uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 15 of 15
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Ellonen, N
    et al.
    Jernbro, C
    Janson, S
    Tindberg, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i D län (CKFD).
    Lucas, Steven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Current parantal attitudes towards upbringing practices in Finland and Sweden thirty years afer the ban on corporal punishment2015In: Child Abuse Review, ISSN 0952-9136, E-ISSN 1099-0852, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 409-417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thirty years have now passed since Sweden and Finland, as the first countries in the world, enacted national legislation against corporal punishment. This study examines the current attitudes towards corporal punishment among Finnish and Swedish parents of newborn to 12-year-old children. Differences between the countries in parents’ attitudes towards upbringing practices in relation to socio-demographic background factors were also analysed. The study was based on identical survey data collected separately in Finland and Sweden in 2011 and later merged for analysis. The survey included questions regarding parental behaviour and attitudes towards upbringing practices. Data were analysed using univariate tests (chi-2) and logistic regression. The analysis showed that a significantly larger proportion of Finnish parents approved of slapping or hitting their children compared to Swedish parents (OR = 6.20). Swedish parents, on the other hand, approved of shaking more than Finnish parents (OR = 0.54). Furthermore, a larger proportion of Finnish parents had positive attitudes towards non-violent types of punishments compared to Swedish parents. The socio-demographic background factors did not explain the differences between the countries. Cultural factors that may plausibly influence these attitudes are discussed.

  • 2.
    Ellonen, Noora
    et al.
    Univ Tampere, Tampere, Finland..
    Lucas, Steven
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Tindberg, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Janson, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Karlstad Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, SE-65188 Karlstad, Sweden..
    Parents' Self-Reported Use of Corporal Punishment and Other Humiliating Upbringing Practices in Finland and Sweden: A Comparative Study2017In: Child Abuse Review, ISSN 0952-9136, E-ISSN 1099-0852, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 289-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden and Finland were the first countries to ban corporal punishment 30years ago. Since then, the prevalence of attitudes supporting the use of corporal punishment and the practice itself have decreased. This study examines the current frequencies of corporal punishment and other humiliating upbringing practices in Finnish and Swedish families. The analysis is based on survey data among 3170 Finnish and 1358 Swedish parents with children from newborn to 12years of age. Data were analysed using univariate tests (chi-square) and logistic regression. According to the analysis, a larger proportion of Finnish parents, and especially mothers, use humiliating upbringing practices compared to Swedish parents. This difference is not found with regard to corporal punishment. A larger proportion of Finnish parents push their children compared to Swedish parents, while a larger proportion of Swedish parents shake their children. In both countries, corporal punishment is more frequently used by fathers, boys are more often victimised than girls, toddlers are more often exposed to corporal punishment and school-age children are more often subjected to psychologically abusive practices. Corporal punishment and other humiliating upbringing practices are strongly correlated in both countries. The differences found between countries were not explained by socio-demographic factors.

  • 3.
    Jernbro, Carolina
    et al.
    Karlstad Univ, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Otterman, Gabriel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    Lucas, Steven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    Tindberg, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    Janson, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research. Karlstad Univ, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Disclosure of Child Physical Abuse and Perceived Adult Support among Swedish Adolescents2017In: Child Abuse Review, ISSN 0952-9136, E-ISSN 1099-0852, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 451-464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Compared to child sexual abuse (CSA), little is known about disclosure of child physical abuse (CPA). Enhancing the understanding of the characteristics of disclosure is necessary for improved child protection. The aim of the present study was to examine disclosure of CPA and perceived adult support using both quantitative and qualitative data from a survey of child maltreatment carried out among a nationally representative sample of Swedish adolescents (n = 3202). We found that adolescents who experienced any child maltreatment (CPA, emotional abuse, neglect and witnessing intimate partner violence) were less likely to be able to identify an adult confidant compared to those without a history of abuse. Among the adolescents who reported severe CPA, 52 per cent had disclosed the abuse and the most frequent recipient of disclosure was a peer or sibling. Eleven per cent had disclosed to professionals within school, child protective services or law enforcement. Lack of trust in adults appeared to be the most prominent reason for non- disclosure. Several adolescents who had disclosed abuse to professionals perceived an ineffective response, primarily because of professionals' lack of a child perspective. Some respondents experienced supportive interventions, specifically from school social workers. These patterns showed close similarity to disclosure of CSA.

