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  • 1.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Book review: (In)vulnerable domains in multilingualism2005In: Studies in Second Language Acquisition, ISSN 0272-2631, E-ISSN 1470-1545, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 443-486Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Developmental sequences and (in)vulnerable domains in German interlanguage syntax.2006In: Language acquisition and development: Proceedings of GALA 2005 / [ed] Adriana Belletti, Elisa Bennati, Cristiano Chesi, Elisa DiDomenico & Ida Ferrari (eds.), Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Press , 2006, p. 65-78Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Information-structural constraints on word order in advanced L2 Swedish2012In: Estudos Linguísticos, ISSN 1647-0346, Vol. 6/7, p. 91-112Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    MAIN: Swedish version (Svenska)2012In: ZAS Papers in Linguistics, ISSN 1435-9588, Vol. 56Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    MAIN (Multilingual Assessment Instrument for Narratives) utformades för att bedöma berättarförmågan hos barn som lär sig ett eller flera språk från födseln eller från tidig ålder. MAIN är avsett för barn från 3 till 9 år och utvärderar både förståelse och produktion av berättelser. Designen tillåter bedömning av flera språk hos samma barn, samt olika typer av eliciteringssätt: modellsaga (model story), återberättande (retelling) och berättande (telling).

    MAIN innehåller fyra parallella berättelser, var och en med en noggrant designad bildserie bestående av sex bilder. Berättelserna är kontrollerade gällande kognitiv och språklig komplexitet, parallellitet på makrostrukturell och mikrostrukturell nivå, samt kulturell lämplighet och robusthet.

    Instrumentet har utvecklats utifrån omfattande pilotstudier med mer än 500 enspråkiga och flerspråkiga barn mellan 4 och 9 år, med 15 olika språk och språkkombinationer.

    Även om MAIN ännu inte har normerats kan dess standardiserade procedurer användas i bedömnings-, interventions- och forskningssyfte.

     

     

    Detta dokument innehåller:

    • Riktlinjer för bedömning

    • Protokoll och bedömningsmall för Katten (Cat), Hunden (Dog), Fågelungarna (Baby Birds), Getungarna (Baby Goats)

    • Bakgrundsfrågor

    • Berättelsetexter (story scripts)

  • 5.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Nonnative acquisition of Verb Second: On the empirical underpinnings of universal L2 claims2005In: The function of function words and functional categories. / [ed] Marcel den Dikken & Christina Tortora (eds.), Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2005, p. 41-77Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acquiring Germanic verb second is typically described as difficult for second-language

    learners. Even speakers of a V2-language (Swedish) learning another V2-language (German)

    are said not to transfer V2 but to start with a non-V2 grammar, following a universal

    developmental path of verb placement. The present study contests this claim, documenting

    early targetlike V2 production for 6 Swedish ab-initio (and 23 intermediate) learners of

    German, at a time when their interlanguage syntax elsewhere is nontargetlike (head-initial

    VPs). Learners whose only nonnative language is German never violate V2, indicating

    transfer of V2-L1 syntax. Informants with previous knowledge of English are less targetlike

    in their L3-German productions, indicating interference from non-V2 English. V2 per se is

    thus not universally difficult for nonnative learners.

  • 6.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Null subjects in Swabian2013In: Studia Linguistica, ISSN 0039-3193, E-ISSN 1467-9582, Vol. 67, no 3, p. 257-289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Few studies have investigated referential null subjects in present-day non-standard varieties of German. This paper explores the distribution of 4,000 null and overt referential subjects in finite clauses in a new corpus of spoken Swabian, a North Alemannic dialect spoken in Southwest Germany. The paper describes Swabian subject use as it emerges from the corpus data with regard to morphological form, syntactic distribution, reference and informational status. Swabian, unlike Standard German, allows and in some cases prefers clause-internal referential subjects to be null, whilst in other contexts, referential null subjects are ruled out. There is a robust second person null-subject property, with 61% of 2nd singular subject pronouns being dropped clause-internally, i.e. from a position following the finite verb in main clauses or following a complementiser in embedded clauses. 1st singular and 3rd singular neuter subjects are dropped clause-internally as well, but at much lower frequencies and only in very specific phonological and lexical constellations, not previously noted in the literature. The empirical findings are compared with an earlier unquantified study of Swabian (Haag-Merz 1996) and discussed in light of other work on present-day Germanic vernaculars and previous accounts of partial null subject languages.

