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  • 1.
    Nolgård, Olle
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Nygren, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Considering the past and present of Romani in Sweden: Secondary school pupils' thinking and caring about the history of the Romani in national tests2019In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 344-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we analyse 126 secondary pupils’ responses to national test questions designed to make them think and care about the history of national minorities in Sweden. Using a mixed method approach we find that historical thinking and empathy as caring are tightly interlinked in the responses. In particular, the cognitive act of corroborating historical sources about the treatment of minorities is linked to historical empathy as caring – while sourcing seems like a separate process. We also find that pupils struggle to link the past to the present and the future more than they do with sourcing and corroboration. Engaging with the past of discrimination of minorities makes pupils take critical positions beyond established dimensions of historical thinking. Our findings highlight how we need to better understand how to scaffold pupils’ practical knowledge, skills and attitudes in ideologically and emotionally charged issues.

  • 2.
    Nygren, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Change: Handbook for history learning and human rights education2017In: Intercultural Education, ISSN 1467-5986, E-ISSN 1469-8439, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 610-611Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Nygren, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Digital källkritik i nyhetsflöden och undervisning2018In: Medie-och informationskunnighet (MIK) i den digitala tidsåldern: En demokratifråga -Kartläggning, analys, reflektioner / [ed] Ulla Carlsson, Nordicom, 2018, p. 63-67Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Nygren, Thomas
    Umeå universitet, Humlab.
    Digitala material och verktyg: möjligheter och problem utifrån exemplet spatial history2013In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 133, no 3, p. 474-482Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Nygren, Thomas
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Erfarna lärares historiedidaktiska insikter och undervisningsstrategier2009Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study has been to investigate, through the narratives of ex-perienced teachers, insights and strategies in the teaching of history in upper secondary school. Based on a flexible grounded theory, life history and theories of pedagogical content knowledge, seven experienced history teachers have been interviewed about their conceptions of history teaching.

    Development of insights into history teaching and the formation of knowledge can be described as involving both a refinement of practice and more revolutionary turning points. These insights emphasize that good knowledge of the subject is central for legitimacy and creativity. History teaching in Sweden is described as increasingly international and contem-porary, and focussed on students’ learning from various points of view. Varied teaching is stressed with the teacher in centre and also being able to take the role of arranger. Of importance is also the handling of teaching in history as a foundation course as well as an advanced or specialized course.

    Influences from other subjects have had a diverse impact at the same time as personal interests and experiences, as well as external influences, have been important for the development of strategies. History teachers’ teaching strategies may be described in terms of 1) multiperspectivity, where different points of view and interpretations of history are central; 2) narrative history, where through both major and minor stories, a chronological structure and animation of the subject of history are strived after; 3) social scientific history, which uses history to explain contemporary society through making comparisons and seeking general patterns; and 4) an eclectic strategy, which strives after varieties of an individualised teaching of history by allowing students to make their ways into history in diverse ways. The experienced history teachers’ narratives make evident how the subject of history can be transformed, they demonstrate different conceivable ways of teaching history and reveal its complexity.

    The teachers’ narratives show how, through their strategies in interaction with their insights in history teaching, they have created an overview and structure in the complex reality of teaching history. The teachers’ insights and strategies constitute a practice based contribution to a more experience informed practice and research on the teaching of history.

  • 6.
    Nygren, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Fakta, fejk och fiktion: Källkritik, ämnesdidaktik och digital kompetens2019Book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Nygren, Thomas
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Historielärare2009In: Ämnesdidaktiska insikter och strategier: berättelser från gymnasielärare i samhällskunskap, geografi, historia och religionskunskap / [ed] Bengt Schüllerqvist & Christina Osbeck, Karlstad: Karlstad University Press , 2009, p. 119-156Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Nygren, Thomas
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    History in the Service of Mankind: International Guidelines and History Education in Upper Secondary Schools in Sweden, 1927–20022011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study the guidelines of the League of Nations, UNESCO and the Council of Europe are investigated in relation to Swedish national curricula, teachers’ perceptions of and students’ work in history, from 1927 to 2002.

