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  • 1.
    de Winter, James
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Teaching and Learning Physics2017In: Science Education An International Course Companion / [ed] Keith Taber and Ben Akpan, Sense Publishers, 2017, 311-324 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Amin, Tamer G.
    et al.
    American University of Beirut, Lebanon.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University.
    Haglund, Jesper
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Conceptual metaphor and embodied cognition in science education2017Book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Gregorcic, Bor
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Etkina, Eugenia
    Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA.
    Planinsic, Gorazd
    University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    A New Way of Using the Interactive Whiteboard in a High School Physics Classroom: A Case Study2017In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent decades, the interactive whiteboard (IWB) has become a relatively common educational tool in Western schools. The IWB is essentially a large touch screen, that enables the user to interact with digital content in ways that are not possible with an ordinary computer-projector-canvas setup. However, the unique possibilities of IWBs are rarely leveraged to enhance teaching and learning beyond the primary school level. This is particularly noticeable in high school physics. We describe how a high school physics teacher learned to use an IWB in a new way, how she planned and implemented a lesson on the topic of orbital motion of planets, and what tensions arose in the process. We used an ethnographic approach to account for the teacher’s and involved students’ perspectives throughout the process of teacher preparation, lesson planning, and the implementation of the lesson. To interpret the data, we used the conceptual framework of activity theory. We found that an entrenched culture of traditional white/blackboard use in physics instruction interferes with more technologically innovative and more student-centered instructional approaches that leverage the IWB’s unique instructional potential. Furthermore, we found that the teacher’s confidence in the mastery of the IWB plays a crucial role in the teacher’s willingness to transfer agency within the lesson to the students.

  • 4.
    Gregorcic, Bor
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Bodin, Madelen
    Department of Science and Mathematics Education, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Algodoo: A Tool for Encouraging Creativity in Physics Teaching and Learning2017In: Physics Teacher, ISSN 0031-921X, E-ISSN 1943-4928, Vol. 55, no 1, 25-28 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Algodoo (http://www.algodoo.com) is a digital sandbox for physics 2D simulations. It allows students and teachers to easily create simulated “scenes” and explore physics through a user-friendly and visually attractive interface. In this paper, we present different ways in which students and teachers can use Algodoo to visualize and solve physics problems, investigate phenomena and processes, and engage in out-of-school activities and projects. Algodoo, with its approachable interface, inhabits a middle ground between computer games and “serious” computer modeling. It is suitable as an entry-level modeling tool for students of all ages and can facilitate discussions about the role of computer modeling in physics.

  • 5.
    Etkina, Eugenia
    et al.
    Graduate School of Education, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08904, USA..
    Gregorcic, Bor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Vokos, Stamatis
    Department of Physics, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, California 93407, USA..
    Organizing physics teacher professional education around productive habit development: A way to meet reform challenges2017In: Physical Review Special Topics : Physics Education Research, ISSN 1554-9178, E-ISSN 1554-9178, Vol. 13, no 1, 010107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extant literature on teacher preparation suggests that preservice teachers learn best when they are immersed in a community that allows them to develop dispositions, knowledge, and practical skills and share with the community a strong vision of what good teaching entails. However, even if the requisite dispositions, knowledge, and skills in pursuing the shared vision of good teaching are developed, the professional demands on a teacher’s time are so great out of, and so complex during class time that if every decision requires multiple considerations and deliberations with oneself, the productive decisions might not materialize. We argue that the link between intentional decision making and actual teaching practice are teacher’s habits (spontaneous responses to situational cues). Teachers unavoidably develop habits with practical experience and under the influence of knowledge and belief structures that in many ways condition the responses of teachers in their practical work. To steer new teachers away from developing unproductive habits directed towards “survival” instead of student learning, we propose that teacher preparation programs (e.g., in physics) strive to develop in preservice teachers strong habits of mind and practice that will serve as an underlying support structure for beginning teachers. We provide examples of physics teacher habits that are to be developed during the program, propose mechanisms for the development of such habits, and outline possible future research agendas around habits.

  • 6.
    Netzell, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Realgymnasiet, Norrköping.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University.
    Haglund, Jesper
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Schönborn, Konrad J
    Linköping University.
    Visualising energy transformations in electric circuits with infrared cameras2017In: School Science Review, ISSN 0036–6811, Vol. 98, no 364, 19-22 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Haglund, Jesper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Hultén, Magnus
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Tension between visions of science education: The case of energy quality in Swedish secondary science curricula2017In: Science & Education, ISSN 0926-7220, E-ISSN 1573-1901, Vol. 26, no 3, 323-344 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to contribute to an understanding of how curricular change is accomplished in practice, including the positions and conflicts of key stakeholders and participants, and their actions in the process. As a case, we study the treatment of energy in Swedish secondary curricula in the period 1962–2011 and, in particular, how the notion of energy quality was introduced in the curricula in an energy course at upper secondary school in 1983 and in physics at lower secondary school in 1994. In the analysis, we use Roberts’ two competing visions of science education, Vision I in which school science subjects largely mirror their corresponding academic disciplines and Vision II that incorporates societal matters of science. In addition, a newly suggested Vision III represents a critical perspective on science education. Our analysis shows how Vision II and III aspects of science education have gained importance in curricula since the 1980s, but in competition with Vision I considerations. Energy quality played a central role in providing Vision II and III arguments in the curricular debate on energy teaching. Subsequent educational research has found that Swedish teachers and students struggle with how to relate to energy quality in physics teaching, which we explain as partly due to the tension between the competing visions.

  • 8.
    Haglund, Jesper
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Good use of a ‘bad’ metaphor: Entropy as disorder2017In: Science & Education, ISSN 0926-7220, E-ISSN 1573-1901, Vol. 26, no 3, 205-214 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entropy is often introduced to students through the use of the disorder metaphor. However, many weaknesses and limitations of this metaphor have been identified, and it has therefore been argued that it is more harmful than useful in teaching. For instance, under the influence of the disorder metaphor, students tend to focus on spatial configuration with regard to entropy but disregard the role of energy, which may lead their intuition astray in problem solving. Albeit so, a review of research of students’ ideas about entropy in relation to the disorder metaphor shows that students can use the metaphor in developing a more nuanced, complex view of the concept, by connecting entropy as disorder to other concepts such as microstates and spreading. The disorder metaphor—in combination with other explanatory approaches—can be used as a resource for learning, in giving students an early flavour of what entropy means, so long as we acknowledge its limitations; we can put this “bad” metaphor to good use in teaching.

  • 9.
    Heijkenskjöld, Filip
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Edvardsson, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Theoretical Astrophysics.
    Lundberg, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Theoretical Chemistry.
    Aktiva studenter gör demonstrationsexperiment (2)2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Aktiva studenter gör demonstrationsexperiment

    Filip Heijkenskjöld, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi avd. Fysikens didaktik

    Bengt Edvardsson, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, avd. Astronomi

    Marcus Lundberg, Institutionen för kemi - Ångström, Teoretisk kemi

    Sammanfattning

    Projektet avser att aktivera studenterna och gör dem till deltagande aktörer i föreläsningarna genom att ge studenterna ansvar för att designa sina egna experiment som kan visa på centrala begrepp inom fysiken. Studenterna får använda ett mätverktyg (IOLab) för att enkelt kunna experimentera och samla in data. För information om IOLab se http://www.iolab.science

    Vi låter studenterna i kursen 1KB302, Fysik för kemister, ta ansvar för en del av undervisningen. De väljer själva ut vad de vill illustrera med experiment. Studenterna bidrar med var sitt ca 5 minuter långt demonstrationsexperiment och deltar i en efterföljande diskussion på 10 minuter. Efter godkänd insats får de en tentamensdel godkänd. Detta ökar studenternas engagemang och även kopplingen till andra kurser som studeras inom programmen.

  • 10.
    Heijkenskjöld, Filip
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Edvardsson, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Theoretical Astrophysics.
    Marcus, Lundberg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Theoretical Chemistry.
    Aktiva studenter gör demonstrationsexperiment (1)2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Aktiva studenter gör demonstrationsexperiment

    Filip Heijkenskjöld, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi avd. Fysikens didaktik

    Bengt Edvardsson, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, avd. Astronomi

    Marcus Lundberg, Institutionen för kemi - Ångström, Teoretisk kemi

    Sammanfattning

    Projektet avser att aktivera studenterna och gör dem till deltagande aktörer i föreläsningarna genom att ge studenterna ansvar för att designa sina egna experiment som kan visa på centrala begrepp inom fysiken. Studenterna får använda ett mätverktyg (IOLab) för att enkelt kunna experimentera och samla in data. För information om IOLab se http://www.iolab.science

    Vi låter studenterna i kursen 1KB302, Fysik för kemister, ta ansvar för en del av undervisningen. De väljer själva ut vad de vill illustrera med experiment. Studenterna bidrar med var sitt ca 5 minuter långt demonstrationsexperiment och deltar i en efterföljande diskussion på 10 minuter. Efter godkänd insats får de en tentamensdel godkänd. Detta ökar studenternas engagemang och även kopplingen till andra kurser som studeras inom programmen.

  • 11.
    Dolo, Gilbert
    et al.
    University of Cape Town, South Africa.
    Haglund, Jesper
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Schönborn, Konrad J.
    Linköping University.
    Stimulating and supporting inquiry-based science learning with infrared cameras in South Africa2017In: / [ed] Mike K. Mholo & Carolyn Stevenson-Milln, Bloemfontein, South Africa: AFRICAN SUN MeDIA, 2017, 243-245 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Samuelsson, Christopher Robin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Haglund, Jesper
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Elmgren, Maja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Looking for solutions: University chemistry and physics students interacting with infrared cameras2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Infrared (IR) cameras can be used to support the learning and understanding of thermodynamics. Previous research shows that the technology enables university physics students to observe otherwise invisible thermal phenomena. In the present study, the focus is extended to the use of IR cameras in an educational chemistry laboratory setting with a comparison to the physics labs. Depending on the communicative actions made to interact with the cameras, different affordances of the IR cameras are accessed. For example, some students compare what they see with the IR camera with their sense of touch. The kinds of actions students make depend on aspects like their disciplinary experience and the discipline of study. Predict-Observe-Explain is used to probe students’ potential actions for interaction with the IR camera. Data is collected by video recording and iterative transcription to find contrasting or shared patterns of interaction across the groups. A multimodal approach to conversation analysis is used to find these patterns. The result shows that the physics and chemistry students use the technology to confirm or disconfirm predictions made, but differ in the coordination of actions to achieve that goal. The physics students move around and use the sense of touch together with IR-camera observations, while the chemistry students focus on IR-camera observations from one perspective alone.

  • 13.
    Johansson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Studying identity in discourse: From individuals to structure in physics education2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies in physics education research have focused on identity to answer questions about equality and gender. Identity is a concept with many definitions, and some approaches to using it may have an extensive focus on the individual’s navigation of already established norms. In my research, I employ a poststructuralist view of identity as constituted in discourse as one way of moving beyond stable binary categories and focusing on the construction of norms in physics education. Drawing from my studies of identity in university-level physics education, I show how discourse analysis enables a detailed study of both individual  negotiations of identity and the dominant discourses structuring individuals’ negotiations. Specific examples include: identity negotiations of students in a course in electromagnetism; the subject positions offered students in the dominant discourse of quantum physics courses; and negotiations of legitimacy among physics Master’s students. In the end, this approach means employing a student-centered perspective on educational systems to explore limitations and possibilities for a diversity of students in attending physics education at the university.

  • 14.
    Berge, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Johansson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Lecture Jokes - a Litmus Test of Physics Discourse?2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier studies in physics education research have shown the importance of analysing students' processes of ‘becoming a physicist' in a wider sense. For example, it is often expected of physicists to have a kind of ‘authentic intelligence' or ‘smartness', which is generally perceived as male. In this study we contribute to this area of research by analysing an area often forgotten in educational research: humour. Empirically, this study is based on 177 jokes from physics lectures, collected from three different higher education contexts, the US and two Scandinavian countries. With a discourse analytical framework we explore the question of how teacher's jokes in physics lectures portray physics and physicists. In the analysis of the teacher's jokes, physics is constantly constructed as difficult and very advanced, mainly through ironically speaking of it as ‘easy'. Physicists are portrayed as single minded and very passionate, not to say obsessed, about physics. In this study we argue that although none of the jokes were mean the jokes contributed to a discourse that can be perceived as problematic in limiting the conceptions of who a physicist may be.

  • 15.
    Johansson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Learning the right physics: Master’s students’™ negotiations of legitimacy2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The last years have seen an increase in science education research focused on social identity. Studies of university physics education have used identity frameworks to address issues of gender and equality in transitions to and from University educations. This study highlights the specific situation of physics students starting on an international Master’s programme and the identity negotiations that take place there. With a poststructuralist discourse analytical framework, I analyse negotiations of legitimacy in interviews with first-semester Master’s students. Several themes emerge from the analysis, pointing out negotiations of legitimacy related to discourses about the perceived quality of educations from different universities, the central value of knowledge and ‘smartness’ in physics, and the ranking of different directions of physics along lines of ‘coolness’ or ‘smartness’. This relates to norms about masculinity connected to physics practices. In the ends my study contribute to a picture of a physics education discourse that is still constructing some positions as more ‘valued’ and legitimate than others, on grounds that partly appear unjustified and discriminatory.

  • 16.
    Haglund, Jesper
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    The disorder metaphor for entropy: Friend or Foe?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entropy is often introduced by use of the disorder metaphor in thermodynamics, but many weaknesses of the metaphor have been identified [1]. By influence of the disorder metaphor, students tend to focus on spatial configuration with regards to entropy but disregard the role of energy in problem solving [2]. There are also many natural phenomena where an entropy increase comes together with increasing visual disorder, such as the formation of liquid crystals. Due to such identified weaknesses, it has been argued that the disorder metaphor for entropy is more harmful than useful and should be avoided in teaching [1]. Another, alternative perspective is to regard the entropy metaphor as a useful resource for students’ development of an intuitive idea of entropy. From this perspective, the goal of teaching is not to eliminate disorder from students’ conceptualisation of entropy, but help them refine the understanding of when it can be useful and when it does not apply [3]. The purpose of the present study is to investigate whether the disorder metaphor can be useful in the teaching of entropy, and – if that is the case – how its weaknesses can be addressed in the teaching practice. Students’ ideas of entropy were probed through open questionnaire items before and after a university course in thermodynamics [4], and through follow-up interviews with pairs of students one year after the course [5]. The majority of students made use of the disorder metaphor in describing what entropy means, both before and after the course. In addition, they tended to develop a more nuanced, complex view of the concept, by connecting entropy as disorder to other microscopic concepts such as microstates and spreading. In the follow-up interviews, although acknowledging that disorder is not a scientific concept, students still found it useful for getting a qualitative understanding of entropy. In general, every metaphor breaks down at one point, where it is no longer useful. When we introduce metaphors in teaching, we have to bring up explicitly how to interpret the compared domains (in this case disorder and entropy) and how they relate to one another, and what limitations the metaphors have [6]. The disorder metaphor – in combination with other explanatory approaches – can be used to give students an early flavour of what entropy means, so long as we acknowledge its limitations.

    1. F. Lambert (2002) J. Chem. Ed. 78 187.
    2. C. Brosseau & J. Viard (1992) Ensen. Cienc. 10 13.
    3. B. D. Geller et al (2014) Am. J. Phys. 82 394.
    4. J. Haglund et al (2015) Chem. Educ. Res. Pract. 16 537.
    5. J. Haglund et al (2016) Chem. Educ. Res. Pract. 17 489.
    6. R. Duit (1991) Sci. Ed. 75 649.
  • 17.
    Euler, Elias
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Gregorcic, Bor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Physics Students' Use of Algodoo in Modeling2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Electronic devices are ubiquitous in today's society and their inclusion in the classroom alongside traditional laboratory equipment may allow students to interact with physics content in ways that supplement more formal approaches to doing physics. We investigate how one digital tool, Algodoo (a sandbox software with a user-friendly interface that allows users to create simple models of physical phenomena in a quick and intuitive way), promotes communication among students as they complete a physics task using both physical equipment and the Algodoo software on an Interactive WhiteBoard (IWB). While students recreate the physical laboratory setup in Algodoo, they move between physical, ‘semi-formal,’ and formal domains with an expanded set of resources for communication. We show that tracking the information that students transduct into, out of, and within the Algodoo environment is a means of gaining insight into what students consider relevant in a physics context.

