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  • 1.
    Aalto, Sirpa
    University of Oulu.
    Jómsvíkinga Saga as a Part of Old Norse Historiography2014In: Scripta Islandica: Isländska Sällskapets Årsbok, ISSN 0582-3234, E-ISSN 2001-9416, Vol. 65, p. 33-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article argues that Jómsvíkinga saga, despite its mixed modality, should be included in Old Norse historiography. A comparison with kings’ sagas and legendary sagas — in this case Yngvars saga víðfǫrla — shows how these modes were used in Jómsvíkinga saga. The saga is often grouped with Orkneyinga saga and Færeyinga saga, which were also written around the year 1200; all deal in some way with the relationship between kings and aristocrats. The reason for this may be found in contemporary events: The Scandinavian kings were strengthening their position, while the aristocracy was trying to maintain its influence. Therefore, the sagas have also been called political sagas. The oldest extant versions of Jómsvíkinga saga contain the first part of the saga, which deals with the history of the Danish Kings; this shows that the saga was intended to be perceived as history. However, a later version (AM 510 4to) omits this part, which suggests that the historicity of the saga had eroded. The fact that Jómsvíkinga saga was incorporated into manuscripts containing legendary sagas also shows that the saga may have been valued for its entertaining plot and not because of its connections to real events and historical characters.

  • 2.
    Aarelaid-Tart, Aili
    et al.
    Tallinn University, Estonia .
    Bennich-Björkman, Li
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Baltic biographies at historical crossroads2011Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book brings together life stories from five generations of Balts, living through the diverse and recurring transformations of the twentieth century: occupations, war, independence, totalitarianism, and democratic rule and market economy. The twentieth century history of the Baltic countries has often been deeply tragic. Lying on the coastline of the Baltic Sea, these rather small but strategically well located territories have historically found themselves in the middle of many power struggles between larger states, empires and other power-holders: the Teutonic Knights, Swedish kings, Tsarist Russia, Nazi Germany, the Soviet Union. Today, they are once again forced to stand up to the Russian Federation.

    Biographical interviewing is a field focused on individuals, and on how those individuals choose to re-create and present their lived lives, make meaning of it through the narratives they tell. To interpret the biographical narrations of Lithuanians, Latvians and Estonians, shaped by complex and controversial historical background, the authors use Pierre Bourdieu’s concept of social and cultural capitals, the principles of Erving Goffman’s framing analysis and Alessandro Portelli’s distinction of private and public spheres, Anton Steen’s investigations of post-Socialist elites and Piotr Sztompka’s theory of cultural trauma, etc. Given analyses of particular biographical narrations are supplemented by brief historical and sociological overviews, which allow the reader to better understand the contexts of lived lives, and the mental atmosphere in which the interviews were conducted.

  • 3.
    Aava, Kim
    Gotland University, School of Game Design, Technology and Learning Processes.
    Game Save: Game Save Incorporation in Game Design through a MDA Analysis2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is about save systems and will analyze save functions in various games. Save systems in games are usually blamed for harming the suspension of disbelief as it is an act taking place outside the game and should only be used for its intended purpose: letting the players store their game data, and progress whenever they need.

    The game save function developed as rapid leaps of technology were made, with the beginning era of home consoles and home computers allowing players to spend more time playing, creating a demand for longer play sessions in games which lead to a need of methods for storing game data.

    The analysis of save systems is carried out in this paper by using MDA Framework (Mechanics, Dynamics, Aesthetics), a tool used for documenting game design. This framework can be used to analyze a game from a designer‟s or player‟s perspective. By reversing the framework ADM (Aesthetics, Dynamics and Mechanics) one can analyze the user experience, which is how the player perceives the game‟s aesthetics to be, depending on the dynamics and mechanics.

    This analysis aims to provide knowledge of how consistency in game design and the save system can be used to create a cohesive game world that facillitates the player's experience and immersion.

  • 4.
    Abdi Ali, Dusit
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology.
    The bright hopes and desoluted dream of Ethiopian women: A study of circular migration to middle east and the gulf states2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Migration and re-migration of economically and socially marginalized Ethiopian women and girls has become a phenomenon. Based on interviews with 12 Ethiopian migrant women returned from the Middle East and the Gulf States, the primary aim of this thesis is to describe and study Ethiopian women migrants’ circular migration to the Middle East. I will mainly focus on how social dynamics in the family, gender relations and economic circumstances are intricate. The process of women’s migration and how the expectations of the family can be gender differentiated are discussed. Further, the migrant women’s power relation when class and ethnicity determine their position is discussed. Relations with the sending family and the issues related to the women who return, as well as problems affecting them at home and in the destination countries, are looked at. Various and complex issues of migration and the women’s roles are discussed with reference to the women’s experiences. Migration provides women with opportunities for social and economic mobility but can also subject them to ethnic discrimination, exploitation, and abuse. The movement is generally seen as voluntary labor migration and it has placed them in a vulnerable position both at home and abroad. Their migration is interconnected to the economic need but also the responsibilities they have towards their family and kin.

  • 5.
    Abdullahi Elmi, Salma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Evolutionary Ethics and Idealism: The idealists Henry Jones and Andrew Seth Pringle-Pattison in dialog with Darwinism concerning evolution and ethics.2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 6.
    Abish, Aynur
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Balanïŋ dünyege kelüwine baylanïstï salttar ‘Customs concerning the birth of a child’2014In: Turcology and Linguistics: Éva Ágnes Csató Festschrift / [ed] Demir, Nurettin, Karakoç, Birsel and Menz, Astrid, Ankara: Hacettepe University , 2014, p. 9-20Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Abish, Aynur
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Modality in Kazakh as Spoken in China2016Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a comprehensive study on modality in one of the largest Turkic languages, Kazakh, as it is spoken in China. Kazakh is the official language of the Republic of Kazakhstan and is furthermore spoken by about one and a half million people in China in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region and in Aksai Kazakh Autonomous County in Gansu Province.The method employed is empirical, i.e. data-oriented. The modal expressions in Kazakh are analyzed in a theoretical framework essentially based on the works of Lars Johanson. The framework defines semantic notions of modality from a functional and typological perspective. The modal volition, deontic evaluation, and epistemic evaluation express attitudes towards the propositional content and are conveyed in Kazakh by grammaticalized moods, particles and lexical devices. All these categories are treated in detail, and ample examples of their different usages are provided with interlinear annotation. The Kazakh expressions are compared with corresponding ones used in other Turkic languages. Contact influences of Uyghur and Chinese are also dealt with.The data used in this study include texts recorded by the author in 20102012, mostly in the northern regions of Xinjiang, as well as written texts published in Kazakhstan and China. The written texts represent different genres: fiction, non-fiction, poetry and texts published on the Internet. Moreover, examples have been elicited from native speakers of Kazakh and Uyghur. The Appendix contains nine texts recorded by the author in the Kazakh-speaking regions of Xinjiang, China. These texts illustrate the use of many of the items treated in the study.

  • 8.
    Abish, Aynur
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Modality in Kazakh as spoken in China2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a comprehensive study on expressions of modality in one of the largest Turkic languages, Kazakh, as it is spoken in China. Kazakh is the official language of the Republic of Kazakhstan and is furthermore spoken by about one and a half million people in China in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region and in Aksai Kazakh Autonomous County in Gansu Province.The method employed is empirical, i.e. data-oriented. The modal expressions in Kazakh are analyzed in a theoretical framework essentially based on the works of Lars Johanson. The framework defines semantic notions of modality from a functional and typological perspective. The modal volition, deontic evaluation, and epistemic evaluation express attitudes towards the propositional content and are conveyed in Kazakh by grammaticalized moods, particles and lexical devices. All these categories are treated in detail, and ample examples of their different usages are provided with interlinear annotation. The Kazakh expressions are compared with corresponding ones used in other Turkic languages. Contact influences of Uyghur and Chinese are also dealt with.The data used in this study include texts recorded by the author in 20102012, mostly in the northern regions of Xinjiang, as well as written texts published in Kazakhstan and China. The written texts represent different genres: fiction, non-fiction, poetry and texts published on the Internet. Moreover, examples have been elicited from native speakers of Kazakh and Uyghur.