    Inspired by John I Goodlad’s notions of curricula and implementation, the formulation of history is studied. The ideological curricula are analyzed via the international guidelines directed to Swedish history teaching. The formal curricula are examined in national guidelines and also how history is formulated in final examinations and inspectors’ reports. The perceived curricula are studied in teachers’ debates and interviews with experienced teachers. The experiential curricula are examined through looking at students’ choices of topics in final exams, 1,680 titles of students’ individual projects in history and an in-depth analysis of 145 individual projects written between 1969 and 2002.

    The study shows that the means and goals of history education have been formulated in both different and similar ways within and between curricular levels.  On all the curricular levels studied the history subject has become more internationally oriented. After World War II national history landed in the background and the world history, favored by UNESCO, became dominant in Sweden from the 1950s onwards. Despite the fact that the Council of Europe’s Euro-centrism became more prominent in the 1994 syllabus in history, students still preferred world history over European history. International and national guidelines also stressed the value of paying heed to marginalized groups, local cultural heritage and contemporary history.  These orientations were also represented in the teachers’ views of history teaching and in the students’ work in history.

    The results of the study suggest that the implementation of the international guidelines were more than a top-down process. During the entire period studied, guidelines have been formulated and transacted, but also reinterpreted and in some cases, ignored. Teachers and students seem to have been co-creators in the transformation of history education.

    History as a subject, according to the study, encompassed an ever expanding geographical area and more and more perspectives. Not least on the student level, the subject was formulated and dealt with in manifold ways, often oriented towards contemporary world history. Students’ history had great similarities with the international notion of history education in the service of mankind. Students expressed a rejection of war, an understanding of minorities and a wish to safeguard the local cultural heritage. Even if there were exceptions, students’ history appears to have been influenced by international understanding during a century filled with conflicts.

  • 9.
    Nygren, Thomas
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    International reformation of Swedish history education 1927–1961: The complexity of implementing international understanding2011In: Journal of world history, ISSN 1045-6007, E-ISSN 1527-8050, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 329-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study shows how the international efforts for reforming history teaching, by the League of Nations, UNESCO and the Council of Europe, were both neglected and implemented, prior to and after the Second World War. International intentions towards international understanding and away from nationalism, were transferred, interpreted and also influenced by teachers’ and students’ views of history. International understanding and non-European history–but not intercultural history–became a dominant line in the Swedish curriculum in a complex top-down and bottom-up process.

  • 10.
    Nygren, Thomas
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Se och lär av proffsen!: teori och metod för forskning i historieundervisningens praktik2007In: Rum för forskning - rymd för lärande: forskning och pedagogisk praktik / [ed] Gun-Marie Frånberg, Umeå: Fakultetsnämnden för lärarutbildning, Umeå universitet , 2007, p. 64-84Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The gap between theory and practice in teaching needs to be closed. This is a plan for how a combination of theories of education, history and pedagogical content knowledge can be used in the study of history teaching. By using this theory and method of inquiry the strategies for history teaching will be made visible, which will  enable us better to see, understand and appreciate knowledge gained through practice. The strategies will show how teaching has filled the “missing paradigm” and how teachers have experienced and used their professional freedom. Many theories as well as teacher training have been criticised for being too far from reality. By conducting this kind of research theory and practice can meet with mutual benefit for science and for the reflective practitioner.

  • 11.
    Nygren, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education. Umeå universitet; Stanford University.
    Students Writing History Using Traditional and Digital Archives2014In: Human IT, ISSN 1402-1501, E-ISSN 1402-151X, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 78-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study shows that upper secondary students’ historical writing maybe influenced by their use of sources from traditional archives versus theiruse of digital sources in databases. A qualitative approach, theoreticalperspectives, and historical empathy seem to be stimulated primarily byusing traditional archives and print sources, while digital archives andsources, in contrast, stimulate the use of quantitative data and a moresocial scientific approach. The results indicate a historiographical shift instudents’ historical thinking, which researchers of history education needto consider in a digital era. The results of this study call for reflections inhistory teaching to make it possible for students to learn and experiencethe double nature of history as part of the humanities and social sciences.

