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  • 1.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Klinisk diabetologi och metabolism.
    Engström, Britt Edén
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Sundbom, Magnus
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Gastrointestinalkirurgi.
    Karlsson, Anders F.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Klinisk diabetologi och metabolism.
    GLP1 analogs as treatment of postprandial hypoglycemia following gastric bypass surgery: a potential new indication?2013Inngår i: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 169, nr 6, s. 885-889Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The number of morbidly obese subjects submitted to bariatric surgery is rising worldwide. In a fraction of patients undergoing gastric bypass (GBP), episodes with late postprandial hypoglycemia (PPHG) develop 1-3 years after surgery. The pathogenesis of this phenomenon is not fully understood; meal-induced rapid and exaggerated increases of circulating incretins and insulin appear to be at least partially responsible. Current treatments include low-carbohydrate diets, inhibition of glucose intestinal uptake, reduction of insulin secretion with calcium channel blockers, somatostatin analogs, or diazoxide, a KATP channel opener. Even partial pancreatectomy has been advocated. In type 2 diabetes, GLP1 analogs have a well-documented effect of stabilizing glucose levels without causing hypoglycemia. Design: We explored GLP1 analogs as open treatment in five consecutive GBP cases seeking medical attention because of late postprandial hypoglycemic symptoms. Results: Glucose measured in connection with the episodes in four of the cases had been 2.7, 2.5, 1.8, and 1.6 mmol/l respectively. The patients consistently described that the analogs eliminated their symptoms, which relapsed in four of the five patients when treatment was reduced/discontinued. The drug effect was further documented in one case by repeated 24-h continuous glucose measurements. Conclusion: These open, uncontrolled observations suggest that GLP1 analogs might provide a new treatment option in patients with problems of late PPHG.

  • 2.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Klinisk diabetologi och metabolism.
    Engström, Britt Edén
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Sundbom, Magnus
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Gastrointestinalkirurgi.
    Karlsson, Anders F.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Klinisk diabetologi och metabolism.
    Hypoglycemia in everyday life after gastric bypass and duodenal switch2015Inngår i: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 173, nr 1, s. 91-100Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Design: Gastric bypass (GBP) and duodenal switch (DS) in morbid obesity are accompanied by marked metabolic improvements, particularly in glucose control. In recent years, episodes of severe late postprandial hypoglycemia have been increasingly described in GBP patients; data in DS patients are scarce. We recruited three groups of subjects; 15 GBP, 15 DS, and 15 non-operated overweight controls to examine to what extent hypoglycemia occurs in daily life. Methods: Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) was used during 3 days of normal activity. The glycemic variability was measured by mean amplitude of glycemic excursion and continuous overall net glycemic action. Fasting blood samples were drawn, and the patients kept a food and symptom log throughout the study. Results: The GBP group displayed highly variable CGM curves, and 2.9% of their time was spent in hypoglycemia (< 3.3 mmol/l, or 60 mg/dl). The DS group had twice as much time in hypoglycemia (5.9%) and displayed CGM curves with little variation as well as lower HbA1c levels (29.3 vs 35.9 mmol/mol, P < 0.05). Out of a total of 72 hypoglycemic episodes registered over the 3-day period, 70 (97%) occurred in the postprandial state and only about one-fifth of the hypoglycemic episodes in the GBP and DS groups were accompanied by symptoms. No hypoglycemias were seen in controls during the 3-day period. Conclusion: Both types of bariatric surgery induce marked, but different, changes in glucose balance accompanied by frequent, but mainly unnoticed, hypoglycemic episodes. The impact and mechanism of hypoglycemic unawareness after weight-reduction surgery deserves to be clarified.

  • 3.
    Andersen, Kasper
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Kardiovaskulär epidemiologi.
    Farahmand, Bahman
    Ahlbom, Anders
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Uppsala kliniska forskningscentrum (UCR).
    Ljunghall, Sverker
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Uppsala kliniska forskningscentrum (UCR). Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Kardiovaskulär epidemiologi.
    Risk of arrhythmias in 52 755 long-distance cross-country skiers: a cohort study2013Inngår i: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 34, nr 47, s. 3624-3631Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS:

    We aimed to investigate the association of number of completed races and finishing time with risk of arrhythmias among participants of Vasaloppet, a 90 km cross-country skiing event.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    All the participants without cardiovascular disease who completed Vasaloppet during 1989-98 were followed through national registries until December 2005. Primary outcome was hospitalization for any arrhythmia and secondary outcomes were atrial fibrillation/flutter (AF), bradyarrhythmias, other supraventricular tachycardias (SVT), and ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation/cardiac arrest (VT/VF/CA). Among 52 755 participants, 919 experienced arrhythmia during follow-up. Adjusting for age, education, and occupational status, those who completed the highest number of races during the period had higher risk of any arrhythmias [hazard ratio (HR)1.30; 95% CI 1.08-1.58; for ≥5 vs. 1 completed race], AF (HR 1.29; 95% CI 1.04-1.61), and bradyarrhythmias (HR 2.10; 95% CI 1.28-3.47). Those who had the fastest relative finishing time also had higher risk of any arrhythmias (HR 1.30; 95% CI 1.04-1.62; for 100-160% vs. >240% of winning time), AF (1.20; 95% CI 0.93-1.55), and bradyarrhythmias (HR 1.85; 95% CI 0.97-3.54). SVT or VT/VF/CA was not associated with finishing time or number of completed races.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Among male participants of a 90 km cross-country skiing event, a faster finishing time and a high number of completed races were associated with higher risk of arrhythmias. This was mainly driven by a higher incidence of AF and bradyarrhythmias. No association with SVT or VT/VF/CA was found.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Kristofer
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Dent Med, Div Pediat Dent, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Dahllöf, Goran
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Dent Med, Div Pediat Dent, Huddinge, Sweden.;Ctr Pediat Oral Hlth Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lindahl, Katarina
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Kindmark, Andreas
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Grigelioniene, Giedre
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Genet, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Åström, Eva
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Woman & Child Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Astrid Lindgren Childrens Hosp, Pediat Neurol & Musculoskeletal Disorders & Home, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Malmgren, Barbro
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Dent Med, Div Pediat Dent, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Mutations in COL1A1 and COL1A2 and dental aberrations in children and adolescents with osteogenesis imperfecta - A retrospective cohort study2017Inngår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, nr 5, artikkel-id e0176466Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous group of disorders of connective tissue, caused mainly by mutations in the collagen I genes (COL1A1 and COL1A2). Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) and other dental aberrations are common features of OI. We investigated the association between collagen I mutations and DGI, taurodontism, and retention of permanent second molars in a retrospective cohort of 152 unrelated children and adolescents with OI. The clinical examination included radiographic evaluations. Teeth from 81 individuals were available for histopathological evaluation. COL1A1/2 mutations were found in 104 individuals by nucleotide sequencing. DGI was diagnosed clinically and radiographically in 29% of the individuals (44/152) and through isolated histological findings in another 19% (29/152). In the individuals with a COL1A1 mutation, 70% (7/10) of those with a glycine substitution located C-terminal of p. Gly305 exhibited DGI in both dentitions while no individual (0/7) with a mutation N-terminal of this point exhibited DGI in either dentition (p = 0.01). In the individuals with a COL1A2 mutation, 80% (8/10) of those with a glycine substitution located C terminal of p. Gly211 exhibited DGI in both dentitions while no individual (0/5) with a mutation N-terminal of this point (p = 0.007) exhibited DGI in either dentition. DGI was restricted to the deciduous dentition in 20 individuals. Seventeen had missense mutations where glycine to serine was the most prevalent substitution (53%). Taurodontism occurred in 18% and retention of permanent second molars in 31% of the adolescents. Dental aberrations are strongly associated with qualitatively changed collagen I. The varying expressivity of DGI is related to the location of the collagen I mutation. Genotype information may be helpful in identifying individuals with OI who have an increased risk of dental aberrations.

  • 5.
    Banefelt, J.
    et al.
    Quantify Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Akesson, K. E.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Malmo, Clin & Mol Osteoporosis Res, Malmo, Sweden;Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Orthopaed, Malmo, Sweden.
    Spangeus, A.
    Linkoping Univ, Linkoping Univ Hosp, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Karlsson, L.
    Quantify Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Strom, O.
    Quantify Res, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ortsater, G.
    Quantify Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Libanati, C.
    UCB Biopharma Sprl, Allee Rech 60, B-1070 Brussels, Belgium.
    Toth, E.
    UCB Biopharma Sprl, Allee Rech 60, B-1070 Brussels, Belgium.
    Risk of imminent fracture following a previous fracture in a Swedish database study2019Inngår i: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 30, nr 3, s. 601-609Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The SummaryThis study examined the imminent risk of a future fracture within 1 and 2years following a first fracture in women aged 50years and older and assessed independent factors associated with risk of subsequent fractures. The study highlights the need to intervene rapidly after a fracture to prevent further fractures.IntroductionThis study aims to determine the imminent risk of subsequent fractures within 1 and 2years following a first fracture and to assess independent factors associated with subsequent fractures.MethodsRetrospective, observational cohort study of women aged 50years with a fragility fracture was identified from Swedish national registers. Clinical/demographic characteristics at the time of index fracture and cumulative fracture incidences up to 12 and 24months following index fracture were calculated. Risk factors for subsequent fracture were identified using multivariate regression analysis.ResultsTwo hundred forty-two thousand one hundred eight women (mean [SD] age 74 [12.5] years) were included. The cumulative subsequent fracture incidence at 12months was 7.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.9-7.2) and at 24months was 12.0% (95% CI, 11.8-12.1). The rate of subsequent fractures was highest in the first month (similar to 15 fractures per 1000 patient-years) and remained steady between 4 and 24months (similar to 5 fractures/1000 patient-years). Higher age was an independent risk factor for imminent subsequent fractures (at 24months, sub-distribution hazard ratio [HR], 3.07; p<0.001 for women 80-89years [reference 50-59years]). Index vertebral fracture was a strong independent risk factor for subsequent fracture (sub-distribution HR, 2.72 versus hip fracture; p<0.001 over 12months; HR, 2.23; p<0.001 over 24months).ConclusionsOur findings highlight the need to intervene rapidly after any fragility fracture in postmenopausal women. The occurrence of a fragility fracture provides healthcare systems with a unique opportunity to intervene to reduce the increased risk of subsequent fractures.

  • 6.
    Banefelt, J.
    et al.
    Quantify Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Akesson, K.
    Lund Univ, Dept Orthopaed, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Spangeus, A.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Endocrinol, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Karlsson, L.
    Quantify Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Strom, O.
    Quantify Res, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Learning Informat Management & Eth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ortsater, G.
    Quantify Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Libanati, C.
    UCB Pharma, Brussels, Belgium..
    Toth, E.
    UCB Pharma, Brussels, Belgium..
    Short-Term Fracture (Fx) Incidence And Risk Factors Following Fracture In A Swedish Database Study2017Inngår i: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 28, s. S365-S365Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 7.
    Björk, Anne
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Mellström, Dan
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Med, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Geriatr Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci & Orthoped Surg, Malmo, Sweden.
    Mallmin, Hans
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin.
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Kindmark, Andreas
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Haplotypes in the CYP2R1 gene are associated with levels of 25(OH)D and bone mineral density, but not with other markers of bone metabolism (MrOS Sweden)2018Inngår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, nr 12, artikkel-id e0209268Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Polymorphisms in the CYP2R1 gene encoding Vitamin D 25-hydroxylase have been reported to correlate with circulating levels of 25-OH vitamin D3 (25(OH)D). It is unknown whether these variations also affect overall bone metabolism. In order to elucidate the overall associations of polymorphisms in the CYP2R1, we studied haplotype tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the gene and serum levels of 25(OH)D, calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23), as well as bone mineral density (BMD).

    Methods: Baseline data on serum parameters and BMD from MrOS Sweden, a prospective population-based cohort study of elderly men (mean age 75 years, range 69-81), were analyzed. Genotyping was performed for eight SNPs covering the CYP2R1 gene in 2868 men with available samples of DNA. Subjects were followed up concerning incidence of fracture during five years.

    Results: There was a significant genetic association with circulating levels of 25(OH)D (4.6-18.5% difference in mean values between SNP alleles), but there were no correlations with levels of calcium, phosphate, PTH or FGF23 for any genetic variant. No differences were found in fracture incidence between the variants. There was an inverse relationship between lower BMD and concomitant higher 25(OH)D for three of the haplotypes (p < 0.005).

    Conclusions: Common variants in the CYP2R1 gene encoding Vitamin D 25-hydroxylase correlate with levels of circulating 25(OH)D but do not otherwise associate with measures of calcium and phosphate homeostasis. Presence of the specific haplotypes may be an indicator of risk for low 25(OH)D levels, and may in addition be correlated to bone mineral density.

  • 8.
    Björk, Anne
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin.
    Mellström, Dan
    Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg Sweden. Centre for Bone and Arthritis Research at the Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg Sweden. Centre for Bone and Arthritis Research at the Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Karlsson, Magnus
    Department of Clinical Sciences and Orthopedic Surgery, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö..
    Mallmin, Hans
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin.
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Kindmark, Andreas
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Polymorphisms in the CYP2R1 gene are associated with 25OHD3 and bone mineral density, but not with calcium and phosphate concentrations (MrOS Sweden).Manuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 9.
    Björk, Anne
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Ribom, Eva
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin.
    Scragg, R.
    Univ Auckland, Sch Populat Hlth, Sect Epidemiol & Biostat, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Mellstrom, D.
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Med, Dept Internal Med & Clin, Geriatr Med,Nutr, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Grundberg, E.
    McGill Univ, Dept Human Genet, Montreal, PQ, Canada;McGill Univ, Genome Quebec Innovat Ctr, Montreal, PQ, Canada.
    Ohlsson, C.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, M.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci & Orthoped Surg, Malmo, Sweden.
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Kindmark, Andreas
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Variations in the vitamin D receptor gene are not associated with measures of muscle strength, physical performance, or falls in elderly men: Data from MrOS Sweden2019Inngår i: Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, ISSN 0960-0760, E-ISSN 1879-1220, Vol. 187, s. 160-165Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) has been proposed as a candidate gene for several musculoskeletal phenotypes. However, previous results on the associations between genetic variants of the VDR with muscle strength and falls have been contradictory. The MrOS Sweden survey, a prospective population-based cohort study of 3014 elderly men (mean age 75 years, range 69-81) offered the opportunity to further investigate these associations. At baseline, data were collected on muscle strength and also the prevalence of falls during the previous 12 months. Genetic association analysis was performed for 7 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), covering the genetic region surrounding the VDR gene in 2924 men with available samples of DNA. Genetic variations in the VDR were not associated with five different measurements of muscle strength or physical performance (hand grip strength right and left, 6 m walking test (easy and narrow) and timed-stands test). However, one of the 7 SNPs of the gene for the VDR receptor, rs7136534, was associated with prevalence of falls (33.6% of the AA, 14.6% of the AG and 16.5% of the GG allele). In conclusion, VDR genetic variants are not related to muscle strength or physical performance in elderly Swedish men. The role of the rs7136534 SNP for the occurrence of falls is not clear.

  • 10.
    Björk, Anne
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin.
    Ribom, Eva
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin.
    Scragg, Robert
    Section of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zeeland.
    Mellström, Dan
    Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg Sweden. Centre for Bone and Arthritis Research at the Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Grundberg, Elin
    Department of Human Genetics, McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg Sweden. Centre for Bone and Arthritis Research at the Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    Department of Clinical Sciences and Orthopedic Surgery, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö..
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Kindmark, Andreas
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Genetic variation in the vitamin D receptor gene is not associated with measures of muscle strength, physical performance, or falls in elderly men. Data from MrOS Sweden.Manuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 11. Bolinder, J.
    et al.
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Johansson, L.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Wilding, J.
    Langkilde, A. M.
    Sjöstrom, C. D.
    Sugg, J.
    Parikh, S.
    Dapagliflozin maintains glycaemic control while reducing weight and body fat mass over 2 years in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled on metformin2014Inngår i: Diabetes, obesity and metabolism, ISSN 1462-8902, E-ISSN 1463-1326, Vol. 16, nr 2, s. 159-169Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    Dapagliflozin, a highly selective inhibitor of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2), reduces hyperglycaemia and weight in patients with type2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) by increasing urinary glucose excretion. Long-term glycaemic control, body composition and bone safety were evaluated in patients with T2DM after 102 weeks of dapagliflozin treatment.

    Methods

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study (NCT00855166) enrolled patients with T2DM [mean: age 60.7 years; HbA1c 7.2%; body mass index (BMI) 31.9 kg/m(2); body weight 91.5 kg] inadequately controlled on metformin. Patients (N=182) were randomly assigned 1:1 to receive dapagliflozin 10 mg/day or placebo added to open-label metformin for a 24-week double-blind treatment period followed by a 78-week site- and patient-blinded extension period. At week 102, changes from baseline in HbA1c, weight, waist circumference, total body fat mass as measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), serum markers of bone turnover, bone mineral density (BMD) as measured by DXA, and adverse events were evaluated.

    Results

    A total of 140 patients (76.9%) completed the study. Over 102 weeks, dapagliflozin-treated patients showed reductions in HbA1c by -0.3%, weight by -4.54 kg, waist circumference by -5.0 cm and fat mass by -2.80 kg without increase in rate of hypoglycaemia. Compared with placebo, no meaningful changes from baseline in markers of bone turnover or BMD were identified over 102 weeks. One fracture occurred in each treatment group. The frequency of urinary tract infection (UTI) and genital infection was similar in both treatment groups.

    Conclusions

    Over 102 weeks, dapagliflozin improved glycaemic control, and reduced weight and fat mass, without affecting markers of bone turnover or BMD in patients with T2DM inadequately controlled on metformin.

  • 12.
    Borgström, F.
    et al.
    Quantify Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Olafsson, G.
    Quantify Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jonsson, E.
    Quantify Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ström, O.
    Quantify Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Akesson, K.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Orthoped, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Clin Sci Malmo, Lund, Sweden..
    Spangeus, A.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Kanis, J. A.
    Univ Sheffield, Sch Med, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    A Simulation Model For The Treatment Pathway Of Osteoporosis2016Inngår i: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 27, s. S60-S60Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 13.
    Burman, Pia
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp Malmo, Dept Endocrinol, S-20502 Malmo, Sweden..
    Edén-Engström, Britt
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Ekman, Bertil
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Endocrinol, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Karlsson, Anders F.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Klinisk diabetologi och metabolism.
    Schwarcz, Erik
    Univ Orebro, Fac Med & Hlth, Dept Internal Med, SE-70182 Orebro, Sweden..
    Wahlberg, Jeanette
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Endocrinol, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Limited value of cabergoline in Cushing's disease: a prospective study of a 6-week treatment in 20 patients2016Inngår i: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 174, nr 1, s. 17-24Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Context and objective: The role of cabergoline in Cushing's disease (CD) remains controversial. The experience is limited to case reports and few open studies that report the effects determined after >= 1 month of treatment. In prolactinomas and dopamine-responsive GH-secreting tumours, effects of cabergoline are seen within days or weeks. Here, we searched for short-term effects of cabergoline in CD. Design: Twenty patients (19 naive and one recurrent) were included in a prospective study. Cabergoline was administered in increasing doses of 0.5-5 mg/week over 6 weeks. Methods: Urinary free cortisol (UFC) 24 h, morning cortisol and ACTH, and salivary cortisol at 0800, 1600 and 2300 h were determined once weekly throughout. Diurnal curves (six samples) of serum cortisol were measured at start and end. Results: At study end, the median cabergoline dose was 5 mg, range 2.5-5 mg/week. The prolactin levels, markers of compliance, were suppressed in all patients. During the treatment, hypercortisolism varied, gradual and dose-dependent reductions were not seen. Five patients had a >50% decrease of UFC, three had a >50% rise of UFC. Salivary cortisol at 2300 h showed a congruent >50% change with UFC in two of the five cases with decreased UFC, and in one of the three cases with increased UFC. One patient with decreases in both UFC and 2300 h salivary cortisol also had a reduction in diurnal serum cortisol during the course of the study. Conclusions: Cabergoline seems to be of little value in the management of CD. Only one patient had a response-like pattern. Given the known variability of disease activity in CD, this might represent a chance finding.

  • 14.
    Carlzon, Daniel
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Med, Sahlgrenska Acad CBAR, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Svensson, Johan
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Med, Sahlgrenska Acad CBAR, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Petzold, Max
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Ctr Appl Biostat, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Karlsson, Magnus K.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Orthopaed & Clin Sci, Clin & Mol Osteoporosis Res Unit, Malmo, Sweden..
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Haghsheno, Mohammad-Ali
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Urol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Damber, Jan-Erik
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Urol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Mellström, Dan
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Med, Sahlgrenska Acad CBAR, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Med, Sahlgrenska Acad CBAR, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Insulin-like growth factor I and risk of incident cancer in elderly men - results from MrOS (Osteoporotic Fractures in Men) in Sweden2016Inngår i: Clinical Endocrinology, ISSN 0300-0664, E-ISSN 1365-2265, Vol. 84, nr 5, s. 764-770Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectiveStudies of the association between circulating IGF-I and cancer risk have shown conflicting results. We have previously observed a U-shaped association between IGF-I and cancer mortality. This study test the hypotheses of a U-shaped association between IGF-I and incident cancer. DesignElderly men (2368), randomly recruited from the general community. MethodsIGF-I was measured in a cohort of elderly men. Complete data for incident cancer were obtained from the Swedish Cancer Registry. Statistical analyses included Cox proportional hazards regressions with or without a spline approach. ResultsThree hundred and sixty-nine participants had incident cancer after baseline. Prostate cancer was most frequent (n = 140). There was no association between serum IGF-I and all cancer or prostate cancer incidence. However, there was a nonlinear association between IGF-I and nonprostate cancer incidence (P = <005). Exploratory analyses were performed for low and high serum IGF-I (quintiles 1 and 5) vs intermediate (quintiles 2-4, referent). There was a tendency of increased nonprostate cancer risk in men with high IGF-I (HR = 126, 95% confidence interval (CI): 092-171, P = 015). After excluding participants with follow-up of less than 26 years (half median follow-up time), to control for potential diagnostic delay, the association was statistically significant (HR = 155, CI: 103-235). ConclusionThere was a significant nonlinear association between IGF-I and nonprostate cancer. No association between IGF-I and prostate cancer was observed. Future studies are warranted to further investigate this nonlinear association, including whether IGF-I concentration is a reproducible, and useful, risk marker of nonprostate cancer.

  • 15. Carlzon, Daniel
    et al.
    Svensson, Johan
    Petzold, Max
    Karlsson, Magnus K.
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Tivesten, Asa
    Mellstrom, Dan
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Both Low and High Serum IGF-1 Levels Associate With Increased Risk of Cardiovascular Events in Elderly Men2014Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 99, nr 11, s. E2308-E2316Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Most previous prospective studies suggest that low serum IGF-1 associates with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events whereas other studies suggest that high serum IGF-1 associates with increased risk of CVD events. Objective: We tested the hypothesis that not only low, but also high serum IGF-1 levels associate with increased risk of CVD events in elderly men. Setting and Design: Serum IGF-1 levels were measured in 2901 elderly men (age 69-81 years) included in the Swedish cohort of the prospective, population-based Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study (MrOS), Sweden cohort. Data for CVD events were obtained from national Swedish registers with no loss of followup. Results: During followup (median, 5.1 y) 589 participants experienced a CVD event. The association between serum IGF-1 and risk of CVD events was nonlinear, and restricted cubic spline Cox regression analysis revealed a U-shaped association between serum IGF-1 levels and CVD events (P < .01 for nonlinearity). Low as well as high serum IGF-1 (quintile 1 or 5 vs quintiles 2-4) significantly associated with increased risk for CVD events (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.25, 95% confidence interval, [CI], 1.02-1.54; and HR = 1.35, 95% CI 1.10-1.66, respectively). These associations remained after adjustment for prevalent CVD and multiple risk factors. High serum IGF-1 associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) events but not with risk of cerebrovascular events. Conclusions: Both low and high serum IGF-1 levels are risk markers for CVD events in elderly men. The association between high serum IGF-1 and CVD events is mainly driven by CHD events.