  • 7.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    On the “vulnerability” of syntactic domains in Swedish and German2007In: Language Acquisition, ISSN 1048-9223, E-ISSN 1532-7817, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 31-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thispaper investigates the L2 acquisition of clausal syntax in post-puberty learnersof German and Swedish regarding V2, VP headedness and verb particleconstructions. The learner data are tested against L2 theories according towhich lower structural projections (VP) are acquired before higher functionalprojections (IP, CP), VP syntax is unproblematic (invulnerable), but where grammatical operations related to thetopmost level of syntactic structure (CP) are acquired late (e.g. Platzack’s(2001) vulnerable C-domain). It willbe shown that such theories do not hold water: native speakers of Swedishlearning German and native speakers of German learning Swedish both master V2from early on. At the same time, these learners exhibit a nontargetlike syntaxat lower structural levels: residual VO in the case of the Swedish-L1 learnersof German, and persistent nontarget transitive verb particle constructions inthe German-L1 learners of Swedish. I argue that these findings are bestexplained by assuming full transfer of L1 syntax (e.g. Schwartz & Sprouse 1996).

  • 8.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics.
    On the “vulnerability” of syntactic domains in Swedish and German2007In: Language Acquisition, ISSN 1048-9223, E-ISSN 1532-7817, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 31-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thispaper investigates the L2 acquisition of clausal syntax in post-puberty learnersof German and Swedish regarding V2, VP headedness and verb particleconstructions. The learner data are tested against L2 theories according towhich lower structural projections (VP) are acquired before higher functionalprojections (IP, CP), VP syntax is unproblematic (invulnerable), but where grammatical operations related to thetopmost level of syntactic structure (CP) are acquired late (e.g. Platzack’s(2001) vulnerable C-domain). It willbe shown that such theories do not hold water: native speakers of Swedishlearning German and native speakers of German learning Swedish both master V2from early on. At the same time, these learners exhibit a nontargetlike syntaxat lower structural levels: residual VO in the case of the Swedish-L1 learnersof German, and persistent nontarget transitive verb particle constructions inthe German-L1 learners of Swedish. I argue that these findings are bestexplained by assuming full transfer of L1 syntax (e.g. Schwartz & Sprouse 1996).

  • 9.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Placing verbs and particles in non-native German and Swedish2006In: Working Papers in Scandinavian Syntax, ISSN 1100-097X, , p. 51Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Reflections on dummy 'do' in child language and syntactic theory2013In: Dummy auxiliaries in first and second language acquisition / [ed] Blom, Elma, van de Craats, Ineke & Verhagen, Josie, Boston / Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2013, p. 171-208Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Tell me a story in English or Swedish: Narrative production and comprehension in bilingual preschoolers and first graders2016In: Applied Psycholinguistics, ISSN 0142-7164, E-ISSN 1469-1817, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 19-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines macrostructural aspects of narrative skills in 52 bilingual Swedish- and English-speaking children age 5-7. Elicited fictional story production and comprehension tasks were administered in parallel fashion in both Swedish and English (Multilingual Assessment Instrument for Narratives, MAIN, Gagarina et al., 2012). Scores on MAIN were compared across languages; moreover, story structure components in the narratives and answers to probe questions were qualitatively analyzed. Age effects (5-year-olds vs. 6-7-year-olds) for macrostructure production and narrative comprehension were evident, but no effect for language (Swedish/English). The results suggest that story structure is invariant across a bilingual child’s two languages at a given age, with similar awareness of the intentions and goal-directed behavior of the story protagonists, irrespective of language.

  • 12.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    The clause-initial position in L2 Swedish declaratives: word order variation and discourse pragmatics2010In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0332-5865, E-ISSN 1502-4717, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 105-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a recent study of the clause-initial position in verb-second declaratives (the prefield), Bohnacker & Rosén (2008) found significant differences between native Swedish and German concerning the frequencies with which constituents occurred in the prefield, as well as qualitative differences concerning the mapping of information structure and linear word order: Swedish exhibited a stronger tendency than German to place new information, the so-called rheme, later in the clause. Swedish-speaking learners of German transferred these patterns from their L1 to German. Their sentences were syntactically well-formed but had Swedish-style prefield frequencies and a strong pattern of Rheme Later, which native Germans perceive as unidiomatic, as an acceptability judgment and a rewrite-L2texts task showed. The present study extends Bohnacker & Rosén's work in three ways. Learners of the reverse language combination (L1 German, L2 Swedish) are investigated to see whether similar phenomena also manifest themselves there. Secondly, written and oral data from highly advanced learners are examined to see whether the learners’ persistent problems can be overcome by extensive immersion (3, 6 and 9 years of L2 exposure). Thirdly, besides investigating theme–rheme (old vs. new information), some consideration is given to another information-structural level, background vs. focus. The learners are found to overuse the prefield at first, with non-Swedish, German-style frequency patterns (e.g. low proportions of clause-initial expletives and high proportions of clause-initial rhematic elements). This is interpreted as evidence for L1 transfer of information-structural or discourse-pragmatic preferences. After 6 and 9 years, a substantial increase in clause-initial expletive subjects, clefts and lightweight given elements is indicative of development towards the target. The findings are related to current generative theorizing on the syntax-pragmatics interface, where it is often maintained that the integration of multiple types of information is one of the hardest areas for L2 learners to master.

  • 13.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    The role of input frequency in article acquisition in early child Swedish2007In: Frequency effects in language acquisition: Defining the limits of frequency as an explanatory concept / [ed] Gülzow, Insa & Gagarina, Natalia (eds), Berlin & New York: Mouton de Gruyter , 2007, p. 51-82Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates patterns of article use in monolingual early child Swedish and in child-directed adult speech. Article omissions in the adult data are found to be more widespread than previously assumed, especially articleless, “bare” singular count nouns (e.g. sten ‘stone’ instead of en sten ‘a stone’) and article omissions in doubly determined nominals (e.g. lilla tummen (little thumb-the, ‘the little thumb’) instead of den lilla tummen (the little thumb-the; ‘the little thumb’). Such omissions in the input may arguably influence the course of acquisition. In the two children studied, an initial determinerless stage (1;3-1;7) is followed by a stage of optional articles (1;8-1;11). Targetlike article provision is reached at 2;0, which is early compared to most other Germanic languages. Definite enclitic articles (e.g. -en ‘the’ as in sten-en ‘the stone’) emerge at an earlier age and are produced at higher frequencies than indefinite prenominal articles (e.g. en ‘a’ as in en sten ‘a stone’) and at an earlier age and at much higher frequencies than definite prenominal articles (e.g. den ‘the’ as in den lilla tummen ‘the little thumb’). These child frequency patterns appear to replicate those of the adult caregivers. However, input frequency is argued to be an insufficient explanation for Swedish article acquisition, because of striking mismatches in child and adult article use in other areas, especially bare nouns. Investigations of child-directed adult speech are nevertheless important because they tell us what the immediate target looks like for the young child, which may be different from what linguists and reference grammars tend to assume.

  • 14.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    Lund University.
    When Swedes begin to learn German: From V2 to V22006In: Second language research, ISSN 0267-6583, E-ISSN 1477-0326, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 443-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates verb placement, especially Verb second

    (V2), in post-puberty second language (L2) learners of two closely

    related Germanic V2 languages: Swedish and German. Håkansson,

    et al. (2002) have adduced data from first language (L1) Swedish-speaking

    learners of German in support of the claim that the syntactic

    property of V2 never transfers from the L1 to L2 interlanguage

    grammars. Regardless of L1, learners are said to follow a hypothesized

    universal developmental path of L2 German verb placement,

    where V2 is mastered very late (only after Object–Verb, OV, has

    been acquired), if ever. Explanations include the notion of

    Subject–Verb–Object (SVO) being a more basic, ‘canonical’ word

    order (e.g. Clahsen and Muysken, 1986), so-called ‘vulnerability’

    of the C-domain (Platzack, 2001), and ‘processability’, according

    to which SVX and Adv–SVX (i.e. V3) are easier to process (i.e.

    produce) than XVS (i.e. V2) (e.g. Pienemann, 1998). However, the

    empirical data comes exclusively from Swedes learning German as

    a third language, after substantial exposure to English. When these

    learners violate V2, syntactic transfer from English, a non-V2 language,

    cannot be ruled out. In order to control for this potential confound,

    I compare new oral production data from six adult Swedish

    ab initio learners of German, three with prior knowledge of English

    and three without. With an appropriate elicitation method, the

    informants can be shown to productively use non-subject-initial V2

    in their German after four months of exposure, at a point when their

    interlanguage syntax elsewhere is non-targetlike (VO instead of

    OV). Informants who do not know English never violate V2 (0%),

    indicating transfer of V2-L1 syntax. Those with prior knowledge of

    English are less targetlike in their L3-German productions (45% V2

    violations), indicating interference from non-V2 English. These

    results suggest that, contra Håkansson et al. (2002), learners do

    transfer the property of V2 from their L1, and that L2 knowledge of

    a non-V2 language (English) may obscure this V2 transfer. The

    findings also suggest that V2 is not difficult to acquire per se, and

    that V2 is not developmentally dependent on target headedness of

    the VP (German OV) having been acquired first.

  • 15.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Lindgren, Josefin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Fundament, formellt subjekt och frekvens: Ordföljdsmönster i svenska, nederländska och hos vuxna inlärare av svenska2014In: Språk & Stil, ISSN 1101-1165, Vol. 24, p. 33-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    This paper investigates distributional patterns concerning the prefield and expletive subjects in two closely related languages, Swedish and Dutch, and in nonnative learners of Swedish. Native (Swedish, n=17; Dutch, n=17) and nonnative speakers (adult Dutch-speaking learners of Swedish, n=17) completed an oral picture description task and an unedited informal writing task. The overall frequencies with which constituents (subject vs. adverbial vs. object) occurred in the prefield were similar for all three groups in the oral data, though expletive subjects were more frequent in Swedish. In the written data, Swedish showed a more pronounced subject-initial pattern than Dutch. Distributional differences between Swedish and Dutch were smaller than previously reported for Swedish vs. German (Bohnacker & Rosén 2008, Bohnacker 2010). Learners mostly produced syntactically well-formed utterances but overused elliptic V1 clauses with overt postverbal subject (unattested in native Swedish), which can be attributed to syntactic transfer from L1 Dutch. Learners underused certain other word orders, namely prefield doubling (place adverbial + resumptive ) and postverbal expletive subjects, which in the oral genre were extremely frequent in native Swedish. The extent to which L2 learners produced postverbal expletives was found to be related to individual patterns in L1 Dutch, and for Dutch to be affected by regional origin (Netherlands vs. Flanders) and transferred to L2 Swedish.

  • 16.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Lindgren, Josefin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Öztekin, Buket
    Turkish- and German-speaking bilingual 4-to-6-year-olds living in Sweden: Effects of age, SES and home language input on vocabulary production2016In: Journal of Home Language Research, ISSN 2537-7043, Vol. 1, p. 17-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates vocabulary production in the minority home languages of 40 Turkish-Swedish and 38 German-Swedish bilingual preschoolers aged 4;0–6;11, growing up in Sweden. We explore how age, SES, and exposure via mother-tongue instruction and home language use in the family affect child vocabulary skills. This has not previously been investigated in Sweden. Cross-linguistic Lexical Tasks (CLTs; Haman, Łuniewska & Pomiechowska, 2015) were used to test noun and verb production in Turkish and German. Background information was collected using a parental questionnaire. The two bilingual groups performed equally well in their respective home languages, Turkish and German. There were no effects of age, socio-economic status (SES) or mother-tongue instruction on vocabulary. However, input in the home setting had a clear effect. Children whose parents used the home language to the child and to each other had significantly higher vocabulary production scores. Having additional home-language input providers such as friends also affected the scores. These results from a Swedish context echo findings from studies of other language combinations and reveal the importance of input for the development of expressive vocabulary.

  • 17.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Mohammadi, Somaye
    Azad University of Bam.
    Acquiring Persian Object Marking: Balochi learners of L2 Persian2013In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 61, p. 59-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the second language acquisition of Persian object marking by 237 nativeBalochi-speaking children from age eight to eleven. The combination of Balochi and Persian has not beenstudied from an acquisitional perspective, although it widely occurs in southeastern Iran. This paperstudies the second language (L2) development of direct and indirect object marking after two and threeyears of exposure to Persian at school, vs. a control group of 133 monolingual native Persian children ofsimilar age and socio-economic background. Beginning learners predominantly use non-targetlike objectmarking constructions reminiscent of Balochi, whilst there is a clear trend towards Persian-style objectmarking in the more advanced learners. These findings suggest that L2 learners initially transfer core aspectsof their native grammar to their interlanguage Persian. The picture is complicated by the existenceof differential object marking in Balochi and Persian and the somewhat different writing patterns of nativeand non-native learners.

  • 18.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Rosén, Christina
    Växjö universitet, Humaniora.
    Fundamentet i svenskan och tyskan - Syntax och informationsstruktur: Ett problemområde för språkinlärning och undervisning2009In: Språk & Stil, ISSN 1101-1165, Vol. 19, p. 142-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the influence of the first language (L1), here Swedish, on the acquisition of syntax and discourse pragmatics in a closely related second language (L2), here German, by looking at the information structure of Verb-Second clauses. Even though almost any type of element can occur in the so-called ‘prefield’, i.e. the clause-initial preverbal position of V2 declaratives, we document language-specific patterns for native-speaker corpora: The frequencies of prefield constituent types differ substantially between German and Swedish, and Swedish postpones new (‘rhematic’) information and instead fills the prefield with given (‘thematic’) elements and elements of no or low informational value (e.g. expletives) to a far greater extent than German. Using oral production data from Bohnacker (2005, 2006) and new written production data from Rosén (2006), we compare Swedish learners of German at beginner, intermediate and advanced levels to native controls, matched for age and genre. These learners master the syntactic properties of V2, but start their sentences in nonnative ways. They overapply the Swedish principle of “rheme later” in their L2 German, indicating L1 transfer at the interface of syntax and information-structure, especially for structures that are frequent in the L1 (e.g. subject-initial clauses, expletive-initial clauses, fronted thematic objects das ‘it/this’). Implications of these findings for language teaching are discussed.

  • 19.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Rosén, Christina
    How to start a declarative V2 clause: Transfer of syntax or information structure in L2 German2007In: Nordlyd, ISSN 1503-8599, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 29-56Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Rosén, Christina
    Växjö universitet.
    Interaction of syntax and discourse pragmatics in closely related languages: How native Swedes, native Germans, and Swedish-speaking learners of German start their sentences2010In: Researching interfaces in linguistics / [ed] Folli, Raffaella & Ulbrich, Christiane, Oxford: Oxford University Press , 2010, p. 331-350Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the interaction of syntax and discourse in two closely related languages, Swedish and German, and identifies language-specific distributional patterns and discourse-pragmatic differences concerning the clause-initial ‘prefield’ position of verb-second clauses. New corpus data indicate that Swedish has a much stronger tendency than German to place new information later in the clause. Swedish uses the prefield mainly for informationally given elements and expletives, whilst German regularly allows new information in clause-initial position. The stricter Swedish constraints on what can and does occur in the prefield have repercussions for L2 acquisition at the grammar-pragmatics interface. The paper discusses data from native speakers of Swedish learning German as a foreign language, showing that mastery of pure V2 syntax is well in advance of appropriate discourse-pragmatic use of that syntax. Syntactic and pragmatic transfer from Swedish results in L2 texts that are unidiomatic and not fully cohesive from a native-speaker perspective.