  • 18.
    Gregorcic, Bor
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Planinsic, Gorazd
    University of Ljubljana.
    Etkina, Eugenia
    Rutgers University.
    Doing science by waving hands: Talk, symbiotic gesture, and interaction with digital content as resources in student inquiry2017In: Physical Review Special Topics : Physics Education Research, ISSN 1554-9178, E-ISSN 1554-9178, Vol. 13, no 2, 020104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we investigate some of the ways in which students, when given the opportunity and an appropriate learning environment, spontaneously engage in collaborative inquiry. We studied small groups of high school students interacting around and with an interactive whiteboard equipped with Algodoo software, as they investigated orbital motion. Using multimodal discourse analysis, we found that in their discussions the students relied heavily on nonverbal meaning-making resources, most notably hand gestures and resources in the surrounding environment (items displayed on the interactive whiteboard). They juxtaposed talk with gestures and resources in the environment to communicate ideas that they initially were not able to express using words alone. By spontaneously recruiting and combining a diverse set of meaning- making resources, the students were able to express relatively fluently complex ideas on a novel physics topic, and to engage in practices that resemble a scientific approach to exploration of new phenomena.

  • 19.
    Euler, Elias
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Gregorcic, Bor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Experiencing Variation and Discerning Relevant Aspects Through Playful Inquiry in Algodoo2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Educational simulations in physics tend to be designed to help students learn selected concepts and thus are typically limited in their potential for open-ended and creative exploration. We are interested in the educational potential of a simulation environment, Algodoo, which does not address any one specific physics phenomenon, but rather provides a creative platform for users to design their own simulations using basic building blocks (e.g. massless springs, rigid bodies). In this study, we investigate the ways in which the Algodoo software supports the learning of physics concepts when it is used as an open environment for students’ inquiry through a case study of a pair of students using Algodoo for the first time. Our study suggests that Algodoo promotes learning in two main ways. First, not unlike more traditional educational simulations, it makes purposeful variation of relevant physics parameters possible and allows the user to experience variation in multiple ways. Second, in contrast to traditional educational simulations (and more like ‘messy’ real experiments), it requires the user to discern the relevant parameters to be varied.

  • 20.
    Haglund, Jesper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Melander, Emil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Physics.
    Weiszflog, Matthias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Andersson, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    University physics students’ ideas of thermal radiation expressed in open laboratory activities using infrared cameras2017In: Research in Science & Technological Education, ISSN 0263-5143, E-ISSN 1470-1138, Vol. 35, no 3, 349-367 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    University physics students were engaged in open-ended thermodynamics laboratory activities with a focus on understanding a chosen phenomenon or the principle of laboratory apparatus, such as thermal radiation or a heat pump. Students had access to handheld infrared (IR) cameras for their investigations.

    Purpose

    The purpose of the research was to explore students’ interactions with reformed thermodynamics laboratory activities. It was guided by the research question: How do university physics students make use of IR cameras in the investigation of the interaction of thermal radiation?

    Sample

    The study was conducted with a class of first-year university physics students in Sweden. The interaction with the activities of four of the students was selected for analysis. The four students are males.

    Design and methods

    We used a qualitative, interpretive approach to the study of students’ interaction.  The primary means of data collection was video recording of students’ work with the laboratory activities and their subsequent presentations. The analysis focused on how IR cameras helped students notice phenomena relating to thermal radiation, with comparison to previous research on students’ conceptions of thermal radiation.

    Results

    When using the IR camera students attended to the reflection of thermal radiation on shiny surfaces, such as polished metals, windows or a white-board, and emissive properties of surfaces of different types. In this way, they went beyond using the technology as a temperature probe. Students were able to discuss merits and shortcomings of IR cameras in comparison with digital thermometers.

    Conclusions

    With the help of IR cameras, university physics students attend to thermal phenomena that would otherwise easily go unnoticed.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-01-03 08:20
  • 21.
    Netzell, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Haglund, Jesper
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Schönborn, Konrad J
    Linköpings universitet.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    Linköpings universitet.
    Värmekameran: En laboration med fokus på elektriska kretsar2016In: LMNT-nytt, ISSN 1402-0041, no 1, 24-27 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Haglund, Jesper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Andersson, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Elmgren, Maja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Language aspects of engineering students’ view of entropy2016In: Chemistry Education Research and Practice, ISSN 1756-1108, E-ISSN 1756-1108, Vol. 17, no 3, 489-508 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entropy is a central concept in thermodynamics, but has been found to be challenging to students due to its abstract nature and the fact that it is not part of students’ everyday language. Interviews with three pairs of engineering students (N = 6) were conducted and video recorded regarding their interpretation and use of the entropy concept, one year after a course on chemical thermodynamics. From a syntax perspective, students were asked to assess whether sentences involving temperature, internal energy, and entropy make sense. With a focus on semantics, they were asked to rank a set of notions with regards to how closely they are related to entropy, how scientific they are, and how useful they are for explaining what entropy is. From a pragmatics point of view, students were asked to solve two qualitative problems, which involve entropy. The results show that these chemistry students regard internal energy, but not entropy, as a substance-like entity. The students’ ranking of how closely related to entropy notions are and how useful they are for explaining entropy was found to be strongly negatively correlated to how scientific the notions were seen to be. For example, disorder was seen as highly unscientific, but very useful for explaining entropy. In the problem-solving tasks, Chemical Engineering students were comfortable relating entropy to enthalpy and Gibbs free energy, the three notions being seen to form a “trinity” in thermodynamics. However, the students had challenges grasping the unchanged entropy in reversible, adiabatic expansion of an ideal gas, in which they did not consider how entropy relates to the second law of thermodynamics. In final reflections on their learning processes, the students saw weak connections between their problem-solving skills and their conceptual understanding of entropy, although acknowledging that both aspects of learning are important.

  • 23.
    Haglund, Jesper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Jeppsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University.
    Melander, Emil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Physics.
    Pendrill, Ann-Marie
    National Resource Centre for Physics Education, Lund University.
    Xie, Charles
    Concord Consortium.
    Schönborn, Konrad J
    Linköping University.
    Infrared cameras in science education2016In: Infrared physics & technology, ISSN 1350-4495, E-ISSN 1879-0275, Vol. 75, no March, 150-152 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Melander, Emil
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Physics.
    Haglund, Jesper
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Weiszflog, Matthias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Andersson, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    More than meets the eye: Infrared cameras in open-ended university thermodynamics labs2016In: Physics Teacher, ISSN 0031-921X, E-ISSN 1943-4928, Vol. 54, no 9, 528-531 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Educational research has found that students have challenges understanding thermal science. Undergraduate physics students have difficulties differentiating basic thermal concepts, such as heat, temperature, and internal energy. Engineering students have been found to have difficulties grasping surface emissivity as a thermal material property. One potential source of students’ challenges with thermal science is the lack of opportunity to visualize energy transfer in intuitive ways with traditional measurement equipment. Thermodynamics laboratories have typically depended on point measures of temperature by use of thermometers (detecting heat conduction) or pyrometers (detecting heat radiation). In contrast, thermal imaging by means of an infrared (IR) camera provides a real-time, holistic image. Here we provide some background on IR cameras and their uses in education, and summarize five qualitative investigations that we have used in our courses.

  • 25.
    de Winter, James
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Inglis, Michael
    University of Leeds, UK.
    Enhancing Learning with Effective Practical Science 11-162016In: Physics: Session Guides / [ed] Ian Abrahams and Michael J. Reiss, Bloomsbury Academic, 2016, 183-251 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Gregorcic, Bor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Interactive Whiteboards as a Means of Supporting Students’ Physical Engagement and Collaborative Inquiry in Physics2016In: Selected Papers from the 20th International Conference on Multimedia in Physics Teaching and Learning / [ed] Lars-Jochen Thoms and Raimund Girwidz, Mulhouse: European Physical Society , 2016, 101-108 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interactive whiteboards (IWBs) have become commonplace in classrooms in the western world. However, using the IWB productively in ways that leverage its unique possibilities for student engagement is more challenging. I propose a theoretical perspective that recognizes the IWB-based learning environments as a case of a mixed-reality (a combination of real and virtual worlds). I show how the ideas of embodied cognition and distributed cognition were used to guide the design a learning sequence on the topic of orbital motion of planets and analyse its implementation. I analyse a short video excerpt that illustrates the way in which embodiment enters high-school student discourse in the context of small-group collaborative inquiry, supported by the IWB. Students’ gestures that draw on their physical experience within the IWB-based environment can help students fluently communicate ideas that would be much more difficult to express verbally.