  • 16.
    Clewemar, Pantelis
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrin tumörbiologi.
    Hailer, Nils P.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Hailer, Yasmin
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Klar, Joakim
    Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Kindmark, Andreas
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Stattin, Eva-Lena
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Expanding the phenotypic spectrum of osteogenesis imperfecta type V including heterotopic ossification of muscle origins and attachments2019Inngår i: Molecular Genetics & Genomic Medicine, ISSN 2324-9269, Vol. 7, nr 7, artikkel-id e00723Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a clinical and genetic heterogeneous group of connective tissue disorders, characterized by bone fragility and a propensity to fracture.

    Methods

    In this report we describe the clinical phenotype of two patients, a 28‐year‐old woman and her mother (54 years old), both with a history of short stature and multiple fractures.

    Results

    Exome sequencing revealed the recurring IFITM5:c.‐14 C>T variant causing OI type V. Both patients had several fractures during childhood. CT‐scan and scintigraphy showed ossification of the origin and attachment of muscles and hypertrophic callus formation.

    Conclusion

    Ossification of the origin and attachment of muscles seems to be part of the phenotype in patients with OI type V.

  • 17. Ellegaard, Maria
    et al.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    Lorentzon, Mattias
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Mellstrom, Dan
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Schwarz, Peter
    Jorgensen, Niklas Rye
    Single-nucleotide polymorphism in the P2Y(2) receptor gene is associated with bone mineral density in a cohort of Swedish elderly men2014Inngår i: Purinergic Signalling Purinergic Signalling, ISSN 1573-9538, E-ISSN 1573-9546, Vol. 10, nr 4, s. 751-751, artikkel-id B015Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 18. Eriksson, Anna L.
    et al.
    Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    Mellström, Dan
    Ohlsson, Claes
    High-Sensitivity CRP Is an Independent Risk Factor for All Fractures and Vertebral Fractures in Elderly Men: The MrOS Sweden Study2014Inngår i: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681, Vol. 29, nr 2, s. 418-423Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Epidemiological studies have shown low-grade inflammation measured by high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) to be associated with fracture risk in women. However, it is still unclear whether hs-CRP is also associated with fracture risk in men. We therefore measured serum levels of hs-CRP in 2910 men, mean age 75 years, included in the prospective population-based MrOS Sweden cohort. Study participants were divided into tertile groups based on hs-CRP level. Fractures occurring after the baseline visit were validated (average follow-up 5.4 years). The incidence for having at least one fracture after baseline was 23.9 per 1000 person-years. In Cox proportional hazard regression analyses adjusted for age, hs-CRP was related to fracture risk. The hazard ratio (HR) of fracture for the highest tertile of hs-CRP, compared with the lowest and the medium tertiles combined, was 1.48 (95% CI, 1.20-1.82). Multivariate adjustment for other risk factors for fractures had no major effect on the associations between hs-CRP and fracture. Results were essentially unchanged after exclusion of subjects with hs-CRP levels greater than 7.5mg/L, as well as after exclusion of subjects with a first fracture within 3 years of follow-up, supporting that the associations between hs-CRP and fracture risk were not merely a reflection of a poor health status at the time of serum sampling. Femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD) was not associated with hs-CRP, and the predictive role of hs-CRP for fracture risk was essentially unchanged when femoral neck BMD was added to the model (HR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.09-1.72). Exploratory subanalyses of fracture type demonstrated that hs-CRP was clearly associated with clinical vertebral fractures (HR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.12-2.29). We demonstrate, using a large prospective population-based study, that elderly men with high hs-CRP have increased risk of fractures, and that these fractures are mainly vertebral. The association between hs-CRP and fractures was independent of BMD. (c) 2014 The Authors. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.

  • 19.
    Feudjo Tepie, M.
    et al.
    Amgen Ltd, Uxbridge, Middx, England..
    Banefelt, J.
    Quantify Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ström, O.
    Quantify Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ortsater, G.
    Quantify Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Åkesson, K.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Orthoped, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Clin Sci Malmo, Lund, Sweden..
    Sprafka, J. M.
    Amgen Inc, Thousand Oaks, CA 91320 USA..
    Wagman, R. B.
    Amgen Inc, Thousand Oaks, CA 91320 USA..
    Denosumab (DMAB) Freedom Extension Pseudo Control Study: A Retrospective Cohort Study Of Comorbidities In Swedish Women With Postmenopausal Osteoporosis (PMO)2016Inngår i: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 27, s. S154-S154Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 20. Ghanei, Iman
    et al.
    Rosengren, Bjorn E.
    Hasserius, Ralph
    Nilsson, Jan-Ake
    Mellstrom, Dan
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Karlsson, Magnus K.
    The prevalence and severity of low back pain and associated symptoms in 3,009 old men2014Inngår i: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 23, nr 4, s. 814-820Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence and severity of low back pain (LBP) and the influence of sciatica and neurological deficits in old men. Mister osteoporosis Sweden includes 3,014 community-dwelling men aged 69-81 years. At study start 3,009 participants answered questions on LBP, low back pain and sciatica (LBP + SCI) or low back pain and sciatica with associated neurological deficits (LBP + SCI + NEU) during the preceding 12 months. Data are presented as proportions or medians with mid-quartile ranges. Differences between groups were tested by chi(2) test and Kruskall-Wallis test. 24 % had experienced LBP without SCI, 8 % LBP + SCI and 14 % LBP + SCI + NEU. 10 % of the men with LBP, 22 % of those with LBP + SCI, and 36 % of those with LBP + SCI + NEU rated the pain as severe (p < 0.001). 23 % of the men with LBP, 31 % of those with LBP + SCI and 50 % of those with LBP + SCI + NEU reported limitation in activity of daily living (ADL) (p < 0.001). Men with only LBP had to restrict their activities for 7 days (3-14), those with LBP + SCI 6 days (2-14) and those with LBP + SCI + NEU 10 days (3-30) (p < 0.05). The 1-year prevalence of LBP in community living men aged 69-81 years was close to 50 % but for individuals with LBP or LBP + SCI the morbidity was low with more than two-thirds having no limitations in ADL. In men with LBP + SCI + NEU more than one-third rated the pain as severe and close to half had limitations in ADL.

  • 21.
    Harvey, N. C.
    et al.
    Univ Southampton, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiol Unit, Southampton SO16 6YD, Hants, England.;Univ Southampton, NIHR Southampton Biomed Res Ctr, Tremona Rd, Southampton, Hants, England.;Univ Hosp Southampton NHS Fdn Trust, Tremona Rd, Southampton, Hants, England..
    Johansson, H.
    Univ Gothenburg, CBAR, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Univ Sheffield, Sch Med, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Beech Hill Rd, Sheffield S10 2RX, S Yorkshire, England..
    Oden, A.
    Univ Gothenburg, CBAR, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Univ Sheffield, Sch Med, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Beech Hill Rd, Sheffield S10 2RX, S Yorkshire, England..
    Karlsson, M. K.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Malmo, Clin & Mol Osteoporosis Res Unit, Malmo, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Orthoped, Malmo, Sweden..
    Rosengren, B. E.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Malmo, Clin & Mol Osteoporosis Res Unit, Malmo, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Orthoped, Malmo, Sweden..
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Cooper, C.
    Univ Southampton, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiol Unit, Southampton SO16 6YD, Hants, England.;Univ Southampton, NIHR Southampton Biomed Res Ctr, Tremona Rd, Southampton, Hants, England.;Univ Hosp Southampton NHS Fdn Trust, Tremona Rd, Southampton, Hants, England.;Univ Oxford, NIHR Musculoskeletal Biomed Res Unit, Oxford, England..
    McCloskey, E.
    Univ Sheffield, Sch Med, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Beech Hill Rd, Sheffield S10 2RX, S Yorkshire, England..
    Kanis, J. A.
    Univ Sheffield, Sch Med, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Beech Hill Rd, Sheffield S10 2RX, S Yorkshire, England..
    Ohlsson, C.
    Univ Gothenburg, CBAR, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Mellstrom, D.
    Univ Gothenburg, CBAR, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    FRAX predicts incident falls in elderly men: findings from MrOs Sweden2016Inngår i: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 27, nr 1, s. 267-274Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A Summary Falls and fractures share several common risk factors. Although past falls is not included as an input variable in the FRAX calculator, we demonstrate that FRAX probability predicts risk of incident falls in the MrOs Sweden cohort. Introduction Although not included in the FRAXA (R) algorithm, it is possible that increased falls risk is partly dependent on other risk factors that are incorporated into FRAX. The aim of the present study was to determine whether fracture probability generated by FRAX might also predict risk of incident falls and the extent that a falls history would add value to FRAX. Methods We studied the relationship between FRAX probabilities and risk of falls in 1836 elderly men recruited to the MrOS study, a population-based prospective cohort of men from Sweden. Baseline data included falls history, clinical risk factors, bone mineral density (BMD) at femoral neck, and calculated FRAX probabilities. Incident falls were captured during an average of 1.8 years of follow-up. An extension of Poisson regression was used to investigate the relationship between FRAX, other risk variables, and the time-to-event hazard function of falls. All associations were adjusted for age and time since baseline. Results At enrolment, 15.5 % of the men had fallen during the preceding 12 months (past falls) and 39 % experienced one or more falls during follow-up (incident falls). The risk of incident falls increased with increasing FRAX probabilities at baseline (hazard ratio (HR) per standard deviation (SD), 1.16; 95 % confidence interval (95%CI), 1.06 to 1.26). The association between incident falls and FRAX probability remained after adjustment for past falls (HR per SD, 1.12; 95%CI, 1.03 to 1.22). High compared with low baseline FRAX score (>15 vs <15 % probability of major osteoporotic fracture) was strongly predictive of increased falls risk (HR, 1.64; 95%CI, 1.36 to 1.97) and remained stable with time. Whereas past falls were a significant predictor of incident falls (HR, 2.75; 95%CI, 2.32 to 3.25), even after adjustment for FRAX, the hazard ratio decreased markedly with increasing follow-up time. Conclusions Although falls are not included as an input variable, FRAX captures a component of risk for future falls and outperforms falls history with an extended follow-up time.