  • 4.
    Jernbro, Carolina
    et al.
    Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Health and Environment, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Svensson, Birgitta
    Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Health and Environment, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Tindberg, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i D län (CKFD).
    Janson, Staffan
    Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Health and Environment, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Multiple psychosomatic symptoms can indicate child physical abuse: results from a study of Swedish schoolchildren2012In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 101, no 3, p. 324-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To examine whether children with self-reported experiences of either physical abuse alone or combined with intimate partner violence report more psychosomatic symptoms than other children and to explore whether these possible associations are enhanced by school-related factors, chronic condition and demographic factors.

    Methods: A national cross-sectional study of 2771 pupils in grades 4, 6 and 9 from 44 schools in Sweden was carried out in 2006 (91% response rate). Data were analysed with univariate tests (chi-square), multiple logistic regression analyses and stratified logistic regression analyses, expressed as crude odds ratio (OR) and adjusted odds ratio (AOR) with 95% confidence intervals.

    Results: There was a strong association between reported physical abuse and multiple (three or more) psychosomatic symptoms among schoolchildren (AOR 2.12). Chronic condition was the only determinant that had an obvious enhancing effect on the association between physical abuse and psychosomatic symptoms in childhood.

    Conclusion: This study shows that multiple psychosomatic symptoms are associated with child physical abuse. Health professionals therefore need to pay special attention to schoolchildren who complain about the co-occurrence of psychosomatic symptoms and pattern of symptoms, which could not be easily explained by other causes.

  • 5.
    Jernbro, Carolina
    et al.
    Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Tindberg, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Lucas, Steven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Janson, Staffan
    Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Quality of life among Swedish school children who experiencedmulti-type child maltreatment2015In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 104, no 3, p. 320-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: he aim of thisstudy was to examine the overlap between child maltreatment types and theirassociation with quality of life amongschool children.

    METHODS: A national cross-sectional study of 3,202 grade nine Swedish pupils of 15-years-of-agewas carried out in 2011 with an 84% response rate.Data were analysed usingPearson chi-squareandmultiple linear regression analyses.

    RESULTS: Of the total sample, 650 children (20%) reported at least one type of maltreatment.There was a large degree of overlap between maltreatment types.In particular,neglect and witnessing intimate partner violence overlapped with most other types of maltreatment.There was a significant relationship between the degree of abuse and multi-type maltreatment. Results showeda linear relationship between the number of types ofmaltreatment and quality of life (p<0.001), indicating a dose-response relationship.

    CONCLUSION: The results emphasise the negative impact of child maltreatment on children's lives and highlight the importance of taking the broad spectrum of child maltreatment into account in both research and practice. A more comprehensive assessment of the width of maltreatment among professionals may help to identify the most seriously maltreated children and lead to an improved ability to target intervention and prevention atthese children.

  • 6.
    Lucas, Steven
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Jernbro, Carolina
    Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Tindberg, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i D län (CKFD).
    Janson, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Bully, bullied and abused. Associations between violence at home and bullying in childhood2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 27-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: The aim was to examine experiences of bullying among Swedish adolescents and whether victims and perpetrators were also exposed to violence in the home, with particular focus on how abuse severity affected the risk of exposure to bullying.

    METHODS: A nationally representative sample of pupils aged 14-15 responded to a questionnaire exploring exposure to corporal punishment and other types of violence. Results were analysed using Pearson's chi-square and multiple logistic regression, adjusting for factors regarding the child, the parents and the families' socioeconomic status.

    RESULTS: Among the 3197 respondents, a significant proportion reported at least one incident of either bullying victimisation (girls 36%, boys 26%) or bullying perpetration (girls 24%, boys 36%). Physical and emotional violence in the home, including witnessed intimate partner violence, were significantly associated with both bullying victimisation and bullying perpetration. Odds ratios for exposure to bullying rose with increasing frequency and severity of abuse. Adjusted odds ratios ranged from 1.6 for any event of abuse vs. single episodes of bullying to 20.3 for multiple types of abuse vs. many episodes of bullying. The child's gender and the presence of a chronic health condition were consistently associated with nearly all levels of abuse and bullying.

    CONCLUSIONS: Bullying experiences are common among youth and are clearly associated with abuse. Frequent bullying, whether as victim or perpetrator, warrants particular vigilance, as it appears to be an indicator of severe violence in the home.

