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  • 1.
    Aparac-Jelusic, Tatjana
    et al.
    University of Zadar.
    Ma, Lai
    University College Dublin.
    Ibekwe-SanJuan, Fidelia
    Université d'Aix-Marseille.
    Ortiz-Repiso Jimenez, Virginia
    University of Madrid.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Warner, Julian
    Queen's University Belfast.
    Crossing the Boundaries in Information Science: Perspectives on Interdisciplinarity2013In: ASIS&T 2013 Proceedings of the 76th ASIS&T Annual Meeting Volume 50 2013 Beyond the Cloud: Rethinking Information Boundaries, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information science has often been recognized as an interdisciplinary field. The marriage between librarianship/documentation and computer science was a natural development in the United States in the post-War period (Farkas-Conn, 1991; Hahn & Barlow, 2012), while the development of information science in Europe has largely stayed close to the humanities and the social sciences, in particular, in relation to communication and media (Ibekwe-SanJuan, et al., 2010). For many years, the interdisciplinary nature of information science has been applauded; until recently, we are warned that interdisciplinarinity may be harmful to the identity of the field. Buckland (2012) states that the claim of being "interdisciplinary" is to choose a position of weakness because "in times of economic crisis political power tends to reside in well-established disciplines." Cronin (2012) comments that "the field’s sense of identity, arguably fragile at the best of times, is likely to be further weakened" for its "epistemic promiscuity."

  • 2.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Förord2016In: Tidskrift för ABM, ISSN 2002-4614, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Dell'Unto, Nicolo
    Lund University.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Larsson, Carolina
    Lund University.
    Löwenborg, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Petersson, Bodil
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper (KV).
    Stenborg, Per
    University of Gothenburg.
    A Neo-Documentalist Lens for Exploring the Premises of Disciplinary Knowledge Making2016In: Proceedings from the Document Academy, ISSN 2473-215X, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 1-23, article id 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to demonstrate how documentation analysis with a neo-documentalist lens can help us explore variations (and stabilities) in conceptions and materialities of documents, as intertwined with disciplinary and sub-disciplinary practices of informing and knowing. Drawing on documentation theory, and with previous research on archaeological documentation as a background, by means of autoethnographic vignettes we explore contemporary conceptions of documentation in five areas in or related to archaeology (Intra-site 3D documentation, Development-led archaeology, Aggregating documentation for use outside the organization, Mediating documentation – or documentation mediation, and Documenting and displaying archaeology in a changing environment). Digitization, and how digitization has spurred renegotiations of what counts as documentation, functions as a common denominator discussed in all of the vignettes. The analysis highlights simultaneously ongoing renegotiations of documentation serving each area’s unique epistemic purposes, and pushing document materialities in different directions. This operationalization of documentation analysis creates an understanding for intra-disciplinary variations in documentation but is importantly also a practical tool to uncover documentation-related premises of disciplinary knowledge-making. This tool can be applied for example in processes of information policy development (regulating what purposes documentation should serve, and what it should be like), information systems design (e.g. for creation and communication of documentation), and infrastructure development (e.g. for preservation and accessibility of documentation).

  • 4.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Petersson, Bodil
    Department of Cultural Sciences, Linnaeus University.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM. Information and Knowledge Management, Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Information Policy for (Digital) Information in Archaeology: current state and suggestions for development2015In: Internet Archaeology, ISSN 1363-5387, E-ISSN 1363-5387, no 40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The introduction of digital data capturing and management technologies has transformed information practices in archaeology. Digital documentation and digital infrastructures are integrated in archaeologists' daily work now more than ever. International and national institutions and projects have contributed to the development of digital archiving and curation practices. Because knowledge production in archaeology depends heavily on documentation and information dissemination, and on retrieval of past documentation, the question of how information is managed is profoundly intertwined with the possibilities for knowledge production. Regulations at different levels articulate demands and expectations from the emerging digital information practices, but how are these different regulations coordinated, and do they support archaeological knowledge production?

    In this article we look into the state of information policy - the sum of principles guiding decisions about information - in archaeology and related areas. The aim of the article is to shed light on how information policy directs practice in archaeology, and to show that analysis of such policies is therefore vital. Information policy in legislation and guidelines in Swedish archaeology serves as a case study, and examples from development-led archaeology and the museum sector illustrate how information policies have varied roles across different heritage sectors. There are historical and local trajectories in the policy documents specific to Sweden, but the discussion shows that the emergence of Swedish policies have many parallels with processes in other countries. The article provides recommendations for information policy development for archaeology and related areas.