  • 21.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Rosén, Christina
    Växjö universitet, Humaniora.
    The clause-initial position in L2 German declaratives: Transfer of information structure2008In: Studies in Second Language Acquisition, ISSN 0272-2631, E-ISSN 1470-1545, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 511-538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the information structure of verb-second (V2) declaratives in Swedish, German, and nonnative German. Even though almost any type of element can occur in the so-called prefield, the clause-initial preverbal position of V2 declaratives, we have found language-specific patterns in native-speaker corpora: The frequencies of prefield constituent types differ substantially between German and Swedish, and Swedish postpones new (rhematic) information and instead fills the prefield with given (thematic) elements and elements of no or low informational value (e.g., expletives) to a far greater extent than German. We compare Swedish learners of German to native controls matched for age and Genre (Bohnacker 2005, 2006; Rosén 2006). These learners master the syntactic properties of V2 but start their sentences in nonnative ways. They overapply the Swedish principle of rheme later in their second language German, indicating first language (L1) transfer at the interace of syntax and information structure, especially for structures that are frequent in the L1.

  • 22.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics.
    Rosén, Christina
    Växjö universitet, Humaniora.
    The clause-initial position in L2 German declaratives: Transfer of information structure2008In: Studies in Second Language Acquisition, ISSN 0272-2631, E-ISSN 1470-1545, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 511-538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the information structure of verb-second (V2) declaratives in Swedish, German, and nonnative German. Even though almost any type of element can occur in the so-called prefield, the clause-initial preverbal position of V2 declaratives, we have found language-specific patterns in native-speaker corpora: The frequencies of prefield constituent types differ substantially between German and Swedish, and Swedish postpones new (rhematic) information and instead fills the prefield with given (thematic) elements and elements of no or low informational value (e.g., expletives) to a far greater extent than German. We compare Swedish learners of German to native controls matched for age and Genre (Bohnacker 2005, 2006; Rosén 2006). These learners master the syntactic properties of V2 but start their sentences in nonnative ways. They overapply the Swedish principle of rheme later in their second language German, indicating first language (L1) transfer at the interace of syntax and information structure, especially for structures that are frequent in the L1.

  • 23.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics.
    Rosén, Christina
    Växjö universitet.
    Transferring information-structural patterns from Swedish to German2007In: GALANA 2: Proceedings of the Conference on Generative Approaches to Language Acquisition North America 2 / [ed] Alyona Belikova, Luisa Meroni & Mari Umeda (eds.), Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press , 2007, p. 27-38Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Westergaard, Marit
    Universitetet i Tromsö.
    Introduction: The Nordic languages and second language acquisition theory2010In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0332-5865, E-ISSN 1502-4717, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 99-104Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Westergaard, MaritCASTL, Universitetet i Tromsö.
    Nordic Journal of Linguistics Special issue on the Nordic languages and second language acquisition theory2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Gagarina, Natalia
    et al.
    Zentrum für Allgemeine Sprachwissenschaft, Berlin.
    Klop, Daleen
    Stellenbosch University.
    Kunnari, Sari
    Uleåborgs universitet (Oulu).
    Tantele, Koula
    University of Cyprus.
    Välimaa, Taina
    Uleåborgs universitet (Oulu).
    Balciuniene, Ingrida
    Vilnius University.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Walters, joel
    Bar Ilan University.
    Assessment of narrative abilities in bilingual children2015In: Assessing multilingual children: Disentangling bilingualism from language impairment / [ed] Armon-Lotem, Sharon, de Jong, Jan & Meir, Natalia (eds), Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2015, p. 243-276Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Gagarina, Natalia
    et al.
    Zentrum für Allgemeine Sprachwissenschaft, Berlin.
    Klop, Daleen
    Stellenbosch University.
    Kunnari, Sari
    Uleåborgs universitet (Oulu).
    Tantele, Koula
    University of Cyprus.
    Välimaa, Taina
    Uleåborgs universitet (Oulu).
    Balciuniene, Ingrida
    Vytautas Magnus University, Kaunas.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Walters, Joel
    Bar Ilan University.
    Multilingual Assessment Instrument for Narratives (MAIN)2012In: ZAS Papers in Linguistics, ISSN 1435-9588, Vol. 56, p. 1-140Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Multilingual Assessment Instrument for Narratives (MAIN) was designed in order to assess narrative skills in children who acquire one or more languages from birth or from early age. MAIN is suitable for children from 3 to 9 years and evaluates both comprehension and production of narratives. Its design allows for the assessment of several languages in the same child, as well as for different elicitation modes: Model Story, Retelling, and Telling.