  • 22.
    Harvey, N. C.
    et al.
    Univ Southampton, Southampton Gen Hosp, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiol Unit, Southampton, Hants, England..
    Johansson, H.
    Univ Sheffield, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Oden, A.
    Univ Sheffield, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Karlsson, M. K.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Clin & Mol Osteoporosis Res Unit, Dept Orthoped & Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden..
    Rosengren, B.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Clin & Mol Osteoporosis Res Unit, Dept Orthoped & Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden..
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Cooper, C.
    Univ Southampton, Southampton Gen Hosp, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiol Unit, Southampton, Hants, England..
    McCloskey, E. V.
    Univ Sheffield, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Kanis, J. A.
    Univ Sheffield, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Ohlsson, C.
    Univ Gothenburg, CBAR, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Mellstrom, D.
    Univ Gothenburg, CBAR, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    The Predictive Value Of Past Falls For Incident Falls Decreases, But That Of Frax Remains Stable, With Increasing Follow-Up Time: Findings From MROS Sweden2015Inngår i: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 26, s. S143-S143Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 23.
    Harvey, N. C.
    et al.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Orthopaed Rheumatol & Musculoskelet, Botnar Res Ctr, Oxford, England..
    Oden, A.
    Univ Sheffield, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Med Sch, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Orwoll, E.
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Portland, OR 97201 USA..
    Lapidus, J.
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Prevent Med, Div Biostat, Portland, OR 97201 USA..
    Kwok, T.
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Dept Med & Therapeut, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.;Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Sch Publ Hlth, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Karlsson, M.
    Lund Univ, Dept Orthopaed & Clin Sci, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Rosengren, B.
    Lund Univ, Clin & Mol Osteoporosis Res Unit, Dept Clin Sci Malmo, Malmo, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Orthoped, Malmo, Sweden..
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Cooper, C.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Orthopaed Rheumatol & Musculoskelet, Botnar Res Ctr, Oxford, England..
    Kanis, J. A.
    Univ Sheffield, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Med Sch, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Ohlsson, C.
    Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Mellstrom, D.
    Univ Gothenberg, Sahlgrenska Acad, CBAR, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Johansson, H.
    Univ Sheffield, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Med Sch, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    McCloskey, E. V.
    Univ Sheffield, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Med Sch, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Mobility Related Risk Factors Predict Incident Fractures Independently Of Frax: The Osteoporotic Fractures In Men (MROS) Study2017Inngår i: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 28, s. S61-S61Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 24.
    Harvey, N. C.
    et al.
    Univ Oxford, Musculoskeletal Epidemiol, Botnar Res Ctr, Nuffield Dept Orthopaed Rheumatol & Musculoskelet, Oxford, England..
    Oden, A.
    Univ Sheffield, Sch Med, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Orwoll, E.
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Portland, OR 97201 USA..
    Lapidus, J.
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Prevent Med, Div Biostat, Portland, OR 97201 USA..
    Kwok, T.
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Dept Med & Therapeut, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.;Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Sch Publ Hlth, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Karlsson, M.
    Lund Univ, Dept Orthopaed & Clin Sci, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Rosengren, B.
    Lund Univ, Clin & Mol Osteoporosis Res Unit, Dept Clin Sci Malmo, Malmo, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Orthoped, Malmo, Sweden..
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Cooper, C.
    Univ Oxford, Musculoskeletal Epidemiol, Botnar Res Ctr, Nuffield Dept Orthopaed Rheumatol & Musculoskelet, Oxford, England..
    McCloskey, E.
    Univ Sheffield, Sch Med, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Kanis, J. A.
    Univ Sheffield, Sch Med, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Ohlsson, C.
    Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Mellstrom, D.
    Univ Gothenberg, CBAR, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Johansson, H.
    Univ Sheffield, Sch Med, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    PRIOR FALLS PREDICT INCIDENT FRACTURES INDEPENDENTLY OF FRAX: The Osteoporotic Fractures In Men (MROS) Study2017Inngår i: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 28, s. S259-S259Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 25.
    Harvey, N. C.
    et al.
    Univ Southampton, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiol Unit, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Oden, A.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res CBAR, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Orwoll, E.
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Portland, OR 97201 USA.
    Lapidus, J.
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Div Biostat, Dept Publ Hlth & Prevent Med, Portland, OR 97201 USA.
    Kwok, T.
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Dept Med & Therapeut, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China;Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Sch Publ Hlth, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Karlsson, M.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Malmo, Lund, Sweden.
    Rosengren, B.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Malmo, Lund, Sweden.
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Coopers, C.
    Univ Southampton, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiol Unit, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Cawthon, P. M.
    Univ Calif San Fransisco, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, San Francisco, CA USA.
    Kanis, J. A.
    Univ Sheffield, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England.
    Ohlsson, C.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res CBAR, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mellstrom, D.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res CBAR, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson, H.
    Catholic Univ Australia, Inst Hlth & Aging, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    McCloskey, E. V.
    Univ Sheffield, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England.
    Physical Performance Or Function, But Not Appendicular Lean Mass, Predict Incident Fractures Independently Of FRAX Probability And BMD: Results From The Osteoporotic Fractures In Men (MROS) Cohort2018Inngår i: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 29, s. S69-S70Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 26.
    Harvey, Nicholas C.
    et al.
    Univ Southampton, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiol Unit, Southampton SO16 6YD, Hants, England.;Univ Southampton, NIHR Southampton Biomed Res Ctr, Southampton, Hants, England.;Univ Hosp Southampton NHS Fdn Trust, Southampton, Hants, England..
    Oden, Anders
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, CBAR, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Univ Sheffield, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Orwoll, Eric
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Portland, OR 97201 USA..
    Lapidus, Jodi
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Div Biostat, Dept Publ Hlth & Prevent Med, Portland, OR 97201 USA..
    Kwok, Timothy
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Dept Med & Therapeut, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.;Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Sch Publ Hlth, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Karlsson, Magnus K.
    Lund Univ, Clin & Mol Osteoporosis Res Unit, Dept Clin Sci Malmo, Malmo, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Orthoped, Malmo, Sweden..
    Rosengren, Björn E.
    Lund Univ, Clin & Mol Osteoporosis Res Unit, Dept Clin Sci Malmo, Malmo, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Orthoped, Malmo, Sweden..
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Cooper, Cyrus
    Univ Southampton, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiol Unit, Southampton SO16 6YD, Hants, England.;Univ Southampton, NIHR Southampton Biomed Res Ctr, Southampton, Hants, England.;Univ Hosp Southampton NHS Fdn Trust, Southampton, Hants, England.;Univ Oxford, NIHR Oxford Biomed Res Ctr, Oxford, England..
    McCloskey, Eugene
    Univ Sheffield, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England.;Univ Sheffield, Ctr Integrated Res Musculoskeletal Ageing CIMA, Mellanby Ctr Bone Res, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Kanis, John A.
    Univ Sheffield, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England.;Catholic Univ Australia, Inst Hlth & Aging, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, CBAR, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Mellström, Dan
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, CBAR, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Johansson, Helena
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, CBAR, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Univ Sheffield, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England.;Catholic Univ Australia, Inst Hlth & Aging, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Falls Predict Fractures Independently of FRAX Probability: A Meta-Analysis of the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study2018Inngår i: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681, Vol. 33, nr 3, s. 510-516Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Although prior falls are a well-established predictor of future fracture, there is currently limited evidence regarding the specific value of falls history in fracture risk assessment relative to that of other clinical risk factors and bone mineral density (BMD) measurement. We therefore investigated, across the three Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study cohorts, whether past falls predicted future fracture independently of FRAX and whether these associations varied with age and follow-up time. Elderly men were recruited from MrOS Sweden, Hong Kong, and USA. Baseline data included falls history (over the preceding 12 months), clinical risk factors, BMD at femoral neck, and calculated FRAX probabilities. An extension of Poisson regression was used to investigate the associations between falls, FRAX probability, and incident fracture, adjusting for age, time since baseline, and cohort in base models; further models were used to investigate interactions with age and follow-up time. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to synthesize the individual country associations. Information on falls and FRAX probability was available for 4365 men in USA (mean age 73.5 years; mean follow-up 10.8 years), 1823 men in Sweden (mean age 75.4 years; mean follow-up 8.7 years), and 1669 men in Hong Kong (mean age 72.4 years; mean follow-up 9.8 years). Rates of past falls were similar at 20%, 16%, and 15%, respectively. Across all cohorts, past falls predicted incident fracture at any site (hazard ratio [HR]=1.69; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.49, 1.90), major osteoporotic fracture (MOF) (HR=1.56; 95% CI 1.33, 1.83), and hip fracture (HR=1.61; 95% CI 1.27, 2.05). Relationships between past falls and incident fracture remained robust after adjustment for FRAX probability: adjusted HR (95% CI) any fracture: 1.63 (1.45, 1.83); MOF: 1.51 (1.32, 1.73); and hip: 1.54 (1.21, 1.95). In conclusion, past falls predicted incident fracture independently of FRAX probability, confirming the potential value of falls history in fracture risk assessment.

  • 27.
    Holgersson, Magdalena Bentmar
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Translat Med, Jan Waldenstroms Gata 35,Bldg 91,Plan 10, S-20502 Malmo, Sweden..
    Ruhayel, Yasir
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Urol, Malmo, Sweden..
    Karlsson, Magnus
    Lund Univ, Dept Orthoped & Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden..
    Giwercman, Aleksander
    Lund Univ, Dept Translat Med, Jan Waldenstroms Gata 35,Bldg 91,Plan 10, S-20502 Malmo, Sweden..
    Bjartell, Anders
    Lund Univ, Dept Translat Med, Jan Waldenstroms Gata 35,Bldg 91,Plan 10, S-20502 Malmo, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Urol, Malmo, Sweden..
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res, Dept Geriatr, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Mellstrom, Dan
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res, Dept Geriatr, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Haghsheno, Mohammad-Ali
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Urol,Sahlgrenska Canc Ctr, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Damber, Jan-Erik
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Urol,Sahlgrenska Canc Ctr, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Giwercman, Yvonne Lundberg
    Lund Univ, Dept Translat Med, Jan Waldenstroms Gata 35,Bldg 91,Plan 10, S-20502 Malmo, Sweden..
    Lower prostate cancer risk in Swedish men with the androgen receptor E213 A-allele2017Inngår i: Cancer Causes and Control, ISSN 0957-5243, E-ISSN 1573-7225, Vol. 28, nr 3, s. 227-233Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In a previous population-based study on 3369 European men with self-reported prostate cancer (PCa), it was shown that androgen receptor (AR) haplotype designated H2 was associated with high levels of serum PSA (prostate-specific antigen) concentration, and, at the same time, with low risk for PCa. The aim of this study was to replicate this finding in other cohorts, with registry-based cancer diagnosis. Using data from two population-based cohorts; the Malmo Diet and Cancer Study (MDCS, n = 12,121) and the Swedish Osteoporotic fractures in men study (MrOS, n = 1,120), 628 men with PCa and 1,374 controls were identified and genotyped. PCa data were collected from the Swedish national cancer registry. PCa odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for carriers of the particular AR haplotype, tagged by the rs6624304 T-allele. The 15% of men who were carriers of the AR haplotype H2 had approximately one-third lower risk for PCa diagnosis compared to those with the most common H1 variant (OR 0.65; 95% CI 0.45-0.94; p = 0.021). The same trend, although not statistically significant (OR 0.75; 95% CI 0.47-1.24; p = 0.275), was observed in MrOS Sweden. When both cohorts were merged, an even more significant result was observed (OR 0.68; 95% CI 0.51-0.90; p = 0.008). Swedish men with the variant AR haplotype H2, tagged by rs6624304, have significantly lower risk of PCa compared to those with the more common variant.

  • 28.
    Holmlund-Suila, Elisa
    et al.
    Univ Helsinki, Childrens Hosp, Helsinki, Finland.;Helsinki Univ Hosp, Helsinki, Finland..
    Viljakainen, Heli
    Univ Helsinki, Childrens Hosp, Helsinki, Finland.;Helsinki Univ Hosp, Helsinki, Finland.;Folkhalsan Res Ctr, Helsinki, Finland..
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Hytinantti, Timo
    Helsinki Matern Hosp, Helsinki, Finland..
    Andersson, Sture
    Univ Helsinki, Childrens Hosp, Helsinki, Finland.;Helsinki Univ Hosp, Helsinki, Finland..
    Makitie, Outi
    Univ Helsinki, Childrens Hosp, Helsinki, Finland.;Helsinki Univ Hosp, Helsinki, Finland.;Folkhalsan Res Ctr, Helsinki, Finland.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Genet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 Concentrations Reflect Sex Differences in Mineral Metabolism and Growth in Early Infancy2016Inngår i: Hormone Research in Paediatrics, ISSN 1663-2818, E-ISSN 1663-2826, Vol. 85, nr 4, s. 232-241Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The role of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) in the regulation of mineral homeostasis in early life is inadequately understood. We aimed to explore the effects of vitamin D supplementation on serum FGF23 and to elucidate longitudinal changes in FGF23, in addition to studying its association with mineral metabolism in early infancy. Methods: Altogether 113 healthy infants received vitamin D 3 10, 30 or 40 mu g/day from age 0.5 to 3.0 months. Cord blood at birth and capillary blood samples at 3 months were analyzed for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone, phosphate, calcium and intact and C-terminal FGF23. Results: In repeated-measures ANCOVA, intact FGF23 concentration increased with time (p < 0.001) and C-terminal FGF23 decreased (p < 0.001). At 3 months, girls had a higher concentration of intact FGF23 (51 vs. 26 pg/ml, p < 0.001) and a greater increase over time (Delta FGF23 intact 45 vs. 16 pg/ml, p = 0.001) than boys. Vitamin D did not affect serum intact or C-terminal FGF23 concentrations. Girls showed a positive correlation between phosphate and intact FGF23 (p = 0.004), whereas in boys phosphate and C-terminal FGF23 correlated inversely (p = 0.006). Conclusions: A substantial sex-related difference in intact FGF23 concentration exists during early infancy, possibly related to differences in skeletal growth between boys and girls. (C) 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel

  • 29.
    Hughes, Derralynn
    et al.
    Royal Free London NHS Fdn Trust, London, England;UCL, London, England.
    Mikosch, Peter
    Landesklinikum Mistelbach, Dept Internal Med 2, Mistelbach, Austria;Med Univ Vienna, Externe Lehre, Vienna, Austria.
    Belmatoug, Nadia
    Univ Hosp Paris Nord Val de Seine, Assistance Publ Hop Paris, Dept Internal Med, Referral Ctr Lysosomal Dis, Clichy, France.
    Carubbi, Francesca
    Univ Modena & Reggio Emilia, NOCSAE Hosp, AOU Modena, Dept Biomed Metab & Neural Sci, Modena, Italy.
    Cox, Timothy M.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Med, Cambridge, England.
    Goker-Alpan, Ozlem
    Lysosomal Disorders Res & Treatment Unit, Fairfax, VA USA.
    Kindmark, Andreas
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Mistry, PramodK
    Yale Univ, Sch Med, Dept Internal Med Digest Dis, New Haven, CT USA.
    Poll, Ludger
    Heinrich Heine Univ Dusseldorf, Practice Radiol & Nucl Med Duisburg Moers, Duisburg, Germany.
    Weinreb, Neal
    Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Dept Human Genet, Coral Gables, FL 33124 USA;Univ Miami, Miller Sch Med, Dept Med Hematol, Coral Gables, FL 33124 USA.
    Deegan, Patrick
    Addenbrookes Hosp, Lysosomal Disorders Unit, Box 135,Hills Rd, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England.
    Gaucher Disease in Bone: From Pathophysiology To Practice2019Inngår i: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681, Vol. 34, nr 6, s. 996-1013Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Gaucher disease (GD) is a rare, genetic lysosomal disorder leading to lipid accumulation and dysfunction in multiple organs. Involvement of the skeleton is one of the most prevalent aspects of GD and a major cause of pain, disability, and reduced quality of life. Uniform recommendations for contemporary evaluation and management are needed. To develop practical clinical recommendations, an international group of experienced physicians conducted a comprehensive review of 20 years' of the literature, defining terms according to pathophysiological understanding and pointing out best practice and unmet needs related to the skeletal features of this disorder. Abnormalities of bone modeling, reduced bone density, bone infarction, and plasma cell dyscrasias accompany the displacement of healthy adipocytes in adult marrow. Exposure to excess bioactive glycosphingolipids appears to affect hematopoiesis and the balance of osteoblast and osteoclast numbers and activity. Imbalance between bone formation and breakdown induces disordered trabecular and cortical bone modeling, cortical bone thinning, fragility fractures, and osteolytic lesions. Regular assessment of bone mineral density, marrow infiltration, the axial skeleton and searching for potential malignancy are recommended. MRI is valuable for monitoring skeletal involvement: It provides semiquantitative assessment of marrow infiltration and the degree of bone infarction. When MRI is not available, monitoring of painful acute bone crises and osteonecrosis by plain X-ray has limited value. In adult patients, we recommend DXA of the lumbar spine and left and right hips, with careful protocols designed to exclude focal disease; serial follow-up should be done using the same standardized instrument. Skeletal health may be improved by common measures, including adequate calcium and vitamin D and management of pain and orthopedic complications. Prompt initiation of specific therapy for GD is crucial to optimizing outcomes and preventing irreversible skeletal complications. Investing in safe, clinically useful, and better predictive methods for determining bone integrity and fracture risk remains a need.

  • 30.
    Johansson, H.
    et al.
    Univ Sheffield, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Harvey, N. C.
    Univ Southampton, Southampton Gen Hosp, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiol Unit, Southampton, Hants, England..
    Oden, A.
    Univ Sheffield, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Karlsson, M. K.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Orthoped & Clin Sci, Clin & Mol Osteoporosis Res Unit, Malmo, Sweden..
    Rosengren, B.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Orthoped & Clin Sci, Clin & Mol Osteoporosis Res Unit, Malmo, Sweden..
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Cooper, C.
    Univ Southampton, Southampton Gen Hosp, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiol Unit, Southampton, Hants, England..
    McCloskey, E. V.
    Univ Sheffield, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Kanis, J. A.
    Univ Sheffield, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Ohlsson, C.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, CBAR, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Mellstrom, D.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, CBAR, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Waning Long-Term Predictive Value Of Falls History For Incident Fracture: MROS Sweden2015Inngår i: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 26, s. S42-S42Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 31.
    Johansson, H.
    et al.
    Univ Sheffield, Sch Med, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Oden, A.
    Univ Sheffield, Sch Med, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Karlsson, M.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Orthopaed & Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden..
    Lorentzon, M.
    Sahlgrens Acad, Inst Med, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Geriatr Med, Molndal, Sweden..
    Kanis, J. A.
    Univ Sheffield, Sch Med, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Rosengren, B.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Malmo, Clin & Mol Osteoporosis Res Unit, Malmo, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Orthoped, Malmo, Sweden..
    Mellström, D.
    Sahlgrens Acad, Inst Med, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Geriatr Med, Molndal, Sweden..
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    OhIsson, C.
    Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Harvey, N. C.
    Univ Southampton, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiol Unit, Southampton, Hants, England..
    McCloskey, E.
    Univ Sheffield, Sch Med, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Femoral Neck BMD Is Still The Preferred Site In The Assessment Of Hip Fracture In Elderly Men (10-Year Follow-Up Of MROS Sweden)2016Inngår i: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 27, s. S58-S59Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 32. Johansson, Helena
    et al.
    Oden, Anders
    Karlsson, Magnus
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Mccloskey, Eugene
    Kanis, John A.
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Mellstrom, Dan
    Adiponectin and 10-year probability of fracture in elderly men: MR OS Sweden2013Inngår i: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 24, nr Suppl. 1, s. S47-S47Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 33.
    Jonsson, E.
    et al.
    Quantify Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hansson-Hedblom, A.
    Quantify Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Akesson, K.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Clin & Mol Osteoporosis Unit, Malmo, Sweden..
    Spangeus, A.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Borgstrom, F.
    Quantify Res, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kanis, J. A.
    Catholic Univ Australian, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.;Univ Sheffield, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Cost-Effectiveness Of Complying With Treatment Guidelines In Sweden2017Inngår i: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 28, s. S440-S440Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 34.
    Jonsson, E.
    et al.
    Quantify Res, Hantverkargatan 8, SE-11221 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hansson-Hedblom, A.
    Quantify Res, Hantverkargatan 8, SE-11221 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Akesson, K.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Clin & Mol Osteoporosis Unit, Malmo, Sweden..
    Spangeus, A.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Endocrinol Med & Hlth, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Kanis, J. A.
    Univ Sheffield, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England.;Catholic Univ Australia, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Borgstrom, F.
    Quantify Res, Hantverkargatan 8, SE-11221 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, LIME MMC, Stockholm, Sweden..
    A health economic simulation model for the clinical management of osteoporosis2018Inngår i: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 29, nr 3, s. 545-555Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective was to estimate the burden of osteoporosis in Sweden based on current clinical practice and the cost-effectiveness of improvements in the management of osteoporosis over the clinical management compared to current clinical practice. Results showed that better compliance to treatment guidelines is associated with better projected outcomes and cost-savings.

    Introduction

    The purpose of this study is to estimate the burden of osteoporosis in Sweden based on current clinical practice and the cost-effectiveness of improvements in the management of osteoporosis over the clinical management compared to current clinical practice.

    Methods

    The analysis was carried out using a model that simulates the individual patients considered for pharmacological treatment during 1 year and their projected osteoporosis treatment pathway, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and costs over their remaining lifetime. All patients regardless of treatment or no treatment were simulated. Information on current management of osteoporosis in terms of patient characteristics and treatment patterns were derived from a Swedish osteoporosis research database based on national registers and patient records. Current (standard) clinical management was compared with alternative scenarios mirroring Swedish treatment guidelines.

    Results

    The national burden in terms of lost QALYs was estimated at 14,993 QALYs and the total economic cost at €776M. Scenario analyses showed that 382–3864 QALYs could be gained at a cost/QALY ranging from cost-saving to €31368, depending on the scenario. The margin of investment, i.e. the maximum amount that could be invested in the healthcare system to achieve these improvements up to the limit of the willingness to pay/QALY, was estimated at €199M on a population level (€3,634/patient).