  • 5.
    Daivadanamn, Meena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Cajander, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Dahl, Jo-Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Empowering towards healthy behaviours2016In: Ending Childhood Obesity: Actions through health and food equity, Uppsala University, 2016, p. 34-39Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Enwald, Heidi
    et al.
    University of Oulu.
    Kangas, Maarit
    University of Oulu.
    Keränen, Niina
    University of Oulu.
    Korpelainen, Raija
    University of Oulu and Oulu Deaconess Institute.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Jämsä, Timo
    University of Oulu.
    Opinions and use of mobile information technology among older people in Northern Finland: Preliminary results of a population based study2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 ASIS&T Annual Meeting, Oct 14-18, Copenhagen / [ed] Andrew Grove and Diane H. Sonnenwald and Lauren Harrison and Catherine Blake and Christian Schlögl and Isabella Peters and Barbara Endler-Jobst and Colleen Cool and Yin-Leng Theng, Silver Springs, MD: ASIS&T , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older peoples usage of mobile devices is increasing. This study is part of the GASEL project and seeks to increase the understanding of the use of mobile information technology and opinions towards it. Opinions are compared between genders and age groups. The population based data were collected by conducting a questionnaire survey. A random sample of 1,500 adults 65 years of age or older was obtained from the Finnish Population Register Centre. The number of respondents was 918 with a response rate of 61.2 %. About one fifth (n=169) had used a tablet computer and approximately one third (n=226) had used a mobile phone with a touch screen in the past 12 months without encountering major difficulties. The respondents had mostly thought that using the devices would not be easy. They had also thought that the usage would not be too expensive for them. Men and younger old people held more positive opinions towards these new technologies. Older people are slower in adapting and accepting new technologies and this should be taken into account when designing services, applications and content, as these technologies have the potential to enrichen the lives of this specific population group.

  • 7.
    Enwald, Heidi
    et al.
    University of Oulu and Åbo Akademi University.
    Kangas, Maarit
    University of Oulu.
    Keränen, Niina
    University of Oulu .
    Korpelainen, Raija
    Oulu Deaconess Institute.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM. Information Studies, Åbo Akademi.
    Jämsä, Timo
    University of Oulu.
    Opinions and use of mobile information technology among older people in Northern Finland: Preliminary results of a population based study2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 ASIS&T Annual Meeting, Oct 14-18, Copenhagen, Wiley-Blackwell, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older peoples usage of mobile devices is increasing. This study is part of the GASEL project and seeks to increase the understanding of the use of mobile information technology and opinions towards it. Opinions are compared between genders and age groups. The population based data were collected by conducting a questionnaire survey. A random sample of 1,500 adults 65 years of age or older was obtained from the Finnish Population Register Centre. The number of respondents was 918 with a response rate of 61.2 %. About one fifth (n=169) had used a tablet computer and approximately one third (n=226) had used a mobile phone with a touch screen in the past 12 months without encountering major difficulties. The respondents had mostly thought that using the devices would not be easy. They had also thought that the usage would not be too expensive for them. Men and younger old people held more positive opinions towards these new technologies. Older people are slower in adapting and accepting new technologies and this should be taken into account when designing services, applications and content, as these technologies have the potential to enrichen the lives of this specific population group.

  • 8. Ernst, Elissa
    et al.
    Uotila, Kari
    Muuritutkimus.
    Paalassalo, Jari-Pekka
    Turku University of Applies Sciences.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Using a Mobile-Guide System in Medieval Castles, Fortifications and Battlefields2014In: The castle as social space / [ed] Predovnik, Katarina, Ljubljana: Ljubljana University Press , 2014, Vol. 12, p. 255-261Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Haider, Jutta
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Cox, Andrew
    University of Sheffield.
    Francke, Helena
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Hall, Hazel
    Edinburgh Napier University.
    Transformation or continuity? The impact of social media on information: implications for theory and practice2012In: Proceedings of the 2012 ASIS&T Annual Meeting, Baltimore, MD / [ed] Andrew Grove, Silver Springs, MD: ASIS&T , 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This panel debates whether the ways in which social media are changing the nature, creation, seeking, use and sharing of infor- mation constitute a transformation or are primarily marked by con- tinuity. Ubiquitous and everyday access to social media (for some) seems to be bringing about changes in social practice, including of information-related activities, such that conceptualisations of infor- mation itself are potentially reshaped. Discussants draw inspiration from the pervasive impact on information activities of the every- day adoption of social media. At a theoretical level they also draw inspiration from the analytic resources of contemporary practice theory and its emphasis on materiality and embodiment, routine and change, social expectations and social identity, and knowledge as a process. All the participants of the panel have conducted new empirical research on social media use with a focus on its deep as well as broad impact. The audience members are invited to dis- cuss with the panelists questions such as how social media relate to routinised daily practices and institutionalised practices and hi- erarchies, how their use refashions social relationships, how they turn information seekers and users into information managers, pro- ducers and creators and shape perceptions of information authority and trustworthiness, and how a new theorisation can help librari- ans, information professionals and researchers understand change and assume a proactive role in it.

  • 10. Holmberg, Kim
    et al.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Learning together apart: Distance education in a virtual world2008In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 13, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A course in information studies was partly held in the virtual world of Second Life. Second Life was used as a platform to deliver lectures and as a place for organizing group assignments and having discussions. Students’ opinions about Second Life were studied and compared to their opinions about more traditional methods in education. The results show a lower threshold for participation in lectures. According to the students, Second Life should not replace face–to–face education, but it could serve as an excellent addition to other more traditional methods and platforms used in education. The students also considered that lectures held in Second Life were much more “fun” than those using other methods. This particular aspect, and its effect on learning outcomes, requires further research. This research demonstrates that Second Life has potential as a learning environment in distance education.

  • 11.
    Holmberg, Kim
    et al.
    Åbo Akademi University.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Kronqvist-Berg, Maria
    Åbo Akademi University.
    Nivakoski, Outi
    Åbo Akademi University.
    Widén-Wulff, Gunilla
    Åbo Akademi University.
    Kirjasto 2.0: Muuttuva osallistumisen kulttuuri2009Book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Holmberg, Kim
    et al.
    Information Studies, Åbo Akademi University.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Kronqvist-Berg, Maria
    Information Studies, Åbo Akademi University.
    Widén-Wulff, Gunilla
    Information Studies, Åbo Akademi University.
    What is Library 2.0?2009In: Journal of Documentation, ISSN 0022-0418, E-ISSN 1758-7379, Vol. 65, no 4, p. 668-681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The aim of this paper is to define both theoretically and empirically the concept of Library 2.0. Design/methodology/approach – Written answers to the question “What is Library 2.0?” given by practitioners and researchers (n=29) interested in Library 2.0 issues were analyzed by using co-word analysis to map the underlying elements of the concept. Findings – The study resulted in a model of Library 2.0, containing seven building-blocks of the phenomenon: interactivity, users, participation, libraries and library services, web and web 2.0, social aspects, and technology and tools. Research limitations/implications – The model provides a basis for framing Library 2.0 as a research object and to map central themes of future research. Practical implications – A comprehensive model enables both researchers and practitioners to frame the phenomenon more clearly, evaluate existing and planned services and their proximity to what is Library 2.0. Originality/value – Unlike earlier proposals for a definition of the notion Library 2.0, the present study presents an empirical and consensual crowd-sourcing approach of defining the concept Library 2.0 and provides basis for discussing the future evolution of the notion and its implications for library and information science research and library practices.

  • 13.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Aesthetic judgments in folksonomies as a criteria for organising knowledge2010In: Paradigms and conceptual systems in knowledge organization.: Proceedings of the 11th International ISKO Conference 23-26 February, Rome, Italy / [ed] Claudio Gnoli & Fulvio Mazzocchi, Würzburg: Ergon Verlag , 2010, Vol. 12, p. 308-315Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most central challenges of knowledge organisation research and practice is the question of organising principles. Bliss proposed a consensus of experts as a criteria for knowledge organisation. Thereafter the complexity and ambiguity of criteria has become a subject of discussion, especially influenced by relativist philosophical theories. Hulme introduced already in 1911-1912 the notion of (literary) warrant to denote the (literary) criteria of organising knowledge. Hjørland has written about the limits of consensus and proposed (together with Albrechtsen) domain analysis as an approach for reaching pragmatic criteria. Even though the problems have been acknowledged, in practice, the veritable criteria are articulated only seldom. Feinberg [4] calls for a more explicit argumentation of criteria from the part of the designers of knowledge organisation systems, a view with which Hjørland concurs. The significance of the challenge is underlined by Gnoli who lists the problems related to ’viewpoint warrant’ (viewpoint as a criteria for organising knowledge) as a central challenge of future knowledge organisation research.The present study refers to aesthetics as exemplary of the problems related to viewpoints and knowledge organisation. Aesthetic judgments are essentially cultural and subjective, but same time people tend to expect others to concur with their own judgments [12]. In order to improve the explicity of the warranting factors (as [4] suggests) of aesthetic organisation of knowledge, the present study explores the possibilities to ground organisatory criteria on an empirical investigation of explicit aesthetic judgments of a group of people. This study discusses folksonomies as a source of aesthetic judgments and those judgments as a warrant for controlled organisation of knowledge. The question is whether folksonomies can be used as a source for aesthetic statements which can be used to warrant organisation of knowledge. Photosharing service Flickr is used as an example.

     

  • 14.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Affective capitalism of knowing and the society of search engine2016In: Aslib Journal of Information Management, ISSN 2050-3806, E-ISSN 2050-3814, Vol. 68, no 5, p. 566-588Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to discuss the affective premises and economics of the influence of search engines on knowing and informing in the contemporary society.

    Design/methodology/approach A conceptual discussion of the affective premises and framings of the capitalist economics of knowing is presented.

    Findings The main proposition of this text is that the exploitation of affects is entwined in the competing market and emancipatory discourses and counter-discourses both as intentional interventions, and perhaps even more significantly, as unintentional influences that shape the ways of knowing in the peripheries of the regime that shape cultural constellations of their own. Affective capitalism bounds and frames our ways of knowing in ways that are difficult to anticipate and read even from the context of the regime itself.

    Originality/value In the relatively extensive discussion on the role of affects in the contemporary capitalism, influence of affects on knowing and their relation to search engine use has received little explicit attention so far.

