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  • 1.
    Andersdotter, Karolina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Cross-border Copyfight: European libraries re-thinking the InfoSoc Directive2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This master's thesis focuses on the argumentation of library organisations and European national libraries in their contributions to the European Commission's public consultation on the review of the EU copyright rules. This study aims to explain how the debate around copyright limitations and exceptions is constructed in library stakeholders' contributions. The construction is explained through argumentation analysis and a theoretical framework of the relations between structural, instrumental, and discursive power.

    The main findings are that library stakeholders in general are strongly supportive of a EU copyright reform, arguing that democratic values as well as the EU Single Market would benefit. There are also library stakeholders who argue against legislative change, either suggesting extended collective licences, or arguing that the Member States' sovereignity is more important than a pan-European copyright legislation. Furthermore, many library stakeholders propose either a general ”fair use” exception in EU copyright law, or adding several specific exceptions, e.g. for text and data mining, e-lending, publicly funded research openly available, and that contracts and technical protection measures cannot override limitations and exceptions. National libraries and library organisations from the Central and Eastern European Member States' are more supportive of a copyright reform than their Western European counterparts. They do not mention licences as a possible solution. In general, the library stakeholders agree that the interoperability, exchange and cooperation in activities and projects involving several EU Member States suffers from the current copyright legislation.

  • 2. Andersen, Jens Peter
    et al.
    Hammarfelt, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Price revisited: on the growth of dissertations in eight research fields2011In: Scientometrics, ISSN 0138-9130, E-ISSN 1588-2861, Vol. 88, no 2, p. 371-383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies the production of dissertations in eight research fields in the natural sciences, the social sciences and the humanities. In using doctoral dissertations it builds on De Solla Prices seminal study which used PhD dissertations as one of several indicators of scientific growth (Price, Little science, big science, 1963). Data from the ProQuest: Dissertations and Theses database covering the years 1950-2007 are used to depict historical trends, and the Gompertz function was used for analysing the data. A decline in the growth of dissertations can be seen in all fields in the mid-eighties and several fields show only a modest growth during the entire period. The growth profiles of specific disciplines could not be explained by traditional dichotomies such as pure/applied or soft/hard, but rather it seems that the age of the discipline appears to be an important factor. Thus, it is obvious that the growth of dissertations must be explained using several factors emerging both inside and outside academia. Consequently, we propose that the output of dissertations can be used as an indicator of growth, especially in fields like the humanities, where journal or article counts are less applicable.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Maj-Britt
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Why world cultural heritage?: Democracy, local participation and knowledge production in the world culture nomination of Farms in Hälsingland, Sweden2009In: The 16th International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences (IUAES), Kunming, China, 27 - 31 July, 2009. Humanity, Development and Cultural Diversity: Session: Indigenous Knowledge and Sustainable Development Organizers: Dr. BILLINGS Dorothy and Dr. RUDNEV Viatcheslav, 2009, p. 1-9Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Around the world there is a rush in nominating tangible and intangible sites for UNESCO’s World Culture Heritage List. The requirements for nomination are that the sites have "universal value for mankind", that they are unique and authentic, and there is a need to secure the sites’ sustainable development by opening them up for the tourist industry. Sweden has a total of fourteen natural and cultural heritage sites on the list, one of which is a natural site, twelve are cultural sites, and one is a mixed site. It was anticipated that the large timbered red-painted farmhouses of Hälsingland in the north of Sweden would be listed in June 2009. ICOMOS, however, came to another conclusion and deferred the nomination.

    The nomination process has lasted for over ten years and has been a painstaking process involving the local communities and the county administration board in the county town of Gävle. The local people are partly thrilled, because they assume that there is money to earn when they open up their homes for tourists; an income that for some is badly needed because of the deterioration of the buildings due to the high costs of renovation. But some are openly critical to the entire enterprise, which is seen as a status project for some politicians and threat to the landscape by disturbing the harmony between the built environment, people and the natural landscape. In a cultural heritage nomination process, a complicated interaction arises between expert knowledge and local knowledge, which generates insights that are crucial to capture and dress in words to be able to formulate a successful world heritage proposal and not the least to make it operational.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Maj-Britt
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Why World Culture Heritage? Democracy, local participation and knowledge production in the world culture nomination of Farms in Halsingland, Sweden2011In: Indigenous Knowledge and Sustainable Development / [ed] Dorothy Billings, Viatcheslav Rudnev, Beijing, China: The Intellectual House , 2011, p. 21-33Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes the nomination process of the Swedish heritage site Farms and Villages in Hiilsingland (2007) for UNESCO's World Heritage List. It was anticipated that the large timbered red-painted farmhouses of Halsingland in the north of Sweden would be listed in June 2009, but ICOMOS (International Council on Monuments and Sites) came to another conclusion,  deferred  the  nomination  and  returned  it  to  the  Swedish  authorities  for improvements.

    The  nomination  process  lasted  for  over  10  years  and  has  been  a  painstaking  process involving the local communities and the county administration board in the county town of Gavle. The costs were estimated to be 15 million Swedish Crowns (1.6 million EURO) which did not trickle down to the owners of the farmhouses. The local people were nonetheless thrilled because they assumed that a nomination would benefit them economically, especially if they were prepared to join the tourist circus and make their homes accessible for visitors. The extra income was badly needed since the restoration costs for these large houses in most cases can only with difficulties be carried by the individual house owner. But some were openly critical to the entire enterprise and they saw it as a status project for some politicians and a threat to the perceived harmony between the traditionally built environment and the landscape. A nomination would cause a disruption between old and new ways of living instead of continuity. In a cultural heritage nomination process a complicated interaction arises between expert knowledge and local knowledge, which generates insights that need to be formulated in the final product. Cultural sensitivity and local participation must be pillars in such a project to make it sustainable.

  • 5.
    Aparac-Jelusic, Tatjana
    et al.
    University of Zadar.
    Ma, Lai
    University College Dublin.
    Ibekwe-SanJuan, Fidelia
    Université d'Aix-Marseille.
    Ortiz-Repiso Jimenez, Virginia
    University of Madrid.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Warner, Julian
    Queen's University Belfast.
    Crossing the Boundaries in Information Science: Perspectives on Interdisciplinarity2013In: ASIS&T 2013 Proceedings of the 76th ASIS&T Annual Meeting Volume 50 2013 Beyond the Cloud: Rethinking Information Boundaries, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information science has often been recognized as an interdisciplinary field. The marriage between librarianship/documentation and computer science was a natural development in the United States in the post-War period (Farkas-Conn, 1991; Hahn & Barlow, 2012), while the development of information science in Europe has largely stayed close to the humanities and the social sciences, in particular, in relation to communication and media (Ibekwe-SanJuan, et al., 2010). For many years, the interdisciplinary nature of information science has been applauded; until recently, we are warned that interdisciplinarinity may be harmful to the identity of the field. Buckland (2012) states that the claim of being "interdisciplinary" is to choose a position of weakness because "in times of economic crisis political power tends to reside in well-established disciplines." Cronin (2012) comments that "the field’s sense of identity, arguably fragile at the best of times, is likely to be further weakened" for its "epistemic promiscuity."