  • 7.
    Nylander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Fernell, Elisabeth
    Tindberg, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Chronic conditions and coexisting ADHD-a complicated combination in adolescents2015In: European Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0340-6199, E-ISSN 1432-1076, Vol. 174, no 9, p. 1209-1215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescents with chronic conditions (CCs) take more health risks than peers. However, coexisting ADHD has not sufficiently been considered. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of different CCs on protective factors and health-risk behaviors, taking coexisting ADHD into account. A school-based study among 6895 15- and 17-year-old students was performed in the county of Sormland, Sweden in 2011 (response rate 80 %). The questionnaire explored background factors, CCs, protective factors, and health-risk behaviors. CCs were reported by 11 %, while 55 % were healthy. Students with CCs more often reported coexisting ADHD than healthy students. In adolescents with neurological conditions, the odds ratio for having ADHD was 7.34 (95 % CI 3.00-17.99) as compared to healthy peers. Few protective factors (< 4) and clustered health-risk behaviors (a parts per thousand yen4) were more common among students with CCs, especially if ADHD or a combination including ADHD was reported. Conclusion: CCs and coexisting ADHD are associated with few protective factors and clustered-health risk behaviors. Adolescents with ADHD-in addition to a chronic condition-should be specially acknowledged by health care professionals in order to prevent health risk behaviors. ADHD should be considered when studying these outcomes in adolescents.

  • 8.
    Nylander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Seidel, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Tindberg, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    The triply troubled teenager - chronic conditions associated with fewer protective factors and clustered risk behaviours2014In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 103, no 2, p. 194-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This study aimed to measure protective factors and risk behaviour among adolescents with chronic conditions (CCs) and to evaluate the impact of protective factors on risk-taking.

    METHODS: A population-based study of 7262 students aged 15 and 17 years old was performed in Sörmland, Sweden 2008 (response rate 82%). The questionnaire explored background factors, CCs, risk behaviours and protective factors. CCs were reported by 8%, while 58% had no health problems.

    RESULTS: Girls with CCs encompassed less individual protective factors, while boys with CCs tended to over-report all individual risk behaviours compared with healthy peers. Both boys and girls with CCs were more likely to report few protective factors and co-occurrence of risk behaviours. The adjOR for clustered health risk behaviours was 1.6 (1.0-2.5) in youths with CCs and ≥4 protective factors and 6.3 (3.6-10.9) in youths with CCs and 0-3 protective factors, as compared to healthy peers with ≥4 protective factors.

    CONCLUSION: Adolescents with CCs reported fewer protective factors and more risk behaviours than their healthy peers. The vulnerability of adolescents with CCs and few protective factors is important to acknowledge. Professionals should provide stronger protection for these adolescents, to prevent risky behaviour.

  • 9.
    Nylander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Tindberg, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Fernell, Elisabeth
    Risky sexual behaviour among adolescents may be related to ADHD2015In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 104, no 6, p. E235-E235Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Nylander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Endocrinology.
    Tindberg, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    Haas, Josephine
    Swenne, Ingemar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Endocrinology.
    Torbjörnsdotter, Torun
    Åkesson, Karin
    Örtqvist, Eva
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Endocrinology.
    Fernell, Elisabeth
    Self- and parent-reported executive problems in adolescents with type 1 diabetes are associated with poor metabolic control and low physical activity.2018In: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 98-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Management of diabetes is demanding and requires efficient cognitive skills, especially in the domain of executive functioning. However, the impact of impaired executive functions on diabetes control has been studied to a limited extent. The aim of the study is to investigate the association between executive problems and diabetes control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two hundred and forty-one of 477 (51%) of 12- to 18-year-old adolescents, with a diabetes duration of >2 years in Stockholm, Uppsala, and Jönköping participated. Parents and adolescents completed questionnaires, including Behavioral Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF), Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)-Rating Scale (ADHD-RS) and demographic background factors. Diabetes-related data were collected from the Swedish Childhood Diabetes Registry, SWEDIABKIDS. Self-rated and parent-rated executive problems were analyzed with regard to gender, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), frequency of outpatient visits, and physical activity, using chi-square tests or Fisher's test, where P-values <.05 were considered significant. Furthermore, adjusted logistic regressions were performed with executive problems as independent variable.