  • 15.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Alternatives to Being Information Literate2018In: Information Literacy in the Workplace / [ed] Serap Kurbanoğlu, Joumana Boustany, Sonja Špiranec, Esther Grassian, Diane Mizrachi, Loriene Roy, Springer, 2018, p. 813-821Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In contrast to the relative abundance of conceptualisations of information literacy, the earlier research has placed considerably less attention on its alternatives. The findings show that there are shades of being less and non-literate beyond a mere lack of necessary skills or engagement in inappropriate practices. Information illiteracy can be experienced as a problem but it can also represent a conscious choice for delimiting and organising information practices. From a theoretical and practical perspective, this study suggests that both information literacies and information illiteracies should be taken into account in information literacy research and education, and when developing and deploying information systems and services to compensate for the lack of literacies.

  • 16.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Analytical information horizon maps2009In: Library and information Science Research, ISSN 0740-8188, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 18-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sonnenwald, D.H. (1999) introduced information horizons as a theoretical framework for information behavior. Later, she and her colleagues developed a data-gathering method based on information horizons theory and user-drawn information horizon maps. The method provides a good basis for in-depth discussions and complements interviewing as a way to gather data. Based on interview records of Finnish and Swedish archaeology professionals, researchers drew diagrams called analytical information horizon maps with the purpose of structuring, describing and analyzing typical information behaviors related to the work roles of the interviewed individuals. The findings indicate that the analytical information horizon maps provide a practicable and qualitatively valid means to visualize, communicate, and structure individual and shared patterns of use of the information resources and the organization of information activity.

  • 17.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Another Wood Between the Worlds?: Regimes of Worth and the Making of Meanings in the Work of Archivists2015In: The Information Society, ISSN 0197-2243, E-ISSN 1087-6537, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 121-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through interviews of Nordic archives professionals, this article explicates the transformation and complexities of the worth and meaning of archival records and archival work. The analysis shows how the worth and meaning of archival records and the work of archivists are constituted in a complex interplay of quasi-institutionalized orders of archival work, their associated but often conflicting regimes of worth and information, and changing local intermediary practices. Through interviews of Nordic archives professionals, this article explicates the transformation and complexities of the worth and meaning of archival records and archival work. The analysis shows how the worth and meaning of archival records and the work of archivists are constituted in a complex interplay of quasi-institutionalized orders of archival work, their associated but often conflicting regimes of worth and information, and changing local intermediary practices.

  • 18.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Archaeologists and their information sources2014In: Perspectives to Archaeological Information in the Digital Society / [ed] Huvila, Isto, Uppsala: Department of ALM, Uppsala University , 2014, p. 25-54Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: In spite of the moderately growing interest in humanities researchers' and practitioners' information activity, there is only a little research on individual disciplines like archaeology. The importance of understanding of how archaeologists use information has increased during the last two decades because of the digitalisation of archaeological information processes, privatisation of archaeological fieldwork especially in many European countries and growing pressure on the efficiency of archaeological work around the world. The aim of the present study is to explicate and discuss the patterns of information source use of archaeology professionals. The study is based on an empirical investigation of the work and information behaviour based on qualitative intreviews of 25 Finnish and Swedish archaeology professionals. The findings suggest that the information use patterns and source selection of archaeologists is at the same time dependent on the demands of the multifaceted nature of the archaeological work and the limitations imposed by how information is managed and disseminated in archaeology. The results imply that more open forms and processes of disseminating information and systematic development of relevant finding aids would increase the impact of archaeological information and facilitate the work of archaeologists. 

  • 19.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Archiv2017In: Digitalisierung / [ed] Koch, Gertraud, Konstanz: UVK , 2017, p. 89-105Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Archiv2017In: Digitalisierung / [ed] Koch, Gertraud, Konstanz: UVK , 2017, p. 89-105Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Archives, Libraries and Museums in the Contemporary Society: Perspectives of the Professionals2014In: iConference 2014 Proceedings / [ed] Kindling, Maxi and Greifeneder, Elke, llinois: iSchools , 2014, p. 45-64Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate how ALM professionals conceptualise the common role of archives, libraries and museums (ALMs) in the contemporary society. There is only a little earlier empirical research on the topic. This study is based on a quantitative analysis of the results of a web survey of 131 ALM professionals. The analysis shows that the views of the respondents epitomise diverging and contradictory ideas of the role of the institutions. The findings underline the need to discuss and define the future of the ALMs on a profound level of their societal role with a clear emphasis of its theoretical underpinnings. The diverse of opinions and number of mostly practice-oriented visions can be helpful in shaping and reshaping the role of the institutions. At the same time, it is apparent that they do not have the required theoretical depth to function as a common ground for explicating the role of ALMs in the contemporary society.