  • 6.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Closing panel: Sharing wisdom and reflections on the enduring questions2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a written contribution to the concluding session of the conference on displacement and resettlement at the University of Oxford. Parts of this text has been incorporated in the final paper "Concluding Session: Reflections on the Enduring Questions in Development-Induced Displacement and Resettlement" chaired by Susan Tamondong (main author).

  • 7.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Heritage: A Conceptual Paper Toward a Theory of Cultural Heritage in Humanitarian Action2009In: Papers World Conference Humanitarian Studies (WCHS), Groningen: University of Groningen , 2009, p. 1-19Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This conceptual paper deals with definitions of and approaches to cultural and natural heritage and discusses functions of heritage and culture as elements of sustainable peace-building. The paper assumes the necessity of a longer-term strategic thinking. A fundamental question occupying heritage research is why some parts of the human Lebensraum are singled out and marked as a cultural heritage and why this need for preserving, protecting and capturing in time and space is escalating globally. Some researchers argue that this is a consequence of that we seem to be living in a fragmented, post, post-modern society where no coherent story is told and people and places are regarded as texts and isolated narratives open for interpretations and re-interpretations. Some others argue that the Drang for heritage is based on economic interests and connected to the booming tourist industry, while others refer to the politicizing of place.

    The conceptual discussion will be exemplified with the ethnographic case of The Museum of Terror/ Terror Haza in Budapest in order to show the complexity of heritage as elements of reconciliation and transition.

  • 8.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    On knowledge production and local participation2007In: NOHA – ECHO Presidency: Seminar on Changing Scope of Humanitarian Action. Lisbon, Portugal 9-12 October 2007, 2007, p. 1-16Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Local participation, beneficiary participation, informed participation, or, folkligt deltagande (peoples’ participation [Swe.] ), are concepts that are highly used and appreciated in development projects as well as in the field of humanitarian action. In the present introductory paper, I will discuss this concept and refer to it as “local participation” or only “participation” for the sake of convenience, although I am very much aware of the refinement of the concept expressed in the different forms of the word as mentioned above. I am not questioning the concept per se, and I will not dwell on the meaning of it. Instead, I am concerned with the outcomes of local participation, that is the knowledge produced and I would like to take this knowledge and merge into a universal (global) knowledge production, with the purpose of getting a way from the associated locality of the concept, which makes it both vulnerable and at the same time powerful.

  • 9.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM. IDEAS.
    The Imperfect Use of the Past in Resettlement2017In: EVALUATION FOR AGENDA 2030: Providing Evidence on Progress and Sustainability / [ed] Rob D. van den Berg, Indran Naidoo, Susan D. Tamondong, Exeter: IDEAS, UNDP , 2017, 1, p. 239-256Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter discusses the use of the past in the implementation, knowledge production, and evaluation of resettlement projects. It argues that heritage and memories are neglected resources, and necessary analytical elements of the sociocultural dimensions of resettled societies. Sociocultural dimensions are the tangible and intangible resources that constitute everyday routine culture, supported and molded by the social relations, memories, heritage, and emotions that are attached to the landscape and environment. These dimensions are the least studied and the least understood in resettlement. It is further argued that the present resettlement models are insufficient to grasp the longitudinal consequences of resettlement. A consideration of heritage and memory would improve the model. The use of the past from a longitudinal perspective is explored through the ethnography of the Zimapán resettlement project.

  • 10.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    The Local Landscape - an arena of knowledge exchange: natural heritage, tourism and business  2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with the multitude of relations between local people and their environment and the demands of the tourists for authentic experiences in their encounter with people and landscape. The argument is that their is a need to bridge the gap between theory and practice in the academic view on the topic.  

  • 11.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    The Paradox with Local Participation in Development-Caused Forced Displacement and Resettlement2009In: Revista Romana de Sociologie, ISSN 1224-9262, Vol. XX, no 1-2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is an inquiry into the theoretical and empirical concept of local participation as it used within the field of development-caused forced displacement and resettlement (DFDR). Local participation has repeatedly proved its relevance for mitigating negative impacts caused by DFDR project by involving the people in the process. Paradoxically the people contributing with their very main asset of their culture and livelihood - the land - often end up in chronic poverty despite the use of local participation. It seems that the concept that was developed to protect and support the affected people to overcome poverty at the same time contributes to the undermining of the local culture, which shows signs of “falling-apart from within”. Several questions arise from this: Is it the concept per se that is misleading or misused? Or is it the way the project is constructed, processed and executed with its crucial elements of identified risks and compensations that needs to be reinterpreted and rethought?

    In this article, I will argue, that we have to come to a deeper understanding of what is happening on the ground by focusing on the value domains that are created between the main parties during the negotiations. I see this approach as a way to avoid deadlocks and to avoid viewing the negotiations as an inflexible, hierarchical, one-way relationship between two main parties locked in an asymmetrical power game with no possibility to escape. The Zimapán hydroelectric dam project in Mexico will be used as the ethnographic jumping-off point for discussions.

  • 12.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    The Paradox with Local Participation in Development-Induced Resettlement2004In: Paper presented at the International Conference GRAPPLING WITH POVERTY. Institute of Latin American Studies. University of Stockholm. September 23-24th 2004, 2004Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Local participation has repeatedly proved its relevance for mitigating negative consequences in development-induced displacement and resettlement projects. Despite its verified strengths, we seem to encounter a paradox here.

  • 13.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    The Reestablishment of Routine Cultures in Displaced Societies2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to contribute to the longitudinal studies of DFDR by presenting ethnographic material from the Zimapán resettlement project in Mexico. The data is analyzed through a lens of anthropological and heritage theories. The role of anthropology in contested projects is also discussed.