  • 27.
    Andersson, Staffan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Johansson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Gender gap or program gap?: Students’ negotiations of study practice in a course in electromagnetism2016In: Physical Review Physics Education Research, ISSN 2469-9896, Vol. 12, no 2, 020112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study of achievement differences, as reflected by course grades, on a third-semester electromagnetism course at a Swedish research university was motivated by instructor concerns about gender inequalities. Quantitative analysis showed a gender gap in course grades between female and male students for the period of fall 2007 to spring 2013. Dynamics behind this gap were explored through interpretative discourse analysis on interviews of 21 students who had recently passed the course. A recurring pattern was identified in the interviews. Students described studying electromagnetism as either studying to pass or studying to learn. Their choice of practice was influenced by the significance recognized in the course, which primarily was discussed in relation to program affiliation. Students stressed that perceived differences, in their study context, were larger between students affiliated with different programs than between male and female students on the same program. This was supported by quantitative analysis of course grades in relation to study programs, where the grade difference between female and male students on the same program in most cases were not statistically significant. The gender gap in grades for the whole course was related to different achievements on different programs. Programs further from the discipline of physics had lower mean grades and also enrolled a larger fraction of female students. Society-wide gender differences in interest and study choice are reflected in the grades on this single course. These results displace the achievement gap from the level of individuals to that of programs, and the gender gap from a difference in achievement to a difference in study choice. We discuss the implications of this shift of perspective in relation to gender differences for both research and teaching.

  • 28.
    Airey, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    EAP, EMI or CLIL?: (English for Academic Purposes, English Medium Instruction or Content and Language Integrated Learning)2016In: Routledge Handbook of English for Academic Purposes / [ed] Hyland, K. & Shaw, P., Milton Park: Routledge, 2016, 71-83 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Volkwyn, Trevor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy. University of the Western Cape.
    The Role of Mathematics in Learning Physics2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation was given at the launch conference and retreat for the Graduate school in subject education research held at Friiberghs Herrgård, Örsundsbro, Upplands, Sweden, Sept 5 – 6, 2016. The aim was to present my initial formulation of my research problem and to introduce the main theoretical bases, proposed methodologies and potential research questions.

    Recent PER work has begun to produce compelling evidence that many physics students lack essential parts of mathematics conceptual understanding, which results in severely limiting the possibility of working appropriately and/or productively with problem solving, and/or effect further advanced learning in a range of negative ways (e.g., Christensen & Thompson, 2012). Of interest from a contextually relevant perspective, is the dire state of mathematics education at upper secondary and introductory university levels in South Africa, and how this situation is most likely having a negative effect on physics teaching and learning. The broad aim then of my PhD study is to embark on a series of studies that explore the teaching and learning relations between mathematical knowledge and constructing appropriate ways of understanding and applying physics. The theoretical framing will build on the work of Airey & Linder (2009), who argued that in undergraduate physics there is a critical constellation of semiotic resources that are needed in order to make appropriate learning possible. By semiotic resources is meant language, graphs, diagrams, laboratory work, apparatus, mathematics, etc. Duval (2006) argues that whilst many teachers focus on teaching mathematical operations (what he calls treatment), the main problem occurs in the movement between one semiotic system and another (what he terms conversion). This movement between the various modes of representing a discipline is termed as transduction by Gunther Kress (1997). A number of researchers have identified this movement as critical for the ability to do physics (e.g. Lemke, 1998; Van Heuvelen, 1991; Mc Dermott 1990). This study will investigate the teaching and learning relations between semiotic resources in mathematics and physics. Video and interview data will be collected of students working with experimental design that potentially encourages transduction, with a strong possibility for comparative data collection in Sweden and South Africa.

    References

    Airey, J., & Linder, C. (2009). A disciplinary discourse perspective on university science learning: Achieving fluency in a critical constellation of modes. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 46(1), 27-49.

    Christensen W., & Thompson J. (2012). Investigating graphical representations of slope and derivative without a physics context. Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 8, 023101.

    Duval, R. (2006) A cognitive analysis of problems of comprehension in a learning of mathematics. Educational Studies in Mathematics (2006) 61: 103–131.

    Kress, G. (1997). Before Writing: Rethinking the Paths to Literacy. London & New York: Routledge.

    Lemke, J. L. (1998). Teaching all the languages of science: Words, symbols, images, and actions. http://academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/education/jlemke/papers/barcelon.htm.

    McDermott, L. (1990). A view from physics. In M. Gardner, J. G. Greeno, F. Reif, A. H. Schoenfeld, A. A. diSessa, & E. Stage (Eds.), Toward a scientific practice of science education (pp. 3-30). Hillsdale: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

    Van Heuvelen, A. (1991). Learning to think like a physicist: A review of research-based instructional strategies. American Journal of Physics, 59(10), 891-897.

  • 30.
    Airey, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.