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  • 1.
    Alexandersson, Henrik
    et al.
    Institutionen för historiska studier, Göteborgs universitet.
    Andreeff, AlexanderUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.Bünz, AnnikaInstitutionen för historiska studier, Göteborgs universitet.
    Med hjärta och hjärna: En vänbok till professor Elisabeth Arwill-Nordbladh2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vänboken Med hjärta och hjärna innehåller en mångfald av artiklar som på olika sätt och på flera olika plan knyter an till professor Elisabeth Arwill-Nordbladhs forskargärning. Under drygt fyrtio år har Arwill-Nordbladh varit arkeologin trogen och hon har ägnat sin forskning åt arkeologihistoria, genus, kroppslighet och materialitet, perspektiv på yngre järnålder, minne och minnespraktiker samt livsberättelser. Artikelförfattarna tar genom sina perspektiv med läsaren på en rad resor genom tider och rumsligheter, land och hav samt städer och landsbygder. Med hjälp av arkeologiska lämningar och arkivmaterial vidgar artikelförfattarna från olika discipliner vår förståelse av människors verkligheter och föreställningsvärldar.

  • 2.
    Alsos, Inger Greve
    et al.
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Arctic Univ Museum Norway, NO-9037 Tromso, Norway..
    Lammers, Youri
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Arctic Univ Museum Norway, NO-9037 Tromso, Norway..
    Kjellman, Sofia E.
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Dept Geosci, POB 6050, NO-9037 Tromso, Norway..
    Merkel, Marie Kristine Foreid
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Arctic Univ Museum Norway, NO-9037 Tromso, Norway..
    Bender, Emma M.
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Dept Geosci, POB 6050, NO-9037 Tromso, Norway..
    Rouillard, Alexandra
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Dept Geosci, POB 6050, NO-9037 Tromso, Norway.;Univ Copenhagen, GLOBE Inst, Sect GeoGenet, Oster Voldgade 5-7, DK-1350 Copenhagen K, Denmark..
    Erlendsson, Egill
    Univ Iceland, Inst Life & Environm Sci, Sturlugata 7, IS-102 Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Gudmundsdottir, Esther Ruth
    Univ Copenhagen, GLOBE Inst, Sect GeoGenet, Oster Voldgade 5-7, DK-1350 Copenhagen K, Denmark.;Univ Iceland, Nordic Volcanol Ctr, Inst Earth Sci, Sturlugata 7, IS-102 Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Benediktsson, Ivar Orn
    Univ Iceland, Inst Earth Sci, Sturlugata 7, IS-102 Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Farnsworth, Wesley R.
    Univ Iceland, Nordic Volcanol Ctr, Inst Earth Sci, Sturlugata 7, IS-102 Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Brynjolfsson, Skafti
    Iceland Inst Nat Hist, IS-600 Borgum Vio Noroursloo, Akureyri, Iceland..
    Gisladottir, Gudrun
    Univ Iceland, Inst Life & Environm Sci, Sturlugata 7, IS-102 Reykjavik, Iceland.;Univ Iceland, Inst Earth Sci, Sturlugata 7, IS-102 Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Dögg Eddudottir, Sigrun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Schomacker, Anders
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Dept Geosci, POB 6050, NO-9037 Tromso, Norway..
    Ancient sedimentary DNA shows rapid post-glacial colonisation of Iceland followed by relatively stable vegetation until the Norse settlement (Landnam) AD 8702021In: Quaternary Science Reviews, ISSN 0277-3791, E-ISSN 1873-457X, Vol. 259, article id 106903Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding patterns of colonisation is important for explaining both the distribution of single species and anticipating how ecosystems may respond to global warming. Insular flora may be especially vulnerable because oceans represent severe dispersal barriers. Here we analyse two lake sediment cores from Iceland for ancient sedimentary DNA to infer patterns of colonisation and Holocene vegetation development. Our cores from lakes Torfdalsvatn and Nykurvatn span the last c. 12,000 cal yr BP and c. 8600 cal yr BP, respectively. With near-centennial resolution, we identified a total of 191 plant taxa, with 152 taxa identified in the sedimentary record of Torfdalsvatn and 172 plant taxa in the sedimentary record of Nykurvatn. The terrestrial vegetation at Torfdalsvatn was initially dominated by bryophytes, arctic herbs such as Saxifraga spp. and grasses. Around 10,100 cal yr BP, a massive immigration of new taxa was observed, and shrubs and dwarf shrubs became common whereas aquatic macrophytes became dominant. At Nykurvatn, the dominant taxa were all present in the earliest samples; shrubs and dwarf shrubs were more abundant at this site than at Torfdalsvatn. There was an overall steep increase both in the local accumulated richness and regional species pool until 8000 cal yr BP, by which time 3/4 of all taxa identified had arrived. The period 4500-1000 cal yr BP witnessed the appearance of a a small number of bryophytes, graminoids and forbs that were not recorded in earlier samples. The last millennium, after human settlement of the island (Landnam), is characterised by a sudden disappearance of Juniperus communis, but also reappearance of some high arctic forbs and dwarf shrubs. Notable immigration during the Holocene coincides with periods of increased incidence of sea ice, and we hypothesise that this may have acted as a dispersal vector. Thus, although ongoing climate change might provide a suitable habitat in Iceland for a large range of species only found in the neighbouring regions today, the reduction of sea ice may in fact limit the natural colonisation of new plant species.

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  • 3.
    Alvin, Anderling
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Främmande brons i nord: Användningen deponeringen och importen av Hallstattsvärd i Sverige under den yngre bronsåldern2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This bachelor’s thesis covers the usage, deposition and trade of hallstatt swords in Sweden during the late bronze age. While much has been said about the findings of hallstatt swords within the geographical boundaries of the Hallstatt culture comparably little has been written about the rich collection of the same swords found in southern Scandinavia. This thesis aims to discuss the context of these findings through spatial and comparative analysis together with the interpretations of previous archaeologists to figure out how these foreign objects may have been used outside of their area of origin. The findings conclude that the Swedish hallstatt swords have been deposited in the traditions prevalent in Scandinavia at the time and many of them show signs of local production. The blade damage prevalent on some swords suggest a different usage from the perceived cavalry weapons observed in Hallstatt. The swords have been interpreted from a post processual perspective as living objects whos destruction and deposit mimics that of the death and burial of the human user.

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  • 4.
    Anderson, Atholl
    et al.
    Australian Natl Univ, Dept Archaeol & Nat Hist, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia..
    Stothert, Karen
    Univ Texas San Antonio, Dept Anthropol, San Antonio, TX 78249 USA..
    Martinsson-Wallin, Helene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Wallin, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Flett, Iona
    Australian Natl Univ, Dept Archaeol & Nat Hist, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia..
    Haberle, Simon
    Heijnis, Henk
    Australian Nucl Sci & Technol Org, Inst Environm Res, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232, Australia..
    Rhodes, Edward
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Geog, Sheffield S10 2TN, S Yorkshire, England..
    Reconsidering Precolumbian Human Colonization In The Galapagos Islands, Republic Of Ecuador2016In: Latin American antiquity, ISSN 1045-6635, E-ISSN 2325-5080, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 169-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fifty years ago, Heyerdahl and Skjolsvold (1956, 1990) collected material from five archaeological sites in the Galapagos Islands. They retained earthenwares of possible precolumbian origin and discarded ceramic, metal, and glass artifacts postdating the arrival of the Spanish in A.D. 1535. Consequently, they argued that each site was formed as the results of a series of discard events from unrelated short-term occupations extending from the precolumbian to the historical era, and that the earthenwares represented occasional visits by fishermen from precolumbian Peru and Ecuador. In 2005, we re -excavated the sites and collected all the excavated materials. Our results show that each class of material, irrespective of age or origin, was distributed spatially and stratigraphically in the same pattern, contradicting the former assumption of multiple, unrelated occupations. We reject the palimpsest model in favor of the null hypothesis of single-phase site occupation. Analysis of putatively precolumbian pottery using optically-stimulated luminescence dating indicates that it is mostly of historical age. Radiocarbon dating confirms that the archaeological sites are younger than the sixteenth century. Research on sedimentary cores shows probable anthropogenic impacts as restricted to the last 500 years. We conclude that there was no human occupation in the Galapagos Islands until the historical era.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Cajsa-Stina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    A Comparative Study of Mayan Archaeology: A Case Study of the Regional Spatial Differences in the Mayan Natural- and Urban Landscapes2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Under lång tid har mayafolkets landskap, av arkeologer, ansetts vara homogent. Detta har bidragit till tolkningen att det förhållande som mayabefolkningen hade till sin urbana levnadsmiljö respektive omgivande topografi, likväl som förhållande till det kulturella livet har sett likadant ut oberoende av region. I realiteten är det naturliga landskapet i Mesoamerika heterogent, vilket då även resulterar i urbana och kulturella skillnader mellan regionerna.

    I denna uppsats kommer undersökas och diskuteras de skillnader som finns mellan de olika mayakulturerna och hur detta kan ha påverkat jordbruket inom regionerna. Dessutom kommer regionerna jämföras med avseende på potentiella skillnader i kultur likväl som rumsliga skillnader i topografi och det urbana landskapet. Den klassiska tidsepoken (250-950 e.Kr.) kommer vara i fokus, men som referenspunkter och med grund i att olika städer uppstod vid olika epoker kommer även andra tidsperioder att behandlas i uppsatsen. Denna uppsats är baserad på litteratur studier och är en kvalitativ undersökning.

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  • 6.
    Andersson, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    De första jordbrukarna och gånggrifterna på Falbygden.: Immigranter eller lokal uppfinningsrikedom, det är frågan?2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay will discuss where the people who built the passage graves and the first farmers at the Falbygden area in Sweden came from. That the first farmers built the passage graves is today a given fact, but how did the Neolithic transition take form in Scandinavia? Two theories have been put forward over the past century, that they learned through cultural diffusion, or that the first farmers were immigrants. Recent DNA- and Strontiumanalyses have been made on skeletons from passage graves from Falbygden and on skeletons from different regions across Europe, both from Mesolithic and Neolithic people. These results show that the Mesolithic hunter-gatherers shares no or little continuity with the Neolithic farmers, even in cases where the two groups lived in close neighbouring for a long time.

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  • 7.
    Andersson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Med historien i ryggen: Om den arkeologiska uppgiften2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation explores the boundaries of archaeology. Its subject is an archaeological practice that no longer seems to be able to challenge our modern conception of the world. We are faced with an archaeology that takes the form of a conservative and repetitive practice, because of the discipline’s demand that discussions on epistemology and ontology within its discourse should be incorporated in a presupposed teleological assignment. They must be part of the modern archaeological project or else their critique is irrelevant.

    The initial disappointment is transformed into an inquisitive exploration of archaeology’s limitations. At the archaeological frontier several keywords are used to illustrate the architecture of that archaeological space. Concepts such as narrative, time, the trace and reality act as themes for a conversation on archaeology and the archaeological. Postprocessual archaeology is called upon as a primary discussant in this conversation, playing the part of a textual embodiment of a virtual archaeological formula. One major component of this formula that is discussed is archaeology’s connection to the historical. History as a narrative form, as a perspective on time and as a metanarrative to refer our statements to, is found to be a metaphysical fundament for the archaeological project, delimiting our understanding of the temporal relationship between the past and the present.

    The thesis briefly discusses an alternative nostalgic archaeology but this hypothetical post-historic archaeology can never be articulated, since its destiny will be the same as all other similar attempts within archaeology – i.e. to become part of an updated modern archaeological practice. The exploration then ends with an insight that there is no escape from either archaeology or modernity. What is left is only to point out the boundaries, and to let the dreams of freedom that go beyond them keep us from falling into a discursive sleep.

  • 8.
    Andersson Söderberg, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Häst och människa: En social zooarkeologisk undersökning av hästoffer och agens2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Horses have played a large part in many cultures across the world, the Scandinavian Viking Age included. They are frequently found in graves and sacrificial sites, meant to denote, or represent the status and social caste of the humans they served. More and more studies and research projects are now taking place where the horses are allowed to take center stage, but these rarely touch on the subject of the horse’s agency. Were the abilities of the horses themselves what determined whether they be brutally sacrificed, or whether they keep serving the living? This is an area of study which hopes to introduce new perspectives into a complicated, lengthy debate over horses in sacrificial contexts, and shift focus away from the anthropocentric perspective that has dominated the subject. This study will discuss the archaeological and osteological finds in Scandinavia through a social zooarchaeological perspective, in an effort to offer a different perspective and to give agency to one animal that helped to shape our world.

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  • 9.
    Andreasson, Kajsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    moyar : hafin : iþra : byn : reta; Flickor, förrätta era böner väl: social struktur i gotländska runinskrifter under medeltid2010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses runic inscriptions from the middle ages on Gotland and how they portray social structure. It focuses on three themes: (1) fixed time and space, (2) women and the nuclear family and (3) profession and social status/structure. It also discusses changes brought on by a more structured and established Christianity, as well as differences between medieval rune stones on Gotland and their predecessors Viking Age rune stones in the Mälar Valley.

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    FULLTEXT03
  • 10.
    Andreeff, Alexander
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Arkeologiska undersökningar av bildstensplats och stengrundshus vid Buttle Änge, Gotland2017In: Arkeologi på Gotland 2: Tillbakablickar och nya forskningsrön / [ed] Paul Wallin; Helene Martinsson-Wallin, Visby: Gotlands Museum , 2017, 1, p. 191-197Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Husgrunderna från Buttle Änge visar, förutom sin skilda storlek, upp en olikartad karaktär vad gäller konstruktion, kulturlagrens djup och delvis fyndmaterial. Vidare arkeologiska undersökningar och analyser behövs för att klarlägga husens tidshorisont, funktion och relation till varandra. Är de skilda husen samtidiga eller förligger det kronologiska och/eller funktionella skillnader? Forskningsprojektet syftar även till att ge en ökad förståelse av de kronologiska och kontextuella relationerna mellan bildstensplats och gårdsmiljö genom seklerna både vid Buttle Änge och generellt via jämförande studier av andra bildstensplatser och stengrundsmiljöer.

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  • 11.
    Andreeff, Alexander
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Melander, Victor Niels Love
    The Australian National University, Archaeology and Anthropology, Canberra, Australia.
    Sjöstrand, Alexander
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Rapport från arkeologisk undersökning vid Buttle Änge 2015: Raä Buttle 43:1, 43:2, 43:3, 43:4, 145:1 och 146:2, Nygårds 1:28, Buttle sn, Gotland2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this report the field documentation and the results from the 2015 archaeological investigations at Nygårds 1:28, Buttle parish on the farm Buttle Änge, Gotland, Sweden, are presented. The excavations in 2015 are a continuation of surveys from 2009 and 2013-2014 (see Andreeff, Melander & Bakunic Fridén 2014; Andreeff & Melander 2015) conducted as field courses in archaeology by Uppsala University. The campaign is a part of Andreeff’s research projects Stones and People: Viking Age Picture stones from the Island of Gotland and Picture stone sites and Stone house foundations: Iron Age in the Gotlandic Inland. The field investigations were led by Alexander Andreeff, Paul Wallin and Alexander Sjöstrand, Uppsala University.

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  • 12.
    Andreeff, Alexander
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Potter, Rich
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Imaging picture stones: Comparative studies of rendering techniques2014In: Med hjärta och hjärna: En vänbok till professor Elisabeth Arwill-Nordbladh / [ed] Henrik Alexandersson, Alexander Andreeff, Annika Bünz, Göteborg: Institutionen för historiska studier, Göteborgs universitet , 2014, 500, p. 669-689Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The results from different rendering techniques will be shown in this article and briefly discussed with regard to investigations of the pictorial surface on three picture stones from Gotland, Sweden. The island is the largest in the Baltic Sea and is well-known for its very rich and outstanding archaeological material, especially from the Viking Age and Early Medieval period. The picture stones that are the case studies for this article originate from three different sites on Gotland: Fröjel Bottarve, Fröjel Stenstugu and Buttle Änge. All of these sites are located in rural areas with rich agricultural lands and an abundance of ancient remains that speak of habitation and land use since at least the Bronze Age to present day. Fröjel Stenstugu and Buttle Änge are still standing at their original sites while Fröjel Bottarve was found re-used in a grave.

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    Andreeff & Potter 2014 Imaging picture stones
  • 13.
    Andreeff, Alexander
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Uvelius, Anton
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Rapport från arkeologisk undersökning vid Buttle Änge 2017, Del I: Raä Buttle 43:1, 43:2, 43:3, 43:4 och 145:1, Nygårds 1:28, Buttle sn, Gotland2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this report the field documentation and the results from the 2017 archaeological investigations at Nygårds 1:28, Buttle parish on the historical farm Buttle Änge, Gotland, Sweden, are presented. The excavations in 2017 are a continuation of surveys from 2009 and 2013–2016 (see Andreeff & Melander 2015; Andreeff, Melander & Bakunic Fridén 2014; Andreeff, Melander & Sjöstrand 2017; Melander 2017; Melander, Andreeff & Sjöstrand 2017) conducted as field courses in archaeology by Uppsala University. The campaign is a part of Andreeff’s research projects Stones and People: Viking Age Picture stones from the Island of Gotland and Picture stone sites and Stone house foundations: Iron Age in the Gotlandic Inland. The field investigations were led by Alexander Andreeff, Paul Wallin, Alexander Sjöstrand, Uppsala University and Victor Melander, The Australian National University.

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  • 14.
    Apel, Jan
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Archaeol & Class Studies, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olausson, Deborah
    Lund Univ, Dept Archaeol & Ancient Hist, SE-22100 Lund, Sweden.
    Knutsson, Kjel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Knutsson, Helena
    StoneSlab, Saves Vag 40, SE-75236 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Taffinder, Jackie
    Swedish Hist Museum, Narvavagen 13-17, SE-11484 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Errett Callahan (1937-2019) and his impact on Swedish archaeology2019In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 114, no 4, p. 258-262Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Apel, Jan
    et al.
    Lund Univ LUX, Dept Archaeol & Ancient Hist, Box 192, Lund, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Archaeol & Class Studies, Osteoarchaeol Res Lab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wallin, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Stora, Jan
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Archaeol & Class Studies, Osteoarchaeol Res Lab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Possnert, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, För teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten gemensamma enheter, Tandem Laboratory.
    Early Holocene human population events on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea (9200-3800 cal. BP)2018In: Quaternary International, ISSN 1040-6182, E-ISSN 1873-4553, Vol. 465, p. 276-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The summed probability distribution of 162 radiocarbon dates from Gotland was analysed with reference to archaeological and environmental data in order to evaluate possible variations in settlement intensity on the island. The data indicated variations in demographic development on the island, with probably several different colonization events and external influences; the pioneer settlement reached the island around 9200 cal. BP. After the initial colonization, the radiocarbon dates were rather evenly distributed until around 7700-7600 cal. BP, then there was a drop in the number of dates between 8300 and 8000 cal. BP that may be associated with the 8200 cold event. A marked decline in the number of dates between 7600 and 6000 cal. BP may be associated initially with the Littorina I transgression, but this transgression cannot explain why the Late Mesolithic period is not well represented on Gotland: the climatic development was favourable but did not result in increased human activity. The number of radiocarbon dates indicated that the population size remained low until around 6000 cal. BP, after which there was a gradual increase that reached a first 'threshold' after 5600 cal. BP and a second 'threshold' after 4500 cal. BP. The first apparent population increase was associated with the appearance of the Funnel Beaker Culture (FBC) and the second with Pitted Ware Culture (PWC) complexes. A decline in the number of dates occurred after 4300 cal. BP, i.e. towards the Late Neolithic. There was an association between the frequency distributions of the radiocarbon dates and the number of stray finds from different time periods but any correlation was not straightforward. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA. All rights reserved.

  • 16.
    Armstrong, Chelsey
    et al.
    Department of Archaeology, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada .
    Shoemaker, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    McKechnie, Iain
    Department of Anthropology, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, Hakai Institute, Heriot Bay, Quadra Island, British Columbia, Canada.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Szabó, Péter
    Department of Vegetation Ecology, Institute of Botany of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Lane, Paul J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology. School of Geography, Archaeology and Environmental Studies, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa .
    McAlvay, Alex C.
    Department of Botany, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America .
    Boles, Oliver
    Institute of Archaeology, University College London, London, United Kingdom .
    Walshaw, Sarah
    Department of History, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada .
    Petek, Nik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Gibbons, Kevin
    Department of Anthropology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, United States of America.
    Quintana Morales, Erendira
    Department of Anthropology, Rice University, Houston, Texas, United States of America .
    Anderson, Eugene
    Department of Anthropology, University California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California, United States of America .
    Ibragimow, Aleksandra
    Adams Mickiewicz Univ, Polish German Res Inst, Poznan, Poland.; European Univ, Viadrina, Germany.
    Podruczny, Grzegorz
    Adams Mickiewicz Univ, Polish German Res Inst, Poznan, Poland.; European Univ, Viadrina, Germany.
    Vamosi, Jana
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada .
    Marks-Block, Tony
    Department of Anthropology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America.
    LeCompte, Joyce
    Independent Scholar, Seattle, Washington, United States of America.
    Awâsis, Sākihitowin
    Department of Geography, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada, Atlohsa Native Family Healing Services, Canada, London, Ontario, Canada .
    Nabess, Carly
    Department of Anthropology, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, British Columbia, Canada.
    Sinclair, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Crumley, Carole L.
    Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America; Integrated History of Future of People on Earth (IHOPE) Initiative, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Anthropological contributions to historical ecology: 50 questions, infinite prospects2017In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 2, article id e0171883Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the results of a consensus-driven process identifying 50 priority research questions for historical ecology obtained through crowdsourcing, literature reviews, and in-person workshopping. A deliberative approach was designed to maximize discussion and debate with defined outcomes. Two in-person workshops (in Sweden and Canada) over the course of two years and online discussions were peer facilitated to define specific key questions for historical ecology from anthropological and archaeological perspectives. The aim of this research is to showcase the variety of questions that reflect the broad scope for historical-ecological research trajectories across scientific disciplines. Historical ecology encompasses research concerned with decadal, centennial, and millennial human-environmental interactions, and the consequences that those relationships have in the formation of contemporary landscapes. Six interrelated themes arose from our consensus-building workshop model: (1) climate and environmental change and variability; (2) multi-scalar, multi-disciplinary; (3) biodiversity and community ecology; (4) resource and environmental management and governance; (5) methods and applications; and (6) communication and policy. The 50 questions represented by these themes highlight meaningful trends in historical ecology that distill the field down to three explicit findings. First, historical ecology is fundamentally an applied research program. Second, this program seeks to understand long-term human-environment interactions with a focus on avoiding, mitigating, and reversing adverse ecological effects. Third, historical ecology is part of convergent trends toward transdisciplinary research science, which erodes scientific boundaries between the cultural and natural.

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  • 17.
    Arthur, Frank
    et al.
    Department of Natural Sciences and Environmental Health, University of South-Eastern Norway, Norway.
    Hatlestad, Kailin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lindholm, Karl-Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Loftsgarden, Kjetil
    The Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo, Norway.
    Löwenborg, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology. Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Solheim, Steinar
    The Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo, Norway.
    Roche, Didier M
    Earth and Climate Cluster, Faculty of Science, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands;Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l’Environnement, LSCE/IPSL, CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, Université Paris-Saclay, France.
    Renssen, Hans
    Department of Natural Sciences and Environmental Health, University of South-Eastern Norway, Norway.
    The impact of volcanism on Scandinavian climate and human societies during the Holocene: Insights into the Fimbulwinter eruptions (536/540 AD)2024In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent paleoclimatic research has revealed that volcanic events around 536–540 AD caused severe, short-term global cooling. For this same period, archeological research from various regions evidences significant cultural transformation. However, there is still a lack of understanding of how human societies responded and adapted to extreme climate variability and new circumstances. This study focuses on the effects of the 536/540 AD volcanic event in four Scandinavian regions by exploring the shift in demographic and land use intensity before, during, and after this abrupt climate cooling. To achieve this, we performed climate simulations with and without volcanic eruptions using a dynamically downscaled climate model (iLOVECLIM) at a high resolution (0.25° or ~25 km). We integrated the findings with a comprehensive collection of radiocarbon dates from excavated archeological sites across various Scandinavian regions. Our Earth System Model simulates pronounced cooling (maximum ensemble mean −1.1°C), an abrupt reduction in precipitation, and a particularly acute drop in growing degree days (GDD0) after the volcanic event, which can be used to infer likely impacts on agricultural productivity. When compared to the archeological record, we see considerable regional diversity in the societal response to this sudden environmental event. As a result, this study provides a more comprehensive insight into the demographic chronology of Scandinavia and a deeper understanding of the land-use practices its societies depended on during the 536/540 AD event. Our results suggest that this abrupt climate anomaly amplified a social change already in progress.

  • 18.
    Arwill-Nordbladh, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Göteborg universitet, Institutionen för historiska studier.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Affective interventions and ‘the hegemonic other’ in runestones from Västergötland and Södermanland, Sweden2021In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 155-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the eleventh century AD, the Scandinavian countries were in the final stage of the process of conversion to Christianity. Local and regional processes of negotiations towards a Christian hegemony took various courses in different parts of Scandinavia. There are few substantial indications that social tensions resulted in violence. Rather, archaeological evidence indicates a gradual change. This paper highlights how these processes of negotiations were expressed by counter-hegemonic groups that took advantage of the affective affordances of runestones. By raising specific runestones, these non-Christian groups were part of an agonistic political process, as described by the political philosopher Chantal Mouffe.

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  • 19.
    Asp, Dennis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Mälardalskeramik: En definitionsstudie av udda neolitisk keramik i Mälardalen.2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    During the Middle and Late Neolithic, especially in south-eastern Sweden, the archaeological material sometimes reveals a type of hybrid ceramic that was previously classified as a Battle-axe ceramic. But as recent as the latter part of the 1990s, this hybrid pottery was again noticed by researchers in a compilation of Neolithic pottery. In this compilation, the name Third Group is used as a collective name for the hybrid ceramics. Further studies have since resulted in a relatively restrictive template with several subgroups where the material has been defined as the Third Group.

    This work is a type of definition analysis with an element of comparative analysis where the use of the term Third Group is analyzed, as well as the definition behind the term. The main goal of the study is that during the relatively short period the term has been in use, be able to follow and gain a deeper understanding of how words and definitions in technical language are used, developed, and discussed. The aim of the study is to show that communication and language use within one's own profession is extremely relevant for further research.

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  • 20.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Art as entangled material practices: The Case of Late Iron Age Scandinavian Gold Foil Figures in the Making2019In: Artistic Practices and Archaeological Research / [ed] Dragos Gheorghiu, Theodor Barth, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2019, p. 21-30Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses Late Iron Age gold foil figures from Scandinavia. The figures can be described as tiny humanoid beings stamped on very thin gold foil. They date to c. AD 550–800, and are commonly interpreted in representationalist ways, and as being symbols. By contrast, this paper starts from the assumption that art and imagery are simultaneously material, affective and emergent. As a consequence the gold foil figures are seen as to be continuously in the making, where Karen Barad’s concepts of intra-action and agential realist ontology are especially helpful to illuminate the open-ended and generative character of the figures.

  • 21.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Härjad hög i Hallunda: Arkeologisk undersökning av anläggning 34 från yngre järnålder på gravfält RAÄ 75, Hallunda, Botkyrka sn, Södermanland2000Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    På ett gravfält, RAÄ 75, beläget ca 200 meter sydost om Hallunda gård, Botkyrka sn, Södermanland, upptäcktes att en gravhög, nr 34, ca 9 m i diameter och 1 m hög, i mitten hade en kraftig grop, där såväl ett fåtal brända ben som keramikskärvor var fullt synliga i gropens ytskikt.  Därför genomfördes en utgrävning av hög nr 34, då det befarades att graven i sitt utsatta skick snart skulle vara helt förstörd.

    Gravhögens plundringsgrop synes ha uppkommit dels i omedelbar nutid och dels i äldre historiska tider då den fungerat som potatiskällare. Trots högens omfattande skador eller mångskiftande användningsområden (och därmed mångtydigheter), var en liten del av brandlagret intakt. Här anträffades rikligt med brända ben, flera järnföremål, såsom nitar och stift, keramikskärvor samt kamfragment och textilfragment av silke av hög kvalitet, där textilanalys utförts av Anita Malmius. Utifrån analyser av fynden har gravhögen daterats till vikingatid.

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  • 22.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Materials of Affect: Miniatures in the Scandinavian Late Iron Age (AD 550-1050)2013In: Archaeology after interpretation: Returning materials to archaeological theory / [ed] Alberti, Benjamin, Jones, Andrew Meirion and Pollard, Joshua, Walnut Creek, California: Left Coast Press Inc., 2013, p. 325-344Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses Scandinavian gold foil figures – small human-like figures hammered or cut out of thin foil – from the early part of the Scandinavian Late Iron Age (AD 550--1050) from a relational perspective. Earlier interpretations largely approach them as symbols and representations, which downplays a practice or performative role, and results in static or embalmed objects. In this paper the affective dimensions of the figures are discussed as well as some of the myriad rhizomatic relations that were generated through processes of making, manipulation and visual encounter. It is argued that during the Late Iron Age in Scandinavia certain human beings and gold foil figures were ontological equivalents. It is further argued that ontological equivalence also included other spheres; these were considered equivalent because the same desirable properties of wealth and regeneration were seemingly produced by different technical processes with different materials. Hence the processes of formation were primary, not states of matter. Seen this way gold foil figures go far beyond our contemporary understanding of representations.

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  • 23.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Jones, Andrew MeirionSouthampton University, United Kingdom.
    Images in the Making: Art, Process, Archaeology2020Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book presents a study of material images and asks how an appreciation of the making and unfolding of images and art alters archaeological accounts of prehistoric and historic societies. With contributions focusing on case studies ranging from prehistoric Britain, Scandinavia, Iberia, the Americas, and Dynastic Egypt, and including contemporary reflections on material images, it makes a novel contribution to ongoing debates relating to archaeological art and images. The book offers a new materialist analysis of archaeological imagery, with an emphasis on considering the material character of images and their making and unfolding. The book reassesses the predominantly representational paradigm of archaeological image analysis and argues for the importance of considering the ontology of images. It considers images as processes or events and introduces the verb ‘imaging’ to underline the point that images are conditions of possibility that draw together differing aspects of the world. The book is divided into three sections ‘Emergent Images’ which focuses on practices of making; ‘Images as Process’ which examines the making and role of images in prehistoric societies; and, ‘Unfolding Images’ which focuses on how images change as they are made and circulated. The book features contributions from archaeologists, Egyptologists, anthropologists and artists. The contributors to the book highlight the multiple role of images in prehistoric and historic societies, demonstrating that archaeologists need to recognize the dynamic and changeable character of images.

  • 24.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Jones, Andrew Meirion
    Southampton University.
    Introduction2020In: Images in the making: Art, process, archaeology / [ed] Ing-Marie Back Danielsson & Andrew Meirion Jones, Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This introduction addresses and challenges long held assumptions concerning archaeological art and images, and offers new ways to approach and understand them. It is less concerned with the thorny question of defining art, and instead primarily focus on images. We develop approaches that enable us to follow images in their making, their unfolding, their transformation, their multiplicity. We also discuss how images can be understood, given that they appear to be in constant motion.

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  • 25.
    Backman Jääskeläinen, Julius
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    De dog i Grekland: Skandinaviska runstenar och grekiska färder2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Scandinavia has a rich history of the raising of runestones, monuments in stone of varying sizes for honoring the fallen. Among these there exist a group of runestones that mention a land far away from the cold winds of the north, the land of the Byzantine Empire, stretching from the Balkans to the edge of Anatolia with Greece at its center. Scandinavia and the former Byzantine empire has a long history between them where many made their way down the eastern rivers of the Rus to finally reach the city of Constantinople or ‘Miklagard’ as the Scandinavians called it, the great city. Here in the vast empire of the Greeks many Scandinavians saw an opportunity for wealth and fortune. Many of these however did not return home, they died in Greece and for some of them a runestone was raised in their memory. These would form the so-called Greece runestones, a collection of 27 runestones which will be explored in this thesis. The travelers to Greece also left behind their own writings at places like the Hagia Sophia and the Piraeus Lion. Where with their own words they tell of their journey to this distant land, which will also be covered along with the Greece runestones. The aim of this thesis is to explore these writings to hopefully give a greater insight to the early medieval Scandinavian society and what would motivate so many to travel all the way to Greece. This together with an analysis of the import of byzantine coins to the baltic area will hopefully provide us with a better understanding of these motives and at what period these travels primarily took place.

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  • 26.
    Barregren, Simon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Spjutets plats i kultur och tro: En undersökning av dekorerade spjut i Birkas kammargravar2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Viking Age town Birka has since long been a central part of archaeological studies and excavations in Sweden. It has brought much light and information about the people living there from the late 8th century to the late 10th century. The purpose of this thesis is to explore the decorated spears found in a selected number of Birka's chamber graves to see if any visual traces of religious expressions are present. The spears and their context will then be put into contrast with the clear patterns of the worship of Odin in Birka's Garrison area and religious studies from pre-Christian Scandinavia. This is done in the hopes of shedding some light on the spear’s relevance in the Viking Age's culture and religious contexts.

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  • 27.
    Barthel, Stephan
    et al.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    Royal Institute of Technology.
    Ljungkvist, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Innovative Memory and Resilient Cities: Echoes from Ancient Constantinople2010In: The Urban Mind: Cultural and Environmental Dynamics / [ed] Paul J.J. Sinclair, Gullög Nordquist, Frands Herschend and Christian Isendahl, Uppsala: Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University , 2010, p. 391-405Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter uses insights from resilience thinking in analysing a two-thousand-year period of ancient and modern Constantinople, addressing one of the great challenges of the Urban Anthropocene: how to nurture an ecologically sound urbanisation. One of the lessons is that Constantinople maintained a diversity of insurance strategies to a greater degree than  many historical and contemporary urban centres. It invested heavily not only in military infrastructure but also in systems for supplying, storing, and producing food and water. From major granaries and at least four harbours the citizens could receive seaborne goods, but during sieges the trade networks broke down. At those times, when supplies ran dry, there were possibilities to cultivate food within the defensive walls and to catch fish in the Golden Horn. Repeated sieges, which occurred on average every fifty years, generated a diversity of social-ecological memories – the means by which the knowledge, experience, and practice of how to manage a local ecosystem were stored and transmitted in a community. These memories existed in multiple groups of society, partly as a response to the collapse of long-distance, seaborne, grain transports from Egypt. Food production and transports were decentralized into a plethora of smaller subsistence communities (oikoi), which also sold the surplus to the markets of the city. In this way Constantinople became more self-reliant on regional ecosystems. An additional result was that the defensive walls were moved, not in order to construct more buildings but to increase the proportion of gardens and agricultural land. In a comparison with Cairo, it can be seen that these innovations related to enhanced self-reliance in food production made it possible for Constantinople to bounce back from extreme hardships, such as extended sieges, without collapsing into chaos or moral decay. Transformed urban morphology of the city would simply remind residents, through the visual presence of a living garden culture, of the importance of the latter for food security. Without the gardens the long intervals between sieges would probably have been enough to dissolve living memoryHence, the urban  resilience of Constantinople was enhanced, promoting well-established old regimes and traditions of importance for producing ecosystem services to society while at the same time testing and refining new and successful regimes, or in other words through the interplay of memory and innovation. Currently, and even more so in decades to come, the mindsets of urban people hold power in a global arena. Questions related to how the loss of green space in metropolitan landscapes will affect worldviews are worrisome since it is the desires and demands of urban people that will affect future decisions and essentially determine the fate of the planet. People throughout the world, and not least in Western societies, need to be constantly reminded of our dependence on a living planet and stay motivated to support it. Social-ecological memories related to local food production have to be nurtured in urban landscapes as well, and an urban morphology is needed that strengthens ecological awareness across urban populations rather than the opposite.

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  • 28.
    Bates, Rupert
    et al.
    Univ Durham, Dept Geog, Durham, England..
    Erlendsson, Egill
    Univ Iceland, Inst Life & Environm Sci, Sturlugata 7, IS-102 Reykjvik, Iceland..
    Dögg Eddudottir, Sigrun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology. Univ Iceland, Inst Life & Environm Sci, Sturlugata 7, IS-102 Reykjvik, Iceland. .
    Mockel, Susanne Claudia
    Univ Iceland, Inst Life & Environm Sci, Sturlugata 7, IS-102 Reykjvik, Iceland..
    Tinganelli, Leone
    Univ Iceland, Inst Life & Environm Sci, Sturlugata 7, IS-102 Reykjvik, Iceland.;Landgraeoslan, Hella, Iceland..
    Gisladottir, Guorun
    Univ Iceland, Inst Life & Environm Sci, Sturlugata 7, IS-102 Reykjvik, Iceland.;Univ Iceland, Inst Earth Sci, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Landnam, Land Use and Landscape Change at Kagaoarholl in Northwest Iceland2022In: Environmental Archaeology, ISSN 1461-4103, E-ISSN 1749-6314, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 211-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Palaeoecological studies from across Iceland, in tandem with historical and archaeological examinations, have helped improve our understanding of patterns and processes involved in the initial settlement of Iceland. Here, we present a new high resolution reconstruction of vegetation and landscape dynamics for the farm Kagaoarholl, a lowland site in Austur-HunavatnssATIN SMALL LETTER Y WITH ACUTEsla, Northwest Iceland, a region with a notable scarcity of known archaeological sites. Through palynology and the analysis of lithological proxies, the study locates and examines human influence at the study site and evaluates the mechanisms of environmental change. Prior to settlement, following long-term vegetation regression, Betula woodland interspersed with sedge bog was prevalent at Kagaoarholl. Woodland clearance and grazing was initiated no later than AD 900, illustrating the arrival of humans. Over the following centuries, the record shows continued grazing, increased soil erosion and a transition into heathland and shrubland indicative of anthropogenic environmental degradation. Woodland conservation and management practices are also inferred. The study is important in extending knowledge of Icelandic environmental change and anthropogenic activity where archaeological research is scant and in bringing together regional patterns of settlement in order to understand wider settlement processes.

  • 29.
    Bazire Leidersdorff-Menzel, Clovis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Brunnen på bosättningen: Ett funktionellt ting eller ett ekonomiskt och socialt ting2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to discuss and clarify the interpretative potential of wells in order to understand the relationships between different features on the settlement. The empirical data used for this thesis have been confined to two different settlements locations in Uppland in Sweden, where a total of eight well’s structures have been analysed in relation to nearby archaeological and ecological features. This was made possible by analysing how the arrangements of wells were related to nearby places and archaeological remains and by using GIS (Geographic information system). The material is analysed using the theoretical approach of “entanglement”. Entanglement is a concept that can be used to facilitate the understanding of how many and how different cohesive relationships between material and humans and vice versa are interconnected. During the work with the thesis, the spatial relations of wells to and between other things have been clarified. The environment around the wells locations presents interesting contexts between archaeological remains and the locations. Ancient people used places and things in the natural setting in order to organize their social life. The well as a functional thing and as a special place should be understood in relation to the human's way of action, that is, there is a coherent relationship between the two that together affect both the human world and the wells.

  • 30.
    Bengtsson, Emmelie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Vad individerna viskar: Människorna från Broa gravfältet i Halla2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay addresses and analyses the grave field from Broa in Halla, RAÄ 48:1 and SHM 11106 with objects in SHM 10796, dated to 800-900 a.d. The essay is done as part of examination in archaeology C with osteological orientation spring 2018 at Uppsala university, campus Gotland. Gustav Malmborg was supervisor for this essay. The objective of the essay is to give an osteological analysis since it hasn’t been done since the excavation 1899, but also to bring forth what information that can be pursued osteologically. This due to that grave A is the only one to be researched upon and not in full context, only partly focusing on the equestrian equipment, the amber lyre bridge and the sword. The questions of issue are; what can be told about the individuals from the grave field? Is there any grave that can be compared against grave A? What can be said about the contemporary society and the premises? Future research can use this essay as a stepping stone for other comparisons and use the osteological data to relate more information about lyre individuals.

     

    This quantitative essay presents the analysis each grave individually using morphological and metric methods, such as age, sex, paleopathological changes, MIND and estimated stature. After analysis is result presented as a table for easy overview (Table 1). Discussion and interpretation follows, one grave at a time over to the grave field and thereafter the premises. End discussion handles the questions of issue to summarize the discussion and interpretation. Conclusion summarizes the results from all of the above mentioned, such as one grave contains more than one individual which has been unknown before. Possible kinship is found in a grave and the possibility of the contemporary premises to be part of a larger house/farm.

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  • 31.
    Bengtsson, Fanny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Dräkt och identitet: En studie av tidigmedeltida dräktföremål från Västergarn2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Västergarn is a medieval settlement situated on the west coast of the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea. It has for a long time been the focus of study for researchers due to its cultural heritage in regards of its church, rampart and archaeological remains of a settlement dating to the Early Middle Ages. The University of Uppsala conducted excavations at the site during 2005–2013 which have led to large amounts of archaeological material which enabled several theses being written about the place. This thesis aims to study metal dress accessories from Västergarn and the people behind these artifacts who lived there during the early medieval period. Gender identity, ethnicity and cultural belonging will be addressed. The main part of the thesis focuses on typology and chronology. This will be achieved by a morphological study of the material. In addition to this, an ArcGis study is conducted to study distribution patterns in the settlement. The conclusion is that dress accessories allow different conclusions on the population of Västergarn. In terms of gender, it is argued that both men and women were present, albeit artefacts of male gender dominate the assemblages. The majority of the material in terms of ethnicity and cultural identity can be attributed to a Gotlandic tradition, while some dress accessories seem to come from abroad, to the Slavonic areas and other regions in the Baltic Sea. Also, oriental influences can be seen, mainly in regard to the decorated belt mounts. in conclusion, the result of this thesis indicates that two separate groups, both Gotlanders and non-Gotlanders were active in Västergarn during the early Middle Ages which is visible in the two churches, the Baltic ware pottery and the form of dress accessories people wore at the time.

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  • 32.
    Bengtsson, Fanny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Låt graven berätta: En paleopatologisk- och rumslig analys av tre tidigmedeltida individer från S:t Hans i Visby2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, three early medieval buried individuals from St. Hans church in Visby are studied. The purpose of this thesis is to highlight early medieval health in Visby as well as study burial practices. To achieve this, an osteological analysis has been performed on the skeletons with the purpose to examine the individuals age, sex and body length as well as identify eventual pathologies and skeletal changes. The results are then put in to context to the other individuals from St. Hans to give an overall perspective. Aside from this the spatial distribution of the graves are studied in ArcGIS to examine if any patterns emerge among the buried that can reveal how they chose to bury their dead. The theory is to use the social division at a medieval graveyard to try and understand the results we see regarding health and burial practices. The result show that the most common disease group among the buried were degenerative changes. It was also common with infections, metabolic diseases and caries. In regards to the spatial analysis, no clear patterns could be discerned.

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    Bengtsson Fanny Låt graven berätta
  • 33.
    Bergman, Jonas
    Arkeolgerna.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development, CSD Uppsala, Centre for Environment and Development Studies. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Med landet i centrum ˗: boskap, jordbruk och landskap i Gamla Uppsala2017In: at Upsalum -: människor och landskapande: Utbyggnad av Ostkustbanan genom Gamla Uppsala / [ed] Beronius Jörpeland, Lena; Göthberg, Hans; Seiler, Anton; Wikborg, Jonas (red.), Stockholm: Arkeologerna , 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Bergquist, Lars-Göran
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    En enkel till Himlingøje. Dödens mode 1: ett virrvarr av varianter: Praktgravar i Sydskandinavien under 1000 år: ca 150 e.Kr. – ca 1050 e.Kr2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One purpose of this dissertation is to show how these graves, set apart due to their often spectacular exterior and an abundance of rich contents, have been inspired as to construction and ideological contents by Roman influence from the south when local Scandinavian chieftains were buried with finesse extraordinaire – from the earliest Roman Iron Age via the more complex societal forms of the Migration and Vendel Periods to the regulated and strictly stratified society of the Viking Period.

    The dissertation also intends to show how the most magnificent burial customs the Scandinavian Iron Age was not necessarily influenced only by religious beliefs: imported (Roman) prestige goods and, in time, increasingly more lavish local props to bring into the grave became one way for the German farmer and warrior elite groups to manifest and maintain their superior social position and thus accelerating class differences in the Iron Age society of southern Scandinavia. I suggest that this type of German burial customs was dictated by a continuously changing fashion among chieftains and princes of northern Europe as they journeyed from life to death, rather than any ancient religious belief. The main characteristic of the elite strata of the Scandinavian Iron Age was long-distance communication: contacts with distant chiefdoms and the ability to travel themselves.

    The dissertation also aims to reinstate the cultural historical perspective that i.a. sees material remains as the result of culture, rather than as culture itself. In direct opposition to the over-theoretical archaeology of the late 20th century and the early 21st century I propose the use of a methodological analysis for the study of rich graves. The text also proposes to act as a counterpoint to the sort of ghostly impersonal presentations that too often written are by archaeologists.

  • 35.
    Bergqvist, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Gotlands hällristningar: En analytisk tolkning av motiven och placeringen i landskapet.2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The rock carvings in southern Scandinavia are an important part of Bronze Age research and the Scandinavian cultural heritage. There are three known sites with rock carvings on the island of Gotland. They are located in the parishes of Lärbro, Fårö, and Lye. The rock carvings on Gotland has been somewhat forgotten and are not a big part of research regarding the Bronze Age on Gotland.

    The aim of this thesis is to analyse the images on the rock carvings as well as analyse their placements in the landscape, both the natural and the cultural. The images will be analysed and possible interpretations of them will be discussed individually and together. Their relation to other ancient monuments and archaeological features will also be analysed. Each area’s cultural landscape where the rock carvings are present will be presented and compared with the other sites on Gotland.

    The result of this thesis shows that the rock carvings in Lärbro and Fårö are similar in both images and placement in the landscape. Ships, cupmarks, and weapons are among images carved at both sites. They both have a connection to fresh water and are in close proximity to stone ships. These two rock carving sites show a connection to the sea and a maritime identity in both their images and the surrounding cultural landscape. The rock carving in Lye has a smaller number of images, only cupmarks and a pair of foot soles. It is located in a different landscape which does not exhibit a connection to water in any way but instead shows a link to the land. This indicates that the rock carvings on Gotland had a connection to both the water and the land.

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  • 36. Beronius Jörpeland, Lena
    et al.
    Göthberg, Hans
    Ljungkvist, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Seiler, Anton
    Wikborg, Jonas
    Återigen i Gamla Uppsala: Förundersökningsrapport OKB-projektet i Gamla Uppsala. Utbyggnad av Ostkustbanan genom Gamla Uppsala Uppland; Gamla Uppsala socken; Gamla Uppsala S:3, 20:1, 21:7, 21:13, 21:27, 21:44, 21:56, 21:71, 21:76, 21:78, 26:4, 26:5, 74:3, 77:3, 77:5, 77:7, 77:19 och Dragarbrunn 32:1; Uppsala 134:4, 240:1, 284:2, 547:1, 586:1, 603:1, 604:1, 605:1, 605:2 och 682 Dnr 422-278-2011 och 422-1516-20112011Report (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Bertelsen, Lise Gjedssø
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    De visuelle manifestationer på Bayeuxtapetet af den gudfrygtige kong Edvard og dets få kvinder2014In: Iconographisk post: Nordisk tidskrift för ikonografi, ISSN 0106-1348, E-ISSN 2323-5586, ISSN 2323-5586, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 26-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article suggests that the appearances of Edward the Confessor on the Bayeux Tapestry underline Duke William’s entitlement to the English throne and the weakness of Harold Godwinson’s claims. It is argued that King Edward might be depicted six times rather than five. A mediaeval king had two bodies, one natural and the other with divine right to rule by God’s grace. In the first five representations of Edward we witness the gradual decay and peaceful death of his natural body in sharp contrast to Harold Godwinson’s violent death later on the battlefield, and in the sixth, Duke William sits half hidden by a man closely resembling Edward. This might be Edward’s spiritual political body sustaining William’s divine right to the English throne. – The gender balance for individuals depicted on the Bayeux Tapestry is 99 % men and 1 % women. Of the total of six women the three in the main register are high status persons who appear near important buildings, depicted as mistress (probably), wife or mother. Three other women appear in erotic scenes in the margins, but their lack of clothes and attributes makes it difficult to determine their identity.

  • 38.
    Bertilsson, Carolina
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Odontol, Dept Cariol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sten, Sabine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Andersson, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Lundberg, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Lingstrom, Peter
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Odontol, Dept Cariol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dental health of Vikings from Kopparsvik on Gotland2020In: International journal of osteoarchaeology, ISSN 1047-482X, E-ISSN 1099-1212, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 551-556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence, distribution, and location of dental caries were studied in complete and partial human dentitions dating from the Viking Age dating (900-1050 AD) excavated in Kopparsvik on island of Gotland, Sweden. 18 individuals and a total of 370 teeth were examined, using a strong light source and dental probe. Carious lesions were found in a large number of the individuals, 14 out of 18. The percentage of teeth affected by caries (11,9%) corresponds well with studied skull materials from the same period. The surface most susceptible to caries was the occlusal surface, whereas only a few proximal lesions and one single carious root surface was found. The tooth most commonly affected by caries was the mandibular first molar. The tooth most commonly missing ante-mortem was also the mandibular molar, and the tooth most commonly missing post mortem was the mandibular incisor. Other findings included apical infections, which were detected clinically in 3% of the teeth.

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  • 39.
    Blinova Högberg, Sofya
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Gravskick i Gotländska Skeppssättningar: En osteologisk analys av kremerade ben2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis will focus on stone ship settings and the burial practice surrounding them. Over 400 stone ships have been found in Gotland but only 70 of them have been studied and even less osteological analyses have been made. The burials in focus will be four ships which are all made of pieces of limestone formed like ships and are located under the surface opposed to the other types of stone ships settings that are made of big raised rocks. The ships in question are graves therefore the study will focus on the monuments as burial places and will seek so see similarities and differences in the outer and inner burial practice. By analyzing cremated bones, I will determine the age, sex and the number of individuals buried and with the help of the artefacts find possible patterns that can help determine the inner burial practice.

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  • 40.
    Bokor, Lauren
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    An Homage to the Ancestors: A study of the secondary use of ancient fortifications as burial grounds during the Late Iron Age on Gotland2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Fortifications are a common type of ancient monument found throughout Scandinavia, and while the functions of forts are studied and debated quite heavily, the re-use of these structures is less known. On Gotland, there exist 84 ancient fortifications, of which approximately one-third have burials or registered graves within or in close proximity to their locations. This thesis identifies those locations where empirical evidence can be found to identify burials as a form of secondary use of fortifications. The case study of Gudings slott, in Eke Parish, is examined to exemplify the chronological extent of secondary use of an ancient fortification by continued burial rituals from the Late Iron Age through the early Middle Ages. Ancestral worship, memory theory, burial practices, and spatial analysis are utilized to explain why these sites may have been chosen for re-use as burial grounds during the Late Iron Age. The resulting interpretations reveal a unique combination of topographic location, ancestral connectivity, and social stressors as key factors in the secondary use of the examined sites. In addition, new possibilities for the study of Gotland’s ancient fortification sites and suggestions for future research are put forward.

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  • 41. Boles, Oliver
    et al.
    Courtney Mustaphi, Colin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology. University of York.
    Richer, S
    Marchant, R
    Joining the dots of land-use and land-cover change in Eastern Africa2018In: PAGES News, ISSN 1811-1602, E-ISSN 1811-1610, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 16-17Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 42.
    Boles, Oliver J. C.
    et al.
    Univ Penn, Dept Anthropol, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA;Univ York, Dept Environm, York Inst Trop Ecosyst, York, N Yorkshire, England;UCL, Inst Archaeol, London, England.
    Shoemaker, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Courtney Mustaphi, Colin J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology. Univ York, Dept Environm, York Inst Trop Ecosyst, York, N Yorkshire, England;Univ Basel, Dept Environm Sci, Geoecol, Basel, Switzerland.
    Petek, Nik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Lane, Paul J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology. Univ Cambridge, Dept Archaeol, Downing St, Cambridge, England;Univ Witwatersrand, Sch Geog Archaeol & Environm Studies, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Historical Ecologies of Pastoralist Overgrazing in Kenya: Long-Term Perspectives on Cause and Effect2019In: Human Ecology, ISSN 0300-7839, E-ISSN 1572-9915, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 419-434Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The spectre of overgrazing' looms large in historical and political narratives of ecological degradation in savannah ecosystems. While pastoral exploitation is a conspicuous driver of landscape variability and modification, assumptions that such change is inevitable or necessarily negative deserve to be continuously evaluated and challenged. With reference to three case studies from Kenya - the Laikipia Plateau, the Lake Baringo basin, and the Amboseli ecosystem - we argue that the impacts of pastoralism are contingent on the diachronic interactions of locally specific environmental, political, and cultural conditions. The impacts of the compression of rangelands and restrictions on herd mobility driven by misguided conservation and economic policies are emphasised over outdated notions of pastoralist inefficiency. We review the application of overgrazing' in interpretations of the archaeological record and assess its relevance for how we interpret past socio-environmental dynamics. Any discussion of overgrazing, or any form of human-environment interaction, must acknowledge spatio-temporal context and account for historical variability in landscape ontogenies.

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  • 43.
    Bonnechere, Pierre
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology. Univ Montreal, Montreal, PQ H3C 3J7, Canada..
    Cursaru, Gabriela
    Univ Montreal, Montreal, PQ H3C 3J7, Canada..
    The Catabase In The Greek World Between Its Past And Its Future2015In: Etudes classiques (Namur), ISSN 0014-200X, Vol. 83, no 1-4, p. 3-13Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Bornfalk Back, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Från stenkrigare till borgjarl: Befästningskonsten i östra Sverige, 375-750 e.Kr2023Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The main fortification tradition of pre-Viking Age eastern Sweden consisted of defensive walls built in an advanced dry-stone technique, some including internal timber-lacing and supporting earthen banks. Erected on mountain crests, hillocks, plains and shorelines, these constructions were part of the martial landscape of an immensely transformative period in Scandinavian Iron Age. However, inadequate temporal and spatial frameworks have long hampered any engagement with this phenomenon. In combination with the profound demilitarization of these walls and ramparts, which dominated Swedish archaeology from c. 1990 and two decades on, this has resulted in a state of knowledge of this tradition that is not on a par with the significance it once had.

    The thesis addresses these issues by establishing the chronology of this architectural tradition and, with this tool, by exploring the martial dimensions of the fortifications as well as the lifestyle of those behind the walls. Data from c. 80 excavations of various sizes, many of them carried out in the 20th century, are processed and combined with on-site analyses of the architecture and layout of the individual walls. Episodes concerning the concept of fortification in the Beowulf poem are examined and compared to the archaeological material. 

    An approach is adopted which views the material culture of the fortifications as physical expressions of a complex network or system made up by the social, economic, religious and ideological elements that define the character of warfare and its participants. All members of a society are part of and influence such “war systems” practically as well as normatively, consciously or not.

    The study argues that the fortification tradition including the dry-stone technique was not static, widespread or an architectural monoculture. Instead, it was constantly evolving during the period AD 375/400-700/750 in relation to changing needs, ideals and skills according to regional conditions in the political and geographical landscape. 

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  • 45.
    Bornfalk Back, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Herrgårdsklint revisited: a fortified hill-site on Gotland2014In: Runsa borg: Representative life on a migration period hilltop site – a Scandinavian perspectiv / [ed] Michael Olausson, Östersund: Jengel , 2014, p. 287-301Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the author argues that the Gotlandic hilltop complex, Herrgårdsklint,should be viewed as a fortified hill-site (Sw. befäst höjdbosättning). This phenomenon occured mainly on the East Middle Swedish mainland, where the fortified hill-sites were constructed by the late Early Iron Age period (AD 0–550) élite. The complex comprises a 120 metre long and 2.5 metres high dry-stone wall of limestone built on a large cliff and encloses an area of c. 1.5 ha, in which several significant house foundations of limestone are visible even today. It was once given the antiquarian designation “cliff fort”(Sw. klintborg), a term which has contributed to a rather simplistic approach from scholars. In past archaeological research, Herrgårdsklint, with the rest of the constructions categorized as cliff-forts, has often been seen merely as a “temporary refuge in times of unrest.” This perception has been challenged, however, by a new approach that puts Herrgårdsklint in the spotlight of eastern Gotland during the Roman Iron Age/Migration Period. A recently initiated project, which aims to remedy the weak empirical situation regarding the diverse Gotlandic cliff-forts, has carried out new analyses of the pottery and animal bone material found in a 1940s excavation of a couple of the house foundations. Together with the observation of the architecturally advanced stone wall’s entrance construction (which the author suggests is an imitation of a clavicula-entrance of a sort used by the Imperial Roman army), the results indicate that Herrgårdsklint should be viewed as a strongly fortified permanent/semi-permanent settlement, which controlled a large hinterland that specialized in beef production and shows signs of close connections to Roman ideas.

  • 46.
    Bornfalk Back, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    "oppa moraskoogh": Svar till Mats G. Larsson2022In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 117, no 2, p. 149-151Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Bornfalk Back, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Scorched earth: a posthole approach to Iron Age warfare2022In: Journal of Archaeology and Ancient History (JAAH), E-ISSN 2001-1199, no 31, p. 1-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the author presents a method to identify Iron Age (500 BC – AD1050) warfare through farmsteads destroyed by fire. Specific fire patterns onindividual houses, combined with abnormally high numbers of contemporaryburnt buildings, are used as proxy for raised levels of aggression during certainperiods. The Uppsala plain in East Central Sweden forms a case study. With thisapproach, two periods stand out with relatively high numbers of burnt farms: AD350-425 and AD 500-575. The results are discussed in relation to some sourcecritical factors and to their possible contribution to questions regarding GamlaUppsala developing into a central place by the 7th century, as well as to the AD536 event discourse.

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  • 48.
    Bornfalk Back, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    The vitrified wall of Broborg hillfort in Uppland, Sweden – A comment on Sjöblom et al. (2022)2023In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 48, article id 103904Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, Sjöblom et al. assessed the cause of the vitrified wall of Broborg, the 5th century CE hillfort in East Middle Sweden. By exploring possible incentives and competence to melt stones together, as well as the genesis of the vitrified material, the authors suggested that the builders of Broborg used vitrification as a construction method to strengthen the wall. In this comment, I critically examine the line of arguments presented in support of this claim. The conclusion reached is that there is no convincing evidence to warrant a construction hypothesis.

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  • 49.
    Bornfalk Back, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Till frågan om Mora ting: ett arkeologiskt perspektiv2021In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 116, no 3, p. 205-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phenomenon of the medieval royal election thing of Mora, on the outskirts of Uppsala in central Sweden, is an under-researched topic from an archaeological viewpoint. With the archaeological material in focus, the author reviews the current state of research and offers a new hypothesis about the development of Mora as a non -continuous thing site with three phases: in the 500s, 1300s and 1400s. It connects to long debated questions such as where in Mora the actual thing was located, why Mora was chosen to host this important ceremonial act, and how the semi-mythical "Stone of Mora" is to be understood.

  • 50.
    Boström, Sebastian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Kunskapsproduktion under Arkeologi E4 Uppland projektet2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
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