  • 12.
    Nygren, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Teaching and learning the mindset of the digital historian and more: Scaffolding students’ critical skills in the digital humanities2017In: DHN 2017: Digital humaniora i Norden/ Digital Humanities in the Nordic Countries, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Nygren, Thomas
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    The Contemporary Turn: Debate, Curricula and Swedish Students’ History2012In: Journal of Educational Media, Memory and Society, ISSN 2041-6938, E-ISSN 2041-6946, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 40-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Swedish media during 2010 a proposal for a new syllabus for history was criticized for emphasizing contemporary history at the expense of ancient history. The present study shows how UNESCO and the Council of Europe’s guidelines, like the national curriculum and guidelines and students’ work since the 1950s, have increasingly focused on contemporary history. In the 1930s graduating students chose to focus mainly on the early modern era, but from 1950 contemporary history became more and more dominant in students’ work. Even though history and civics were given separate status as school subjects in 1961, students’ work in history continued to focus contemporary subjects. This study shows that the dominance of contemporary history in students’ history is by no means a new phenomenon.

  • 14.
    Nygren, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education. Department of History, Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis, Stanford University.
    Thinking and caring about indigenous peoples’ human rights: Swedish students writing history beyond scholarly debate2016In: Journal of Peace Education, ISSN 1740-0201, E-ISSN 1740-021X, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 113-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to national and international guidelines, schools should promote historical thinking and foster moral values. Scholars have debated, but not analysed in depth in practice, whether history education can and should hold a normative dimension. This study analyses current human rights education in two Swedish senior high school groups, in classes meant to promote what has been described as conflicting ideals of historical thinking and empathy as caring. Content analysis of students’ exam essays shows intertwined relationships between critical thinking and judgements. The results also highlight how students care that people are treated unjustly; can identify different perspectives; link the past to the present and the future; and use corroboration of information to get the best grade. This analysis shows that the students focus on historical empathy as caring rather than sourcing and corroboration. However, all students combine normative judgements with the complicated act of more neutral perspective recognition in their papers. Evidently, students may combine historical thinking and empathy as caring in line with recommendations of international understanding when they write history about indigenous peoples’ human rights. These findings are significant to all researchers, teachers and decision-makers interested in furthering analytical skills or moral values in education.

  • 15.
    Nygren, Thomas
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    UNESCO and Council of Europe Guidelines, and History Education in Sweden, c. 1960-20022011In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 37-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, international recommendations for history education issued by UNESCO and the Council of Europe are compared with the construing of history in national guidelines, teachers’ perceptions and the results of students’ work in history in Sweden. The study shows how history education from the 1960s onwards could be critical and oriented towards minorities in a global world, clearly in line with the recommendations of UNESCO. International understanding, unity in diversity and safeguarding the local heritage in many ways became part of students’ historical consciousness.

  • 16.
    Nygren, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    UNESCO Teaches History: Implemeting International Understanding in Sweden2016In: A History of UNESCO: Global Actions and Impact / [ed] Poul Duedahl, Palgrave Macmillan, 2016, p. 201-230Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    International organizations aiming to promote peace and development throughout the world rose from the ashes of World War II. In a world troubled by conflicts and gaps between rich and poor, UNESCO faced many challenges and used different strategies in its struggle to shape a better world, many of them highlighted in this book.

    This chapter shows how history education became an important part of UNESCO’s mission to promote international understanding, unity in diversity and safeguard world heritage. It also highlights how UNESCO was more successful than the League of Nations and the Council of Europe in reforming history education in Sweden, and how UNESCO’s efforts impacted the way students after World War II started to write a more peaceful, global and multicultural history.

