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  • 1.
    Andersson, Maj-Britt
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Why world cultural heritage?: Democracy, local participation and knowledge production in the world culture nomination of Farms in Hälsingland, Sweden2009In: The 16th International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences (IUAES), Kunming, China, 27 - 31 July, 2009. Humanity, Development and Cultural Diversity: Session: Indigenous Knowledge and Sustainable Development Organizers: Dr. BILLINGS Dorothy and Dr. RUDNEV Viatcheslav, 2009, p. 1-9Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Around the world there is a rush in nominating tangible and intangible sites for UNESCO’s World Culture Heritage List. The requirements for nomination are that the sites have "universal value for mankind", that they are unique and authentic, and there is a need to secure the sites’ sustainable development by opening them up for the tourist industry. Sweden has a total of fourteen natural and cultural heritage sites on the list, one of which is a natural site, twelve are cultural sites, and one is a mixed site. It was anticipated that the large timbered red-painted farmhouses of Hälsingland in the north of Sweden would be listed in June 2009. ICOMOS, however, came to another conclusion and deferred the nomination.

    The nomination process has lasted for over ten years and has been a painstaking process involving the local communities and the county administration board in the county town of Gävle. The local people are partly thrilled, because they assume that there is money to earn when they open up their homes for tourists; an income that for some is badly needed because of the deterioration of the buildings due to the high costs of renovation. But some are openly critical to the entire enterprise, which is seen as a status project for some politicians and threat to the landscape by disturbing the harmony between the built environment, people and the natural landscape. In a cultural heritage nomination process, a complicated interaction arises between expert knowledge and local knowledge, which generates insights that are crucial to capture and dress in words to be able to formulate a successful world heritage proposal and not the least to make it operational.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Maj-Britt
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Why World Culture Heritage? Democracy, local participation and knowledge production in the world culture nomination of Farms in Halsingland, Sweden2011In: Indigenous Knowledge and Sustainable Development / [ed] Dorothy Billings, Viatcheslav Rudnev, Beijing, China: The Intellectual House , 2011, p. 21-33Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes the nomination process of the Swedish heritage site Farms and Villages in Hiilsingland (2007) for UNESCO's World Heritage List. It was anticipated that the large timbered red-painted farmhouses of Halsingland in the north of Sweden would be listed in June 2009, but ICOMOS (International Council on Monuments and Sites) came to another conclusion,  deferred  the  nomination  and  returned  it  to  the  Swedish  authorities  for improvements.

    The  nomination  process  lasted  for  over  10  years  and  has  been  a  painstaking  process involving the local communities and the county administration board in the county town of Gavle. The costs were estimated to be 15 million Swedish Crowns (1.6 million EURO) which did not trickle down to the owners of the farmhouses. The local people were nonetheless thrilled because they assumed that a nomination would benefit them economically, especially if they were prepared to join the tourist circus and make their homes accessible for visitors. The extra income was badly needed since the restoration costs for these large houses in most cases can only with difficulties be carried by the individual house owner. But some were openly critical to the entire enterprise and they saw it as a status project for some politicians and a threat to the perceived harmony between the traditionally built environment and the landscape. A nomination would cause a disruption between old and new ways of living instead of continuity. In a cultural heritage nomination process a complicated interaction arises between expert knowledge and local knowledge, which generates insights that need to be formulated in the final product. Cultural sensitivity and local participation must be pillars in such a project to make it sustainable.

  • 3.
    Aparac-Jelusic, Tatjana
    et al.
    University of Zadar.
    Ma, Lai
    University College Dublin.
    Ibekwe-SanJuan, Fidelia
    Université d'Aix-Marseille.
    Ortiz-Repiso Jimenez, Virginia
    University of Madrid.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Warner, Julian
    Queen's University Belfast.
    Crossing the Boundaries in Information Science: Perspectives on Interdisciplinarity2013In: ASIS&T 2013 Proceedings of the 76th ASIS&T Annual Meeting Volume 50 2013 Beyond the Cloud: Rethinking Information Boundaries, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information science has often been recognized as an interdisciplinary field. The marriage between librarianship/documentation and computer science was a natural development in the United States in the post-War period (Farkas-Conn, 1991; Hahn & Barlow, 2012), while the development of information science in Europe has largely stayed close to the humanities and the social sciences, in particular, in relation to communication and media (Ibekwe-SanJuan, et al., 2010). For many years, the interdisciplinary nature of information science has been applauded; until recently, we are warned that interdisciplinarinity may be harmful to the identity of the field. Buckland (2012) states that the claim of being "interdisciplinary" is to choose a position of weakness because "in times of economic crisis political power tends to reside in well-established disciplines." Cronin (2012) comments that "the field’s sense of identity, arguably fragile at the best of times, is likely to be further weakened" for its "epistemic promiscuity."

  • 4.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Heritage: A Conceptual Paper Toward a Theory of Cultural Heritage in Humanitarian Action2009In: Papers World Conference Humanitarian Studies (WCHS), Groningen: University of Groningen , 2009, p. 1-19Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This conceptual paper deals with definitions of and approaches to cultural and natural heritage and discusses functions of heritage and culture as elements of sustainable peace-building. The paper assumes the necessity of a longer-term strategic thinking. A fundamental question occupying heritage research is why some parts of the human Lebensraum are singled out and marked as a cultural heritage and why this need for preserving, protecting and capturing in time and space is escalating globally. Some researchers argue that this is a consequence of that we seem to be living in a fragmented, post, post-modern society where no coherent story is told and people and places are regarded as texts and isolated narratives open for interpretations and re-interpretations. Some others argue that the Drang for heritage is based on economic interests and connected to the booming tourist industry, while others refer to the politicizing of place.

    The conceptual discussion will be exemplified with the ethnographic case of The Museum of Terror/ Terror Haza in Budapest in order to show the complexity of heritage as elements of reconciliation and transition.

  • 5.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    On knowledge production and local participation2007In: NOHA – ECHO Presidency: Seminar on Changing Scope of Humanitarian Action. Lisbon, Portugal 9-12 October 2007, 2007, p. 1-16Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Local participation, beneficiary participation, informed participation, or, folkligt deltagande (peoples’ participation [Swe.] ), are concepts that are highly used and appreciated in development projects as well as in the field of humanitarian action. In the present introductory paper, I will discuss this concept and refer to it as “local participation” or only “participation” for the sake of convenience, although I am very much aware of the refinement of the concept expressed in the different forms of the word as mentioned above. I am not questioning the concept per se, and I will not dwell on the meaning of it. Instead, I am concerned with the outcomes of local participation, that is the knowledge produced and I would like to take this knowledge and merge into a universal (global) knowledge production, with the purpose of getting a way from the associated locality of the concept, which makes it both vulnerable and at the same time powerful.

  • 6.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    The Paradox with Local Participation in Development-Induced Resettlement2004In: Paper presented at the International Conference GRAPPLING WITH POVERTY. Institute of Latin American Studies. University of Stockholm. September 23-24th 2004, 2004Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Local participation has repeatedly proved its relevance for mitigating negative consequences in development-induced displacement and resettlement projects. Despite its verified strengths, we seem to encounter a paradox here.

  • 7.
    Aronsson, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Gumucio, Juan Carlos
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology.
    In search for a common ground in the encounter between technical expertise andindigenous knowledge2009In: Papers World Conference Humanitarian Studies (WCHS), Groningen: University of Groningen , 2009, p. 1-17Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In spite of repeated efforts of conciliation, the relation between expert and indigenous knowledge remains a deeply ambivalent arena. This ambivalence puts obstacles to a crucial factor in Humanitarian Action - the effective alliances between these as perceived as two different cognitive forms. Coordinated programs should of course proceed from a fundament of established mutual trust, a precondition that often gets bogged down in a muddled discourse on issues such as inspiration from original conservationists, respect of natural harmonies, the precedence of instrumental precision before traditional approximations, not to mention mystifications and delusions.

  • 8.
    Backlund, Janne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    How to claim knowledge: The use of information in the lifeworld of the educational context2003In: ERDSA (Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia) Annual Conference Proceedings, (Book of refereed proceedings), 2003, p. 9-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a small body of empirical data concerning the types of information students

    handle, this paper inquires into the problematic of knowledge creation, artifacts of

    knowledge, and the possible role of examination as a negative factor in students’ reflective

    achievements. Habermas’ theory of communicative action is proposed as the theoretical

    framework for analyzing the educational environment seen as a lifeworld. From the observed

    fact that types of information students themselves produce (papers, essays, lecture notes,

    master theses, etc.) are hardly mentioned as information they say they handle, the tentative

    conclusion is drawn that these missing types are systematically excluded. The theoretical

    framework provides an explanation for this state of affairs. The overall goal of higher

    education is to increase knowledge in a particular field. In teaching, however, this goal is

    dealt with in a training manner, clearly manifest in the examination process. Therefore, the

    action orientations of the students will differ more or less from the overall goal. Claims of

    validity connected with knowledge turn in a normative direction in action situations oriented

    towards examination. Since information is the link anchoring claims of validity, students

    become inclined to exclude the artifacts of their own knowledge creation. The latter are not

    viewed as dealing with information linking the claims connected with the overall goal of

    increasing ‘real’ knowledge, instead being taken as constituting the links for normative

    claims. The paper also proposes certain means in line with the theory for improving this state

    of affairs.