  • 14.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    The Setting of Negotiation Agendas in Involuntary Resettlement2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    International polices on involuntary resettlement have been developed for the last 30 years following the ground breaking World Bank guidelines from the 1980s.  The World Bank is now reviewing their safeguards on involuntary resettlement presented in The Environmental and Social Safeguards Frame (ESF) (2014).These policies partially set the agenda for the protracted and conflictive on-the ground negotiations between the main stakeholders (lender, client (government or private) and the people to be displaced. In these policies, the participatory model has been in focus in order to empower and strengthening the community engagement. This paper argues that it is not about participation per se, but about negotiations. 

  • 15.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Downing, Theodore E
    University of Arizona.
    Five Sides of the Same Coin: The Place of Global Policy Frameworks in the Setting of Negotiation Agendas of Involuntary Resettlement2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper contributes to the discussion of the role of policy guidelines in involuntary resettlement projects in the light of the World Bank´s revision of its safeguards Environmental and Social Safeguards (2014). The paper concludes that the present and proposed guidelines do not take into consideration the complexity on the ground in these kinds of stressful projects.  The authors have a unique possibility to compare "inside and outside" events and decisions as one of the author was embedded in the local culture while the other one was the assigned resettlement expert of the lenders.

  • 16.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Gumucio, Juan Carlos
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology.
    In search for a common ground in the encounter between technical expertise andindigenous knowledge2009In: Papers World Conference Humanitarian Studies (WCHS), Groningen: University of Groningen , 2009, p. 1-17Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In spite of repeated efforts of conciliation, the relation between expert and indigenous knowledge remains a deeply ambivalent arena. This ambivalence puts obstacles to a crucial factor in Humanitarian Action - the effective alliances between these as perceived as two different cognitive forms. Coordinated programs should of course proceed from a fundament of established mutual trust, a precondition that often gets bogged down in a muddled discourse on issues such as inspiration from original conservationists, respect of natural harmonies, the precedence of instrumental precision before traditional approximations, not to mention mystifications and delusions.

  • 17.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Josefsson, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Heritage as Life-values: A Critical Investigation of the Cultural Heritage Concept2016In: Current Science, ISSN 1 Vol 110(11):2091-2098., Vol. 110, no 1, p. 2091-2098Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For a long time now, the world has been facing a heritage stampede with an array of stakeholders – nations, global heritage organizations, NGOs, terrorists and ordinary people – all claiming their rights to heritage and the past. Hence, there is a great need to understand what heritage does, or what we do with heritage in an everyday context. This article aims to contribute to the discussion through investigation of the heritage concept from a theoretical and analytical perspective, starting from a Swedish and European view on heritage; how it came into being, established itself and developed, and finally found itself called into question and at risk of being discarded. Our argument is that the present heritage concept would benefit from the introduction of the concept of life-values, not in order to replace it, but to enrich and take heritage into the 21st century. The article is based on field workd in Albania.   

  • 18.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Utan, Ûnal
    Who Owns the Local Landscape?: Local Peoples' Rights and Tourism2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presence of a rich intangible and tangible cultural heritage is closely connected to the tourist industry and its economic potentials. But who earns? Who develops? And what is the dynamics between the external and local agents? The purpose ot this paper is to explore these complex and dialectic relations between local and foreign adventure enterprises that operate in the tourist industry.

  • 19.
    Avraam, Elsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Knowledge Organisation and Contemporary Art: Cataloguing Practices in two Libraries in Sweden, Umeå universitetsbibliotek and Konstbiblioteket2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This master thesis examines the cataloguing practices of two art libraries in Sweden in relation to contemporary art. The aim of this study is to show how classification systems and other forms of controlled vocabulary correspond to contemporary art and reveal the factors that influence the everyday practice of cataloguing.

    The qualitative methods of semi-structured interviews and an analysis of bibliographic records have been used for the purposes of this study. The study is based on domain analysis as conceived by Hjørland and Albrechtsen and some concepts and principles of Knowledge Organisation in the field of Library and Information Science.

    A total of three interviews of cataloguers has proved that perceptions concerning classification and subject indexing differ among cataloguers and cataloguing practices depend on local policies concerning acquisition, shelving and user perspectives, but also each library’s resources and the institutional context (academic vs museum). Through the analysis of eleven bibliographic records, no consistent pattern has been detected, in relation to indexing and classification. The libraries do not use special systems for subject analysis. The classifications provided by universal systems have been considered insufficient to express all the concepts found in documents. The use of subject headings is, therefore, important and complements the process of subject analysis. The classification systems and subject headings lists analysed include the Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC), the Swedish Sveriges Allmänna Biblioteksförenings Klassifikationssystem (SAB) and the Svenska ämnesord (SAO). This is a two-year master’s thesis in Archive, Library and Museum studies.

  • 20.
    Axelsson, Fredrica Hedge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    In the event of a zombie apocalypse: An investigation into policies of long-term preservation of digital media in the modern world of Open Access institutional repositories2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With the purpose to investigate policies within long-term preservation of digital media in the modern world of Open Access institutional repository, this two year's master thesis was conducted through a qualitative study with quantitative overtures. The main objectives of this thesis centre on the criteria for long-term digital preservation, preservation in relation to institutional repositories, the issues cropping up within the field of institutional repositories, and the essential components of a preservation policy.

    The theoretical framework is constructed around a model based upon scholarly communication, with its aspects of dissemination, acquisition, preservation, discovery and access, and with the facet of preservation at its centre. The methodology of this study is cued to content analysis and its in-depth investigative process, which was conducted on a sample of ten preservation policies within Open Access institutional repositories that were compared to a standardised expert set of policy categorisation.

    The results show that a perfect preservation policy does not appear to exist in the current world, based exclusively on the selected sample. This gives a strong indication of a need for further research within the field of Open Access institutional repositories preservation policies.

  • 21.
    Backlund, Janne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    How to claim knowledge: The use of information in the lifeworld of the educational context2003In: ERDSA (Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia) Annual Conference Proceedings, (Book of refereed proceedings), 2003, p. 9-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a small body of empirical data concerning the types of information students

    handle, this paper inquires into the problematic of knowledge creation, artifacts of

    knowledge, and the possible role of examination as a negative factor in students’ reflective

    achievements. Habermas’ theory of communicative action is proposed as the theoretical

    framework for analyzing the educational environment seen as a lifeworld. From the observed

    fact that types of information students themselves produce (papers, essays, lecture notes,

    master theses, etc.) are hardly mentioned as information they say they handle, the tentative

    conclusion is drawn that these missing types are systematically excluded. The theoretical

    framework provides an explanation for this state of affairs. The overall goal of higher

    education is to increase knowledge in a particular field. In teaching, however, this goal is

    dealt with in a training manner, clearly manifest in the examination process. Therefore, the

    action orientations of the students will differ more or less from the overall goal. Claims of

    validity connected with knowledge turn in a normative direction in action situations oriented

    towards examination. Since information is the link anchoring claims of validity, students

    become inclined to exclude the artifacts of their own knowledge creation. The latter are not

    viewed as dealing with information linking the claims connected with the overall goal of

    increasing ‘real’ knowledge, instead being taken as constituting the links for normative

    claims. The paper also proposes certain means in line with the theory for improving this state

    of affairs.

  • 22.
    Backlund, Janne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Lifeworld and Meaning: Information in Relation to Context2005In: Context: Nature, Impact, and Role: 5th International Conference on Conceptions of Library and Information Sciences, CoLIS 2005, Glasgow, UK, June 4-8, 2005. Proceedings / [ed] Fabio Crestani, Ian Ruthven, Berlin: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2005, p. 119-140Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes a concept of information defined as semantic links to a meaning external to the information, located in the structure of the lifeworld. In building upon Habermas Theory of Communicative Action, the progress of linguistically coordinated action in the lifeworld through speech acts connected with claims of validity is briefly described. The claim is put for ward that the meaning of a statement or an artefact can only be determined through communicative action since all information is semantically contex tualized in the lifeworld, the basic structure of society within which the repro duction of world views and cultural traditions occurs. However, communicative rationality shapes social institutions into a system of growing complexity that exerts pressure on the lifeworld, increasing the need for communicative action. The function of facilitating the evaluation of validity claims makes access to information necessary for consensus formation and action coordination, thereby emphasizing the significance of IS. The paper presents a model of contextualized praxis as it concludes that information specialists must act communicatively.

  • 23.
    Berg, Anne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Edquist, Samuel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Mays, Christin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Westberg, Johannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Åkerlund, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History.
    The History of Educational Finance2015In: Nordic Journal of Educational History, ISSN 2001-9076, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 3-22Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Bjurström, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    On the Use of Bibliometrics for Domain Analysis: A study of the Academic Field of Political Science in Europe2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The academic field of political science in Europe is studied in this thesis which examines the application of bibliometrics for domain analysis. It takes its point of departure in the domain analytic approach outlined by Birger Hjørland and Hanne Albrechtsen, which claims the study of domains as central for information specialists to be able to identify information needs in their fields of practice. Three features of the domain were studied by the use of bibliometric methods. Data was extracted from the Web of Science. Impact Factor was used to select 50 journals from each of the years 1999, 2004 and 2009. Only items published by authors with European addresses were included. Co-word analysis was used to study topics within the discipline and several kinds of citation analyses were conducted to examine citation patterns of the domain. Lastly core journals, authors and works were identified by the use of citation analysis and co-citation maps were drawn for the analyses.Several subfields within the domain, as well as some differences in citation patterns of the subfields, were possible to distinguish. The domain showed to be multifaceted, yet specific European research areas were identified. Some significant changes of the citation patterns were apparent between 1999 and 2009. In 2009 there were more references per article, journal articles were cited to a higher degree, relatively older publications were cited to a greater extent and the most cited journals received a larger share of the total amount of citations.The existence of a specific European domain within political science is discussed as well as the diverse characteristics of the subfields and their implications for the bibliometric methods. Finally suggestions are presented of how bibliometrics can be used for domain analysis within library and information science as well as by information service institutions.This paper is a two years master’s thesis in Library and Information Science.

  • 25.
    Blom, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Information Overload and the Growing Infosphere: A Comparison of the Opinions and Experiences of Information Specialists and General Academics on the Topic of Information Overload2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Information overload is a popular term intimately associated with the information society in which we are now thought to live. This two-year master’s thesis explores perceptions and experiences of this phenomenon through a quantitative study of two groups of academics; on the one hand, academically active information specialists, and on the other, active academics in general.

    The theoretical framework for this study is based on Orrin E. Klapp’s notion of ‘meaning lag’ and Luciano Floridi’s concept of ‘infosphere’, to provide a context for discussing how and why information overload might develop. The relationship between information overload and ‘information literacy’ is another important point explored as part of this discussion.

    An international, web-based survey directed at information specialists as well as general academics reveals that information overload is a very common experience for people active in academic settings. A number of statistics are presented regarding how, when and where information overload is usually experienced, as well as the more general information habits and perceptions of the information environment that these groups display. After comparing the two examined groups, the thesis concludes that there are, in fact, no major differences in how these groups perceive and experience information overload and their surrounding information environment. Having an academic interest and specialty in information science is thus not indicative of being able to avoid or even think very differently about information overload. Finally, some relevant research directions are proposed.

  • 26.
    Burman Wallace, Alice
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Classification at the Swedish alcohol monopoly: A study of the classification system of beverages at Systembolaget2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis considers the beverage classification at Systembolaget, the Swedish alcohol monopoly. In order to help customers with the pairing of food and beverages, Systembolaget has developed a classification system with three classification elements: the flavour type, which describes the overall character of the beverage; the flavour graphics, which indicate levels of flavour experiences; and the food symbols, which are pictures that indicate various kinds of food. This thesis studies how Systembolaget classifies their beverages and how Systembolaget employees use classification elements in customer interactions. This study made use of genre theory as conceived by Jack Andersen and the concept of classification in context as conceived by Jens-Erik Mai. Genre theory informed the method.

    The study consisted of an interview with product informers at Systembolaget and a survey sent out to store employees. The interview revealed that Systembolaget’s classification system is standardised and the classification of beverages is methodological. The classification elements are assigned sensorially. Assigned flavour graphics affect the choice of flavour type. Food symbols are determined through the flavour graphics and flavour type. The survey revealed that store employees primarily use flavour types and flavour graphics and do so practically, by recommending beverages, or pedagogically, with the goal of teaching customer about beverages and Systembolaget's classification. The food symbols are not useful for those with in-depth knowledge of wine and food pairings but are sometimes relied upon by customers. Employees’ use of classification elements was dependent on their genre knowledge. The practical and pedagogical approaches were genres of activity that realised the classification into viable tools rather than just descriptive elements. This is a two years master’s thesis in Archive, Library and Museum studies.