    The Appendix contains nine texts recorded by the author in the Kazakh-speaking regions of Xinjiang, China. These texts illustrate the use of many of the items treated in the study.

  • 9.
    Abrahamian, Karineh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
    Global Marketing through Local Cultural Strategies: A Case Study of IKEA2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 10.
    Abusabib, Mohamed
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy.
    Art, politics, and cultural identification in Sudan2004Book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Abusabib, Mohamed
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM, Aesthetics and Cultural Studies.
    Back to Mangu Zambiri: Art, Politics and Identity in Northern Sudan2001In: New Political Sciences, Vol. 23, no 1Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 12.
    Abusabib, Mohamed
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM, Aesthetics and Cultural Studies.
    Political Islam and the Arts: the Sudanese Experience2001In: ISIM Newsletter, no 8Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 13.
    Abusabib, Mohamed
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM, Aesthetics and Cultural Studies.
    The Concept of Sudanism in Ahmed A. Zein Alabdin's Thought,2000In: Kitabat Sudaniyya, no 12Article in journal (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The article reflects, in a critical mode, on the cultural basis of modern Sudanese visual art as perceived by Zein Alabdin, the late Sudanese art historian.

  • 14.
    Abusabib, Mohamed
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM, Aesthetics and Cultural Studies.
    The Impact of Islam on African Art: The Sudanese Example1995In: Islamic Art and Culture in Sub-Saharan AfricaArticle in journal (Other scientific)
  • 15.
    Abusabib, Mohamed A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM, Aesthetics and Cultural Studies.
    African art: an aesthetic inquiry1995Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Adam, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Musicology.
    Street Music, City Rhythms: The urban soundscape as heard by street musicians2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The soundscape plays a key, if often overlooked, role in the construction of public urban space. Street music – a conscious deliberate propagation of sound in public space – opens an entryway into comprehending the role of sound in the city, and what it reveals about the city’s inhabitants. Ethnographic fieldwork in Brussels and Stockholm focuses on street musicians of all kinds, exploring how their music is shaped by their personal motivations, how their practices negotiate meaning in sound and in space, and how their rhythms shape, and are shaped by, the city. These explorations give reason to question R. Murray Schafer’s philosophies on soundscape studies, particularly in the urban context. Drawing from Henri Lefebvre’s notions of the production of space, and rhythmanalysis as an analytical tool, the urban soundscape is understood as an ongoing negotiation of individual actions, where dynamics of power, identity, and ideology become audible. Street musicians and their sound cultures feature not just as a topic worthy of study, but also as a guide of how and why to listen to and analyze the rhythms of the city.

  • 17.
    Adams, Ernest
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Game Design.
    Rollings, Andrew
    Fundamentals of Game Design2006 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An introductory undergraduate textbook on the design of computer and video games.

  • 18.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Det Danske Sprog- og Litteraturselskab.
    Richardson, Ian
    Leeds Metropolitan University.
    An English Dictionary of Runic Inscriptions in the Younger Futhark2006Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Adams, Jonathan
    University of Hull.
    An Introduction to the Danish Translations of St Birgitta’s Revelations2000In: The Vernacular Translations of St Birgitta of Sweden / [ed] Bridget Morris & Veronica O'Mara, Turnhout: Brepols, 2000, p. 87-105Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Det Danske Sprog- og Litteraturselskab.
    Analysing Language Mixture in a Medieval Birgittine Manuscript2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Analysing Language Mixture in a Medieval Birgittine Manuscript: Method and Findings2013In: The Birgittine Experience / [ed] Claes Gejrot, Mia Åkestam & Roger Andersson, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 2013, p. 370-395Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    ‘Beware of false prophets’: A Fragment of the Old Swedish Miracle Homily Book2016In: Medieval Sermon Studies, ISSN 1366-0691, E-ISSN 1749-6276, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 5-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article comprises an introduction to and an edition and translation of an Old Swedish sermon fragment found in the Hannaas Collection at the Ethno-Folkloristic Archive, University of Bergen, Norway (Hannaas 66). This previously unpublished paper fragment is one of the missing parts of the Old Swedish Homily Book (known as Svensk järteckens postilla), dating from the second half of the fifteenth century and now housed at the Royal Library in Stockholm, Sweden (Cod. Holm. A 111). The text in Hannaas 66 comprises a sermon for the 8th Sunday after Trinity based on Matthew 7. 15–16 and includes a miracle exemplum that illustrates the importance of acting justly and following the will of God.

  • 23.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Birgitta and Bernard: Five Old Swedish Fragments in the Danish National Archives2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Danish National Archives in Copenhagen houses several thousand manuscript fragments, the remains of numerous works that were cut up and used in the bindings of later books. The majority of these fragments are written in Latin, Middle Low German, or Danish, although a few in Old Swedish also survive. Five of these Old Swedish fragments are published and discussed in this article. They contain parts of two of St Birgitta’s Revelations (Liber Caelestis) and of St Bernard’s A Rule of Good Life (Ad sororem modus bene vivendi in christianam religionem), known in Old Swedish as Ett gudhelikt lifwærne. The Birgittine texts are from an early stage of the retranslation process when compared to other extant versions and include several unique wordings that demonstrate the specific use of the original manuscript in a monastic environment. The Bernard fragments are one of just two extant versions and appear to predate the version in Stockholm, Royal Library, A 9; as such, they are an important witness to the propagation of the saint’s writings in Sweden.

  • 24.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Birgitta and Bernard: Two Saints and Five Old Swedish Fragments in the Danish National Archives2017In: European Journal of Scandinavian Studies, ISSN 2191-9399, E-ISSN 2191-9402, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 263-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Danish National Archives in Copenhagen houses several thousand manuscript fragments, the remains of numerous works that were cut up and used in the bindings of later books. The majority of these fragments are written in Latin, Middle Low German, or Danish, although a few in Old Swedish also survive. Five of these Old Swedish fragments are published and discussed in this article. They contain parts of two of St Birgitta’s Revelations (Liber Caelestis and Revelationes Extravagantes) and of St Bernard’s A Rule of Good Life (Ad sororem modus bene vivendi in christianam religionem). The Birgittine texts are from an early stage of the retranslation process when compared to other extant versions and include several unique wordings that demonstrate the specific use of the original manuscript in a monastic environment. The Bernard fragments are one of just two extant versions and may predate the version in Stockholm, Royal Library, A 9; as such, they are an important witness to the propagation of the saint’s writings in Sweden.

  • 25.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Charisma and Religious Authority: Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Preaching 1200–1500. Edited by Katherine L. Jansen and Miri Rubin. Europa sacra, 4. Pp. xi + 260. Turnhout: Brepols. 2010. ISBN: 978-2-503-52859-52012In: Medieval Sermon Studies, ISSN 1366-0691, Vol. 56, p. 66-69Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Christ killers, menstruating males and savage wolves: The portrayal of Jews in medieval Denmark2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Det Danske Sprog- og Litteraturselskab.
    Displaced Texts: An Old Swedish Birgittine Revelation in Copenhagen, GkS 1154 fol. and Three Sermons in Vienna, Cod. Vind. 130132008Book (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Ferocious lions and menstruating men: The portrayal of Jews in medieval Danish manuscripts2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Adams, Jonathan
    University of Hull.
    Helle Degnbol et al., ed., Ordbog over det norrøne prosasprog (a–bam), Copenhagen: The Arnamagnæan Institute, 19952000In: Saga-Book of the Viking Society for Northern Research, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 334-336Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Idolaters, Warriors, and Lovers: Muslims in Medieval Swedish and Danish Texts2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Between the Viking Age and the Middle Ages, there was a noticeable change in relations between Scandinavia and the Islamic world – the sources point to a shift from travel and trade to hostility and war. Muslims did not settle in the North until the eighteenth century, and during the Middle Ages there was little contact between Scandinavians and ‘real’ Muslims. So how did Danes and Swedes imagine and describe this Other? Is there anything unusual or unexpected about the portrayal of Muslims? How does this image compare to that of the other great religious opponent, the Jew? By investigating East Norse devotional texts, travel literature, saints’ lives, romances and accounts of Ottoman warfare, this paper aims to draw out some of the major themes in medieval Scandinavian descriptions of Muslims and Islam.

  • 31.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Images of Jews and Saracens in Old Danish and Old Swedish sermons and wall paintings: Sources for an investigation of the spread of images and ideas from “continental” Europe and the Mediterranean to medieval Denmark and Sweden2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Jews were not permitted to settle in Scandinavia until the modern era (Denmark 1622, Sweden 1718) and Muslims did not arrive in significant numbers until the late twentieth century. Yet despite the fact that there was no resident population, Muslims and, in particular, Jews can be found in many different literary genres (including sermons) and works of art (including wall-paintings, altar pieces and sculptures). These two non-Christian groups in medieval Scandinavia are thus an example of what Gloria Cigman with regard to England has called “absent-presence”, although in Denmark and Sweden they were not a memory or continuation from a pre-expulsion era but rather manifestations of the imagination that drew upon pre-existing classical and foreign traditions.

    This paper surveys the extant vernacular sermon material from medieval Denmark and Sweden that mentions Muslims and Jews and attempts to categorise the different types and uses of the representations. As the extant corpus of sermon material from medieval Denmark and Sweden is rather small, I shall look briefly at the saints’ lives and legends that were often used to fashion exempla in sermons. The paper will also consider the rich treasury of wall paintings and how these pictures reinforced the ideas about Jews propagated in sermons. (There are no unequivocal images of Muslims, Saracens or Turks in medieval Danish and Swedish wall paintings.)

    Finally, the paper will attempt to trace the Scandinavian imagery and influences back to ‘continental’ Europe and uncover what sorts of ideas about Muslims and Jews were useful enough to Scandinavians to survive the long journey north.

  • 32.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Det Danske Sprog- og Litteraturselskab.
    In Danico Dicitur: Glossing in Danish Manuscripts2010In: Scandinavian Studies, ISSN 0036-5637, E-ISSN 2163-8195, no 82, p. 117-158Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Inside and Outside. The Role of the “Others” in Medieval Societies around the Baltic Coast: Preaching about Jews in Medieval Denmark2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Det Danske Sprog- og Litteraturselskab.
    Language Difficulties in Some Medieval Vernacular Scandinavian Sermons2008In: Constructing the Medieval Sermon / [ed] Roger Andersson, Turnhout: Brepols, 2008, p. 189-207Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Lessons in Contempt2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Lessons in Contempt: Poul Ræff’s Translation and Publication in 1516 of Johannes Pfefferkorn’s The Confession of the Jews2013Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Published in 1516, Poul Ræff's Iudeorum Secreta, a translation of Johannes Pfefferkorn's The Conlession of the Jews, was a landmark in the development of anti-Jewish polemics in Denmark.

    For the first time, Danes were presented with descriptions of Jewish ceremonies that aimed to portray these practices as dangerously anti-Christian, superstitious and deviating from 'real' Biblical Judaism. Contemporary Judaism is described as a rabbinical construction that is worthy of nothing but ridicule and mockery.  Lessons in Contempt explores this key text that comprises a valuable source for a range of academic disciplines: the history of antisemitism, the study of Jewish-Christian relations, social history, the history of religious culture, and medieval and early modern Danish language and literature.

    This book includes an outline of how Jews were portrayed in medieval Danish vernacular literature; a description of Pfefferkorn's life and works; a discussion of Ræff's translation and publication of Iudeorum Secreta; a presentation of the language and style of the Danish version, as well as an edition of the text together with the Latin original, an English translation and an extensive commentary.

  • 37.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Det Danske Sprog- og Litteraturselskab.
    Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics!: Language Mixture in a Medieval Scandinavian Manuscript2008In: Svenska språket och litteraturen i ett tvärvetenskapligt perspektiv, Kraków: Uniwersytet Jagielloński , 2008, p. 203-213Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Medieval Mass Media and Minorities2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The portrayal and (mis)use of the figure of the Jew and the Muslim in vernacular sermons and wall paintings from medieval Denmark and Sweden.

  • 39.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Muhammad’s Miracles: Science, Faith, and the Prophet’s Tricks in Medieval East Norse Texts2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, I talk about the lives of the Prophet Muhammad found in vernacular saints’ lives (Old Swedish Legendary), devotional works (Consolation of the Soul), and travel descriptions (John Mandeville) from fourteenth- and fifteenth-century Denmark and Sweden. The paper focuses on stories about how Muhammad deceived people into believing that he was a Prophet using tricks, natural phenomena, and his alleged medical condition: trained animals to appear to worship him, used magnets to create a floating coffin, and epilepsy to give the impression of divine ecstasy.

    These lives of Muhammad are adaptations of works in Latin and German, while their presentation of Muhammad as a false prophet is traceable to Byzantine polemical authors, such as John of Damascus. The East Norse portrayal of Muhammad as a trickster owes a debt of gratitude to Gautier de Compiègne’s Otia de Machometi (before 1150). However, rather than the East Norse lives of Muhammad being free-standing works, they are found as integrated sections in collections of devotional and didactic works aimed at teaching and nurturing Christian piety in their readers. This is perhaps an unexpected textual context: why, for example, would a false Prophet be found in a collection of Christian saints’ lives? When the Qur’ān attributes no miracles to the Muhammad whatsoever, what is the reason for these Christian writers to do so and then to set about exposing them as false? Hermeneutical argumentation and strawman-polemics are key to understanding the purpose of “Muhammad’s miracles” among a readership that had little, if any, chance of ever coming into contact with Islam.

  • 40.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Preaching about an Absent Minority: Medieval Danish Sermons and Jews2014In: The Jewish-Christian Encounter in Medieval Preaching / [ed] Jonathan Adams and Jussi Hanska, New York: Routledge, 2014, p. 92-116Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Det Danske Sprog- og Litteraturselskab.
    Preaching about Jews without Jews2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Det Danske Sprog- og Litteraturselskab.
    Roger Andersson, De birgittinska ordensprästerna som traditionsförmedlare och folkfostrare. En studie i svensk medeltidspredikan på den 8:e söndagen efter trefaldighet, Runica et Mediævalia, Scripta minora, 4 (Stockholm: Sällskapet Runica et Mediævalia, 2001); and Roger Andersson, Sermones sacri Svecice. The Sermon Collection in Cod. AM 787 4°, SFSS 1, 86 (Uppsala: Svenska fornskriftsällskapet, 2006)2008In: Medieval Sermon Studies, no 52, p. 85-90Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    The Bishop Murderer2017In: Beyond the Piraeus Lion: East Norse Studies from Venice / [ed] Jonathan Adams & Massimiliano Bampi, Copenhagen: Syddansk Universitetsforlag, 2017, p. 79-103Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [da]

    Artiklen præsenterer og diskuterer et pergamentfragment på Det Kongelige Bibliotek i København (Fragmentsamling, nr. 3230), ét blad af et nu tabt håndskrift. Det indeholder en mirakelberetning om en bispemorder, en fortælling der også findes i det berømte opbyggelsesværk Sjælens trøst. Fragmentet er dog ikke en overlevende rest af den store, tabte del af det danske Sjælens trøst-håndskrift (de to overlevende rester findes som Ups. C 529 og Holm. A 109); fragmentet hører hjemme i en anden redaktion eller snarere i en helt anden overleveringstradition.

  • 44.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    The Image of Muslims, Islam and Muḥammad in East Norse Texts2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    The Life of the Prophet Muḥammad in East Norse2015In: Fear and Loathing in the North: Jews and Muslims in Medieval Scandinavia / [ed] Jonathan Adams & Cordelia Heß, Berlin: De Gruyter , 2015, p. 203-237Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    The Revelations of St Birgitta: A Study and Edition of the Birgittine-Norwegian Texts, Swedish National Archives, E 89022015Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In The Revelations of St Birgitta: A Study and Edition of the Birgittine-Norwegian Texts, Swedish National Archives, E 8902, Jonathan Adams offers a detailed analysis of the manuscript and its contents as well as a new edition of this puzzling text. The Birgittine-Norwegian texts are very distinctive from the main Birgittine vernacular corpus of literature and have taxed scholars for decades as to why and for whom they were written.

    The linguistic study of the manuscript is combined with contextual and historical information in order to reinforce the arguments made and offer explanations within a cultural context. This provides a welcome new dimension to earlier research that has otherwise been pursued to a large degree within a single academic discipline.

     

    CONTENTS

     

    Table of contents

    List of Figures

    List of Tables

    Acknowledgements

    List of Abbreviations

     

    I Background

     

    1 St Birgitta and her Revelations

    1.1 Why St Birgitta?

    1.2 The life of St Birgitta

    1.3 The Revelations of St Birgitta (Latin tradition)

    1.4 The Revelations of St Birgitta (Swedish tradition)

    1.5 This book

     

    2 Textual history of the vernacular Scandinavian manuscripts

    2.1 Extant Swedish manuscripts

    2.1.1 Swedish retranslation

    2.2 Other Scandinavian manuscripts

    2.2.1 Old Danish

    2.2.2 Middle Norwegian

    2.3 Summary

     

    3 Birgitta and Norway

    3.1 Towards Nordic union in the fourteenth century: Royalty and the nobility

    3.2 Birgitta’s own personal contacts with Norway

    3.3 Birgitta’s family connections with Norway

    3.4 The Birgittine Movement in Norway and Munkeliv

    3.5 Summary

     

    4 Summary of previous research into the manuscript

    4.1 Gustaf E. Klemming

    4.2 Robert Geete

    4.3 Knut B. Westman

    4.4 Vilhelm Gödel

    4.5 Salomon Kraft

    4.6 Marius Sandvei

    4.7 Didrik Arup Seip

    4.8 Elias Gustaf Adolf Wessén

    4.9 Lars Wollin

    4. 10 Lennart Moberg

    4.11 Hans Torben Gilkær

    4.12 General evaluation of earlier theories

     

    II Manuscript

     

    5 Manuscript description

    5.1 Date and origin

    5.2 Provenance

    5.3 Contents

    5.4 Make-up and description

    5.4.1 Foliation

    5.4.2 Materials and dimensions

    5.4.3 Quiring

    5.4.4 Ruling and pricking

    5.4.5 Catchwords

    5.5 Script

    5.5.1 Scribal characteristics

    5.5.2 Abbreviations

    5.5.3 Punctuation

    5.5.4 Hyphenation and Word Division

    5.5.5 Spacing

    5.5.6 Rubrics and Guide Letters

    5.5.7 Marginal Notes

    5.6 Binding

    5.7 Damage

    5.8 Scribal error

     

    III Language

     

    6 Lexicon: idiosyncracies, foreign influence, and dialectal forms

    6.1 Hapax Legomena

    6.1.1 *drøvuker

    6.1.2 *iakilse and *iatilse

    6.1.3 *nidherflytilse

    6.1.4 *solbadh

    6.1.5 *spailse

    6.1.6 *søkiarinna

    6.1.7 *unsæld

    6.1.8 *urfamse/orfamse

    6.1.9 Distribution

    6.1.10 Discussion

    6.2 Middle Low German loanwords

    6.2.1 Unbound Morphemes

    6.2.2 Bound Morphemes

    6.2.3 Summary

    6.3 Latin words and phrases in E 8902

    6.3.1 Adjectives and Common Nouns

    6.3.2 Proper Nouns

    6.4 Vadstenaspråk-like, Östgötska, and Danish features

     

    7 Language mixture in medieval Scandinavian manuscripts

    7.1 Causes of Swedish influence on Norwegian in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries

    7.1.1 Early definitions

    7.1.2 The problem of defining “norm” in the context of Old Norwegian 

    7.1.3 Internal causes of mixture

    7.1.4 External causes of mixture

    7.1.5 A diglossic situation in late medieval Norway?

    7.2. Intentional types of language mixture in medieval Scandinavian manuscripts

    7.2.1 Terminology

    7.2.2 Summary

    7.3 Causes of unintentional language mixture (“interference”) in medieval Scandinavian manuscripts

    7.3.1 Scribe’s own idiolect

    7.3.2 Scribe’s own dialect

    7.3.3 Dialect of the original

    7.3.4 Dialect of the area

    7.3.5 Norm of the genre

    7.3.6 Norm of the scriptorium

    7.3.7 Audience

    7.3.8 Summary

    7.4 Concluding remarks

     

    8 Analysis of language mixture in E 8902

    8.1 The use of statistics in literary research

    8.2 The diagnostic test features for E 8902 

    8.2.1 Diagnostic test feature A: Progressive i-mutation

    8.2.2 Diagnostic test feature B: Itacism

    8.2.3 Diagnostic test feature C: Diphthongisation

    8.2.4 Diagnostic test feature D: Monophthongisation

    8.2.5 Diagnostic test feature E: Vowel merger

    8.2.6 Diagnostic test feature F: Elision

    8.2.7 Diagnostic test feature G: Dental assimilation

    8.2.8 Diagnostic test feature H: First person singular pronoun

    8.2.9 Diagnostic test feature I: Relative particle

    8.2.10 Diagnostic test feature J: Anglo-Saxon letter forms

    8.3 Statistical procedure

    8.3.1 Total number of occurrences and proportion

    8.3.2 Rate of occurrence

    8.3.3 Ellegård’s distinctiveness ratio

    8.3.4 Testing for significance

    8.3.5 Pearson’s product-moment correlation coefficient

    8.3.6 Summary

    8.4 Language mixture

    8.4.1 Findings of the statistical analysis of language mixture

    8.5 Miscellaneous south-eastern Norwegian Forms

    8.5.1 The intrusive svarabhakti vowel

    8.5.2 Metaphony

    8.5.3 Metathesis of “vr”

    8.6 Summary of hand mixture types

    8.6.1 Hand 1

    8.6.2 Hand 2

    8.6.3 Hand 3

    8.6.4 Hand 4

    8.7 Summary of linguistic analysis

     

    9 Conclusion

    9.1 Summary of aims, methods, and findings

    9.2 Writing E 8902 

    9.2.1 Scribes

    9.2.2 Language

    9.2.3 Place of composition

    9.2.4 The manuscript’s place in the Swedish tradition

    9.3 Contents and audience

     

    IV Edition

     

    10 Text and commentary

    10.1 Editorial procedure

    10.2 Transcription

     

    11 Commentary, references, and indexes

    11.1 Commentary and references

    11.2 Index of names and places in E 8902

     

    Bibliography

    Index

     

  • 47.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Det Danske Sprog- og Litteraturselskab.
    The Trials and Tribulations of Teaching East Norse to the British2007In: Encyclopædica Brittannica: Festskrift til Britta Olrik Frederiksen / [ed] Ragnheiður Mósesdóttir, Jonna Louis-Jensen & Florian Grammel, Copenhagen: The Arnamagnæan Collection , 2007, p. 1-3Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 48.
    Adams, Jonathan
    University of Hull.
    Three newly “discovered” Danish sermons in the Austrian National Library2002In: Medieval Sermon Studies, ISSN 1366-0691, no 46, p. 70-94Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    “Thus shall Christian people know to punish them”: Translating Pfefferkorn into Danish2017In: Revealing the Secrets of the Jews: Johannes Pfefferkorn and Christian Writings about Jewish Life and Literature in Early Modern Europe / [ed] Jonathan Adams & Cordelia Heß, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2017, p. 135-153Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Thus shall Christian people know to reproach them: Translating Pfefferkorn into Danish2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1516 Poul Ræff published Nouiter in lucem data: iudeorum secreta (‘Recently brought out into the light: The secrets of the Jews’), his Danish translation of Johannes Pfefferkorn’s Libellus de Judaica confessione (‘The small book of the confession of the Jews’ from 1508). Nouiter in lucem data is the oldest extant book in Danish printed by a Dane in Denmark – something that makes the book rather remarkable. (Earlier books in Danish had been printed either by Danes abroad or by foreigners in Denmark.)

    This paper will investigate how Ræff translated Pfefferkorn by focusing on his use of native elements, mistranslations and errors, and omissions and simplifications. It will also look at the context in which Ræff’s translation was read by looking at the marginalia and surrounding texts tha Nouiter in lucem data is bound with in its two extant copies. Furthermore, it will attempt to answer the question of why Ræff invested his time and money in publishing Pfefferkorn in Denmark – a country with no resident Jewish population at the time – and whether he was successful in his aims.

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