    RESULTS: Executive problems, according to BRIEF and/or ADHD-RS were for both genders associated with mean HbA1c >70 mmol/mol (patient rating P = .000, parent rating P = .017), a large number of outpatient visits (parent rating P = .015), and low physical activity (patient rating P = .000, parent rating P = .025). Self-rated executive problems were more prevalent in girls (P = .032), while parents reported these problems to a larger extent in boys (P = .028).

    CONCLUSION: Executive problems are related to poor metabolic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Patients with executive problems need to be recognized by the diabetes team and the diabetes care should be organized to provide adequate support for these patients.

  • 11.
    Nylander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Toivonen, Henri
    Department of Paediatrics, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Nasic, Salmir
    Centre for Research and Development, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Söderström, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Tindberg, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Fernell, Elisabeth
    Department of Paediatrics, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes and high HbA1c: a neurodevelopmental perspective2013In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 102, no 4, p. 410-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To examine the association between neurodevelopmental problems and high HbA1c among paediatric patients with type 1 diabetes.

    Methods

    A population-based study was performed among patients with type 1 diabetes (5–16 years) in two Swedish counties (n = 233). The Five to Fifteen (FTF) questionnaire targeted neurodevelopmental qualities. Scores above the 90th percentile in the various domains are considered as definitive problems and scores above the 75th percentile as mild. FTF scores were compared with regard to HbA1c ≤73 mmol/mol and >73 mmol/mol (8.0%).

    Results

    The response rate was 190 (82%). Neurodevelopmental problems were not overrepresented among patients in general. Memory and learning problems were associated with HbA1c >73 mmol/mol (p = 0.01). This correlation was especially seen in adolescents (12–16 years) where mild executive problems (adjOR 3.1), definite memory problems (adjOR 5.0) and definite learning problems (adjOR 5.0) were associated with HbA1c >73 mmol/mol after adjustment for gender, diabetes duration and age of onset.

    Conclusion

    Our findings that high HbA1c is more common in adolescent diabetes patients with neurodevelopmental problems generate the hypothesis that these problems might precede poor metabolic control. If so, early detection of neurodevelopmental problems would allow individually tailored treatment that may improve metabolic control and prevent complications.

  • 12.
    Tindberg, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i D län (CKFD).
    Handfasta råd för möte med ungdomar2014In: Ungdomars hälsa / [ed] Kristina Berg Kelly, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2014, 1, p. 44-45Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Tindberg, Ylva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Barn- och ungdomsmedicinska kliniken i Sörmland.
    Bergström, Per
    Astrid Lindgrens Barnsjukhus, Stockholm.
    Hur ska man identifiera skador från misshandel och vanvård hos barn?2013In: Barnläkaren, ISSN 1651-0534, no 5, p. 10-11Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Tindberg, Ylva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i D län (CKFD).
    Otterman, Gabriel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Skador av våld på små barn – tecken, handläggning och diagnostik2014In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, no 47Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Wackernagel, Dirk
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dube, Martina
    Malarsjukhuset Hosp, Dept Paediat, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Blennow, Mats
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden; Huddinge Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tindberg, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Continuous subcutaneous glucose monitoring is accurate in term and near-term infants at risk of hypoglycaemia2016In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 105, no 8, p. 917-923Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Postnatal hypoglycaemia increases the risk of adverse neurological outcomes in newborn infants, and adequate glucose control requires repetitive and painful blood sampling. This study evaluated a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) that aims to improve glucose control and decrease the frequency of blood samples taken from neonates.

    METHODS: CGMS sensors, which measure glucose values every five minutes and require calibration twice a day, were placed on 20 infants at risk of hypoglycaemia. The infants also underwent blood glucose sampling, and the blood glucose values were compared with CGMS values six times during the first 30 minutes after sampling.

    RESULTS: We used 97/264 (37%) of the blood glucose values taken for the CGMS calibration. The highest accuracy, a mean of 0.22 (95% confidence interval 0.13-0.30 mmol/L), was found 15-19 minutes after sampling, due to the calibration process. No significant subcutaneous glucose time lag was detectable.

    CONCLUSION: The CGMS system was an accurate and feasible method for glucose control, provided earlier detection of hypoglycaemia in newborn infants and reduced their exposure to procedural pain. The delay in calibration in infants was a new finding and needs to be taken into account when comparing CGMS readings to blood glucose values.

1 - 15 of 15
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf