uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Knaust, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Ogden, Sam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Hjort, Klas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Bodén, Roger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Integrated high-pressure fluid manipulation in microfluidic systems2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Knaust, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Andersson, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Hjort, Klas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Klintberg, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Influence of surface modifications and channel structure for microflows of supercritical carbon dioxide and water2016In: Journal of Supercritical Fluids, ISSN 0896-8446, E-ISSN 1872-8162, Vol. 107, p. 649-656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Miniaturization offers a possibility to increase the performance and decrease the time scales of systems. Existing microsystems using supercritical CO2 mainly utilizes multiphase segmented flows. To allow for a broader toolbox for future systems, also parallel flows are useful which eases the separation of the different phases. Here, the effect of different surface coatings are studied for multiphase flows of scCO2 and H2O in flat microchannels, with and without a 4 μm high ridge guide, which allows for pinning of the fluid interface inside the 190 μm wide and 35 μm high channel. Three different surfaces with different wettings towards scCO2 and H2O are studied, where a surface terminated with a hydrocarbon-based silane was observed to be neutral in the H2O/scCO2 system, a surface terminated with a fluorocarbon-based silane was hydrophobic, and an uncoated glass surface was hydrophilic.

    Using two flow rates of 5:5 μl/min (CO2:H2O) and 6.5:3.5 μl/min (CO2:H2O), a parallel flow between scCO2 and H2O was observed for uncoated and flat channels where the H2O flow pushed the CO2 to the side, before the flows eventually breaks up into segments. With a ridge guide in the middle of the channel, the interface was pinned at half the channel width, although still breaking up into segments. The neutral hydrocarbon-based surface coating with approximately 90° contact angles resulted in evenly created segments without a ridge guide. Including a guide in the middle of the channel, a parallel flow was observed throughout the channel, although occasionally small CO2 segments entered the H2O outlet. Using the fluorocarbon-based silane resulted in an unstable segmented system with pressure fluctuations.

    Using surface modifications, an increased control can be achieved for either segmentation or parallel flow where a neutral surface is favored for a stable flow behavior. Together with a ridge guide, the fluid interface was pinned at the center. 

  • 3.
    Knaust, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Andersson, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Hjort, Klas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Klintberg, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Mannitol for High Temperature Phase Change Actuators2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To enable valves for hot water microsystems, the possibility of using the volume expansion of the phase transition from solid to liquid in mannitol for strong high temperature actuators was studied. From room temperature to 160°C, a linear expansion of 4% was measured, and the expansion at the phase transition from solid to liquid at 160°C to 180°C was measured to be 7%. Stainless steel structures with a stainless steel diaphragm was filled and repeatedly heated up to 180◦C while measuring the deflection of the diaphragm using a laser sensor. The height differences was measured to be 25 μm at 180°C.

    In combination with a fluidic system, the mannitol actuator should capable as a valve for hot water microsystems. 

  • 4.
    Knaust, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Andersson, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Rogeman, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Hjort, Klas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH.
    Klintberg, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Influence of flow rate, temperature and pressure on multiphase flows of supercritical carbon dioxide and water using multivariate partial least square regression2015In: Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, ISSN 0960-1317, E-ISSN 1361-6439, Vol. 25, no 10, article id 105001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) is often used to replace harmful solvents and can dissolve a wide range of organic compounds. With a favorable critical point at 31 °C and 7.4 MPa, reaching above the critical point for scCO2 is fairly accessible. Because of the compressible nature of scCO2 and the large changes of viscosity and density with temperature and pressure, there is a need to determine the behavior of scCO2 in microfluidic systems. Here, the influence of how parameters such as flow rate, temperature, pressure, and flow ratio affects the length of parallel flow of water and scCO2 and the length of the created CO2 segments are investigated and modeled using multivariate data analysis for a 10 mm long double-y channel. The parallel length and segment size were observed in the laminar regime around and above the critical point of CO2. The flow ratio between the two fluids together with the flow rate influenced both the parallel length and the segment sizes, and a higher pressure resulted in shorter parallel lengths. Regarding the segment length of CO2, longer segments were a result of a higher Weber number for H2O together with a higher temperature in the channel. 

  • 5.
    Knaust, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Khaji, Zahra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Sturesson, P.
    Klintberg, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Characterization of dielectric properties of polycrystalline aluminum nitride for high temperature wireless sensor nodes2013In: 13th International Conference on Micro And Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (Powermems 2013), 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An aluminium nitride (AIN) passive resonance circuit intended for thermally matched high temperature wireless sensor nodes (WSN) was manufactured using thick-film technology. Characterization was done for temperatures up to 900 C in both a hot-chuck for frequencies below 5 MHz, and using wireless readings of resonating circuits at 15 MHz, 59 MHz, and 116 MHz. The substrate for the circuits was sintered polycrystalline AIN. Using a simplified model for the resonators where the main contribution of the frequency-shift was considered to come from a shift of the dielectric constant for these frequencies, the temperature dependency of the dielectric constant for AIN was found to decrease with increasing frequency up to 15 MHz. With an observed frequency shift of 0.04% at 15 MHz, and up to 0.56% at 59 MHz over a temperature range of 900 C, AIN looks as a promising material for integration of resonance circuits directly on the substrate.

  • 6.
    Ogden, Sam
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Knaust, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Dahlin, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Hjort, Klas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Bodén, Roger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    On-chip pump system for high-pressure microfluidic applications2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a micropump system with four integrated paraffin actuated pumps: Two mobile phase pumps and two sample injector pumps. The mobile phase pumps are evaluated by their ability to deliver a stable, low-ripple flow to be used in chip-based high performance liquid chromatography. It is shown that the two mobile phase pumps can be driven in combined operation with an induced offset to significantly lower flow fluctuations.

  • 7.
    Sturesson, Peter
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology. Försvarshögskolan/Swedish National Defence College.
    Khaji, Zahra Atena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Knaust, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Sundqvist, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Klintberg, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Thornell, Greger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Thermomechanical stability and integrability of an embedded ceramic antenna with an integrated sensor element for wireless reading in harsh environments2013In: Journal of Physics: Conference Series: Volume 476 / [ed] Paul Mitcheson and Steve Beeby, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on the design, manufacturing and evaluation of a small, wirelessly powered and read resonating antenna circuit with an integrated pressure sensor. The work aims at developing miniature devices suitable for harsh environments, where high temperature prevents the use of conventional, silicon-based microdevices. Here, the device is made of alumina with platinum as conducting material. Ceramic green tapes were structured using high-precision milling, metallized using screen printing, and subsequently laminated to form stacks before they were sintered. The device's frequency shift as a function of temperature was studied up to 900°C. The contributions to the shift both from the thermomechanical deformation of the device at large, and from the integrated and, so far, self-pressurized sensor were sorted out. A total frequency shift of 3200 ppm was observed for the pressure sensor for heating over the whole range. Negligible levels of thermally induced radius of curvature were observed. With three-point bending, a frequency shift of 180 ppm was possible to induce with a curvature of radius of 220 m at a 10 N load. The results indicate that a robust pressure sensor node, which can register pressure changes of a few bars at 900°C and wirelessly transmit the signal, is viable.

  • 8.
    Sturesson, Peter
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Khaji, Zahra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Knaust, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Klintberg, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Thornell, Greger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Microsystems Technology.
    Thermomechanical properties and performance of ceramic resonators for wireless pressure reading in high temperatures2015In: Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, ISSN 0960-1317, E-ISSN 1361-6439, Vol. 25, no 9, article id 095016Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on the design, fabrication and thermomechanical study of ceramic LC resonators for wireless pressure reading, verified at room temperature, at 500 °C and at 1000 °C for pressures up to 2.5 bar. Five different devices were fabricated of high-temperature co-fired ceramics (HTCC) and characterized. Alumina green tape sheets were screen printed with platinum paste, micromachined, laminated and fired. The resulting samples were 21 x 19 mm2 with different thicknesses. An embedded communicator part was integrated with either a passive backing part or with a pressure-sensing element, including an 80 μm thick and 6 mm diameter diaphragm. The study includes measuring thermally and mechanically induced resonance frequency shifts, and thermally induced deformations. For the pressure sensor device, contributions from changes in the relative permittivity and from expanding air, trapped in the cavity, were extracted. The devices exhibited thermomechanical robustness during heating, regardless of the thickness of the backing. The pressure sensitivity decreased with increasing temperature from 15 050 ppm/bar at room temperature to 2400 ppm/bar at 1000°C, due to the decreasing pressure difference between the external pressure and the air pressure inside the cavity. 

  • 9.
    Svensson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Micro Structural Technology .
    Micropumps for extreme pressures2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this thesis was to improve a paraffin actuated micropump design, to be able to pump against extreme pressures (above 100 bar). This was accomplished by initially studying the membrane activation, using video capturing. The micropump has been improved to withstand pressures high enough, to enable use in an high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system. The micropump has been shown to pump against back pressures up to 150 bar, with a positive net-flow. This should be compared with the previously recorded maximum back pressure of 50 bar. The pumping against high back pressures was possible due to an increased understanding of the sealing of the membranes. This resulted in a new design that was manufactured and characterised. Without clamping the pump was measured to manage back pressures of 10 bar, and then starting to leak in a bond at the flow channel. With supporting clamping, the managed back pressures increased ten folded.

    When measured on the different valves, pressure above 200 bar has been possible to withhold. Although the valves were below their maximum limit, the pressure was not possible to be further increased due to a limitation in the equipment, i.e. risk of damaging the connections. When examined after pressurised at extreme pressures (above 100 bar) several times, no signs of fatigue or damage of the membrane was seen.

    A new behaviour of the valves was discovered. Above certain pressures some designs self sealed, i.e. withholding the pressure after the voltage was turned off. For these valves the pressure had to be released by some other means.

1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf