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  • 1.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Det Danske Sprog- og Litteraturselskab.
    Analysing Language Mixture in a Medieval Birgittine Manuscript2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Birgitta and Bernard: Five Old Swedish Fragments in the Danish National Archives2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Danish National Archives in Copenhagen houses several thousand manuscript fragments, the remains of numerous works that were cut up and used in the bindings of later books. The majority of these fragments are written in Latin, Middle Low German, or Danish, although a few in Old Swedish also survive. Five of these Old Swedish fragments are published and discussed in this article. They contain parts of two of St Birgitta’s Revelations (Liber Caelestis) and of St Bernard’s A Rule of Good Life (Ad sororem modus bene vivendi in christianam religionem), known in Old Swedish as Ett gudhelikt lifwærne. The Birgittine texts are from an early stage of the retranslation process when compared to other extant versions and include several unique wordings that demonstrate the specific use of the original manuscript in a monastic environment. The Bernard fragments are one of just two extant versions and appear to predate the version in Stockholm, Royal Library, A 9; as such, they are an important witness to the propagation of the saint’s writings in Sweden.

  • 3.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Christ killers, menstruating males and savage wolves: The portrayal of Jews in medieval Denmark2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Det middelalderlige syn på verdens tilblivelse2012Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Ferocious lions and menstruating men: The portrayal of Jews in medieval Danish manuscripts2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Fornöstnordiskt predikospråk: Gammeløstnordisk prædikensprog2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Fremstillingen af jøder i den danske middelalder2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Fremstillingen af jøder i tekster fra den danske senmiddelalder: Et skifte i antijødisk polemisk litteratur i den tidlige reformatoriske periode?2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Grumme løver, menstruerende mænd og fule bedragere: Jøder i østnordiske tekster fra middelalderen2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Idolaters, Warriors, and Lovers: Muslims in Medieval Swedish and Danish Texts2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Between the Viking Age and the Middle Ages, there was a noticeable change in relations between Scandinavia and the Islamic world – the sources point to a shift from travel and trade to hostility and war. Muslims did not settle in the North until the eighteenth century, and during the Middle Ages there was little contact between Scandinavians and ‘real’ Muslims. So how did Danes and Swedes imagine and describe this Other? Is there anything unusual or unexpected about the portrayal of Muslims? How does this image compare to that of the other great religious opponent, the Jew? By investigating East Norse devotional texts, travel literature, saints’ lives, romances and accounts of Ottoman warfare, this paper aims to draw out some of the major themes in medieval Scandinavian descriptions of Muslims and Islam.

  • 11.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Images of Jews and Saracens in Old Danish and Old Swedish sermons and wall paintings: Sources for an investigation of the spread of images and ideas from “continental” Europe and the Mediterranean to medieval Denmark and Sweden2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Jews were not permitted to settle in Scandinavia until the modern era (Denmark 1622, Sweden 1718) and Muslims did not arrive in significant numbers until the late twentieth century. Yet despite the fact that there was no resident population, Muslims and, in particular, Jews can be found in many different literary genres (including sermons) and works of art (including wall-paintings, altar pieces and sculptures). These two non-Christian groups in medieval Scandinavia are thus an example of what Gloria Cigman with regard to England has called “absent-presence”, although in Denmark and Sweden they were not a memory or continuation from a pre-expulsion era but rather manifestations of the imagination that drew upon pre-existing classical and foreign traditions.

    This paper surveys the extant vernacular sermon material from medieval Denmark and Sweden that mentions Muslims and Jews and attempts to categorise the different types and uses of the representations. As the extant corpus of sermon material from medieval Denmark and Sweden is rather small, I shall look briefly at the saints’ lives and legends that were often used to fashion exempla in sermons. The paper will also consider the rich treasury of wall paintings and how these pictures reinforced the ideas about Jews propagated in sermons. (There are no unequivocal images of Muslims, Saracens or Turks in medieval Danish and Swedish wall paintings.)

    Finally, the paper will attempt to trace the Scandinavian imagery and influences back to ‘continental’ Europe and uncover what sorts of ideas about Muslims and Jews were useful enough to Scandinavians to survive the long journey north.

  • 12.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Inside and Outside. The Role of the “Others” in Medieval Societies around the Baltic Coast: Preaching about Jews in Medieval Denmark2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Judar och muslimer i det medeltida Skandinavien och Baltikum2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Jødernes hemmeligheder2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Lessons in Contempt2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Medieval Mass Media and Minorities2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The portrayal and (mis)use of the figure of the Jew and the Muslim in vernacular sermons and wall paintings from medieval Denmark and Sweden.

