruction and image-processing methods, and scoring metrics were defined and used to evaluate theperformance of the methods.

    This paper describes the analysis framework and metrics used to predicttomographer performance. It also presents the design of a “universal” GET(UGET) instrument intended to support the full range of verification scenariosenvisioned by the IAEA. Finally, it gives examples of the expected partial-defectdetection capabilities for some fuels and diversion scenarios, and it provides acomparison of predicted performance for the notional UGET design and anoptimized variant of an existing IAEA instrument.

  • 31.
    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    White, Timothy A.
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.
    Smith, Eric
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.
    Mozin, Vladimir
    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Davour, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Holcombe, Scott
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Trellue, Holly
    Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Deshmukh, N.
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.
    Wittman, R. S.
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.
    Gamma-ray Emission Tomography: Modelling and evaluation of partial-defect testing capabilities2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessment of gamma emission tomography (GET) for spent nuclear fuel verification is the task in IAEA MSP project JNT1955. In line with IAEA Safeguards R&D plan 2012-2023, the aim of this effort is to “develop more sensitive and less intrusive alternatives to existing NDA instruments to perform partial defect tests on spent fuel assemblies prior to transfer to difficult to access storage". The current viability study constitutes the first phase of three, with evaluation and decision points between each phase. Two verification objectives have been identified; (1) counting of fuel pins in tomographic images without any a priori knowledge of the fuel assembly under study, and (2) quantitative measurements of pin-by-pin properties, e.g. burnup, for the detection of anomalies and/or verification of operator-declared data.

    Previous measurements performed in Sweden and Finland have proven GET highly promising for detecting removed or substituted fuel pins (i.e. partial defects) in BWR and VVER-440 fuel assemblies even down to the individual fuel pin level. The current project adds to previous experiences by pursuing a quantitative assessment of the capabilities of GET for partial defect detection, across a broad range of potential IAEA applications, fuel types, and fuel parameters. A modelling and performance-evaluation framework has been developed to provide quantitative GET performance predictions, incorporating burn-up and cooling-time calculations, Monte Carlo radiation-transport and detector-response modelling, GET instrument definitions (existing and notional) and tomographic reconstruction algorithms, which use recorded gamma-ray intensities to produce cross-sectional images of the source distribution in the fuel assembly or conclusive pin-by-pin data. The framework also comprises image-processing algorithms and performance metrics that recognize the inherent trade-off between the probability of detecting missing pins and the false-alarm rate. Here, the modelling and analysis framework is described and preliminary results are presented. 

  • 32.
    Jansson, Peter
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Håkansson, Ane
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    A laboratory device for developing analysis tools and methods for gamma emission tomography of nuclear fuel2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Tomography is a measurement technique that images the inner parts of objects using only external measurement. It is widely used within the field of medicine, and may become important also for nuclear fuel verification where inspectors can obtain information from fuel assemblies’ inner sections without dismantling them.

    At Uppsala University, Sweden, a laboratory device has been built for investigating the tomographic measurement techniques on nuclear fuel. The device is composed of machinery to position model fuelrods, activated with Cs-137, in a fuel assembly pattern according to the user's choice. The gamma radiation from the model fuel assembly is collimated to a set of detectors that record the radiation intensity in various positions around the fuel model. Reconstruction of the gamma activity distribution within the fuel model is performed off-line.

    The objective for constructing the laboratory device was to support the development of tomographic techniques for nuclear fuel diagnostics as well as for nuclear safeguards purposes. The device allows for evaluating the performance of different data-acquisition setups, measurement schemes and reconstruction algorithms, since the activity content of each fuel rod is well known.

    For safeguards purposes, the device is unique in its capability to model various fuel geometries and configurations of partial defects. The latter includes removed, empty and substituted fuel rods. It is well suited for developing tomographic techniques that are optimized for partial defect detection. It also allows for development of analysis tools necessary to quantify detection limits.

    Here, we describe the capabilities of the laboratory device and elaborate on how the device may be used to support the nuclear safeguards community with the development of unattended gamma emission tomography.

