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  • 1.
    Baral, Anna
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kulturantropologi och etnologi.
    Bad Guys, Good Life: An Ethnography of Morality and Change in Kisekka Market (Kampala, Uganda)2018Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on ethnographic data gathered over a period of almost three years, this dissertation scrutinizes the everyday lives of informal workers selling auto parts in Kisekka Market, central Kampala. Its ambition is to understand how the workers navigated a highly moralized environment in today’s Uganda, where the supposed moral deterioration of society is passionately discussed in public and in private.

    Analytically the dissertation focuses on three “moral landscapes,” or moral discourses of different geographical scales, that intersected in the workers’ lives: first, the Ugandan nation or the country; second, the Buganda kingdom with its cultural institutions to which the majority of the workers professed allegiance; and third, the capital city Kampala. Materializing in Kisekka Market, each landscape posed moral demands that the workers navigated daily as they struggled to balance norms with lived practices.

    The workers were perceived by external observers as morally ambiguous for their supposed instrumentality in riots and violent crimes in Kampala. Their notoriousness increased for the fact that they were men, often uneducated, and therefore, in public discourse, potentially threatening. Consequently, they were referred to as bayaaye, translated as hooligans or bad guys, and this label defined their relations with customers from all parts of Kampala and Uganda.

    In exploring the implications of the three moral landscapes, particular attention is paid to the in-between. Rather than focusing on mediatized events like riots and crimes, the dissertation investigates and locates the workers’ agency in the mundane processes of care and getting by and the tentative paths to a good life that unfolded daily in Kisekka Market, regardless of larger political tensions in Kampala and beyond. The city’s development plan to replace Kisekka Market with a fancy shopping mall rendered the workers’ situation increasingly exposed and their lives increasingly vulnerable. In the workers’ quest for some degree of control and self-worth, the label of bayaaye refracted into its multiple dimensions – proudly appropriated or painfully rejected by the workers themselves – attesting  to the complexities of everyday ethics, in Kampala as elsewhere. Consequently, the ethnography of this dissertation problematizes the dominant yet fraught narrative around young men in urban Africa.

  • 2.
    Ekoluoma, Mari-Elina
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kulturantropologi och etnologi.
    Everyday Life in a Philippine Sex Tourism Town2017Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Sabang used to be a small, marginalized Philippine fishing village that in the span of three decades became a well-known international sex tourism site. This thesis deals with the implications of tourism (including sex tourism) and how it has become embedded in the daily life in today’s Sabang. The thesis highlights the local populations’ diverse reactions to the various changes associated with tourism growth, in particular how various symbolic, moral, and spatial boundaries are constructed and maintained.

    The ethnographic material examined in this thesis builds on several periods of fieldwork, in total 18 months, that were carried out between 2003 and 2015. Analytical tools found in tourism anthropology and in particular the branch of postcolonial tourism studies has guided the discussion and analysis of the socio-cultural effects of becoming a tourism town.

    This thesis argues that complex networks of boundaries are significant in maintaining a sense of order and social cohesion in times of change. Notions of cultural differences are expressed through the narratives and behaviors of the various inhabitants, and contribute to the maintaining of boundaries within and between groups. From the beginning of tourism growth commercial sex has been central and has become a significant factor in the tourism economy. While residents acknowledge their dependency on the go-go bars, the business of the night is framed so as not to defeat the inhabitants’ struggles to maintain local community’s sense of morality, or at least to set up boundaries between the outsiders’ immorality and insiders’ morality. Tourism has also offered opportunities to challenge conventional social hierarchies and local seats of power, and there are also recurrent discussions about who has the right to control resources and who can claim entitlement to a place now shared by people from all over the world.  

  • 3.
    Persson-Fischier, Ulrika
    Oslo universitet.
    The Social Life of Ethnic Categories: Three cases of indigeneity, Russia and anthropological knowledge production2016Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Examining three cases on indigeneity, Russia and anthropological knowledge production, this thesis investigates indigeneity as a form of ethnic classification. The first case is about the so-called census-war in the Republic of Altai, and who, thus, is allowed to be indigenous. The second is about how the construction of ´the north´, the very epitome of Russian indigeneity, becomes attached to one particular village and only parts of its inhabitants, by way of association with Scandinavian Saami, excluding other potentially ´northern´ people. The third case is about how ethnic classifications, on part of the Vega expedition in 1878, collecting ethnographic objects and human skulls along the Siberian coast, have been reproduced over time at Swedish institutions, and now form the basis of repatriation of human remains at the Ethnographic Museum in Stockholm, reproducing a colonial mindset. I all three cases global indigeneity, Soviet and post-Soviet Russian variants, clash with complex local situations, with the consequence that many local actors are excluded from indigeneity. It turns out that anthropology plays a crucial role in these processes of inclusion and exclusion.

  • 4.
    Lutz, Peter A.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kulturantropologi och etnologi.
    Tinkering Care Moves: Senior Home Care in Practice2016Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation builds on the current anthropological studies of care relations in practice. It draws inspiration from science and technology studies (STS) and postfeminist technoscience. A qualitative ethnographic approach grounds the empirical data collection and analysis. This entails ethnographic fieldwork with senior home care in the United States and Sweden during 2007–2008 and 2011–2012. Analytical attention centers on how movements situate various tensions of senior home care in practice. Four interrelated published works comprise the main thematic chapters. Each article exemplifies how human and nonhuman relations move and mediate care. They develop several heuristic terms that advance ideas about how older people, aging bodies, technologies, spaces, and times that tinker each other through movements of care in practice. The comprehensive summary frames these articles with an overview of the primary thematic orientations and methodological concerns. A discussion of the main contributions and implications of the dissertation concludes the work.

    Delarbeten
    1. Clutter Moves in Old Age Homecare
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Clutter Moves in Old Age Homecare
    2010 (Engelska)Ingår i: New Technologies and Emerging Spaces of Care / [ed] Michael Schillmeier, Farnham: Ashgate, 2010, s. 77-94Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter introduces the notion of 'clutter moves' as an experimental heuristic for tracing how movement threads together a range of messy entities in old age homecare ecologies including older people and their technical arrangements. It is based on empirical data originating from an ethnographic study of old age homecare in the United States. Here the category of home clutter was revealed as more complex than it is commonly portrayed in popular or scholarly accounts, especially gerontology and geriatric–related literature on risk. This literature frequently cites general household clutter as a hazard in the domestic environment. In such reports moving around with cluttered things tends to threaten a dangerous outcome for older people. But what other possibilities emerge when analytical attention focuses on relational movements between older people and their cluttered collections of homely things? The chapter suggests that the moves between collecting and distributing clutter must be considered. For instance, it highlights how home clutter can afford older people additional movements that are not readily apparent. The chapter ends with reflections on the notion of clutter technology to extend the heuristic of clutter moves and help rethink conceptual assumptions about new technologies for home care.

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    Farnham: Ashgate, 2010
    Nyckelord
    United States, elderly, home care, technology
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Tvärvetenskapliga studier inom samhällsvetenskap Socialantropologi Systemvetenskap, informationssystem och informatik med samhällsvetenskaplig inriktning
    Forskningsämne
    Kulturantropologi; Hälso- och sjukvårdsforskning; Människa-dator interaktion; Vårdvetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-292762 (URN)9780754678649 (ISBN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2016-05-09 Skapad: 2016-05-09 Senast uppdaterad: 2018-01-10
    2. Surfacing Moves: Spatial-Timings of Senior Home Care
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Surfacing Moves: Spatial-Timings of Senior Home Care
    2013 (Engelska)Ingår i: Social Analysis: Journal of Cultural and Social Practice, ISSN 0155-977X, E-ISSN 1558-5727, Vol. 57, nr 1, s. 80-94Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Like many countries, Sweden faces the challenge of population aging and senior care. Compared with institutionalized health care, senior home care offers a viable option, promising familiar surroundings and lower costs. However, those performing senior home care sometimes resist time management policies that pressure such care in practice. Some scholars analyze this situation as opposition between ‘objective’ and ‘subjective’ time. This article takes a different route. It explores how time surfaces in Swedish senior home care through relational movements of care. These enlist things such as schedules, machines, and aging bodies. To this end, the article also experiments with ‘surfacing’ as an ethnographic heuristic for figuring the coming togeher of different times and spaces of care. The article concludes that surfacing matters not only in senior home care but also in the field-desk of ethnographic analysis.

    Nyckelord
    ethnography, elderly, home care, socio-material relations, spatial-timings, surfacing, Sweden, time management
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Systemvetenskap, informationssystem och informatik med samhällsvetenskaplig inriktning Socialantropologi Tvärvetenskapliga studier inom samhällsvetenskap
    Forskningsämne
    Kulturantropologi; Människa-dator interaktion; Vårdvetenskap; Hälso- och sjukvårdsforskning
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-292766 (URN)10.3167/sa.2013.570106 (DOI)
    Tillgänglig från: 2016-05-09 Skapad: 2016-05-09 Senast uppdaterad: 2018-01-10
    3. Multivalent moves in senior home care: From surveillance to care-valence
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Multivalent moves in senior home care: From surveillance to care-valence
    2015 (Engelska)Ingår i: Anthropology & Aging, ISSN 2374-2267, Vol. 36, nr 2, s. 145-163Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies of care argue that it is a relational phenomenon, whereby human and nonhuman entities enter into transformative relations. In this light, different entities of care potentially mediate one another in practice, sometimes with surprising and unforeseen effects. In this article, I trace a similar argument. Drawing on ethnographic material from Sweden and the United States, I proffer that careful attentions to older people at home produce multivalent moves with transformative effects. Increasingly, such attentions encompass new technologies to monitor and observe aging bodies. On this topic, the healthcare literature often invokes the idea of care surveillance. Certainly, surveillance can offer a valuable analytical purchase in the study of care. Yet, care attentions are not always straightforward. Rather, the moving around of aging bodies with technologies can obstruct and transform care and its attentions. At the same time, care attentions can also obstruct and transform aging bodies and their technologies. I argue that the existence of these multivalent, somatechnic moves challenges the notion of surveillance in care. To strengthen this argument, I draw on STS-inspired anthropological studies of care. In turn, I also develop the heuristic term “care-valence”. The key advantage with this term, I proffer, is that it offers an analytical compliment to the notion of care surveillance and helps refocus the analysis on multivalent moves in care. 

    Nyckelord
    Aging Bodies, Care Technology, Home Care, Surveillance, Sweden, United States
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Socialantropologi Systemvetenskap, informationssystem och informatik med samhällsvetenskaplig inriktning Tvärvetenskapliga studier inom samhällsvetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-292800 (URN)10.5195/aa.2015.105 (DOI)
    Tillgänglig från: 2016-05-09 Skapad: 2016-05-09 Senast uppdaterad: 2018-01-10
    4. Comparative Tinkering with Care Moves
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Comparative Tinkering with Care Moves
    2016 (Engelska)Ingår i: Practicing Comparison. Revitalizing the Comparative Act / [ed] Deville, J. et al., Manchester: Mattering Press , 2016Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter stems from ethnographic fieldwork in the United States and Sweden. This work traces relations between people and technology as they come together in gatherings or socio-technical collectives for care. These hetergenious collectives situate interrelated consequences for the human and nonhuman actors concerned, but these are rarely smooth. Instead, they comprise ongoing tensions or frictions, which situate multiple acts of negotiation or tinkering. In this way, 'care moves' offers a conceptual-empirical figure for fine-tuning ethnographic attention to care as a rough and tinkered process. It denotes an analytical emphasis on care as a mediating phenomenon interwoven with collective relations on the move, empirically and conceptually, that entai both effects and affects. At the same time, the chapter does not seek a standardised social scientific comparison of two national healthcare systems. Rather than rely on established categories, it focuses on how to ethnographically tinker together - and thus care with - transnational comparisons in a more fluid manner. As such, it seeks an experimental and ethnographic approach sensitive to the specific ways care moves with its collective relations.

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    Manchester: Mattering Press, 2016
    Nyckelord
    research methods, comparison, ethnography, senior home care, Sweden, United States
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Socialantropologi Tvärvetenskapliga studier inom samhällsvetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-292803 (URN)978-0-9931449-0-5 (ISBN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2016-05-09 Skapad: 2016-05-09 Senast uppdaterad: 2018-01-10
  • 5.
    Århem, Nikolas
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kulturantropologi och etnologi.
    Forests, Spirits and High Modernist Development: A Study of Cosmology and Change among the Katuic Peoples in the Uplands of Laos and Vietnam2015Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores how Katuic-speaking indigenous groups in the Central Annamitic Cordillera of Vietnam and Laos understand their environment – hills, streams and forest. Katuic eco-cosmology assumes that the natural landscape is imbued with spirit agents, with whom people must continuously communicate lest misfortune will strike and their livelihoods fail. The thesis posits the hypothesis that these spirit beliefs, and a variety of taboo notions accompanying them, can be interpreted as expressions of a complex socio-environmental adaptation. Today, the indigenous groups in the study region are confronted with a massive development- and modernisation push on two fronts – that of the global development industry on the one hand, and the implementation of national development policies and programs as part of the high-modernist state project in communist Vietnam and Laos, on the other.

    A second objective of the thesis, then, is to examine the effects of this multi-layered and multi-scaled confrontation on indigenous cosmology, livelihood and landscape. It is argued, this confrontation at the development frontier can be conceived of as an interface between different ontologies or reality posits – one animist, articulated in a relational stance towards the landscape; the other, a naturalist or rationalist ontology, expressed as an objectivist stance towards nature and embodied in the high-modernist development schemes and programs unfolding in the region with the aim of re-engineering its indigenous societies and exploiting its natural resources.     

    Large parts of the Central Annamites were severely impacted by the Vietnam War; uncounted numbers of minority people were killed, or had their villages destroyed or relocated while defoliants, bombs, and forest fires ravaged the landscape. In the decades that followed the war, the entire social and natural landscape has been reshaped by national development policies and the modernist visions that underpin them. The thesis attempts to understand this physical and cultural transformation of the landscape, focusing particularly on the gradual breakdown of the complex indigenous socio-religious institutions that appear to have played an important functional role in maintaining the pre-war structure of the landscape.

    The thesis is based primarily on fieldwork carried out between 2004 and 2009 in the provinces of Quảng Nam and Thừa Thiên–Huế in Vietnam and Sekong in Laos. 

  • 6.
    Sundberg, Molly
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kulturantropologi och etnologi.
    Training for Model Citizenship: An Ethnography of Civic Education and State-Making in Rwanda2014Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis addresses how government in Rwanda plays out in practice and how it affects lived experiences of state power and citizenship. Two decades after the genocide, Rwanda has come to be associated both with security, development, and stability, on the one hand, and with state repression and coercion, on the other. In 2007, a nationwide programme was launched to teach all Rwandans about the politically dominant vision of the model Rwandan citizen – an ideal that is today pursued through remote trainings camps, local village trainings, and everyday forms of government.

    The thesis is based on ten months of anthropological research in Rwanda, oriented around three ethnographic spaces: the life and workings of the Itorero training sites, the voices of two dozen Rwandans living in Kigali, and the daily government of a local neighbourhood in Kigali.

    The findings highlight how certain government practices in Rwanda engender in people experiences of being exposed to the state’s power and violent potential. As such, they represent an authoritarian mode of rule, reproduced through the way experiences of exposure guide everyday actions and behaviour vis-à-vis the state. The thesis starts from the Foucauldian assumption that all relations of power depend on the acceptance and agency of both those holding power and those who relate to themselves as their subjects. In Rwanda, the terms of acceptance are partly grounded in local social realities. Personal memories of mass violence, for example, justify for many the state’s tight social control. Such memories are also actively nurtured by the government itself, by associating the loosening of state control with the risk of renewed violence. Furthermore, in light of Rwanda’s attraction of foreign aid, authoritarian rule needs to be understood in relation to international terms of acceptance, which are embedded in liberal understandings of good, or at least good enough, governance. 

  • 7.
    Bjarnesen, Jesper
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kulturantropologi och etnologi.
    Diaspora at Home?: Wartime Mobilities in the Burkina Faso-Côte d'Ivoire Transnational Space2013Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    In the period 1999-2007, more than half a million Burkinabe returned to Burkina Faso due to the persecution of immigrant labourers in neighbouring Côte d’Ivoire. Ultranationalist debates about the criteria for Ivorian citizenship had intensified during the 1990s and led to the scapegoating of immigrants in a political rhetoric centred on notions of autochthony and xenophobia. Having been actively encouraged to immigrate by the Ivorian state for generations, Burkinabe migrant labourers were now forced to leave their homes and livelihoods behind and return to a country they had left in their youth or, as second-generation immigrants in Côte d’Ivoire, had never seen.

    Based on 12 months of ethnographic fieldwork in Burkina Faso and Côte d’Ivoire, the thesis explores the narratives and everyday practices of returning labour migrants in Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso’s second-largest city, in order to understand the subjective experiences of displacement that the forced return to Burkina Faso engendered. The analysis questions the appropriateness of the very notion of “return” in this context and suggests that people’s senses of home are multiplex and tend to rely more on the ability to pursue active processes of emplacement in everyday life than on abstract notions of belonging, e.g. relating to citizenship or ethnicity.

    The study analyses intergenerational interactions within and across migrant families in the city and on transformations of intra-familial relations in the context of forced displace-ment. A particular emphasis is placed on the experiences of young adults who were born and raised in Côte d’Ivoire and arrived in Burkina Faso for the first time during the Ivorian crisis. These young men and women were received with scepticism in Burkina Faso because of their perceived “Ivorian” upbringing, language, and behaviour and were forced to face new forms of stigmatisation and exclusion. At the same time, young migrants were able to exploit their labelling as outsiders and turn their difference into an advantage in the competition for scarce employment opportunities and social connections.

  • 8.
    Ullberg, Susann
    Stockholms universitet.
    Watermarks: Urban Flooding and Memoryscape in Argentina2013Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 9.
    Kaskija, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kulturantropologi och etnologi, Kulturantropologiska avdelningen.
    Images of a Forest People: Punan Malinau – Identity, Sociality, and Encapsulation in Borneo2012Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a study of groups of forest foragers and horticulturalists in the Malinau River basin in northeast Borneo. These groups are known to themselves and others as Punan, or more specifically – in order to distinguish them from other groups of Punan (or Penan) living in other parts of Borneo – as Punan Malinau. Scholars have debated whether the Punan are to be regarded as ‘genuine’ rain-forest hunter-gatherers or rather should be considered as groups of ‘runaway farmers’ who have left the fields for a life as professional collectors in the forest.

    The study is based on anthropological fieldwork carried out in Indonesian Borneo from August 1990 through May 1992, with shorter revisits in September–October 1997 and February 2000. The first three chapters offer a detailed overview of the many aspects of the recent hunter-gatherer debates in anthropology and related disciplines. Chapter four provides a description of the ethnic setting, giving brief information on the various ethnic groups of the area. Chapter five gives an ethno-historical sketch of the Malinau area, with particular reference to the last 200 years, during which the history of the Punan Malinau is intimately intertwined with that of the sedentary Merap. Chapter six presents general data on Punan subsistence, settlement patterns, social and political organization and local variation. In Chapter seven the focus is shifted from subsistence to ‘mode of thought’. A number of distinctive features of Punan sociality are explored – such as immediate return, individualism, opportunism, and sharing. Many of these features not only regulate internal relationships, but also serve as a collection of efficacious ‘tools’ by which social and natural resources of all kinds are examined and manipulated, including the management of contacts with surrounding societies. The concept of ‘encapsulation’ therefore becomes an important element in my discussion. Chapter eight, finally, is devoted to the situation at the turn of the millennium. In the course of the 1990s, a growing number of powerful outsiders started interfering with the local situation, including NGOs, and timber and mining companies. This was a time of increasing competition for land and various new sources of income among the people of the Malinau area. A Punan NGO was founded in the context of expanding political awareness, where lobbying for recognition and funding, from governmental or non-governmental organizations, became increasingly important. These developments show that the imaginings of the Punan, as well as their livelihoods, identity, and encapsulation are still a dynamic process.

  • 10.
    Einarsson, Níels
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kulturantropologi och etnologi.
    Culture, Conflict and Crises in the Icelandic Fisheries: An Anthropological Study of People, Policy and Marine Resources in the North Atlantic Arctic2011Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is offered as a contribution to studies of social and cultural change in the Icelandic fisheries and fishing communities. Such changes may be seen as a result of the interplay of internal dynamics with both national and global forces and processes, not least with regard to the impacts of fisheries governance. These changes occur also in an international context of new environmental ideologies and perceptions of marine mammals, with consequences for social dynamics of local resource-use. Here it is argued that the conflicts over the harvesting or conservation of cetaceans can productively be understood from a cultural perspective. The thesis discusses the elevation of whales as symbols of particular value, and the metaphorical and cognitive aspects of, in particular, anthropomorphism, the projection of human motives and values onto animal behaviour, as a significant and effective part of conservation rhetoric and ideology.

    Specifically, the thesis deals with issues concerning whaling and whale watching along with issues and debates concerning these alternative forms of exploiting marine mammals. It also discusses central questions regarding fisheries governance and rights to fishing with reference to social and economic viability in Icelandic fishing communities. The unifying themes of this thesis are: how marine-mammal issues and controversies and social impacts of fisheries governance form part of globalization processes; how environmental and economic paradigms influence change, particularly in terms of marine-mammal conservation campaigns and market liberalist resource policy; and how these external ideological forces call for responses at local and national levels. The adaptive actions of the human agents and communities involved are described as creative, cumulative and complex. The thesis also highlights the central transformative role of the new regime of private property rights introduced into Icelandic fisheries governance in the 1980s.

    Delarbeten
    1. Of seals and souls: Changes in the position of seals in the world-view of Icelandic small-scale fishermen
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Of seals and souls: Changes in the position of seals in the world-view of Icelandic small-scale fishermen
    1990 (Engelska)Ingår i: Maritime Anthropological Studies, ISSN 0922-1476, Vol. 3, nr 2, s. 35-48Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Nyckelord
    small-scale fishing, Iceland, seals, environmentalism
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Etnologi
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-142901 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2011-01-17 Skapad: 2011-01-17 Senast uppdaterad: 2017-12-11Bibliografiskt granskad
    2. All animals are equal but some are cetaceans: Conservation and culture conflict
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>All animals are equal but some are cetaceans: Conservation and culture conflict
    1993 (Engelska)Ingår i: Environmentalism: the view from anthropology / [ed] Kay Milton, London: Routledge , 1993, s. 73-84Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    London: Routledge, 1993
    Nyckelord
    whaling, marine mammal conservation, environmentalism, animal symbolism
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Etnologi
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-142903 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2011-01-17 Skapad: 2011-01-17 Senast uppdaterad: 2011-03-22Bibliografiskt granskad
    3. Environmental arguments and the survival of small-scale fishing in Iceland
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Environmental arguments and the survival of small-scale fishing in Iceland
    1993 (Engelska)Ingår i: Green arguments and local subsistence / [ed] Gudrun Dahl, Stockholm: Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm University , 1993, s. 117-127Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    Stockholm: Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm University, 1993
    Nyckelord
    small-scale fishing, Iceland, environmentalism
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Etnologi
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-142904 (URN)91-7153-131-9 (ISBN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2011-01-17 Skapad: 2011-01-17 Senast uppdaterad: 2011-03-22Bibliografiskt granskad
    4. A sea of images: Fishers, whalers and environmentalists
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>A sea of images: Fishers, whalers and environmentalists
    1996 (Engelska)Ingår i: Images of contemporary Iceland: everyday lives and global contexts / [ed] Gísli Pálson & E. Paul Durrenberger, Iowa City: University of Iowa Press , 1996, s. 46-59Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 1996
    Nyckelord
    environmental perceptions, small-scale fishing, Iceland, whale conservation
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Etnologi
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-142906 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2011-01-17 Skapad: 2011-01-17 Senast uppdaterad: 2011-03-22Bibliografiskt granskad
    5. From good to eat to good to watch: whale watching adaptation and change in Icelandic fishing communities
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>From good to eat to good to watch: whale watching adaptation and change in Icelandic fishing communities
    2009 (Engelska)Ingår i: Polar Research, ISSN 0800-0395, E-ISSN 1751-8369, Vol. 28, nr 1, s. 129-138Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Arctic and North Atlantic fishing communities may seem unlikely candidates for a viable whale-watching industry, because of the prevalent traditional consumptive attitudes toward marine mammals and their uses. The topic of this paper is the introduction of an internationally growing industry of whale watching in a fishing village in north-east Iceland, and how local inhabitants reconcile opposing views on whales, whaling and the new cetacean tourism. The paper also discusses the conflict between fishermen and marine mammals, and how it is managed in an area where fishing is still a mainstay of the economy, and where marine mammals are seen by many as competitors for scarce resources, and even as pests. This anthropological case study is used to address wider issues of adaptation, community viability and resilience in small resource-dependent coastal settlements, coping with rapid social and ecological change.

    Nyckelord
    Arctic anthropology human-environmental relations fishing Iceland whale watching
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Etnologi
    Forskningsämne
    Kulturantropologi
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-142900 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2011-01-17 Skapad: 2011-01-17 Senast uppdaterad: 2017-12-11Bibliografiskt granskad
    6. Fisheries Governance and Social Discourse in Post-Crisis Iceland: Responses to the UN Human Rights Committee’s Views in Case 1306/2004
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Fisheries Governance and Social Discourse in Post-Crisis Iceland: Responses to the UN Human Rights Committee’s Views in Case 1306/2004
    2011 (Engelska)Ingår i: The Yearbook of Polar Law, ISSN 1876-8814, E-ISSN 2211-6427, Vol. 3Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with the social discourse on resource rights, fisheries policy and human rights in Iceland, especially in light of the 2007 United Nations Human Rights Committee view that the Icelandic fisheries management system is in violation of basic principles of human rights. The Committee’s ruling is discussed, together with the impacts on, and implications for, Icelandic fisheries policy and the discourse on resource rights and social justice it has evoked in Iceland. In this context, the relationship between fisheries management and the privatization of a former common property resource is discussed, in particular in the light of the 2008 economic and social meltdown in Iceland.

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    Leiden-Boston: Brill, 2011
    Nyckelord
    fisheries governance, Iceland, human rights, social discourse
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Etnologi
    Forskningsämne
    Kulturantropologi
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-146238 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2011-02-15 Skapad: 2011-02-15 Senast uppdaterad: 2017-12-11Bibliografiskt granskad
  • 11.
    Zink, Eren
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kulturantropologi och etnologi, Kulturantropologiska avdelningen.
    Flexible Science: An Anthropology of Scientists, Society and Nature in Vietnam2011Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Eren Zink explores the conditions of doing science in Vietnam. The scientists included in this study were engaged in local and international efforts to conserve nature, establish the fact of climate change, and carry out scientific research in Vietnam. In most instances they had received some of their higher education outside of Vietnam, and later returned to positions within Vietnamese government ministries, universities, research institutes or (to a lesser extent) nongovernmental organizations.

    Paying close attention to cultural and historical influences, the thesis reveals a politics of science whereby actors deftly navigate intricate webs of social and political networks. Partnerships amongst local and foreign actors become possible as a result of the ‘slippery spaces’ where misunderstandings are carefully cultivated and maintained. And, in combination with increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases and international development aid, these actor-networks support the arrival of climate change in Vietnam.