  • 27.
    Börjeson, Love
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    What to Do with Interviews – A Clinical-Organizational Perspective2014In: Against Separation: Experiences in Early Intervention for Young Children with Disabilities in Russia and Byelorussia / [ed] Kenneth Sundh, Elena Kozhevnikova, Jonas Alwall, Ersta Sköndal University College , 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    An attempt to nuance the understanding of professional reports in archaeology2015In: GL16 Conference Proceedings, Amsterdam, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Professional (i.e. extra-academic) contract archaeology is an internationally widespread practice contributing significantly to the archaeological literature. However, professional knowledge production in archaeology, and most notably the professional report genre, is at times described as problematic. The problem descriptions are ambiguous and can be grouped under at least three different topics: concerns for content quality and practical accessibility, concerns for the comparably low degree of analytical and theoretical synthesizing in reports and concerns for lack of mutual knowledge transfer between academic archaeologists and professional archaeologists. Technical issues of access are to an increasing extent being solved. Format standardizations are also developing. Hence the report genre becomes more accessible, and the content more readable and informative. Yet articulations of attitudes toward the genre in archaeology text books and journal articles remain focused on the genre’s problems. The aim of my ongoing dissertation research is to nuance the understanding of the professional report genre in archaeology. I do so by analyzing factors shaping reporting as it takes place in the intersection between academic norms, professional values and market logics. I argue an improved genre understanding is crucial to diminish cultural issues of access to the report literature, and also as a basis for development of reporting practices. In1the dissertation research I analyze (1) perceptions about the report genre in archaeology literature, (2) information policy regulating reporting in archaeology, (3) how report writers and county board professionals interpret the reporting and report auditing work tasks and (4) the frames of reference report writers bring into reporting. The aim of this paper is to explicate the research design consisting of four sub-studies, to briefly report on findings from study no. 4, and to discuss preliminary, partial results from study no. 2.

  • 29.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Beyond information policy: Conflicting documentation ideals in extra-academic knowledge making practices2016In: Journal of Documentation, ISSN 0022-0418, E-ISSN 1758-7379, Vol. 72, no 4, p. 674-695Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore and explicate documentation ideals parallel to information policy, and by means of this analysis demonstrate how the concept “documentation ideals” is an analytical tool for engaging with political and institutional contexts of information practices.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on a case study of documentation ideals in a debate about quality in archaeological documentation. The methodology draws on idea analysis, and on the science and technology studies’ controversy studies approach.

    Findings – The paper explicates three documentation ideals, how these ideals allocate responsibility for documentation to different actors, how the ideals assign roles to practitioners, and how the ideals point to different beneficiaries of the documentation. Furthermore, the analysis highlights ideas about two different means to reach the documentation ideals.

    Research limitations/implications – The case’s debate reflects opinions of Northern European professionals.

    Social implications – The paper illuminates how documentation ideals tweak and even contest formal information policy in claims on the documentation and on the practitioners doing documentation.

    Originality/value – Documentation ideal analysis is crucial as a complement to formal information policy analysis and to analysis guided by practice theory in attempts to understand the contexts of information practices and documentation, insights central for developing information literacies.

  • 30.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Data file for journal article Beyond information policy: Conflicting documentation ideals in extra-academic knowledge making practices2016Other (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Data files for journal article Grey literature – grey sources? Nuancing the perception of professional documentation: the case of Swedish archaeology2015Data set
  • 32.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Research outside academia?: An analysis of resources in extra-academic report writing2016In: Proceedings of the 79th ASIS&T Annual Meeting: Creating Knowledge, Enhancing Lives through Information & Technology / [ed] Andrew Grove, Diane H. Sonnenwald, Lauren Harrison et. al., Silver Spring: Association for Information Science and Technology , 2016, Vol. 53Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A significant part of all research takes place in extraacademic organizations. Practitioner researchers often present their results in publications different from those in academia, e.g. in reports, sometimes (and here) referred to as “gray literature”. Gray literature is increasingly available online. However, availability does not mean that reports are exploited to their full potential in research. Disciplines like archaeology have substantial problems with the scholarly communication and knowledge sharing between extraacademic and academic research. This paper approaches this problem from a report-user perspective. For the benefit of potential report users’ gray literature literacies, reportwriting practices are analyzed by means of practice theory. Qualitative interviews with six practitioner researchers in Swedish archaeology firms make up the material. The analysis focuses on how report writers draw on regulative, institutional, and infrastructural resources in their practices. Based on the findings about the practices in which reports are written and become informative, the paper presents seven suggestions supporting report users’ potential to critically analyze and use report content. The results contribute to the information science field with insights into extra-academic information practices, and as input in a wider critical discussion of the information-related conditions for research outside academia.

  • 33.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM. Dept. of ALM, Uppsala University.
    Research outside academia?: An analysis of resources in extra-academic report writing2016In: Proceedings of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A significant part of all research takes place in extra-academic organizations. Practitioner researchers often present their results in publications different from those in academia, e.g. in reports, sometimes (and here) referred to as “gray literature”. Gray literature is increasingly available online. However, availability does not mean that reports are exploited to their full potential in research. Disciplines like archaeology have substantial problems with the scholarly communication and knowledge sharing between extra-academic and academic research. This paper approaches this problem from a report-user perspective. For the benefit of potential report users’ gray literature literacies, report-writing practices are analyzed by means of practice theory. Qualitative interviews with six practitioner researchers in Swedish archaeology firms make up the material. The analysis focuses on how report writers draw on regulative, institutional, and infrastructural resources in their practices. Based on the findings about the practices in which reports are written and become informative, the paper presents seven suggestions supporting report users’ potential to critically analyze and use report content. The results contribute to the information science field with insights into extra-academic information practices, and as input in a wider critical discussion of the information-related conditions for research outside academia.

  • 34.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Resources for scholarly documentation in professional service organizations: A study of Swedish development-led archaeology report writing2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This information studies dissertation deals with the problem that results from research outside academia risk to receive little or no attention if communicated through reports, instead of in mainstream academic genres like research journal articles. The case in focus is Swedish development-led (DL) archaeology, i.e. state regulated archaeology preceding land development. Swedish DL archaeology is organized as a semi-regulated market. The organizations competing on the market are professional service organizations selling research services to land developers. Regional government departments, county administrative boards, function as intermediaries setting up procurement-like processes.

    In previous research on archaeological documentation, the problem with non-use of reports has been described as depending on cultural issues of access, possible to solve if individuals make efforts to communicate and use extra-academic results. This dissertation offers an alternative definition of the problem, highlighting a different set of solutions. The aim is to further the understanding of how the distribution of research duties to professional service organizations affects the scholarly documentation in Swedish archaeology. The aim is met through identification, operationalization and analysis of resources available to report writing DL archaeology practitioners, and an analysis of how practitioners draw on these resources. The results further the understanding of how reports are shaped within the DL archaeology institution. In view of these results, efforts to solve issues of access should target the organization of research in the archaeology discipline, and specifically how scholarly documentation is governed on the archaeology market.

    The dissertation draws on science and technology studies, practice theory, and document theory for the design of the study of documentation resources and contexts in extra-academic research. A mixed methods approach is applied to capture regulative, institutional, and infrastructural resources, and practitioners’ use thereof. Dissertation papers I-III contain analyses of concrete instantiations of the resources: information policy, documentation ideals, and information source use. The fourth paper presents an analysis of how practitioners draw on these resources in their everyday report writing. The dissertation concerns archaeology specifically, but serves as grounds to inquire into the premises for scholarly documentation in other areas of extra-academic research and knowledge-making as well.

    List of papers
    1. Information Policy for (Digital) Information in Archaeology: current state and suggestions for development
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Information Policy for (Digital) Information in Archaeology: current state and suggestions for development
    2015 (English)In: Internet Archaeology, ISSN 1363-5387, E-ISSN 1363-5387, no 40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The introduction of digital data capturing and management technologies has transformed information practices in archaeology. Digital documentation and digital infrastructures are integrated in archaeologists' daily work now more than ever. International and national institutions and projects have contributed to the development of digital archiving and curation practices. Because knowledge production in archaeology depends heavily on documentation and information dissemination, and on retrieval of past documentation, the question of how information is managed is profoundly intertwined with the possibilities for knowledge production. Regulations at different levels articulate demands and expectations from the emerging digital information practices, but how are these different regulations coordinated, and do they support archaeological knowledge production?

    In this article we look into the state of information policy - the sum of principles guiding decisions about information - in archaeology and related areas. The aim of the article is to shed light on how information policy directs practice in archaeology, and to show that analysis of such policies is therefore vital. Information policy in legislation and guidelines in Swedish archaeology serves as a case study, and examples from development-led archaeology and the museum sector illustrate how information policies have varied roles across different heritage sectors. There are historical and local trajectories in the policy documents specific to Sweden, but the discussion shows that the emergence of Swedish policies have many parallels with processes in other countries. The article provides recommendations for information policy development for archaeology and related areas.

    Keyword
    Digital humanities; cultural heritage sector; digital heritage; digital archaeology; digital museums; information policy; digital agendas; digitization
    National Category
    Information Studies Archaeology
    Research subject
    Library and Information Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-275630 (URN)10.11141/ia.40.4 (DOI)
    Projects
    ARKDIS
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 340-2012-5751
    Available from: 2016-02-04 Created: 2016-02-04 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
    2. Beyond information policy: Conflicting documentation ideals in extra-academic knowledge making practices
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond information policy: Conflicting documentation ideals in extra-academic knowledge making practices
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Documentation, ISSN 0022-0418, E-ISSN 1758-7379, Vol. 72, no 4, p. 674-695Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore and explicate documentation ideals parallel to information policy, and by means of this analysis demonstrate how the concept “documentation ideals” is an analytical tool for engaging with political and institutional contexts of information practices.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on a case study of documentation ideals in a debate about quality in archaeological documentation. The methodology draws on idea analysis, and on the science and technology studies’ controversy studies approach.

    Findings – The paper explicates three documentation ideals, how these ideals allocate responsibility for documentation to different actors, how the ideals assign roles to practitioners, and how the ideals point to different beneficiaries of the documentation. Furthermore, the analysis highlights ideas about two different means to reach the documentation ideals.

    Research limitations/implications – The case’s debate reflects opinions of Northern European professionals.

    Social implications – The paper illuminates how documentation ideals tweak and even contest formal information policy in claims on the documentation and on the practitioners doing documentation.

    Originality/value – Documentation ideal analysis is crucial as a complement to formal information policy analysis and to analysis guided by practice theory in attempts to understand the contexts of information practices and documentation, insights central for developing information literacies.

    Keyword
    Archaeology, Information practices, Information policy, Controversy studies, Documentation ideals, Idea analysis, Knowledge making practices
    National Category
    Information Studies
    Research subject
    Library and Information Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-277190 (URN)10.1108/JDOC-10-2015-0134 (DOI)000379787000004 ()
    Projects
    ARKDIS
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 340-2012-5751
    Available from: 2016-02-17 Created: 2016-02-17 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
    3. Grey literature – grey sources?: Nuancing the view on professional documentation: the case of Swedish archaeology
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Grey literature – grey sources?: Nuancing the view on professional documentation: the case of Swedish archaeology
    2015 (Swedish)In: Journal of Documentation, ISSN 0022-0418, E-ISSN 1758-7379, Vol. 71, no 6, p. 1158-1182Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    This study aims at nuancing the perception about professional documentation (a.k.a. ‘grey literature’), assuming perception of documentation being a cultural aspect of accessibility.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The study explores variations within the archaeological report genre through a bibliometric analysis of source use. Source characteristics are explored as well as correlations between report authors and source originators. Statistical frequency distribution is complemented by a correspondence analysis and a k-Means cluster analysis to explore patterns. The patterns are interpreted as ‘frames of references’ and related to circumstances for archaeological work. The study also discusses source representations.

    Findings

    The source use patterns reveal a latent variation, not visible in the general analysis: a professional/academic frame of reference (mainly among authors affiliated with incorporated businesses and sole proprietorships) and an administrative frame of reference (mainly among authors affiliated with government agencies, foundations and member associations) emerge.

    Research limitations/implications

    The study focuses on Swedish field evaluation reports. Future research could 1) test the results in relation to other types of reports, and 2) go beyond the document perspective to explore source use in documentation practices.

    Social implications

    The results on variations in frames of references among report writers have implication for report readers and user. The results should also be considered in archaeology management and policy-making. On the level of source representation the results call for clarifications of vague representations and possibly omitted sources.

    Originality/value

    This study contextualises archaeological information use and focuses on variations in professional archaeology which has received little previous research attention. The bibliometric approach complements previous qualitative studies of archaeological information.

    Keyword
    Documentation; Reports; Grey literature; Information sources; Information use: Referencing; Bibliometrics; Sociology of professions; Archaeology
    National Category
    Information Studies
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-246514 (URN)10.1108/JD-09-2014-0137 (DOI)000369171600003 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 340-2012-5751
    Available from: 2015-03-08 Created: 2015-03-08 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
    4. Research outside academia?: An analysis of resources in extra-academic report writing
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Research outside academia?: An analysis of resources in extra-academic report writing
    2016 (English)In: Proceedings of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A significant part of all research takes place in extra-academic organizations. Practitioner researchers often present their results in publications different from those in academia, e.g. in reports, sometimes (and here) referred to as “gray literature”. Gray literature is increasingly available online. However, availability does not mean that reports are exploited to their full potential in research. Disciplines like archaeology have substantial problems with the scholarly communication and knowledge sharing between extra-academic and academic research. This paper approaches this problem from a report-user perspective. For the benefit of potential report users’ gray literature literacies, report-writing practices are analyzed by means of practice theory. Qualitative interviews with six practitioner researchers in Swedish archaeology firms make up the material. The analysis focuses on how report writers draw on regulative, institutional, and infrastructural resources in their practices. Based on the findings about the practices in which reports are written and become informative, the paper presents seven suggestions supporting report users’ potential to critically analyze and use report content. The results contribute to the information science field with insights into extra-academic information practices, and as input in a wider critical discussion of the information-related conditions for research outside academia.

    Keyword
    Scholarly communication; Practitioner researchers; Grey literature; Archaeology; Practice theory
    National Category
    Information Studies
    Research subject
    Library and Information Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-303766 (URN)
    Conference
    Annual Meeting of the Association for Information Science and Technology, Copenhagen, Denmark Oct. 14-18, 2016
    Projects
    ARKDIS
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 340-2012-5751
    Available from: 2016-09-23 Created: 2016-09-23 Last updated: 2017-10-20
  • 35.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Dell'Unto, Nicolo
    Lund University.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Larsson, Carolina
    Lund University.
    Löwenborg, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Petersson, Bodil
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper (KV).
    Stenborg, Per
    University of Gothenburg.
    A Neo-Documentalist Lens for Exploring the Premises of Disciplinary Knowledge Making2016In: Proceedings from the Document Academy, ISSN 2473-215X, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 1-23, article id 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to demonstrate how documentation analysis with a neo-documentalist lens can help us explore variations (and stabilities) in conceptions and materialities of documents, as intertwined with disciplinary and sub-disciplinary practices of informing and knowing. Drawing on documentation theory, and with previous research on archaeological documentation as a background, by means of autoethnographic vignettes we explore contemporary conceptions of documentation in five areas in or related to archaeology (Intra-site 3D documentation, Development-led archaeology, Aggregating documentation for use outside the organization, Mediating documentation – or documentation mediation, and Documenting and displaying archaeology in a changing environment). Digitization, and how digitization has spurred renegotiations of what counts as documentation, functions as a common denominator discussed in all of the vignettes. The analysis highlights simultaneously ongoing renegotiations of documentation serving each area’s unique epistemic purposes, and pushing document materialities in different directions. This operationalization of documentation analysis creates an understanding for intra-disciplinary variations in documentation but is importantly also a practical tool to uncover documentation-related premises of disciplinary knowledge-making. This tool can be applied for example in processes of information policy development (regulating what purposes documentation should serve, and what it should be like), information systems design (e.g. for creation and communication of documentation), and infrastructure development (e.g. for preservation and accessibility of documentation).

  • 36.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Petersson, Bodil
    Department of Cultural Sciences, Linnaeus University.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM. Information and Knowledge Management, Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Information Policy for (Digital) Information in Archaeology: current state and suggestions for development2015In: Internet Archaeology, ISSN 1363-5387, E-ISSN 1363-5387, no 40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The introduction of digital data capturing and management technologies has transformed information practices in archaeology. Digital documentation and digital infrastructures are integrated in archaeologists' daily work now more than ever. International and national institutions and projects have contributed to the development of digital archiving and curation practices. Because knowledge production in archaeology depends heavily on documentation and information dissemination, and on retrieval of past documentation, the question of how information is managed is profoundly intertwined with the possibilities for knowledge production. Regulations at different levels articulate demands and expectations from the emerging digital information practices, but how are these different regulations coordinated, and do they support archaeological knowledge production?

    In this article we look into the state of information policy - the sum of principles guiding decisions about information - in archaeology and related areas. The aim of the article is to shed light on how information policy directs practice in archaeology, and to show that analysis of such policies is therefore vital. Information policy in legislation and guidelines in Swedish archaeology serves as a case study, and examples from development-led archaeology and the museum sector illustrate how information policies have varied roles across different heritage sectors. There are historical and local trajectories in the policy documents specific to Sweden, but the discussion shows that the emergence of Swedish policies have many parallels with processes in other countries. The article provides recommendations for information policy development for archaeology and related areas.

  • 37.
    Charapan, Nadzeya
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM. The Faculty of Communication of Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    When in Sweden, do as Swedes do: Deconstructing the cultural metaphor of “the Swedish stuga” during a trip to Ramhäll2017In: Tidskrift för ABM, ISSN 2002-4614, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 27-38Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Dahlqvist, Maja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Stimulating Engagement and Learning Through Gamified Crowdsourcing: Development and Evaluation of a Digital Platform2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to develop a gamified crowdsourcing platform for transcription and metadata tagging of digitised text documents, and further to examine whether the platform can stimulate engagement in archives and be used as an educational resource. The case, around which the thesis project is conducted, is the governmental Archives of Bosnia and Herzegovina and its historical documents which were damaged in a fire in 2014. 

    Theories about engagement, archival pedagogy, and gamification guided the development of the platform. Bosnian-Herzegovinian school children, History teachers, and staff of the Archives of Bosnia and Herzegovina tested the platform and shared their thoughts of it in focus group discussions and interviews.

    The developed platform consists of a game interface, a database, and an interface for results viewing and searching. It is web-based, and coded in HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and PHP. The platform stimulated engagement among the school children who tested it. They expressed interest in reading and learning more about archival documents, in long-term preservation of information, and in the archive’s mission and future. Judging from the discussions and interviews, the platform could well serve as an educational resource. The History teachers showed interest in using the platform in their teaching, and found support for it in the curriculum for the History subject.

    A gamified crowdsourcing platform has been developed, and the perception among school children, History teachers, and archive staff was overall very positive. Crowdsourcing is not just about sourcing out tasks to the crowd. Co-creation of content could furthermore stimulate learning and engagement, and thereby tie a bound between the public and the archive. Gamification can successfully make the overarching goal of crowdsourcing understandable and concrete for the platform users.

  • 39.
    Dahlén, Marianne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Kalinina, Ekaterina
    Copyright, Cultural Heritage and Education2010Report (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Daivadanamn, Meena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Cajander, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Dahl, Jo-Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Empowering towards healthy behaviours2016In: Ending Childhood Obesity: Actions through health and food equity, Uppsala University, 2016, p. 34-39Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Dündar, Hayri
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Digital Library evaluation in Swedish academic libraries: A critical study2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This master thesis aims to critically analyze the state of digital libraries in Swedish academic libraries. With the branching theory of sense-making and the methodology of DELOS and IFLA/UNESCOs digital library manifestos, this thesis hopes to bring to light how far Swedish academic libraries have progressed. By accumulating quantitative data encompassing all digital academic libraries in Sweden, and qualitative data from a select few, conclusions regarding the aforementioned are drawn.

    Focusing on content analysis, this thesis analyzed the different components that can be said to constitute the digital library and compared them to the different manifestos that dictate what a digital library can be said to consist of. By employing the elusive sense-making theory as a general modus of mind, one can begin to understand thought-making processes behind the tapping of digital library resources.

    Results from this thesis found that some functions and components are present within all academic libraries in Sweden, but that the digital library primarily tends to focus on resource acquisition and not so much on resource presentation. User environments are not prioritized. Different aspects are presented in regards to mobile optimization, social media, information organization, information design etc. This is a two years master’s thesis in Archive, Library and Museum studies.

  • 42.
    Düzer, Gözde
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Embracing Twitter: Marketing the Public Library on Social Media2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this master's thesis is to study public libraries' marketing on the social media site Twitter. To achieve this goal, the Twitter accounts of four Swedish public libraries were studied for several months. The four libraries that were studied consist of Stockholm library, Lidingö library, Malmö library, and Gothenburg library. The marketing theory that inspired me is called the seven Ps of marketing, which is a marketing mix that is specifically developed for service industries. My main sources in the application of the theory have been the works of Ned Potter and Eileen Elliott de Sáez, which combine marketing with the field of library and information science. Netnography, a qualitative method that studies online communities, has been applied as methodology. The methods that have been used consist of online observations and e-mail interviews.

    It was seen that the libraries use Twitter as a marketing tool to attain more users and to strengthen their ties with the existing users. Through Twitter, libraries promote their products to users. The communication between the library and its users becomes an important factor in marketing the library on Twitter. It was observed that users play an active role in marketing the library on Twitter. Users not only shape the marketing of the library through their responses but they also contribute to the marketing of the library by retweeting libraries' tweets or "mentioning" the libraries on Twitter.

    This is a two years master's thesis in Archive, Library and Museum studies.

  • 43.
    Edin, Elisabet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Exploring creative spaces in Australian libraries2017In: Tidskrift för ABM, ISSN 2002-4614, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 39-43Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Edquist, Samuel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Demarcating popular education with government subsidies: Sweden 1911–19912015In: Nordic Journal of Educational History, ISSN 2001-7766, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 73-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By analysing the regulating mechanisms of state subsidies to Swedish institutions generally considered mediating “popular education” during the twentieth century, it is argued that a tension has been developed between two parallel notions of popular education. A narrower ideal popular education—emphasising non-formality and independence—has been discursively nurtured along with a broader organisational popular education, denoting the de facto institutions that have received government funding, primarily the folk high schools and study associations. It is argued that the organisational popular education is a reality in itself, spanning over border zones between, for example, non-formal and formal education. Furthermore, an argu- ment against using “popular education” as an analytical concept is put forth, since it is overly contested. Rather, it is promoted as a discursive construct that has for- med real organisational structures with their own logic, which cannot be denoted by words such as non-formal adult education. 

  • 45.
    Edquist, Samuel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Ethical Destruction?: Privacy concerns regarding Swedish social services records2017In: The Right of Access to Information and the Right to Privacy: A Democratic Balancing Act / [ed] Patricia Jonason & Anna Rosengren, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola, 2017, p. 11-39Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Edquist, Samuel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Nationalismen–nordismen 5–0 Henrik Åström Elmersjö, Norden, nationen och historien, anm. av fakultetsopponent Samuel Edquist: [The Nordic region, the nation and history: Perspectives on the Nordic history textbook revision 1919-1972]2014In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 134, no 2, p. 286-292Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Edquist, Samuel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Berg, Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    The Capitalist State and the Construction of Civil Society: Public Funding and the Regulation of Popular Education in Sweden, 1870–19912017Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book challenges the idea that a sharp boundary should be drawn between the state and civil society. Although this idea is extremely common in modern capitalist societies, here it is turned on its head through a study of the ways in which public funding from the 1870s to the 1990s has enabled and shaped collective action in Swedish popular education. Popular education has generally been seen as independent of government control, with strong connections to popular and labour movements; in this volume, Berg and Edquist narrate a new story of its rise by analysing how a government grant system was constructed to drive its development. A key element in this government policy was to create and protect popular education as an autonomous phenomenon, yet making it perform state functions by regulating its bureaucratic make-up and ideological content. The book will appeal to scholars and students of history, education, and sociology, particularly those with an interest in the workings of the capitalist state as well as the history of education.

  • 48.
    Edquist, Samuel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM. Södertörns högskola.
    Holmén, Janne
    Identities and history writing on islands in the Baltic Sea2012In: From One Island to Another: A Celebration of Island Connections / [ed] Karin Topsø Larsen, Nexø: Centre for Regional and Tourism Research (CRT) , 2012, p. 73-82Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Edquist, Samuel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM. Södertörns högskola.
    Holmén, Janne
    Islands of Identity: History-writing and identity formation in five island regions in the Baltic Sea2015Book (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Einarsson, Christopher
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Pottery in Museums: How, Why and What do we exhibit?2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is a study of pottery in the museum world. Throughout the study, questions along the lines of how, why and what we exhibit are brought up and answered. The study is done through observations and interviews with seven different museums, four of which are located in Sweden and three in Italy. The author has also used museological literature and theories in order to strengthen the essay and show that the issues brought up in the observations are known since before in the field, but still exist in the museums today.The exhibiting of pottery comes with several issues, such as overcrowding of displays, requirements of pre-knowledge from the visitors, aesthetical problems with broken, coarse or fine pottery and epistemological prob-lems. Epistemology is a subject that seems to be partly ignored in the observed museums, despite it being general knowledge that fewer visitors will read the text the longer it is. Other epistemological problems that are brought up are the issues of text placement, vocabulary and actual mediated information. These problems are brought up throughout the essay and explained, with a smaller section that discusses possible improvements to them, which have been brought up by researchers in the field.In interviews with curators of the museums, thoughts about what the visitors see and understand compared to what the museums want them the see are presented. Also their views on the possibilities of interaction with pottery as a mediator and whether they focus primarily on aesthetics or learning in the exhibitions are shown. This essay is not meant to be a decider between what is right or wrong concerning the exhibiting of pottery, but could be used as a stepping-stone towards such studies. This is a two years master’s thesis in Archive, Library and Museum studies.

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