    MAIN contains four parallel stories, each with a carefully designed six-picture sequence. The stories are controlled for cognitive and linguistic complexity, parallelism in macrostructure and microstructure, as well as for cultural appropriateness and robustness.

    The instrument has been developed on the basis of extensive piloting with more than 500 monolingual and bilingual children aged 3 to 10, for 15 different languages and language combinations.

    Even though MAIN has not been norm-referenced yet, its standardized procedures can be used for evaluation, intervention and research purposes. MAIN is currently available in the following languages: English, Afrikaans, Albanian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Cypriot Greek, Danish, Dutch, Estonian, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Icelandic, Italian, Lithuanian, Norwegian, Polish, Russian, Spanish, Standard Arabic, Swedish, Turkish, Vietnamese, and Welsh.

  • 28. Kupisch, Tanja
    et al.
    Anderssen, Merete
    Bohnacker, Ute
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Snape, Neal
    Article acquisition in English, German, Norwegian and Swedish2009In: Little Words: Their history, phonology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics and acquisition / [ed] Leow, Ronald P., Héctor Campos & Donna Lardiere, Washington: Georgetown University Press , 2009, p. 223-235Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Article omission is a well-documented phenomenon in early child speech. Interestingly, children differ in terms of how extensively they omit articles depending on their age and what language(s) they are exposed to. Different accounts have been proposed to account for this cross-linguistic variation. One of the most widely discussed models is the Nominal Mapping Parameter (NMP), originally proposed in Chierchia (1998), which relates variation in child language to the syntactic and semantic properties of noun phrases across languages (e.g. Chierchia, Guasti and Gualmini 1999, Guasti and Gavarró 2003, Guasti et al. 2004). Other influential accounts of determiner omission have been formulated in prosody-oriented research (e.g. Gerken 1991, 1994, Lleó 1998, 2001, Lleó and Demuth 1999, Roark and Demuth 2000, Demuth et al., in press). So far, no common agreement has been reached.

    This paper presents a study on article acquisition in English, German, Norwegian and Swedish, where article use is subject to similar syntactic and semantic conditions. Hence, the NMP predicts similar acquisition patterns. In terms of their metrical structure, noun phrases in these languages differ considerably. Accordingly, different acquisition patterns are expected.

  • 29. Kupisch, Tanja
    et al.
    Anderssen, Merete
    Bohnacker, Ute
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics.
    Snape, Neal
    Article acquisition in English, German, Norwegian and Swedish2009In: Little Words: Their history, phonology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics and acquisition / [ed] Leow, Ronald P., Héctor Campos & Donna Lardiere, Washington: Georgetown University Press , 2009, p. 223-235Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Article omission is a well-documented phenomenon in early child speech. Interestingly, children differ in terms of how extensively they omit articles depending on their age and what language(s) they are exposed to. Different accounts have been proposed to account for this cross-linguistic variation. One of the most widely discussed models is the Nominal Mapping Parameter (NMP), originally proposed in Chierchia (1998), which relates variation in child language to the syntactic and semantic properties of noun phrases across languages (e.g. Chierchia, Guasti and Gualmini 1999, Guasti and Gavarró 2003, Guasti et al. 2004). Other influential accounts of determiner omission have been formulated in prosody-oriented research (e.g. Gerken 1991, 1994, Lleó 1998, 2001, Lleó and Demuth 1999, Roark and Demuth 2000, Demuth et al., in press). So far, no common agreement has been reached.

    This paper presents a study on article acquisition in English, German, Norwegian and Swedish, where article use is subject to similar syntactic and semantic conditions. Hence, the NMP predicts similar acquisition patterns. In terms of their metrical structure, noun phrases in these languages differ considerably. Accordingly, different acquisition patterns are expected.

1 - 29 of 29
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