  • 17.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Om at oversætte antisemitisme til dansk: Poul Ræffs udgivelse af Jødernes hemmeligheder (1516)2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Det Danske Sprog- og Litteraturselskab.
    Preaching about Jews without Jews2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    The Image of Muslims, Islam and Muḥammad in East Norse Texts2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Thus shall Christian people know to reproach them: Translating Pfefferkorn into Danish2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1516 Poul Ræff published Nouiter in lucem data: iudeorum secreta (‘Recently brought out into the light: The secrets of the Jews’), his Danish translation of Johannes Pfefferkorn’s Libellus de Judaica confessione (‘The small book of the confession of the Jews’ from 1508). Nouiter in lucem data is the oldest extant book in Danish printed by a Dane in Denmark – something that makes the book rather remarkable. (Earlier books in Danish had been printed either by Danes abroad or by foreigners in Denmark.)

    This paper will investigate how Ræff translated Pfefferkorn by focusing on his use of native elements, mistranslations and errors, and omissions and simplifications. It will also look at the context in which Ræff’s translation was read by looking at the marginalia and surrounding texts tha Nouiter in lucem data is bound with in its two extant copies. Furthermore, it will attempt to answer the question of why Ræff invested his time and money in publishing Pfefferkorn in Denmark – a country with no resident Jewish population at the time – and whether he was successful in his aims.

  • 21.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Translating Anti-Judaism into Old Danish: Poul Ræff’s Publication of Iudeorum Secreta (1516)2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Det Danske Sprog- og Litteraturselskab.
    Unmixing mixture with statistics: Analysing the language of a medieval Birgittine manuscript2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Airey, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Disciplinary differences in the use of English2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Airey, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Disciplinary Literacy2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Airey, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Teachers transitioning to teaching in English2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26. Airey, John
    Teaching and Learning in English: The experiences of students and teachers2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Eriksson, Urban
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Fredlund, Tobias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics.
    On the Disciplinary Affordances of Semiotic Resources2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the late 70’s Gibson (1979) introduced the concept of affordance. Initially framed around the needs of an organism in its environment, over the years the term has been appropriated and debated at length by a number of researchers in various fields. Most famous, perhaps is the disagreement between Gibson and Norman (1988) about whether affordances are inherent properties of objects or are only present when they are perceived by an organism. More recently, affordance has been drawn on in the educational arena, particularly with respect to multimodality (see Linder (2013) for a recent example). Here, Kress et al. (2001) have claimed that different modes have different specialized affordances. Then, building on this idea, Airey and Linder (2009) suggested that there is a critical constellation of modes that students need to achieve fluency in before they can experience a concept in an appropriate disciplinary manner. Later, Airey (2009) nuanced this claim, shifting the focus from the modes themselves to a critical constellation of semiotic resources, thus acknowledging that different semiotic resources within a mode often have different affordances (e.g. two or more diagrams may form the critical constellation).

    In this theoretical paper the concept of disciplinary affordance (Fredlund et al., 2012) is suggested as a useful analytical tool for use in education. The concept makes a radical break with the views of both Gibson and Norman in that rather than focusing on the discernment of one individual, it refers to the disciplinary community as a whole. Put simply, the disciplinary affordances of a given semiotic resource are determined by those functions that the resource is expected to fulfil by the disciplinary community. Disciplinary affordances have thus been negotiated and developed within the discipline over time. As such, the question of whether these affordances are inherent or discerned becomes moot. Rather, from an educational perspective the issue is whether the meaning that a semiotic resource affords to an individual matches the disciplinary affordance assigned by the community. The power of the term for educational work is that learning can now be framed as coming to discern the disciplinary affordances of semiotic resources.

    In this paper we will briefly discuss the history of the term affordance, define the term disciplinary affordance and illustrate its usefulness in a number of educational settings.

  • 28.
    Andersson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    Jacob Böhme als Netzwerkdenker: Die Lehre von den sieben Quellgeistern in der Morgen Röte2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Andersson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    Jacob Bölhme's Philosophical Writing2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Andersson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    När tyska var nästan lika vanligt som svenska: Tyskt språk och tysk kultur i 1600-talets Svenska Rike2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Andersson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    Världens vackraste kvinna skriver andlig lyrik: Aurora von Königsmarck (1662-1728) och samlingen "Nordischer weÿrauch"2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Andersson, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Ethics.
    Franz Kafka’s and Hannah Arendt’s perceptions of membership in a human community2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the complex, paradoxical and tortuous relationship between human, nonhuman and inhuman in the fiction of Franz Kafka and the philosophy of Hannah Arendt in connection with the issues of the ethical importance of being human and the political processes that produces the ideological concept of “the human.” Whereas Arendt, as a philosopher, is especially concerned with the legal or quasi-legal norms that should entitle every subject, even a stateless refugee, to appear as a member in a political community, Kafka, as a literary writer, analyzes the social norms of “imagination” that determine whether a human being appears to fellow human beings as a member of the human community at all.

  • 33.
    Andersson, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Ethics.
    On the Humanity of Animals in Cixous and Derrida2016In: On the Humanity of Animals in Cixous and Derrida, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Fast Food, Happiness, and the Misery of Behavioral Science’2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    ‘Reconsidering Frank Lestringant’s Cannibale2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Appelbaum, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    ‘What Masterchef Says’2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    The Setting of Negotiation Agendas in Involuntary Resettlement2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    International polices on involuntary resettlement have been developed for the last 30 years following the ground breaking World Bank guidelines from the 1980s.  The World Bank is now reviewing their safeguards on involuntary resettlement presented in The Environmental and Social Safeguards Frame (ESF) (2014).These policies partially set the agenda for the protracted and conflictive on-the ground negotiations between the main stakeholders (lender, client (government or private) and the people to be displaced. In these policies, the participatory model has been in focus in order to empower and strengthening the community engagement. This paper argues that it is not about participation per se, but about negotiations. 

  • 38.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Balancing between the conflicting interests of different stakeholders in research2017In: European Business Ethics Network: Research / [ed] Ioannis Filos, Athens: Deree, American College of Greece College , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We in academia produce a lot of research in the form of papers, technologies, methods, medicines and so on. All those outcomes are of great importance for society and people. On the other hand, there are many stakeholders in the process of producing research outcomes nowadays. Researchers themselves are of course the main stakeholders because their career is dependent on research. However, when research projects are connected to various political goals or affect profits for industries, many other stakeholders like politicians and business people get involved to research activities as well. Especially industries offer a lot of research funds to academic projects, and actually today many collaborative research projects between industry and academia are in progress. Thus, research environments are very complex and morally challenging since many different and conflicting interests interfere. Many academic researchers believe that what they produce belongs to society, and that their work is there mainly to satisfy the interests and needs of society and people. But, at the same time, they need to fulfill the demands coming from research supporters who offer funds and research opportunities. In producing research of good quality, it is unavoidable and very important for researchers to make a fair choice between the quality of scientific research and the satisfaction of stakeholders’ demands. This paper explores how researchers make justice between these conflicting interests, what kind of ethical dilemmas and problems they face in their daily research activities, and how they solve the ethical problems. This study is the first step of a research project that focuses on how scientific research activities and outcomes become 'social' and 'valuable'.

  • 39.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Robots as companions in feelings and discussions2017In: Retfærdighed – Justice, Robophilosophy / [ed] Martin Mose Bentzen, Copenhagen, 2017, p. 42-42Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Robots are used in emotional relationships. On the other hand, it is not very common to think that robots can be used as partners in a philosophical dialog. It would be challenging to find the conditions under which a robot can be one of the parts in an emotional relationship or in a Socratic dialog. Robots usable as emotional or philosophical companions need probably to function well at both dimensions, providing continuous and interchanging support for feelings and reasoning. Our aim here is not to investigate the technical possibilities for such a machine but the theoretical requirements and ethical conditions for its creation and use.

  • 40.
    Asai, Ryoko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    The paradoxical nature of privacy2012In: Privacy in the social networked world / [ed] Andrew A. Adams, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Privacy appears to be a very important issue today when ICT permeates more and more aspects of our life. Mainly this is understood as a risk of breaking the privacy of persons, and possibly the privacy of groups, organizations, corporations and states. It is therefore interesting to investigate the main definitions of privacy, try to grasp its nature and to discern its features, and to discuss the possible ways of suitable and needed activities.

     

    There are essentially two types if definitions. One is focused on the protection of information and on the rules that govern openness and protection. Moor (1997), defines privacy like “the expression of a core value, viz., the value of security” or “sometimes used to designate a situation in which people are protected from intrusion or observation by natural or physical circumstances.... In addition to natural privacy there is normative privacy. A normatively private situation is a situation protected by ethical, legal, or conventional norms.” A similar definition is given by Edmund Byrne (1998): Privacy as a “zone of inaccessibility”.

     

    A different approach to the definition of privacy is focused on the control of information, and the main example of this kind of definition is given by Charles Fried (1968): “Privacy is not simply an absence of information about us in the minds of others, rather it is the control we have over information about ourselves”. In the same wavelength we find the definition given by Quinn (2011): “Privacy is a social arrangement that allows individuals to have some level of control over who is able to gain access to their physical selves and their personal information”.

     

    Which of the two lines of definitions is more accurate and fruitful, regarding its power to guide our activities toward the achievement of desired goals? If we make an effort to describe the nature of privacy we can easily and rather fast come to the conclusion that privacy is not only something that has to be protected. Although this is important, underlined by both lines of definitions, it seems that privacy sometimes has to be diminished or invaded in order to satisfy important interests and values. One is to create a bond to another person, group or organization. To achieve this one has to give access to private information, or even to give up part or all limitations toward this special person or organization. It is a matter of trust between each other. The other situation, which is the most common one, is that a person, group or organization, which we may call a separate entity, has always another important interest added to the interest of protecting its own privacy: To break, diminish or invade the privacy of any other entity that is a prospective or actual partner in any sense. It is very important for any entity to acquire access to the information about any other entity that is of some interest.

     

    If we now go back to the definitions of privacy, and look upon them through the glasses of our observations of its nature we may have good arguments to maintain that a definition focused on the control of information is more plausible. Given the controversial nature of privacy (protect it and break it at the same time) and the clashes arising constantly between all entities in a social interaction, the focus cannot be on normative solutions which if they work are always limited to a certain situation, but on the ways skills, methods and tools we use to create, revise and apply policies, guidelines, rules and principles to manage the issues of privacy.

     

    References

    Byrne, E. F. (1998). “Privacy”. Encyclopedia of Applied Ethics, 3, 649-659.

    Fried, C. (1968). “Privacy: A moral analysis”. Yale Law Journal, 77, 475-493.

    Moor, J. (1997). “Towards a theory of privacy in the information age”. Computer and Society, 27, 27-32.

    Quinn, M. J. (2011). Ethics for the Information Age. Boston: Pearson.

  • 41.
    Assenova, Daniela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    Bulgarian Nobel Prize Nominees in Literature: A Swedish/Scandinavian Perspective on Bulgarian Literature during 1901–19612012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Assenova, Daniela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    I Balkanbergens skugga: bulgariska författares Nobeläventyr2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Assenova, Daniela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    Българската литература в контекста на Нобеловата награда2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Backman Prytz, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Arkivkurragömma med historiens flickor – ett genusperspektiv på barn- och ungdomshistoriska källor.2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Berg, Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Icke-formell självbildning: En ny undersökningskategori i historisk forskning2015In: Perspektiv på folkbildning: Forskarna Anne Berg, Anders Burman, Samuel Edquist och Kerstin Rydbeck samtalar med Per Sundgren om folkligt bildningsarbete, 2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Vad skiljer folkbildning från bildning? Vilket är folket i folkbildningen? Är folkbildningsidealet fortfarande användbart? Eller behöver det förnyas? I så fall hur? Kan vi folkbilda oss på egen hand? Kan universiteten inrymma folkbildning? Se [http://abfstockholm.se/event/2016/02/perspektiv-pa-folkbildning/]

    Möt de fyra forskarna Anne Berg, Anders Burman, Samuel Edquist och Kerstin Rydbeck i ett samtal om folkbildning som leds av Per Sundgren. Utgångspunkten tar vi i den nyutkomna boken Perspektiv på folkbildning. Fyra forskares tankar om folkligt bildningsarbete.

  • 46.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Old and New Testament Exegesis, New Testament Exegesis.
    Discerning Quotations from Heracleon in Origen’s Commentary on the Gospel of John2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Old and New Testament Exegesis, New Testament Exegesis.
    Discerning Quotations from Heracleon in Origen’s Commentary on the Gospel of John2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Old and New Testament Exegesis, New Testament Exegesis.
    Evaluating quotations in ancient literature: the case of Heracleon’s lost exegetical notebook2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Old and New Testament Exegesis, New Testament Exegesis.
    Excavating Heracleon from Origen: A Shadowy Character Preserved in Fragments by an Adversary2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Old and New Testament Exegesis, New Testament Exegesis.
    Gränsdragningar i de första kommentarerna till Nya testamentet2017Conference paper (Other academic)
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