  • 17.
    Nygren, Thomas
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Veteran Teachers’ Strategies in History Teaching: History Didactic Narratives from Practice in Sweden2011In: The Processes of History Teaching: An International Symposium held at Malmö University, Sweden, March 5-7, 2009 / [ed] Kenneth Nordgren, Per Eliasson & Carina Rönnqvist, Karlstad: Karlstad University Press , 2011, p. 90-104Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Nygren, Thomas
    Umeå universitet, Historiska studier.
    Vis av erfarenhet: olika strategier för undervisning i historia2006In: Rikskonferensen i ämnesdidaktik i Kristianstad 2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Nygren, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Brounéus, Fredrik
    Vetenskap & Allmänhet.
    Nyhetsvärderaren: Forskarfredags massexperiment 2017: Slutrapport2018Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Nygren, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Brounéus, Fredrik
    Vetenskap & Allmänhet.
    The News Evaluator: Evidence-based innovations to promote digital civic literacy2018In: Youth and News in a Digital Media Environment: Nordic-Baltic Perspectives / [ed] Yvonne Andersson, Ulf Dahlquist, Jonas Ohlsson, Nordicom, 2018, p. 19-28Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Nygren, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Brounéus, Fredrik
    Vetenskap och allmänhet.
    Unmasking fake news2017In: The Learning Teacher Magazine, ISSN 2000-2610, no 4, p. 7-8Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Nygren, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Brounéus, Fredrik
    Vetenskap & Allmänhet.
    Svensson, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media, Media and Communication Studies.
    Diversity and credibility in young people’s news feeds: A foundation for teaching and learning citizenship in a digital era2019In: Journal of Social Science Education, ISSN 1611-9665, E-ISSN 1618-5293, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 87-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Key points: – Citizen science approach to map young people’s digital news feeds.− Students predominately read hard news.− Digital news comes primarily from established news media sites deemed credible by students.− On social media, students mostly share news they find credible.− Students' authentic news feeds as potentials and challenges in education and democracy.

    Purpose: The credibility of digital news is presently a topic of debate, and curricula underline the importance of media literacy. However, the content and credibility of young people’s news feeds have not been investigated in detail in any large-scale studies. Here we explore the nature of news featured in Swedish upper secondary school students’ news feeds, how news is shared, and how credible the news is according to the students.Approach: Using citizen science and a mixed methods approach we review 2617 news from authentic news feeds.Findings: The students’ news feeds primarily contain hard news from established news media. News is predominately found on news domains, not through social media. Soft news is less common and is perceived as less credible. Boys find more sports while girls identify more entertainment and lifestyle news. The news feeds also contain some highly biased political information.Research limitations: The study was carried out in Sweden, and further international research on authentic news feeds is needed to view results in relation to society and educational practices.Research and practical implications: In education, students’ news feeds can be used to scrutinize credibility and help students navigate towards credible news domains to support democratic engagement.

  • 23.
    Nygren, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education. Umeå universitet; Stanford University.
    Foka, Anna
    Umeå universitet.
    Buckland, Phillip I.
    Umeå universitet.
    The status quo of digital humanities in Sweden: past, present and future of digital history2014In: H-Soz-KultArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Nygren, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Guath, Mona
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Mixed Digital Messages: The ability to determine news credibility among Swedish teenagers2018In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE15th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON COGNITION AND EXPLORATORY LEARNING IN THE DIGITAL AGE (CELDA 2018) / [ed] Demetrios G. Sampson, Dirk Ifenthaler and Pedro Isaías, 2018, Vol. 15, p. 375-378Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we investigate the abilities to determine credibility of digital news among 532 teenagers. Using an onlinetest we assess to what extent teenagers are able to determine the credibility of different sources, evaluate credible and biased uses of evidence, and corroborate information. Many respondents fail to identify the credibility of false, biased and vetted news. We identify a digital divide between people with and without the ability to determine credibility. We also find that a large proportion of the respondents struggle to identify the source of information in Sweden’s most read online newspaper. Respondents struggle to determine the bias of news reports regarding racism and weight loss, but are better at debunking manipulated images. Respondents who value the importance of credible news and who indicate that they have learned media literacy in school seem to hold a mind-set helping them to determine credibility better than other respondents. Our findings provide a basis for further research of how to better understand and support digital civic literacy in classrooms and society.