  • 33.
    Jansson, Peter
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Tobin, Steve
    Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Liljenfeldt, Henrik
    Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company.
    Experimental Comparison between High Purity Germanium and Scintillator Detectors for Determining Burnup, Cooling Time and Decay Heat of Used Nuclear Fuel2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A experimental study of the gamma-ray energy spectra from used nuclear fuel has been performed. Four types of detectors were used to measure spectra from three PWR used fuel assemblies stored at the interim storage for used fuel in Sweden, CLAB: HPGe, LaBr3, NaI and BGO.

    The study was performed in the context of used fuel characterization for the back end of the fuel cycle in Sweden. Specifically, the purpose was to evaluate the behaviour of the different scintillator detectors (LaBr3, NaI and BGO) and their ability to be used instead of HPGe detectors when determining spent fuel parameters such as burnup, cooling time and decay heat of the used fuel.

    This paper presents results from the experimental study and an analysis of the capability of the detectors for used fuel characterization. The results shown are important when designing systems for used fuel characterization, e.g. for determining decay heat or fuel parameters concerning safeguards.

  • 34.
    Jansson, Peter
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Gamma emission tomography of nuclear fuel: Objectives and status of the IAEA UGET project2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Jansson, Peter
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Davour, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Mozin, Vladimir
    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA.
    Gamma Transport Calculations for Gamma Emission Tomography on Nuclear Fuel within the UGET Project2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The unattended gamma emission tomography (UGET) for spent nuclear fuel verification is an on-going project in the IAEA member states’ support program. In line with the long term R&D plan of the IAEA Department of Safeguards, it is anticipated that this effort will help develop “more sensitive and less intrusive alternatives to existing NDA instruments to perform partial defect test on spent fuel assembly prior to transfer to difficult to access storage”.

    In the first phase of the project, gamma transport calculations and modelling of exist- ing and proposed new designs of tomographic instruments is performed. In this paper, a set of Monte Carlo calculations regarding modelling of various tomographic devices are presented, including two existing tomographic instruments previously used for spent fuel measurements; one instrument based on scintillator detectors, developed by Uppsala University, and another based on CdTe detector arrays, developed by the JNT 1510 col- laborative effort (Hungary, Finland). Detailed models of the tomographic instruments, including structural materials, and the measured fuel assemblies are used in the simula- tions. The calculated results are compared to the experimentally measured data to provide a benchmark for the simulation procedure.

    The developed modelling capabilities are also used for evaluation of the partial-defect detection capabilities of the tomographic technique based on a proposed GET instrument design. 

  • 36.
    Jansson, Peter
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Österlund, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    A platform for feed-forward and follow-up of students' progression in oral presentation within a study programme2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Didactic research has shown that feedforward has a positive effect on students' experience of their progression in oral presentation. However, studies also show that students often experience a lack of feedback from teachers and audience attending their presentations and consequently they lack an experience of progression.

    In this work we present a platform for structured documentation and follow-up of students' progress of skills in oral presentation that has been been implemented within the bachelor programme in nuclear engineering at Uppsala University. The platform provides efficient communication of feedback and feedforward to the students over this one-year programme, involving several courses and teachers.

    The platform is implemented within the system for learning and study administration that is used by students and staff at Uppsala University ("Student Portal"). It consists of an interface where the students and teachers have an overview of progress made in all individual courses at the programme. For each course that includes an oral presentation, there is a folder where each student uploads a self assessment. In the same folder, the teachers upload their feedback as well as the feedback provided by fellow students for each oral presentation. Self assessments and feedback provide feedforward for future oral presentations. The platform was implemented in August 2014, and it has now been in use for one year within the nuclear engineering programme. Lessons learned from using the platform are presented in this work.

    In order to study the effects of implementing this platform, a questionnaire was distributed to the students for the purpose of collecting information regarding their experience of giving oral presentation, their perceived skill level and their experience of practising oral presentations. The same questionnaire was distributed to the students on three occasions: before, during and after the first year of using the platform. Results from analysis of data are presented, showing that the students have experienced progression during this year.

  • 37.
    Lundkvist, Niklas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Stephen J., Tobin
    Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA.
    Investigation of Possible Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) Techniques for the Future Swedish Encapsulation Facility2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A geological repository for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and an associated encapsulation facility will be built in Sweden. The encapsulation facility is planned to be in operation in 2025 and it will be the last place where verifying safeguards measurements of SNF can be performed. It is not clear what types of measurements that will be performed, because such requirements are not yet posed by national and international authorities and inspecting organizations. This paper describes the objective and most recent results of a master thesis, whereby a few existing NGSI non- destructive assay techniques for verifying SNF were selected for a review. The study focuses on the verifying ability of different techniques, or system of techniques, in relation to the requirement that may be put on the future encapsulation plant. In addition, possible needs for future simulations and measurements are discussed. The work was done within a collaboration between Uppsala University in Sweden and Los Alamos National Laboratory in the USA.

  • 38.
    Martinik, Tomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Henzl, Vlad
    Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Swinhoe, Martyn
    Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Goodsell, Alison
    Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Tobin, Stephen
    Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Development of Differential Die-Away Instrument for Characterization of Swedish Spent Nuclear Fuel2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Martinik, Tomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Henzl, Vladimir
    Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Swinhoe, Martyn T.
    Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Tobin, Stephen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Characterization of Spent Nuclear Fuel with a Differential Die-Away Instrument2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Differential die-away instrument (DDA) is currently being investigated within the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Spent Fuel project as one of the non-destructive assay techniques for spent nuclear fuel characterization and verification. In this paper we report on the progress of designing the first prototype to be deployed at Swedish central interim storage facility (CLAB) where a first set of measurements of 25 PWR and 25BWR spent fuel assemblies is proposed. We also present several working concepts of how the instrument can be customized for dedicated purposes, be it a light weight instrument for portable applications, a minimalist design for reliable and economic operations or a so-called “defectoscope” design for detailed inspection of spent nuclear fuel assemblies.

  • 40.
    Martinik, Tomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics. Los Alamos Natl Lab, POB 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 USA.
    Henzl, Vladimir
    Los Alamos Natl Lab, POB 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 USA.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Swinhoe, Martyn
    Los Alamos Natl Lab, POB 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 USA.
    Goodsell, Alison
    Los Alamos Natl Lab, POB 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 USA.
    Tobin, Stephen
    Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, USA.
    Design of a Prototype Differential Die-Away Instrument proposed for Swedish Spent Nuclear Fuel Characterization2016In: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, ISSN 0168-9002, E-ISSN 1872-9576, Vol. 821, p. 55-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As part of the United States (US) Department of Energy’s Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Spent Fuel (NGSI-SF) project, the traditional Differential Die-Away (DDA) method that was originally developed for waste drum assay has been investigated and modified to provide a novel application to characterize or verify spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Following the promising, yet largely theoretical and simulation based, research of physics aspects of the DDA technique applied to SNF assay during the early stages of the NGSI-SF project, the most recent effort has been focused on the practical aspects of developing the first fully functional and deployable DDA prototype instrument for spent fuel. As a result of the collaboration among US research institutions and Sweden, the opportunity to test the newly proposed instrument’s performance with commercial grade SNF at the Swedish Interim Storage Facility (Clab) emerged. Therefore the design of this instrument prototype has to accommodate the requirements of the Swedish regulator as well as specific engineering constrains given by the unique industrial environment. Within this paper, we identify key components of the DDA based instrument and we present methodology for evaluation and the results of a selection of the most relevant design parameters in order to optimize the performance for a given application, i.e. test-deployment, including assay of 50 preselected spent nuclear fuel assemblies of both pressurized (PWR) as well as boiling (BWR) water reactor type.

  • 41.
    Martinik, Tomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Tobin, Stephen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Håkansson, Ane
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Update on the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative’s Spent Fuel Project with Emphasis on Differential Die-Away Research2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Martinik, Tomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Vladimir, Henzl
    Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Swinhoe, Martyn
    Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Tobin, Stephen Joseph
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics. Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Simulation of differential die-away instrument's response to asymmetrically burned spent nuclear fuel2015In: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, ISSN 0168-9002, E-ISSN 1872-9576, Vol. 788, p. 79-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous simulation studies of differential die-away (DDA) instrument's response to active interrogation of spent nuclear fuel from a pressurized water reactor (PWR) yielded promising results in terms of its capability to accurately measure or estimate basic spent fuel assembly (SFA) characteristics, such as multiplication, initial enrichment (IE) and burn-up (BU) as well as the total plutonium content. These studies were however performed only for a subset of idealized SFAs with a symmetric BU with respect to its longitudinal axis. Therefore, to complement the previous results, additional simulations have been performed of the DDA instrument’s response to interrogation of asymmetrically burned spent nuclear fuel in order to determine whether detailed assay of SFAs from all 4 sides will be necessary in real life applications or whether a cost and time saving single sided assay could be used to achieve results of similar quality as previously reported in case of symmetrically burned SFAs.

    The results of this study suggest that DDA instrument response depends on the position of the individual neutron detectors and in fact can be split in two modes.The first mode, measured by the back detectors, is not significantly sensitive to the spatial distribution of fissile isotopes and neutron absorbers, but rather reflects the total amount of both contributors as in the cases of symmetrically burned SFAs. In contrary, the second mode, measured by the front detectors, yields certain sensitivity to the orientation of the asymmetrically burned SFA inside the assaying instrument. This study thus provides evidence that the DDA instrument can potentially be utilized as necessary in both ways, i.e. a quick determination of the average SFA characteristics in a single assay, as well as a more detailed characterization involving several DDA observables through assay of the SFA from all of its four sides that can possibly map the burn-up distribution and/or identify diversion or replacement of pins.

  • 43.
    Ohlsson, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics.
    Test and Developments of Crystals for a High-Resolution Electromagnetic Calorimeter for PANDA2004Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 44. Parcey, Dennis A.
    et al.
    Chen, J. Dennis
    Vogt, Chris
    Kosierb, Rick
    Larsson, Mats
    Axell, Kåre
    Dahlberg, Joakim
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Lindberg, Bo
    Sundkvist, Erik
    Determination of Cerenkov light absorption by fuel pond water using a calibration light source2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantitative measurement of Cerenkov light generated by spent fuel assemblies requires anunderstanding of the absorbance characteristics of the spent fuel pond water. The presence ofparticulate or organic material can severely attenuate the transmission of the ultravioletcomponent of the Cerenkov spectrum. This can make the quantitative measurement of theCerenkov light using a digital Cerenkov viewing device difficult or in some cases impossible.A calibration light source that can be inserted into the fuel pond has been constructed. Thissource generates a known ultraviolet light flux. Measurements of this source can be used tocalculate the absorbance of Cerenkov light by the fuel pond water and in turn compensate for theabsorbance when measuring the intensity of a spent fuel assembly. This paper discusses thechallenges of constructing such a device and the results from measurements in two spent fuelponds.

  • 45.
    Smith, Eric L.
    et al.
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA.
    Jacobsson, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Mozin, Vladimir
    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, USA.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Miller, Erin
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA.
    Honkamaa, Tapani
    STUK – Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Finland.
    Deshmukh, Nikhil
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA.
    White, Timothy A.
    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).
    Wittman, Rick
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA.
    Trellue, Holly
    Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, USA.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Davour, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Vaccaro, Stefano
    European Commission, DG Energy, Euratom Safeguards Luxemburg, Luxemburg.
    Andersson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Holcombe, Scott
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    A Viability Study of Gamma Emission Tomography for Spent Fuel Verification: JNT 1955 Phase I Technical Report2016Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential for gamma emission tomography (GET) to detect partial defects within a spent nuclear fuel assembly is being assessed through a collaboration of Support Programs to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In the first phase of this study, two safeguards verification objectives have been identified. The first is the independent determination of the number of active pins that are present in the assembly, in the absence of a priori information about the assembly. The second objective is to provide quantitative assay of pin-by-pin properties, for example the activity of key isotopes or pin attributes such as cooling time and relative burnup, under the assumption that basic fuel parameters (e.g., assembly type and nominal fuel composition) are known. The efficacy of GET to meet these two verification objectives has been evaluated across a range of fuel types, burnups, and cooling times, and with a target total interrogation time of less than 60 minutes. This evaluation of GET viability for safeguards applications was founded on a modelling and analysis framework applied to existing and emerging GET instrument designs. Monte Carlo models of different fuel types were used to produce simulated tomographer responses to large populations of “virtual” fuel assemblies. Instrument response data were processed using a variety of tomographic-reconstruction and image-processing methods, and scoring metrics specific to each of the verification objectives were used to predict performance. This report describes the analysis framework and metrics used to predict tomographer performance, the design of a “universal” GET (UGET) instrument intended to support the full range of verification scenarios envisioned by the IAEA, and a comparison of predicted performance for the notional UGET design and an optimized variant of an existing IAEA instrument.

  • 46.
    Tobin, Stephen
    et al.
    Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Liljenfeldt, Henrik
    Svensk Kärnbränslehantering AB.
    Trellue, Holly
    Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Experimental and Analytical Plans for the Non-destructive Assay System of the Swedish Encapsulation and Repository Facilities2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB), European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom), two universities and several U.S. Department of Energy Laboratories have joined in a collaborative research effort to determine the capability of non-destructive assay (NDA) techniques to meet the combined needs of the safeguards community and the Swedish encapsulation and repository facilities operator SKB. These needs include partial defect detection, heat quantification, assembly identification (initial enrichment, burnup and cooling time), and Pu mass and reactivity determination. The experimental component of this research effort involves the measurement of 50 assemblies at the Central Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab) facility in Sweden, 25 of which were irradiated in Pressurized Water Reactors and 25 in Boiling Water Reactors. The experimental signatures being measured for all assemblies include spectral resolved gammas (HPGe and LaBr3), time correlated neutrons (Differential Die-away Self Interrogation), time-varying and continuous active neutron interrogation (Differential Die-away and an approximation of Californium Interrogation Prompt Neutron), total neutron and total gamma fluxes (Fork Detector), total heat (assembly length calorimeter) and possibly the Cerenkov light emission (Digital Cerenkov Viewing Device). This paper fits into the IAEA’s Department of Safeguards Long-Term R&D Plan in the context of developing “more sensitive and less intrusive alternatives to existing NDA instruments to perform partial defect test on spent fuel assembly prior to transfer to difficult to access storage,” as well as potentially supporting pyrochemical processing. The work describes the specific measured signatures, the uniqueness of the information contained in these signatures and why a data mining approach is being used to combine the various signatures to optimally satisfy the various needs of the collaboration. This paper will address efficient and effective verification strategies particularly in the context of encapsulation and repository facilities.

  • 47.
    Tobin, Steve
    et al.
    Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Prototype Development and Field Trials under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Spent Fuel Non-Destructive Assay Project2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Spent Fuel (NGSI-SF) Project started in 2009 with the general purpose of strengthening the technical toolkit of safeguard inspectors and the focused goal of measuring the Pu mass in spent fuel assemblies. Subsequently the safeguards goals of the projects have evolved to include verifying the correctness and completeness of the declaration. The first two years of the NGSI-SF Project research primarily involved Monte Carlo simulations used to quantify the expected non-destructive assay (NDA) signals from 14 different NDA techniques. In 2011, advised by an external review committee, the research focus evolved to the fabrication and fielding of a down-selected set of instruments as well as quantifying the expected performance of integrated systems. In 2013, we will start deploying NDA systems in collaboration with colleagues in Japan, the Republic of Korea and Sweden. This paper will describe the development of prototypes and the planned field trials of each deployed system. Additionally the general evolution in the overall NGSI-SF research project will be described including description of, and motivation for, the six NGSI-SF assembly libraries, and noteworthy technical highlights.

  • 48.
    Tobin, Steve
    et al.
    Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Update on the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative’s Spent Fuel Nondestructive Assay Project2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) Spent Fuel Nondestructive Assay Project was started in March of 2009. The primary focus of this effort is to determine the Pu mass in spent fuel assemblies using nondestructive assay; additional goals include applying other signatures to verify the completeness and correctness of spent fuel declarations. This paper will give both a programmatic and technical update on the first four years of this effort. The programmatic portion will briefly describe the approach, review process, down-selection, experimental plans, and engagement with international partners. The technical portion will elaborate on the systems under on-going research with a particular emphasis on field trials that will take place in the 2013 to 2015 timeframe. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nonproliferation and International Security, National Nuclear Security Administration. LA-UR-13-22090

  • 49. von Wurtemberg, K. Marcks
    et al.
    Geren, L.
    Lundberg, O.
    Tegner, P-E
    Fransson, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Johansson, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Thomé, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Wolke, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Brudvik, J.
    Fissum, K.
    Hansen, K.
    Isaksson, L.
    Lundin, M.
    Schroder, B.
    The response of lead-tungstate scintillators (PWO) to photons with energies in the range 13 MeV-64 MeV2012In: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, ISSN 0168-9002, E-ISSN 1872-9576, Vol. 679, p. 36-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The response of a matrix of 25 lead tungstate (PWO) scintillator detectors, operated at -25 degrees C, to photons in the range 13 MeV-64 MeV has been measured at the tagged-photon facility at MAX-lab, Lund. The tapered PWO crystals, each with a length of 200 mm and a cross-section of 24.4 x 24.4 mm(2) in the front end, read out by 19 mm photomultiplier tubes, were arranged in a 5 x 5 matrix. The response was measured for photons directed towards the centre of the central crystal as well as for photons directed towards the corner of the central crystal, where four crystals meet. The obtained energy resolution surpasses what has been published so far and is close to the limit given by Poisson statistics and escaped energy. For photons directed towards the centre(corner) of the central crystal the relative energy resolution, defined as (FWHM/2.35)/E-gamma, decreases from 7.3%(11.0%) at E-gamma = 13 MeV to 3.3%(3.6%) at E-gamma = 64 MeV. The reconstructed point of impact of a photon in this energy range is determined with an uncertainty (one standard deviation) of 7.3 +/- 0.1 mm.

  • 50.
    White, Timothy A.
    et al.
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA.
    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Smith, Eric
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA.
    Mozin, Vladimir
    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Davour, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Grape, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Trellue, Holly
    Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA.
    Deshmukh, Nikhil
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA.
    Wittman, Richard
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA.
    Honkamaa, Tapani
    STUK – Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Finland.
    Vaccaro, Stefano
    European Atomic Energy Community.
    Ely, James
    International Atomic Energy Agency.
    Passive Tomography for Spent Fuel Verification: Analysis Framework and Instrument Design Study2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential for gamma emission tomography (GET) to detect partial defects within a spent nuclearfuel assembly is being assessed through a collaboration of Support Programs to the InternationalAtomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In the first phase of this study, two safeguards verification objectiveshave been identified. The first is the independent determination of the number of active pins that arepresent in the assembly, in the absence of a priori information. The second objective is to providequantitative measures of pin-by-pin properties, e.g. activity of key isotopes or pin attributes such ascooling time and relative burnup, for the detection of anomalies and/or verification of operator-declareddata. The efficacy of GET to meet these two verification objectives will be evaluated across a range offuel types, burnups, and cooling times, and with a target interrogation time of less than 60 minutes.

    The evaluation of GET viability for safeguards applications is founded on a modelling and analysisframework applied to existing and emerging GET instrument designs. Monte Carlo models of differentfuel types are used to produce simulated tomographer responses to large populations of “virtual” fuelassemblies. Instrument response data are processed by a variety of tomographic-reconstruction andimage-processing methods, and scoring metrics specific to each of the verification objectives aredefined and used to evaluate the performance of the methods. This paper will provide a description ofthe analysis framework and evaluation metrics, example performance-prediction results, and describethe design of a “universal” GET instrument intended to support the full range of verification scenariosenvisioned by the IAEA.

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