    Nevertheless, Vietnamese scientists are much more than intermediaries between local and foreign interests. Where the Red River meets the sea, scientists compete with national plans for aquaculture expansion in an effort to conserve an idea of nature that has roots in the rural villages of their remembered past. Meanwhile, in their own research institutions there are struggles over both the purpose of doing science, and the authority to practice it. With different degrees of success, the Vietnamese scientists studied here use the resources at hand to realize personal and professional ambitions, as well as to contribute to the (re)production of Vietnamese society.

    The study is based upon eleven months of anthropological fieldwork that took place in Vietnam during 2007 – 2009. Study sites included Vietnamese research institutions, universities, ministries, embassies, and non-governmental organizations, as well as shrimp ponds and national parks in the coastal zone.

  • 12.
    Lundgren, Silje
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kulturantropologi och etnologi, Kulturantropologiska avdelningen.
    Heterosexual Havana: Ideals and hierarchies of gender and sexuality in contemporary Cuba2011Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on two periods of ethnographic fieldwork in Vedado, Havana, in 2004–2007, this dissertation analyses the interconnections between gender, sexuality, and heterosexuality. With theoretical inspiration from the works of Stevi Jackson and Beverley Skeggs, it discusses how the logics underlying heterosexual relations also regulate hierarchical gendered ideals. It examines how gendered conceptions of sexuality confirm a position of heterosexual desirability, and traces a specifically heterosexual gender construction of men and women as oppositional forces, glued together in a relationship of eroticized complementarity.

    Moreover, the dissertation shows that the everyday negotiation of ideals around gender and sexuality is characterized by constant hierarchization. It explores how the emic concept of ‘cultural level’ is used in a process of othering to mark moral distance and create a position of superiority. It also suggests that in post-crisis Cuba, the body has become a new site on which to inscribe distinction and mark privilege, as a way of navigating in a context of new and unfamiliar differentiations.

    The dissertation demonstrates how female eroticism, male eroticized performances in street interaction, and the female body ideal are central sites for establishing an image of national particularity. In this historic moment, these have also become sites for marking difference and creating hierarchies. The dissertation argues that inclusive and unifying conceptions of ‘Cubanness’ are both delineated and reinforced through exclusion and the demarcation of difference within this collectivity.

    This notion of the nation carries gendered and sexualized inscriptions. It has been constructed through the historical exclusion of non-heterosexuality, which has been closely connected to the consolidation of a specific ideal of masculinity. The dissertation analyses the destabilizing potential of a shift in Cuban sexual politics during the last two decades and explores how this might imply a new configuration of the relationship between gender and sexuality.

  • 13.
    Körling, Gabriella
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kulturantropologi och etnologi, Kulturantropologiska avdelningen.
    In Search of the State: An Ethnography of Public Service Provision in Urban Niger2011Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores public health and education provision in Niamey, the capital of Niger, by merging the ethnographic study of public services with an anthropological analysis of the state and of local politics. Based on anthropological fieldwork carried out in a group of neighbourhoods in the periphery of Niamey, the study highlights the political dimensions of public service provision in a local arena where international development interventions and national plans meet local realities and where a wide range of actors and institutions, dis-courses, meanings, and practices are mobilized in the offering of and the regulation of access to public services. It focuses on the political, economic, and socio-cultural aspects of public service provision, too often hidden behind contemporary buzzwords of development such as community participation and decentralization that dominate global debates about education and healthcare in developing countries. The study brings forth the strategies of urban resi-dents in dealing with daily challenges in the consolidation of service provision and in educa-tion and health-seeking trajectories. It shows that access to a satisfactory treatment of illness or a successful school career is premised on the ability to navigate on the medical and educa-tion markets, which are made up of a plurality of providers and of official and unofficial costs and transactions. Further, these public services engage different actors such as commu-nity committees, traditional chiefs, local associations, the municipality and elected municipal councillors, emergent leaders, NGOs, and international development aid. The study demon-strates that despite the uncertainty of state support in health and education provision and a widespread dissatisfaction with these public services, the image of the state as service pro-vider is reproduced on a day by day basis through local efforts at securing public services.

  • 14.
    Andersson Trovalla, Ulrika
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kulturantropologi och etnologi, Kulturantropologiska avdelningen.
    Medicine for Uncertain Futures: A Nigerian City in the Wake of a Crisis2011Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The Nigerian city of Jos used to be seen as a peaceful place, but in 2001 it was struck by clashes that arose from what was largely understood as issues of ethnic and religious belonging. The event, which would become known as ‘the crisis’, was experienced as a rupture and a loss of what the city had once been, and as the starting point of a spiral of violence that has continued up to today. With the crisis, Jos changed. Former friends became enemies, and places that had been felt to be safe no longer were so. Previous truths were thrown into confusion, and Jos’s inhabitants found themselves more and more having to manoeuvre in an unstable world coloured by fear and anger. Life in Jos became increasingly hard to predict, and people searched for different ways forward, constantly trying out new interpretations of the world. This book, which is inspired by pragmatism, analyses the processes that were shaping the emergent city of Jos and its inhabitants in the aftermath of the crisis. At its core are some of Jos’s practitioners of traditional medicine. As healers, diviners, and providers of spells to protect from enemies or solve conflicts, they had special skills to influence futures that were becoming more and more unpredictable. Still, the medical practitioners were as vulnerable to the changing circumstances as everyone else. Their everyday lives and struggles to find their footing and ways forward under the changing circumstances are used as a point of departure to explore larger wholes: life during times characterised by feelings of uncertainty, fragmentation, fear, and conflict – in Jos as a city and Nigeria as a nation.

  • 15.
    Spasenić, Jelena
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kulturantropologi och etnologi.
    The Shadows of the Past: A Study of Life-World and Identity of Serbian Youth after the Milošević Regime2011Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis explores the consequences of the Milošević regime and the Yugoslav wars in the 1990s for young people in Serbia. It deals with the conditions under which recent history makes itself relevant in the lives of two high-school classes of eighteen- and nineteen-year-olds. In order to unravel the ramifications of the past, anthropological fieldwork was conducted for twelve months during 2007-2009 in the city of Novi Sad, situated in the northern Serbian province of Vojvodina. The study builds on participant observation and interviews. It pays attention to the interplay of objective conditions, which have arisen from complex social processes in the Balkans, and subjective understanding of past events and their corollaries in social relations at present. Drawing on a phenomenological perspective, symbolic interactionism, and social identity theory, which provide important insights into the processes of cognition and identification, it is demonstrated that young people’s relationship to the past and present of their society is marked by ambivalence. Most of the participants in the study have no experience of the war in the true sense of the word. On the other hand, they do have an experience of a surrounding world characterized by considerable social contradictions and oppositions, and of people who are stressed and worried about the future. A closer investigation of the realms of school, family, society, and self indicates that the impacts and meanings of historical events due to differing cultural and political models are not uniform. In order to be of import in everyday life, they have to be integrated into individuals’ comprehension of their world. Such an integration of the legacies of the past will depend not only on the human capacity for moral reflection but also on the prospects for economic development and social stability in Serbia.

  • 16.
    Ögmundardóttir, Helga
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kulturantropologi och etnologi.
    The Shepherds of Þjórsárver.: Traditional Use and Hydropower Development in the Commons of the Icelandic Highland.2011Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores a damming dispute that has been going on for over four decades in Iceland, about whether a dam, Norðlingaölduveita, should be built in the central highland, near the glacier Hofsjökull and the wetland reserve Þjórsárver, or not.  The study focuses on the local resistance against the dam, led by a group of people in the farming community Gnúpverjahreppur, which has its highland grazing commons in the Þjórsárver area.  This group is supported by both national and international individuals and organisations for the preservation of Þjórsárver.  The Icelandic National Power Company has had the damming project on its agenda as a part of the total damming of the river Þjórsá, which runs from the glacier Hofsjökull to the Atlantic Ocean, mostly for electricity production to power aluminium plants in the southwest part of Iceland, near the capital, Reykjavík.  The local resistance has its roots in the traditional way of herding sheep, especially the custom of letting the community’s sheep graze in its highland commons during the summer and fetching them in the autumn in the fjallferð, or ‘mountain round-up’.  In the fjallferð, people from most of the farms participate, searching together in the vast highland nature for sheep, according to elaborate search patterns, where knowledge of the area, courage and cooperation are a key to success.  Through these annual round-ups, that have been practiced for hundreds of years, the people not only create and recreate close ties with each other, as a community with common goals, but also maintain an intimate and long-lasting relationship with the nature of their highland commons.  In its features, the people read and recall the history of their community, its successes and losses, past and future.  Seeing the commons as a vital part of their community, they are not willing to jeopardize the nature there.  Although this conflict lacks the indigenous dimension that is often found in such conflicts elsewhere, its rhetoric follows similar lines.  The study thus offers an interesting contribution to the research field of environmental resource and land use disputes.

  • 17.
    Green, Carina
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kulturantropologi och etnologi.
    Managing Laponia: A World Heritage Site as Arena for Sami Ethno-Politics in Sweden2009Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)