  • 25.
    Nygren, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Guath, Mona
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Swedish teenagers’ difficulties and abilities to determine digital news credibility2019In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 23-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we investigate the abilities to determine the credibility of digital news among 483 teenagers. Using an online survey with a performance test we assess to what extent teenagers are able to determine the credibility of different sources, evaluate credible and biased uses of evidence, and corroborate information. Many respondents fail to identify the credibility of false, biased and vetted news. Respondents who value the importance of credible news seem to hold a mindset helping them to determine credibility better than other respondents. In contrast, respondents self-reporting to be good at searching informa-tion online and who find information online trustworthy are not very good at civic online reasoning. Our findings, which may be linked to theories of disciplinary literacy, science curiosity and overconfidence, provide a basis for further research of how to better under-stand and support civic online reasoning in classrooms and society.

  • 26.
    Nygren, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Haglund, Jesper
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Samuelsson, Robin
    af Geijerstam, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Prytz, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Critical thinking in national tests across four subjects in Swedish compulsory school2018In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Critical thinking is brought to the fore as a central competence in today’s society and in school curricula, but what may be emphasised as a general skill may also differ across school subjects. Using a mixed methods approach we identify general formulations regarding critical thinking in the Swedish curriculum of school year nine and seven more subject-specific categories of critical thinking in the syllabi and national tests in history, physics, mathematics and Swedish. By analysing 76 individual students’ critical thinking as expressed in national tests we find that a student that thinks critically in one subjects does not necessarily do so in other subjects. We find that students’ grades in different subjects are closely linked to their abilities to answer questions designed to test critical thinking in the subjects. We also find that the same formulations of critical thinking in two subjects may mean very different things when translated into assessments. Our findings suggest that critical thinking among students comprise different, subject-specific skills. The complexity of our findings highlights a need for future research to help clarify to students and researchers what it means to think critically in school.

  • 27.
    Nygren, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Johnsrud, Brian
    Stanford University, USA.
    What Would Martin Luther King Jr. Say?: Teaching the Historical and Practical Past to Promote Human Rights in Education2018In: Journal of Human Rights Practice, ISSN 1757-9619, E-ISSN 1757-9627, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 287-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How might teachers challenge oversimplified narratives regarding the life and deedsof Martin Luther King Jr. (MLK), in order to support ideals of human rights in education?In this study, we examine ongoing history education where teachers try to promotea more radical human rights perspective on the history and legacy of MLK bycontrasting contemporary uses of history with primary sources from the era of thecivil rights movement. Teachers ask students to engage in tandem with what we callthe ‘historical’ and ‘practical’ past and we find that this may be constructive, but alsochallenging, in human rights education. We observe that students are able to deconstructtextbook narratives but find it difficult to challenge authorities and media thatoversimplify popular perceptions of the past. Yet many students did learn a more activeperspective on the life and deeds of MLK, evident even a year after the initialteaching took place, clearly influenced by the authentic historical writings of MLK.This study highlights important potentials and limitations in the attempts to teachstudents about, through and for human rights by making the past both historicaland practical. This study also illustrates ways that promoting alternative historicalperspectives can help students interrogate the past alongside their own present.

  • 28.
    Nygren, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Nolgård, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Skolverket osynliggör minoriteter i historieundervisningen2019Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Nygren, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education. Umeå universitet; Stanford University.
    Sandberg, Karin
    Mälardalens Högskola.
    Vikström, Lotta
    Umeå universitet, Centrum för befolkningsstudier (CBS).
    Digitala primärkällor i historieundervisningen: en utmaning för elevers historiska tänkande och historiska empati2014In: Nordidactica: Journal of Humanities and Social Science Education, ISSN 2000-9879, no 2, p. 208-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, 110 Swedish upper secondary students use a historical database designed for research. We analyze how they perceive the use of this digital tool in teaching and if they are able to use historical thinking and historical empathy in their historical writing and presentations. Using case-study methodology including questionnaires, observations, interviews and text analysis we find this to be a complex task for students. Our results highlight technological problems and problems in contextualizing historical evidence. However, students show interest in using primary sources and ability to use historical thinking and historical empathy, especially older students in more advanced courses when they have time to reflect upon the historical material.