  • 9.
    Backlund, Janne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Lifeworld and Meaning: Information in Relation to Context2005In: Context: Nature, Impact, and Role: 5th International Conference on Conceptions of Library and Information Sciences, CoLIS 2005, Glasgow, UK, June 4-8, 2005. Proceedings / [ed] Fabio Crestani, Ian Ruthven, Berlin: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2005, p. 119-140Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes a concept of information defined as semantic links to a meaning external to the information, located in the structure of the lifeworld. In building upon Habermas Theory of Communicative Action, the progress of linguistically coordinated action in the lifeworld through speech acts connected with claims of validity is briefly described. The claim is put for ward that the meaning of a statement or an artefact can only be determined through communicative action since all information is semantically contex tualized in the lifeworld, the basic structure of society within which the repro duction of world views and cultural traditions occurs. However, communicative rationality shapes social institutions into a system of growing complexity that exerts pressure on the lifeworld, increasing the need for communicative action. The function of facilitating the evaluation of validity claims makes access to information necessary for consensus formation and action coordination, thereby emphasizing the significance of IS. The paper presents a model of contextualized praxis as it concludes that information specialists must act communicatively.

  • 10.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    An attempt to nuance the understanding of professional reports in archaeology2015In: GL16 Conference Proceedings, Amsterdam, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Professional (i.e. extra-academic) contract archaeology is an internationally widespread practice contributing significantly to the archaeological literature. However, professional knowledge production in archaeology, and most notably the professional report genre, is at times described as problematic. The problem descriptions are ambiguous and can be grouped under at least three different topics: concerns for content quality and practical accessibility, concerns for the comparably low degree of analytical and theoretical synthesizing in reports and concerns for lack of mutual knowledge transfer between academic archaeologists and professional archaeologists. Technical issues of access are to an increasing extent being solved. Format standardizations are also developing. Hence the report genre becomes more accessible, and the content more readable and informative. Yet articulations of attitudes toward the genre in archaeology text books and journal articles remain focused on the genre’s problems. The aim of my ongoing dissertation research is to nuance the understanding of the professional report genre in archaeology. I do so by analyzing factors shaping reporting as it takes place in the intersection between academic norms, professional values and market logics. I argue an improved genre understanding is crucial to diminish cultural issues of access to the report literature, and also as a basis for development of reporting practices. In1the dissertation research I analyze (1) perceptions about the report genre in archaeology literature, (2) information policy regulating reporting in archaeology, (3) how report writers and county board professionals interpret the reporting and report auditing work tasks and (4) the frames of reference report writers bring into reporting. The aim of this paper is to explicate the research design consisting of four sub-studies, to briefly report on findings from study no. 4, and to discuss preliminary, partial results from study no. 2.

  • 11.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Research outside academia?: An analysis of resources in extra-academic report writing2016In: Proceedings of the 79th ASIS&T Annual Meeting: Creating Knowledge, Enhancing Lives through Information & Technology / [ed] Andrew Grove, Diane H. Sonnenwald, Lauren Harrison et. al., Silver Spring: Association for Information Science and Technology , 2016, Vol. 53Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A significant part of all research takes place in extraacademic organizations. Practitioner researchers often present their results in publications different from those in academia, e.g. in reports, sometimes (and here) referred to as “gray literature”. Gray literature is increasingly available online. However, availability does not mean that reports are exploited to their full potential in research. Disciplines like archaeology have substantial problems with the scholarly communication and knowledge sharing between extraacademic and academic research. This paper approaches this problem from a report-user perspective. For the benefit of potential report users’ gray literature literacies, reportwriting practices are analyzed by means of practice theory. Qualitative interviews with six practitioner researchers in Swedish archaeology firms make up the material. The analysis focuses on how report writers draw on regulative, institutional, and infrastructural resources in their practices. Based on the findings about the practices in which reports are written and become informative, the paper presents seven suggestions supporting report users’ potential to critically analyze and use report content. The results contribute to the information science field with insights into extra-academic information practices, and as input in a wider critical discussion of the information-related conditions for research outside academia.

  • 12.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM. Dept. of ALM, Uppsala University.
    Research outside academia?: An analysis of resources in extra-academic report writing2016In: Proceedings of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A significant part of all research takes place in extra-academic organizations. Practitioner researchers often present their results in publications different from those in academia, e.g. in reports, sometimes (and here) referred to as “gray literature”. Gray literature is increasingly available online. However, availability does not mean that reports are exploited to their full potential in research. Disciplines like archaeology have substantial problems with the scholarly communication and knowledge sharing between extra-academic and academic research. This paper approaches this problem from a report-user perspective. For the benefit of potential report users’ gray literature literacies, report-writing practices are analyzed by means of practice theory. Qualitative interviews with six practitioner researchers in Swedish archaeology firms make up the material. The analysis focuses on how report writers draw on regulative, institutional, and infrastructural resources in their practices. Based on the findings about the practices in which reports are written and become informative, the paper presents seven suggestions supporting report users’ potential to critically analyze and use report content. The results contribute to the information science field with insights into extra-academic information practices, and as input in a wider critical discussion of the information-related conditions for research outside academia.

  • 13.
    Börjesson, Lisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Alsbjer, Peter
    Biblioteken som lärandeorganisationer - hur skapas och bibehålls de?2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Daivadanamn, Meena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Cajander, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Dahl, Jo-Anne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Empowering towards healthy behaviours2016In: Ending Childhood Obesity: Actions through health and food equity, Uppsala University, 2016, p. 34-39Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Ekström, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    The Illicit Information Community: Information - Practical Reflections on the Shadow Library AAARG2017In: Improving Quality of Life Through Information: Proceedings of the XXV Bobcatsss Symposium, Tampere Finland, January 2017 / [ed] Paavo Arvola, Tanja Hintsanen, Serafia Kari, Soile Kolehma, Shan Luolin, Jasmiina Sillanpää, Tampere, 2017, p. 121-125Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a netnographic analysis of information needs and practices related to the shadow library AAARG. AAARG is regarded as a portal and community for the sharing and distribution of academic and artistic texts, books and articles. The portal in question is defined as an actor within the guerrilla open access movement, a radical node within the larger open access movement, which is analysed as a cultural field using the theoretical framework of Sociologist Pierre Bourdieu. AAARG is thereafter discussed in an information-practical sense with re- gards to social interaction between individual users’ needs as well as discursive and constructional origins of such needs. These needs and the practices they create are then examined with regards to the order that the platform itself creates, tied to the cultural field which it is a part of. The conclusion is that alternative knowledge organizational platforms such as AAARG have had and will continue to have a big influence on the discussion of today’s open access models, since they clearly fill a certain demand. The discrepancy between such initiatives and institutional open access activities will therefore need further analysis in a library and information scientific context.

  • 16.
    Enwald, Heidi
    et al.
    University of Oulu.
    Kangas, Maarit
    University of Oulu.
    Keränen, Niina
    University of Oulu.
    Korpelainen, Raija
    University of Oulu and Oulu Deaconess Institute.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Jämsä, Timo
    University of Oulu.
    Opinions and use of mobile information technology among older people in Northern Finland: Preliminary results of a population based study2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 ASIS&T Annual Meeting, Oct 14-18, Copenhagen / [ed] Andrew Grove and Diane H. Sonnenwald and Lauren Harrison and Catherine Blake and Christian Schlögl and Isabella Peters and Barbara Endler-Jobst and Colleen Cool and Yin-Leng Theng, Silver Springs, MD: ASIS&T , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older peoples usage of mobile devices is increasing. This study is part of the GASEL project and seeks to increase the understanding of the use of mobile information technology and opinions towards it. Opinions are compared between genders and age groups. The population based data were collected by conducting a questionnaire survey. A random sample of 1,500 adults 65 years of age or older was obtained from the Finnish Population Register Centre. The number of respondents was 918 with a response rate of 61.2 %. About one fifth (n=169) had used a tablet computer and approximately one third (n=226) had used a mobile phone with a touch screen in the past 12 months without encountering major difficulties. The respondents had mostly thought that using the devices would not be easy. They had also thought that the usage would not be too expensive for them. Men and younger old people held more positive opinions towards these new technologies. Older people are slower in adapting and accepting new technologies and this should be taken into account when designing services, applications and content, as these technologies have the potential to enrichen the lives of this specific population group.

  • 17.
    Enwald, Heidi
    et al.
    University of Oulu and Åbo Akademi University.
    Kangas, Maarit
    University of Oulu.
    Keränen, Niina
    University of Oulu .
    Korpelainen, Raija
    Oulu Deaconess Institute.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM. Information Studies, Åbo Akademi.
    Jämsä, Timo
    University of Oulu.
    Opinions and use of mobile information technology among older people in Northern Finland: Preliminary results of a population based study2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 ASIS&T Annual Meeting, Oct 14-18, Copenhagen, Wiley-Blackwell, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older peoples usage of mobile devices is increasing. This study is part of the GASEL project and seeks to increase the understanding of the use of mobile information technology and opinions towards it. Opinions are compared between genders and age groups. The population based data were collected by conducting a questionnaire survey. A random sample of 1,500 adults 65 years of age or older was obtained from the Finnish Population Register Centre. The number of respondents was 918 with a response rate of 61.2 %. About one fifth (n=169) had used a tablet computer and approximately one third (n=226) had used a mobile phone with a touch screen in the past 12 months without encountering major difficulties. The respondents had mostly thought that using the devices would not be easy. They had also thought that the usage would not be too expensive for them. Men and younger old people held more positive opinions towards these new technologies. Older people are slower in adapting and accepting new technologies and this should be taken into account when designing services, applications and content, as these technologies have the potential to enrichen the lives of this specific population group.

  • 18.
    Ericsson, Urban
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Dealing with Youths Alienation: The Swedish Experience2010In: National Conference on Youth Alienation in Nigeria: Breaking the Cycle, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Haider, Jutta
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Cox, Andrew
    University of Sheffield.
    Francke, Helena
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Hall, Hazel
    Edinburgh Napier University.
    Transformation or continuity? The impact of social media on information: implications for theory and practice2012In: Proceedings of the 2012 ASIS&T Annual Meeting, Baltimore, MD / [ed] Andrew Grove, Silver Springs, MD: ASIS&T , 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This panel debates whether the ways in which social media are changing the nature, creation, seeking, use and sharing of infor- mation constitute a transformation or are primarily marked by con- tinuity. Ubiquitous and everyday access to social media (for some) seems to be bringing about changes in social practice, including of information-related activities, such that conceptualisations of infor- mation itself are potentially reshaped. Discussants draw inspiration from the pervasive impact on information activities of the every- day adoption of social media. At a theoretical level they also draw inspiration from the analytic resources of contemporary practice theory and its emphasis on materiality and embodiment, routine and change, social expectations and social identity, and knowledge as a process. All the participants of the panel have conducted new empirical research on social media use with a focus on its deep as well as broad impact. The audience members are invited to dis- cuss with the panelists questions such as how social media relate to routinised daily practices and institutionalised practices and hi- erarchies, how their use refashions social relationships, how they turn information seekers and users into information managers, pro- ducers and creators and shape perceptions of information authority and trustworthiness, and how a new theorisation can help librari- ans, information professionals and researchers understand change and assume a proactive role in it.

  • 20.
    Hammarfelt, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    An examination of the possibilities that altmetric methods offer in the case of the humanities2013In: Proceedings of the ISSI 2013 – 14th International Conference of the International Society for Scientometrics and Informetrics / [ed] Juan Gorraiz, Edgar Schiebel, Christian Gumpenberger, Marianne Hörlesberger & Henk Moed, 2013, p. 721-727Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The advantages of altmetrics — the diversity of dissemination channels analysed, the speed of getting data, the openness of methods, and the ability to measure impact beyond the ‘scholarly realm’— could be seen as especially promising for fields that currently are difficult to study using established bibliometric methods and data sources. This paper reviews the benefits of using altmetric methods to analyse the impact of research in the humanities and tests some of the most common altmetric tools on a small sample of publications and authors. The findings indicate that many of the problems identified in research on the use of bibliometrics on the humanities are also relevant for altmetric approaches. The importance of non-journal publications, the reliance on print as well the limited availability of open access publishers are characteristics that hinder altmetric analysis. However, this study provides only a few examples and further studies are needed in order to examine the possibilities that altmetric methods offer.

  • 21.
    Hammarfelt, Björn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Åström, Fredrik
    Lund University Libraries.
    Mapping the humanities: informetric analyses of literary studies through A&HCI2011In: The 13th conference of the International Society for Scientometrics and Informetrics, Vol 2. / [ed] Ed Noyons, Patrick Ngulube & Jacqueline Leta, 2011, p. 993-995Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Hemmungs Wirtén, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Libratory Law: the (Un)Making of Knowledge, 1976-20062007In: Creativity, Ownership and Collaboration in the Digital Age, 5th Media in Transition Conference, MIT, 27-29 April, 2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Hemmungs Wirtén, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Translation and Copyright: the Transmission of the Law2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24. Holmberg, Kim
    et al.
    Hellqvist, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    The Nordic Landscape of LIS Research: A New Approach for Co-Word Analysis of Research in Three Nordic Countries2009In: PROCEEDINGS OF ISSI 2009: 12TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR SCIENTOMETRICS AND INFORMETRICS / [ed] B. Larsen & J. Leta, 2009, p. 942-943Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Aesthetic judgments in folksonomies as a criteria for organising knowledge2010In: Paradigms and conceptual systems in knowledge organization.: Proceedings of the 11th International ISKO Conference 23-26 February, Rome, Italy / [ed] Claudio Gnoli & Fulvio Mazzocchi, Würzburg: Ergon Verlag , 2010, Vol. 12, p. 308-315Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most central challenges of knowledge organisation research and practice is the question of organising principles. Bliss proposed a consensus of experts as a criteria for knowledge organisation. Thereafter the complexity and ambiguity of criteria has become a subject of discussion, especially influenced by relativist philosophical theories. Hulme introduced already in 1911-1912 the notion of (literary) warrant to denote the (literary) criteria of organising knowledge. Hjørland has written about the limits of consensus and proposed (together with Albrechtsen) domain analysis as an approach for reaching pragmatic criteria. Even though the problems have been acknowledged, in practice, the veritable criteria are articulated only seldom. Feinberg [4] calls for a more explicit argumentation of criteria from the part of the designers of knowledge organisation systems, a view with which Hjørland concurs. The significance of the challenge is underlined by Gnoli who lists the problems related to ’viewpoint warrant’ (viewpoint as a criteria for organising knowledge) as a central challenge of future knowledge organisation research.The present study refers to aesthetics as exemplary of the problems related to viewpoints and knowledge organisation. Aesthetic judgments are essentially cultural and subjective, but same time people tend to expect others to concur with their own judgments [12]. In order to improve the explicity of the warranting factors (as [4] suggests) of aesthetic organisation of knowledge, the present study explores the possibilities to ground organisatory criteria on an empirical investigation of explicit aesthetic judgments of a group of people. This study discusses folksonomies as a source of aesthetic judgments and those judgments as a warrant for controlled organisation of knowledge. The question is whether folksonomies can be used as a source for aesthetic statements which can be used to warrant organisation of knowledge. Photosharing service Flickr is used as an example.

     

  • 26.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Alternatives to Being Information Literate2018In: Information Literacy in the Workplace / [ed] Serap Kurbanoğlu, Joumana Boustany, Sonja Špiranec, Esther Grassian, Diane Mizrachi, Loriene Roy, Springer, 2018, p. 813-821Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In contrast to the relative abundance of conceptualisations of information literacy, the earlier research has placed considerably less attention on its alternatives. The findings show that there are shades of being less and non-literate beyond a mere lack of necessary skills or engagement in inappropriate practices. Information illiteracy can be experienced as a problem but it can also represent a conscious choice for delimiting and organising information practices. From a theoretical and practical perspective, this study suggests that both information literacies and information illiteracies should be taken into account in information literacy research and education, and when developing and deploying information systems and services to compensate for the lack of literacies.

  • 27.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Archives, Libraries and Museums in the Contemporary Society: Perspectives of the Professionals2014In: iConference 2014 Proceedings / [ed] Kindling, Maxi and Greifeneder, Elke, llinois: iSchools , 2014, p. 45-64Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate how ALM professionals conceptualise the common role of archives, libraries and museums (ALMs) in the contemporary society. There is only a little earlier empirical research on the topic. This study is based on a quantitative analysis of the results of a web survey of 131 ALM professionals. The analysis shows that the views of the respondents epitomise diverging and contradictory ideas of the role of the institutions. The findings underline the need to discuss and define the future of the ALMs on a profound level of their societal role with a clear emphasis of its theoretical underpinnings. The diverse of opinions and number of mostly practice-oriented visions can be helpful in shaping and reshaping the role of the institutions. At the same time, it is apparent that they do not have the required theoretical depth to function as a common ground for explicating the role of ALMs in the contemporary society.

  • 28.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    DOME - Deployment of Online Medical Records and e-Health services2013In: ASIS&T European Workshop 2013: Proceedings of the Second Association for Information Science and Technology ASIS&T European Workshop 2013 June 5-6, Åbo/Turku, Finland / [ed] Huvila, Isto, 2013, Vol. 2, p. 209-215Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Entä informaatiokirjoitustaito?2008In: Reader- and User-Oriented Communication: National Conference of Communication Studies 2007 / [ed] Heli Katajamäki, Merja Koskela & Suvi Isohella, Vaasa: University of Vaasa , 2008, p. 22-27Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Even though information literacy implicitly comprises an idea of a complete participation in an information community, the typical definitions of infor- mation literacy have tended to underline seeking, searching, locating, re- ceiving and evaluation instead of information creation. Wilder (2005) has criticised the concept information literacy for emphasising the problems of searching instead of finding relevant information. The problematising of in- formation seeking places emphasis on the difficulty of searching and the complexity of required skills. A more sensible approach would be to facili- tate information use rather than to teach searching using complicated tools. All information sought by human-beings is mostly produced by their fellow humans. Therefore an approach to decrease complexity of information searching could to be to educate people to create more searchable and us- able information. This article discusses information creation as a part of the concept information literacy. Besides technical problems, information crea- tion education is inevitably faced by the complexities of social and cultural dimensions of information and information production.

     

  • 30.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Länkad data på fältet: från fältdokumentation och rapportering till dokumentationskontinuum2012In: Proceedings of the CAA-SE conference 2011, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Mining qualitative data on human information behaviour from the Web2011In: Information und Wissen: global, sozial und frei?: Proceedings des 12. Internationalen Symposiums für Informationswissenschaft (ISI 2011) Hildesheim, 9. bis 11. März 2011. / [ed] Joachim Griesbaum and Thomas Mandl and Christa Womser-Hacker, Boizenburg: Verlag Werner Hülsbusch , 2011, p. 322-326Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses an approach of collecting qualitative data on human information behaviour that is based on mining web data using search engines. The approach is technically the same that has been used for some time in webometric research to make statistical inferences on web data, but the present paper shows how the same tools and data collecting methods can be used to gather data for qualitative data analysis on human information behaviour.

  • 32.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Social aspects of the ecology of information work2011In: Information ecology and libraries: Proceedings of the International Conference organised on the occasion of the 90th anniversary of the establishment of the Faculty of Philosophy at Comenius University in Bratislava, Bratislava, University Library in Bratislava, Slovakia, 10-12 October, 2011 / [ed] Steinerová, Jela, Bratislava: Comenius University of Bratislava , 2011, p. 27-36Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The model of the ecology of information work (Huvila, 2006, 2009) describes the relation of knowledge organisation systems, or in broader sense, the relation of information infrastructures and human information work. The present paper discusses the social aspects of information work and their impact on the interplay of information infrastructures and hu- man activity. The theoretical underpinnings of the discussion build on the ecological approach of Gibson, infrastructural theory and social informa- tion theory. The concluding remarks summarise a reading of the earlier model that places a specific emphasis on foregrounding the social pro- cesses relating to the emergence of information infrastructures and their related information work patterns.

  • 33.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Steps towards a participatory digital library and data archive for archaeological information2009In: Proceedings of the 10th Libraries in the Digital Age (LIDA) 2009 Conference. Dubrovnik and Zadar, Croatia, Zadar: University of Zadar , 2009, p. 149-159Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The e-Science related literature sees digital libraries, digital archives and databanks as central collaborative infrastructures for scientific and scholarly research. The present paper discusses preliminary findings and observations from an action research study on a participatory digital library and data archive for archaeological and archaeology related data. The project aims to develop a combined digital repository and collaboratory for archaeological research with a special emphasis on participation and semantically rich relations between individual digital artifacts. The discussed digital library is based on semantic wiki technology and developed together with archaeologists from a small Nordic archaeology consultancy. The findings of the study indicate that the principal challenges associated with the life- cycle approach relate to the paradox of formality and informality of documentation and to the implications the system has on the customary procedures of archaeological information work.

  • 34.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    To whom it may concern?: The users and uses of digital archaeological information2008In: The Layers of Perception: CAA 2007. Computer Applications and Quantitative methods in Archaeology / [ed] Posluschny, A., Lambers, K., Herzog, I., Bonn: Deutsches Archäologisches Institut / Dr. Rudolph Habelt Gmbh , 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to ensure the functional, not only physical sustainability of the earlier and current archaeological information resources, a special emphasis is needed on the functional aspects of preserva- tion. This paper reports on a study, which has explored the interface between the human patterns of infor- mation use and the methods of structuring and organizing archaeological information and knowledge. The empirical case study was based on a series of thematic interviews with archaeology professionals from the Nordic countries. The study informs future development of information systems and information services for archaeology and cultural heritage professionals. The results of the analysis shows that there are two critical success factors. Several recommendations are proposed on how to improve archaeological informa- tion work and its outcomes.

     

  • 35.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Where is the library, or is it an archive?: Assessing the impact and implications of archaeological information collections2014In: Libraries in the Digital Age (LIDA) Proceedings, Zadar: University of Zadar , 2014, p. 1-2Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Preliminary observations made during the analysis of an interview study of Swedish professionals working with the management of archaeological information are discussed. The paper proposes that three perspectives called library, archive and museum characterise the articulations of informants on what archaeological information is, what is its relevance and impact and how it should be managed and made accessible.

  • 36.
    Huvila, Isto
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Anderson, Theresa Dirndorfer
    University of Technology Sydney.
    Jansen, Eva Hourihan
    University of Toronto.
    McKenzie, Pam
    University of Western Ontario.
    Westbrook, Lynn
    University of Texas at Austin.
    Worrall, Adam
    Florida State University.
    Boundary objects in information science research: An approach for explicating connections between collections, cultures and communities2014In: ASIST 2014 Proceedings of the 77th ASIS&T Annual Meeting: Connecting Collections, Cultures, and Communities / [ed] Andrew Grove, Silver Spring, MD: Association for Information Science and Technology , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Boundary objects (BO) are abstract or physical artefacts that reside in the interfaces between organisations or groups of people. The concept of BO, introduced by Star and Griesemer in an article in 1989, has been used in a broad variety of studies in different research communities from management to computer science and different fields of information science. The aim of this panel, composed of experienced BO researchers, is to provide an overview of and introduction to the state of the art of information science research informed by the theory for the researchers and practitioners participating in the conference; to illustrate the variety of studies and contexts in which the notion of BOs can be found useful in explicating connections between collections, cultures and commu- nities; and to push forward the state of the art of BO-oriented information science research by discussing new empirical and practical areas of interest and the theory itself.

  • 37.
    Huvila, Isto
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Budd, John M.
    University of Missouri.
    Lloyd, Annemaree
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Palmer, Carole
    University of Washington.
    Toms, Elaine
    University of Sheffield.
    Information Work in Information Science Research and Practice2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 ASIS&T Annual Meeting, Oct 14-18, Copenhagen / [ed] Andrew Grove and Diane H. Sonnenwald and Lauren Harrison and Catherine Blake and Christian Schlögl and Isabella Peters and Barbara Endler-Jobst and Colleen Cool and Yin-Leng Theng, Silver Springs, MD: ASIS&T , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information science and technology researchers and practitioners discuss information activities a broad range of terms. A concept that often appears in colloquial discussions of information activities but that has received less systematic attention is that of information work. This panel gathers a group of information science researchers who have explicitly used the notion of information work in their research to discuss how the concept can inform information science and technology research, and practice.