  • 22.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    ASIS&T European Workshop 2013: Proceedings of the Second Association for Information Science and Technology ASIS&T European Workshop 2013 June 5-6, Åbo/Turku, Finland2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Authorship and Documentary Boundary Objects2012In: 45th Hawaii International Conference on System Science (HICSS), 2012, p. 1636-1645Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier research on documentary boundary objects has underlined the contextual nature of the process of their emergence. The aim of this paper is to discuss how the process of making and the attribution or non-attribution of authorship affects documentary boundary objects. A better understanding of the making of boundary objects is helpful in understanding why and how particular boundary objects work, and what are their implications. The article proposes an analytic model of four modes of authorship of documentary boundary objects (1. solitary, and 2. emergent authorship, 3. light-weight, and 4. heavy-weight peer-production) based on a review and synthesis of the spectrum of solitary and collaborative practices of creating documentary boundary objects discussed in the literature.

  • 24.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Awkwardness of becoming a boundary object: Mangle and materialities of reports, documentation data and the archaeological work2016In: The Information Society, ISSN 0197-2243, E-ISSN 1087-6537, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 280-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Information about an archaeological investigation is documented in an archaeological report that makes it the boundary object par excellence for archaeological information work across stakeholder communities from field archaeologists to heritage managers and land developers. The quality of reports have been a subject of debate and recently it has been argued that more emphasis should be placed on making primary research data at least similarly available as the reports. This study explores the changing materialities and reciprocal formation of documents and their users in the advent of digitisation, and how documents become and lose their status as boundary objects in these processes. The study posits that in order to be functional, a boundary object needs to provide a disclosure, means to access reality for adjacent communities. Further, it shows how assumptions of the functioning of the human and non-human (material artefacts) influence the ways how the archaeologists conceptualise the preservation and archiving of archaeological information and the role and potential of different types of digital and paper-based documents. This article is based on an interview study of Swedish archaeology professionals (N=16) with theoretical underpinnings in the notions of boundary objects, mangle of practice and disclosure.

  • 25.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Be informed of your information2014In: Current Swedish Archaeology, Vol. 22, p. 48-51Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Being Formal and Flexible: Semantic Wiki as an Archaeological e-Science Infrastructure2012In: Revive the Past: Proceeding of the 39th Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology, Beijing, 12-16 April 2011, Amsterdam, 2012, p. 186-197Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The multiple challenges of representing archaeological information both using relational databases and semantic web technologies have been acknowledged in the literature. The present paper discusses findings and observations from an action research study on developing an integrated semantic digital data archive and collaboration platform for archaeological and archaeology related research using a semantic wiki based approach. The observations and findings from the project demonstrate that the discussed approach provides means to address some of the problems related to pre-coordinated formal representation of archaeological knowledge. At the same, the study stresses the importance of a full understanding of the implications of the both old and new systems of knowledge representation. Otherwise the new systems may introduce implicit infrastructural bias comparable to the ones addressed by the novel approach.

  • 27.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Change and stability in archives, libraries and museums: mapping professional experiences in Sweden2016In: Information research, ISSN 1368-1613, E-ISSN 1368-1613, Vol. 21, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    One of the most prominent topics of professional and academic archives, libraries and museums related literature revolves around the questions of change and continuity of the institutions. The aim of the study is to find how professionals conceptualise factors that contribute to continuity and change at their institutions.

    Method

    The analysis is based on a qualitative analysis of 131 open-ended questions included in a Web survey of Swedish professionals conducted in February-March 2011. Analysis. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results

    Borrowing from Lewin’s field theory and its derivative, force-field analysis, the professional articulations of the strengths and future prospects of their institutions are interpreted in terms of strategic forces that influence change and stability at archives, libraries and museums. The study shows that the forces that impede and catalyse change are overlapping to a significant degree that indicates the possibility of disparate alternative strategy formulations for the institutions.

    Conclusions

    More focus on defining the ownership of the strategic goals at archives, libraries and museums and defining the operating space and core domains of the organizations is essential for formulating their future strategies.

  • 28.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Distrust, mistrust, untrust and information practices2017In: Information research, ISSN 1368-1613, E-ISSN 1368-1613, Vol. 22, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. We report the results of an investigation of the role and implications of the shortage of trust (untrust), mistrust and distrust in the context of information work. Whereas trust has been discussed extensively in information studies literature, its dark side has been largely omitted before. Method. The conceptual discussion is based on empirical material gathered using thematic interviews of (N=17) Swedish archaeology professionals with special interest in the management of archaeological information. Analysis. The analysis of the interviews was based on a method drawing from the constant comparative method and close reading of the transcripts. Results. The analysis shows that it is possible to distinguish systemic factors related to components, systemic processes and environment that contribute to the emergence and persistence of trust, distrust, mistrust and untrust, and shifts between the different modes of (un)confidence. Conclusion. Distrust, mistrust and untrust have related but distinct influence on information work, they coexist with trust and can have similarly positive implications for the information activities. Finally, similarly to distrust and trust, also untrust and mistrust can be conceptualised following Luhmann as strategies of reducing uncertainty.

  • 29.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    DOME - Deployment of Online Medical Records and e-Health services2013In: ASIS&T European Workshop 2013: Proceedings of the Second Association for Information Science and Technology ASIS&T European Workshop 2013 June 5-6, Åbo/Turku, Finland / [ed] Huvila, Isto, 2013, Vol. 2, p. 209-215Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Ecological Framework of Information Interactions and Information Infrastructures2009In: Journal of information science, ISSN 0165-5515, E-ISSN 1741-6485, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 695-708Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been notably little convergence between information organisation and information use studies. A framework for explicating the contextual interplay of information interactions and infrastructures of information, and more specifically the interface of information work and knowledge organisation systems is proposed. The theoretical foundations of the framework are based on systems theory and ecological approach. It is suggested that the interplay of information use and information infrastructures may be conceptualised as a systemic interaction, which is driven by the simultaneous influence of human activity related warrants and infrastructural affordances and constraints. The model provides an instrument that explicates the interplay of human information use and information infrastructures.

  • 31.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Engagement has its consequences: the emergence of the representations of archaeology in social media2013In: Archäologische Informationen, ISSN 2197-7429, Vol. 36, p. 21-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even if social media is often seen mainly as an instrument for outreach from the archaeologists to the public, it is a two- way channel of communication and a context for participation and negotiation that consists of an information infrastructure, content and participants. This article discusses the consequences and implications of the bidirectionality of social media. The discussion is based on an empirical study of the representations and reappropriations of archaeology in four different social media services (Facebook, Twitter, Second Life, Pinterest). The analysis shows how the popular and scholarly archaeological information is appropriated in the social media services and how the efforts to engage people lead to a double bind of engagement. People engage archaeologists but also other members of the public to participate in an exchange of knowledge and negotiation of the nature and relevance of archaeology. The findings of the study shed light on the emerging patterns of how the use of social media can affect not only the popular ideas of archaeology and the contexts of its relevance, but also archaeological knowledge (i.e. what is known and what is desirable to be known), its documentary representations and the essence of the archaeological work itself.

  • 32.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Entä informaatiokirjoitustaito?2008In: Reader- and User-Oriented Communication: National Conference of Communication Studies 2007 / [ed] Heli Katajamäki, Merja Koskela & Suvi Isohella, Vaasa: University of Vaasa , 2008, p. 22-27Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Even though information literacy implicitly comprises an idea of a complete participation in an information community, the typical definitions of infor- mation literacy have tended to underline seeking, searching, locating, re- ceiving and evaluation instead of information creation. Wilder (2005) has criticised the concept information literacy for emphasising the problems of searching instead of finding relevant information. The problematising of in- formation seeking places emphasis on the difficulty of searching and the complexity of required skills. A more sensible approach would be to facili- tate information use rather than to teach searching using complicated tools. All information sought by human-beings is mostly produced by their fellow humans. Therefore an approach to decrease complexity of information searching could to be to educate people to create more searchable and us- able information. This article discusses information creation as a part of the concept information literacy. Besides technical problems, information crea- tion education is inevitably faced by the complexities of social and cultural dimensions of information and information production.

     

  • 33.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Historia biteiksi - johdatusta digitaaliseen humanismiin. Review of Elo, Kimmo (toim.) Digitaalinen humanismi ja historiatieteet. THY 2016.2016In: Agricola Suomen historiaverkkoArticle, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [fi]

    Digitaalinen humanismi ja historiatieteet luotaa monipuolisesti digitaalisen historiantutkimuksen ja digitaalisen historian tutkimuksen kenttää ja toimii tieteellisenä johdatuksena, lukukirjana ja osin oppikirjanakin sekä aiheesta jo kiinnostuneille että vasta-alkajille.

  • 34.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Historia biteiksi: johdatusta digitaaliseen humanismiin2016In: Agricola Suomen historiaverkko, ISSN 1796-704XArticle, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [fi]

    Digitaalinen humanismi ja historiatieteet luotaa monipuolisesti digitaalisen historiantutkimuksen ja digitaalisen historian tutkimuksen kenttää ja toimii tieteellisenä johdatuksena, lukukirjana ja osin oppikirjanakin sekä aiheesta jo kiinnostuneille että vasta-alkajille.

  • 35.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    How a Museum Knows?: Structures, Work Roles, and Infrastructures of Information Work2013In: Journal of the American Society for Information Science and technology, Vol. 64, no 7, p. 1375-1387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even if knowledge is a commodity that a museum offers as Hooper-Greenhill () has argued, the mechanisms of how a museum comes to know what it mediates are not well understood. Using a case study approach, the aim of this study is to investigate what types of sources and channels, with a special emphasis on social processes and structures of information, support collaborative information work, and the emergence of knowledge in a museum environment. The empirical study was conducted using a combination of ethnographic observation of and interviews with staff members at a medium-sized museum in a Nordic country. The study shows that much of the daily information work is routinized and infrastructuralized in social information exchange and reproduction of documented information and museum collections.

  • 36.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    How a museum knows?: Structures, work roles, and infrastructures of information work2013In: Journal of The American Society For Information Science And Technology, ISSN 1532-2882, E-ISSN 1532-2890, Vol. 64, no 7, p. 1375-1387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even if knowledge is a commodity that a museum offers as Hooper-Greenhill (1992) has argued, the mechanisms of how a museum comes to know what it mediates are not well understood. Using a case study approach, the aim of this study is to investigate what types of sources and channels, with a special emphasis on social processes and structures of information, support collaborative information work, and the emergence of knowledge in a museum environment. The empirical study was conducted using a combination of ethnographic observation of and interviews with staff members at a medium-sized museum in a Nordic country. The study shows that much of the daily information work is routinized and infrastructuralized in social information exchange and reproduction of documented information and museum collections.

  • 37.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Hyvän arkeologian metsästäjät [The hunters of good archaeology]2015In: SKAS, ISSN 1455-0334, no 4, p. 54-58Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    "I asked my Mum, but" and other cases of unsuccessful information seeking by asking2011In: Information Research, ISSN 1368-1613, Vol. 16, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. Failure to find information is common. An exploratory analysis of cases when family members or friends were asked for information can provide better understanding of when, how and why interpersonal information seeking within a close network of individuals fails. Method. A sample of utterances (in form of I asked my mum, but) was harvested from the Web using LexiURL Searcher software. Analysis. The material (327 utterances) was analysed with content analysis and categorised using the constant comparative method. Results. People utter on the Web different types of, mostly fact-related, questions they have asked earlier of their family members and friends. Multiple factors were found to affect interpersonal information seeking including a major barrier, bashfulness, which has not been discussed earlier in the literature. Conclusions. Success in asking questions of family and friends is a broad issue of mastering information content, social environment and other contexts of information seeking rather than a technical ability.

  • 39.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    "I asked my Mum, but" and other cases of unsuccessful information seeking by asking2011In: Information research, ISSN 1368-1613, E-ISSN 1368-1613, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 460-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. Failure to find information is common. An exploratory analysis of cases when family members or friends were asked for information can provide better understanding of when, how and why interpersonal information seeking within a close network of individuals fails. Method. A sample of utterances (in form of "I asked my mum, but") was harvested from the Web using LexiURL Searcher software. Analysis. The material (327 utterances) was analysed with content analysis and categorised using the constant comparative method. Results. People utter on the Web different types of, mostly fact-related, questions they have asked earlier of their family members and friends. Multiple factors were found to affect interpersonal information seeking including a major barrier, bashfulness, which has not been discussed earlier in the literature. Conclusions. Success in asking questions of family and friends is a broad issue of mastering information content, social environment and other contexts of information seeking rather than a technical ability.

  • 40.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    ’If we just knew who should do it’, or the social organization of the archiving of archaeology in Sweden2016In: Information research, ISSN 1368-1613, E-ISSN 1368-1613, Vol. 21, no 2, article id paper713Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. This paper analyses the work practices and perspectives of professionals working with archaeological archives and the social organization of archaeological archiving and information management in Sweden. Method. The paper is based on an interview study of Swedish actors in the field of archaeological archiving (N=16). Analysis. The interviews were recorded and transcribed, then analysed using close reading. Results. We identified eight major work roles of archiving and managing archaeological information. Analysis of the recorded interviews show that there are multiple technical, legislative, conceptual and structural factors that influence and complicate the building, management and use of archaeological archives. Conclusions. Results show that the central challenge of archiving archaeology is the lack of efforts to influence and control the process by the involved actors. A mutual effort to be more explicit about concerns, needs and wishes of all participating organizations would help them to prioritise their work, take other actors concerns into account and develop their work practices to support more effectively the preservation of archaeological information.

  • 41.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    'If we just knew who should do it', or the social organization of the archiving of archaeology in Sweden2016In: Information research, ISSN 1368-1613, E-ISSN 1368-1613, Vol. 21, no 2, article id 713Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. This paper analyses the work practices and perspectives of professionals working with archaeological archives and the social organization of archaeological archiving and information management in Sweden. Method. The paper is based on an interview study of Swedish actors in the field of archaeological archiving (N=16). Analysis. The interviews were recorded and transcribed, then analysed using close reading. Results. We identified eight major work roles of archiving and managing archaeological information. Analysis of the recorded interviews show that there are multiple technical, legislative, conceptual and structural factors that influence and complicate the building, management and use of archaeological archives. Conclusions. Results show that the central challenge of archiving archaeology is the lack of efforts to influence and control the process by the involved actors. A mutual effort to be more explicit about concerns, needs and wishes of all participating organizations would help them to prioritise their work, take other actors' concerns into account and develop their work practices to support more effectively the preservation of archaeological information.

  • 42.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Impact och inverkan av informationsinfrastrukturer2012In: Informaatiotutkimus, Vol. 31, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    In Web search we trust?: Articulation of the cognitive authorities of Web searching2013In: Information research, ISSN 1368-1613, E-ISSN 1368-1613, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 567-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. People search for information on different search engines billions of times day all over the developed world. Not all Web resources are, however, equally authoritative and not all searches return equally authoritative results. Earlier studies have demonstrated the complexity of credibility assessments, but also simultaneously the existence of strong tendencies to uncritically accept the credibility of the information retrieved by a search engine. The success of a search is related, but not the same notion as the authority of the results. The aim of this paper is to analyse the articulated role of 'searching' as a possible source of cognitive authority in Web searching. <p>Method. A qualitative exploratory study based on the analysis of 805 search-related utterances harvested from the Web using Webometric Analyst. <p>Analysis. The data was analysed using constant comparative method.<p>Results. Three types of cognitive authorities were identified: 1) people, 2) search (as an approach), and 3) search as an activity.<p>Conclusions. The findings indicate that searching incorporates cognitive authorities that are abstract, exercised and situational rather than static and nameable.

  • 44.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Information Services and Digital Literacy: In search of the boundaries of knowing2012Book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Information sources and perceived success in corporate finance2010In: Journal of The American Society For Information Science And Technology, ISSN 1532-2882, E-ISSN 1532-2890, Vol. 61, no 11, p. 2219-2229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The work of corporate finance professionals is information-intensive, despite the fact that the practices and motivations of their information preferences have been researched very little. The present study investigates perceived success and how it is related to corporate finance professionals’ information source use behavior based on a Web survey of 92 Finnish corporate finance professionals. The principal finding of the statistical analysis of the data is that perceptions of work success and specific types of information sources contributing to the success are related. The correlations are complex, and very different types of information sources contribute to individual types of success, and vice versa. The findings indicate that information sources function as measures of success and serve an instrumental purpose. Besides functional relations, the correlation of the variables suggests more comprehensive success and information source use related dependencies and preferences. The findings imply that by studying existing perceptions of success, it is possible to make inferences about preferred information sources. The study also suggests that both personal and organizational perceptions of success should be taken into account when planning information services and information literacy education for corporate finance professionals to increase their effectiveness and relevance for the professionals.

  • 46.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Information Sources and Perceived Success in Corporate Finance2010In: Journal of The American Society For Information Science And Technology, ISSN 1532-2882, E-ISSN 1532-2890, Vol. 61, no 11, p. 2219-2229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The work of corporate finance professionals is information-intensive, despite the fact that the practices and motivations of their information preferences have been researched very little. The present study investigates perceived success and how it is related to corporate finance professionals' information source use behavior based on a Web survey of 92 Finnish corporate finance professionals. The principal finding of the statistical analysis of the data is that perceptions of work success and specific types of information sources contributing to the success are related. The correlations are complex, and very different types of information sources contribute to individual types of success, and vice versa. The findings indicate that information sources function as measures of success and serve an instrumental purpose. Besides functional relations, the correlation of the variables suggests more comprehensive success and information source use related dependencies and preferences. The findings imply that by studying existing perceptions of success, it is possible to make inferences about preferred information sources. The study also suggests that both personal and organizational perceptions of success should be taken into account when planning information services and information literacy education for corporate finance professionals to increase their effectiveness and relevance for the professionals.

  • 47.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Introduction2014In: Perspectives to Archaeological Information in the Digital Society / [ed] Huvila, Isto, Uppsala: Department of ALM, Uppsala University , 2014, p. 1-9Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Kuka muistuttaisi muistiorganisaatiota?: Museotyön muistikäytännöt ja muistaminen käytännössä2010In: Informaatiotutkimus, ISSN 1239-3614, Vol. 29, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Kulturarv, deltagande och kulturarvsprofessionalism -- från en facklig hegemoni till stridiga teorier och praktik2014In: Muuttuva kultturiperintö - Det föränderliga kulturarvet / [ed] Tytti Steel and Arja Turunen and Sanna Lillbroända-Annala and Maija Santikko, Helsinki: Ethnos , 2014, p. 334-351Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    "Library users come to a library to find books": The structuration of the library as a soft information system2013In: Journal of Documentation, ISSN 0022-0418, E-ISSN 1758-7379, Vol. 69, no 5, p. 715-735Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - Considering the perceived significance of librarians and information experts as professional information seekers and information seeking educators and of the institutional setting of information work, very little is known about the information practices of librarians and information professionals, their contexts and implications for libraries and their users. The aim of this study is to explore the information interactions of library professionals within and in relation to the context of the setting of the library.Design/methodology/approach - The analysis is based on a qualitative case study of a large North European city library. Material was collected using information seeking diaries, interviews and ethnographic observation in the library space. Findings - The information practices of librarians are contextual to the setting of the library within which the meeting of the assumptions of library users of the use of that particular system play a significant role. The systemic interplay of librarians, library users and other parts of the system constrains the breadth of the available information at libraries, but at the same time, keeping to a particular set of shared norms and practices of library use also facilitates the use of the system.Research limitations/implications - The generalisability of the findings is limited by the fact that they are based on an individual case study.Practical implications - The systemic nature of library and its reproduction in a process of structuration underlines the need to develop information services in libraries from a holistic perspective that takes into account the practical implications of the shared norms and assumptions of how a library should work.Originality/value - There is little earlier research on the information practices of library and information professionals, particularly with specific reference to its implications for libraries and their users.

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