  • 30.
    Nygren, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humlab.
    Vikström, Lotta
    Umeå universitet, Demografiska databasen.
    Treading old paths in new ways: upper secondary students using a digital tool of the professional historian2013In: Education Sciences, E-ISSN 2227-7102, Vol. 3, p. 50-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents problems and possibilities associated with incorporating into history teaching a digital demographic database made for professional historians. We detect and discuss the outcome of how students in Swedish upper secondary schools respond to a teaching approach involving digitized registers comprising 19th century individuals and populations. Even though our results demonstrate that students experience the use of this digital database as messy, stressful, complicated, even meaningless and frustrating, they also perceive working with it as most interesting. We discuss this twofold outcome, its reasons and lessons to learn from it. When technology is functioning and the task is specialized and sufficiently guided by the teacher, which is not always the case, our results propose that digital databases can stimulate young people’s interest and historical thinking. Knowledge construction based upon historical thinking is evident in the students’ examination papers in which they present and debate their findings. These papers indicate that students can use a digital database and write history based upon empirical evidence, source criticism and historical empathy, just as professional historians do.

  • 31.
    Nygren, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Vinterek, Monika
    Dalarna University.
    Thorp, Robert
    Dalarna University.
    Taylor, Margaret
    Hellesdon High School, Norwich, UK .
    Promoting a Historiographic Gaze Through Multiperspectivity in History Teaching2017In: International perspectives on teaching rival histories: Pedagogical responses to contested narratives and the history wars / [ed] Henrik Åstöm Elmersjö, Anna Clark & Monika Vinterek, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, p. 207-228Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, Nygren, Vinterek, Thorp, and Taylor show how a limited educational effort may support students’ historiographic gaze—the ability to identify, learn from, and critically reflect upon divergent perspectives and popularized representations of the past. This is a rare and constructive example of implementing multiperspectivity in secondary schools. Findings show how students’ understanding of divergent historical perspectives and critical attitudes toward popular historical writing can be affected by processing and problematizing historians’ conflicting perspectives on the causes of World War One. This exploratory study also highlights differences between Swedish and English students’ historical understanding and critical attitudes and raises questions about gender differences and how history in schools may support multiperspectivity among students, not least students with lower grades.

  • 32.
    Nygren, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humlab.
    Åstrand, Björn
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    En splittrad historia: Sambandet mellan kursplaner i historia för gymnasieskola och högre utbildning2012In: Nordidactica: Journal of Humanities and Social Science Education, ISSN 2000-9879, no 2, p. 1-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This quantitative and qualitative analysis of syllabuses indicates difficulties in the relation between history teaching in upper secondary schools and in higher education. Using analytical tools stemming from research of education and history didactics we highlight problematic differences between universities. It is evident that history education in many ways lacks a progression from upper secondary school to higher education. Judging from the formulations in the syllabuses, the grading demands on the students in upper secondary schools are in some cases even higher than in the universities. The results from this study suggest a need for further analysis of the teaching of history, and other subjects, in higher education in relation to teaching in upper secondary schools.

  • 33.
    Standish, Katerina
    et al.
    National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
    Nygren, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Looking for peace in the Swedish National Curricula2018In: Nordic Journal of Studies in Educational Policy, ISSN 2002-0317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyses, in the light of peace educational theory, the presence and absence of peace elements in the Swedish national curriculum for compulsory schooling. Using the theoretical framework developed within the international Peace Education Curricular Analysis Project, content analysis and mixed methods we identify how the Swedish curricu-lum underscore and lack the peace elements of recognizing violence, non-violent conflict transformation and positive peace. Our analysis shows that the Swedish curriculum supports teaching and learning which may help pupils to identify violence in society and internation-ally, lack many aspects of non-violent conflict transformation (especially conflict resolution) and emphasize positive peace in numerous but limited ways. We find that many dimensions of peace are underscored in the syllabus of civics, making peace education primarily a concern for a few teachers. Noting how peace in education is a wide-ranging concern for all educators, we highlight how peace may in more nuanced ways become a part of the Swedish curriculum, today and in the future.

1 - 33 of 33
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