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  • 1. al-Yaḥṣubī, al-Qāḍī ʿIyāḍ ibn Mūsā
    Islams grunder: De fem pelarna enligt malikiskolan2018 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2. Andersson, Tobias
    Att tala gott eller vara tyst: Islam och det svenska språket2018In: Muslimer i Sverige / [ed] Eli Göndör, Timbro , 2018, 1, p. 71-83Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3. Andersson, Tobias
    Early Sunnī Historiography: A Study of the Tārīkh of Khalīfa b. Khayyāṭ2018 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Early Sunnī Historiography, Tobias Andersson presents the first full-length study of the earliest Islamic chronological history extant: the Tārīkh (‘Chronicle’) of the Basran ḥadīth scholar and historian Khalīfa b. Khayyāṭ al-ʿUṣfurī (d. 240/854). The book examines how Khalīfa worked as a historian in terms of his social and intellectual context, selection of sources, methods of compilation, arrangement of material and narration of key themes in comparison to the wider historiographical tradition. It shows how Khalīfa’s affiliation with the early Sunnī ḥadīth scholars of Basra is reflected in his methods and concerns throughout the Tārīkh, while also highlighting similarities to other histories compiled by ḥadīth scholars of the third/ninth century.

  • 4. Andersson, Tobias
    The First Islamic Chronicle: The Chronicle of Khalīfa b. Khayyāṭ (d. AD 854)2017In: Universal Chronicles in the High Middle Ages / [ed] Michele Campopiano; Henry Bainton, Boydell & Brewer, 2017, 1, p. 19-42Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Chronicle (Ar. Taʾrīkh) of Khalīfa b. Khayyāṭ (d. AD 854) was composed in the early-to-mid ninth century and is the oldest Islamic chronicle still extant. Its compiler was a scholar of Qurʾān and ḥadīth – that is, a scholar of both of the Qurʾānic revelation and of the ‘reports’ or ‘traditions’ about the Prophet Muḥammad and the earliest Muslims. Khalīfa lived and worked in the large southern Iraqi port city of Basra – at the time one of the foremost centres of learning in the Islamic world. His Chronicle is arranged annalistically by years of the lunar Hijri calendar, beginning, after a short introduction, with year one – the year of the Prophet Muhammad's emigration (hijra) from Mecca to Medina (AD 622) – and ending with year AH 232/AD 847. It covers, in summary fashion, the political and administrative history of the Muslim polity, from its origins in Medina at the time of the Prophet and under the first caliphs through to the Umayyad and Abbasid caliphates.

    Despite its early date, Khalīfa's Chronicle has received little attention in modern scholarship. Survey and textbook accounts tend to remark on its being the earliest surviving history in Arabic arranged chronologically, in contrast to earlier extant works which are structured thematically or arranged as biographical entries on individuals by generations. Modern historians have tended to dismiss it as telling us little or nothing that is not found in later, more famous works of the ninth century. It is, after all, much shorter than the surviving compendious histories produced in Iraq two or three generations later by al-Balādhurī (d. c. 892) and al-Ṭabarī (d. 923): al-Ṭabarī's History of Messengers and Kings (Taʾrīkh al-rusul wa-l-mulūk) is perhaps twenty times as long; al-Balādhurī's genealogically-arranged historical work, Genealogies of the Tribal Notables (Ansāb al-ashrāf), is perhaps about fifty times the length of Khalīfa's work.

    But although Khalīfa's Chronicle may not provide many facts not known from later works, his framing of the material and the context of its compilation are markedly different from other early histories. In other words, the Chronicle itself is a hitherto-overlooked historical fact that raises important questions about the origins and development of Arabic chronicle-writing and the different ways in which the early Muslims went about finding their place in history and politics.

  • 5. as-Suyuti, Jalal ad-Din
    History of the Umayyad Caliphs: from Tārīkh al-Khulafāʾ2015 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6. Ibn Juzayy al-Kalbī, Muḥammad
    Den klara upplysningen: Om grunderna för islams trossatser2019 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
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