  • 38.
    Huvila, Isto
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Budd, John M.
    University of Missouri.
    Lloyd, Annemaree
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Palmer, Carole
    University of Washington.
    Toms, Elaine
    University of Sheffield.
    Information Work in Information Science Research and Practice2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 ASIS&T Annual Meeting, Oct 14-18, Copenhagen, Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information science and technology researchers and practitioners discuss information activities a broad range of terms. A concept that often appears in colloquial discussions of information activities but that has received less systematic attention is that of information work. This panel gathers a group of information science researchers who have explicitly used the notion of information work in their research to discuss how the concept can inform information science and technology research, and practice.

  • 39.
    Huvila, Isto
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Holmberg, Kim
    Social Capital in Second Life2008In: Proceedings of the Internet Research 9.0, Copenhagen: AoIR Digital Library, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Huvila, Isto
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Johannesson, Kristin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Critical about the clustering of tags: An intersectional perspective on folksonomies2011In: Information Science and Social Media: Proceedings of the International Conference Information Science and Social Media ISSOME 2011, August 24-26, Åbo/Turku, Finland / [ed] Huvila, I.; Holmberg, K.; Kronqvist-Berg, M., Åbo: Åbo Akademi , 2011, Vol. 1, p. 99-106Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Johannesson, Kristin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Intersectional Perspectives on Collaborative Tagging2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Johannesson, Kristin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Intersectional perspectives on Knowledge Organisation Systems2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This poster shows some thoughts on how knowledge organisation systems (KOS), with a focus on the example of collaborative tagging, can be analyzed from an intersectional perspective. The perspective which is proposed includes ideas and influences from intersectionality, gender, and queer theories. Some reasonings on what may prove to be interesting approaches in analyzing and comparing different KOS are also made.

    A selection of earlier research, what critical studies of KOS have shown so far, the author's own reflections on them and a couple of examples of tagging are presented. Some suggestions and conclusions are put forward on how intersectional/gender theories in LIS have been used and mightbe used in future research.

    An intersectional perspective in looking at KOS appears as both needed in terms of not having used much in KO(S)-research, and so it can be further developed, and relevant in that constructions of gender and other social categories, as well as KO and KOS, have to do with with categorisations, structures, hierarchies and vocabulary or language. Critical research in KO, taking the for this study relevant example of gender focussed studies, has developed and changed. From being influenced byand performing women's studies, broader approaches are now used where newer theories and perspectives such as social constructionist influences, queer theories and intersectionality are incorporated. Still, these are used to a quite small extent in LIS research and in studies of KOS. This can be done to a larger and more diverse degree.

    KOS, both traditional and new ones, are pertinent to analyze and compare from an intersectional perspective because the systems and their ways of organizing knowledge can tell us important and interesting things about society, our knowledge of it and our views on these things. Writings on collaborative tagging do not often seem to include a critical approach, which makes it especially relevant and interesting to do so.

  • 43.
    Johannesson, Kristin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Tagging Transgressive Theory: A study of how Donna Haraway's Cyborg Manifesto is tagged in Delicious2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Kjellman, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Om forskningen kring bildindexering inom det biblioteks- och informationsvetenskapliga området, belyst genom Kungl. bibliotekets bildsamlande verksamhet2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Kjellman, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Visual knowledge organization: towards an international standard or local institutional practice2008In: Proceedings of the International Society for Knowledge Organization 12: Advances in knowledge organization, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Kjellman, Ulrika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Hansson, Joakim
    Växjö universitet.
    Dahlström, Mats
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Documents reconstructed: digitization and institutional practice as mediation2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Nyström, Per
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Disciplinarity, Inter-disciplinarity and Post-disciplinarity: Changing Disciplinary Patterns in the History Discipline2007In: La interdisciplinaridad y la transdisciplinaridad en la organización de conocimiento científico = Interdisciplinarity and Transdisciplinarity in the Organization of Scientific Knowledge: Actas del VIII Congreso ISKO-España, León, 18, 19 y 20 de Abril de 2007, 2007, p. 620-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this text is to discuss some aspects of the concept of discipline from the standpoint of LIS by showing how “epistemological mutations” in the discipline of history have changed its traditional epistemological starting points and thus the way knowledge in the domain of history is organized. Something that in its prolongation maybe appears as a new kind of disciplinarity (due to epistemological changes) in the field of humanities and social science, that at the same time is challenging the conception of traditional and historical given disciplines. A basic assumption is that bibliographical classification schedules, categories, and classes cannot be regarded apart from some kind of sociological, ideological or epistemological meta-understanding. Accordingly, when this meta-understanding change, also the principles for knowledge organization alter.

  • 48. Rexhepi, Hanife
    et al.
    Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie
    Cajander, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Cancer patients' attitudes and experiences of online medical records2015In: Proc. 17th International Symposium on Health Information Management Research, UK: University of Sheffield , 2015, p. 19-25Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Rodéhn, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Museum education, practical pedagogy and performance2014In: ESERA- Conference proceeding, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Rydbeck, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Från arg tant med knut till farlig sexbomb: om bibliotekariestereotyper i ord och bild2004Conference paper (Other academic)
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