    Conclusions

    The analysis showed that better compliance to treatment guidelines is associated with better projected outcomes and cost-savings. From a cost-effectiveness perspective, there is also considerable room for investment to achieve these improvements in the management of osteoporosis.

  • 35.
    Jonsson, E.
    et al.
    Quantify Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Strom, O.
    Quantify Res, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, LIME MMC, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Spangeus, A.
    Linkoping Univ Hosp, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Akesson, K.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Borgstrom, R.
    Quantify Res, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, LIME MMC, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Banefelt, J.
    Quantify Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Toth, E.
    UCB Pharma, Brussels, Belgium..
    Libanati, C.
    UCB Pharma, Brussels, Belgium..
    Charokopou, M.
    UCB Pharma, Brussels, Belgium..
    Risk Of Major Osteoporotic Fracture (Hip, Vertebral, Radius, Humerus [Mof]) After First, Second And Third Fragility Fracture In A Swedish General Population Cohort2017Inngår i: Value in Health, ISSN 1098-3015, E-ISSN 1524-4733, Vol. 20, nr 9, s. A528-A528Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 36.
    Jonsson, Emma
    et al.
    Quantify Res, Hantverkargatan 8, S-11221 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Eriksson, Daniel
    Quantify Res, Hantverkargatan 8, S-11221 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Åkesson, Kristina
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Orthopaed, Malmo, Sweden..
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Salomonsson, Stina
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Merck Sharp & Dohme Sweden, Sollentuna, Sweden..
    Borgström, Fredrik
    Quantify Res, Hantverkargatan 8, S-11221 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, LIME MMC, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ström, Oskar
    Quantify Res, Hantverkargatan 8, S-11221 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Swedish osteoporosis care2015Inngår i: ARCHIVES OF OSTEOPOROSIS, ISSN 1862-3522, Vol. 10, nr 1, artikkel-id 24Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Mini-abstract The objective of this study was to review and describe the current state of Swedish osteoporosis care and to highlight ongoing challenges. This report encompasses quantitative health outcomes based on Swedish registry data as well as organizational and management aspects. Executive summary Swedish osteoporosis care is characterized by a significant burden of disease, difficulties in identifying high-risk patients, and fragmented pathways for patients in need of secondary fracture prevention. This report aimed to describe the current state, gaps, and challenges in Swedish osteoporosis care, using Swedish national databases, questionnaires, and interviews with healthcare representatives. A secondary aim was to develop quality and process measures to compare differences between counties and to use those measures to describe the interaction between quantitative health outcomes and aspects of care organization and management. In conjunction with fractures, a considerably smaller proportion of men are treated than women, and a smaller proportion of older women are treated compared to younger groups. Between 3 and 16 % of patients receive treatment after a fracture, and the treatment rate in this patient group can likely increase. In addition to an unsatisfactory treatment rate, a limited number of those treated continue treatment throughout the recommended treatment durations, leading to increased risk of fracture. With a substantial variation between counties, there is a clear difficulty to identify non-persistent patients and switch to an alternative treatment. Collaboration around the patient across specialties has been lacking, and systems for secondary prevention have been concentrated to a few counties. However, when this study was conducted, there was a general trend towards implementing regional care programs. This report suggests possible strategies for improving quality of care and, hopefully, it can provide a basis for future evaluations and regional improvement of osteoporosis care in Sweden and other countries.

  • 37.
    Kanis, J. A.
    et al.
    Univ Sheffield, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Oden, A.
    Univ Sheffield, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Harvey, N. C.
    Univ Southampton, Southampton Gen Hosp, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiol Unit, Southampton, Hants, England..
    Leslie, W. D.
    Univ Manitoba, Med & Radiol, Winnipeg, MB, Canada..
    Hans, D.
    Univ Lausanne Hosp, Ctr Bone Dis, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Johansson, H.
    Univ Sheffield, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Barkmann, R.
    Klin Diagnost Radiol, Sekt Biomed Bildgebung, Kiel, Germany..
    Boutroy, S.
    Univ Lyon, Hosp Civils Lyon, Hop E Herriot, INSERM UMR 1033, Lyon, France..
    Brown, J. P.
    CHU Quebec, Res Ctr, Quebec City, PQ, Canada.;Univ Laval, Quebec City, PQ, Canada..
    Chapurlat, R. D.
    INSERM Unit 433, Lyon, France..
    Elders, P.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Fujita, Y.
    Kinki Univ, Fac Med, Dept Publ Hlth, Osaska Sayama, Japan..
    Glueer, C. C.
    Univ Kiel, Diagnost Radiol, Biomed Imaging, Kiel, Germany..
    Goltzman, D.
    Royal Victoria Hosp, Dept Med, Montreal, PQ H3A 1A1, Canada.;Royal Victoria Hosp, Dept Physiol, Montreal, PQ H3A 1A1, Canada.;McGill Univ, Montreal, PQ, Canada..
    Iki, M.
    Kinki Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Fac Med, Osaka, Japan..
    Karlsson, M. K.
    Lund Univ, Clin & Mol Osteoporosis Res Unit, Dept Orthoped & Clin Sci, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Kindmark, Andreas
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Med Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Kurtunatani, N.
    Nara Med Univ, Dept Community Hlth & Epidemiol, Sch Med, Kashihara, Nara 634, Japan..
    Kwok, A.
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Jockey Club, Ctr Osteoporosis Care & Control, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Leung, J.
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Jockey Club, Ctr Osteoporosis Care & Control, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Lippuner, K.
    Univ Hosp Bern, CH-3010 Bern, Switzerland..
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Lorentzon, M.
    Univ Gothenburg, CBAR, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Mellstrom, D.
    Univ Gothenburg, CBAR, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Merlijn, T.
    Oei, L.
    Deakin Univ, Epi Ctr Healthy Ageing, Sch Med, Geelong, Vic 3217, Australia..
    Ohlsson, C.
    Univ Gothenburg, CBAR, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Pasco, J. A.
    Deakin Univ, Epi Ctr Healthy Ageing, Sch Med, Geelong, Vic 3217, Australia..
    Rivadeneira, F.
    Erasmus Univ, Dept Internal Med, Med Ctr, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Med Ctr, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Rosengren, B.
    Lund Univ, Clin & Mol Osteoporosis Res Unit, Dept Orthoped & Clin Sci, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Sornay-Rendu, E.
    Szulc, P.
    Tamaki, J.
    Osaka Med Coll, Dept Hyg & Publ Hlth, Takatsuki, Osaka 569, Japan..
    McCloskey, E. V.
    Univ Sheffield, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    A Meta-Analysis Of Trabecular Bone Score In Fracture Risk Prediction And Its Interaction With Frax2015Inngår i: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 26, s. S46-S46Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 38.
    Karasik, David
    et al.
    Hebrew Senior Life Inst Aging Res, Boston, MA USA;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Bar Ilan Univ, Azrieli Fac Med, Safed, Israel.
    Zillikens, M. Carola
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Netherlands Genom Initiat, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Hsu, Yi-Hsiang
    Hebrew Senior Life Inst Aging Res, Boston, MA USA;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard Med Sch, Dept Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard Sch Publ Hlth, Mol & Integrat Physiol Sci Program, Boston, MA USA.
    Aghdassi, Ali
    Ernst Moritz Arndt Univ Greifswald, Dept Med A, Greifswald, Germany.
    Akesson, Kristina
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Malmo, Malmo, Sweden;Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Orthoped, Malmo, Sweden.
    Amin, Najaf
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Barroso, Ines
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, England;NIHR Cambridge Biomed Res Ctr, Cambridge, England;Univ Cambridge, Metab Res Labs, Inst Metab Sci, Addenbrookes Hosp, Cambridge, England.
    Bennett, David A.
    Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Alzheimers Dis Ctr, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.
    Bertram, Lars
    Univ Lubeck, Lubeck Interdisciplinary Platform Genome Analyt, Lubeck, Germany.
    Bochud, Murielle
    Lausanne Univ Hosp, Univ Inst Social & Prevent Med, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Borecki, Ingrid B.
    Washington Univ, Dept Genet, Div Stat Gen, Sch Med, St Louis, MO 63110 USA;Washington Univ, Sch Med, Div Biostat, St Louis, MO 63110 USA.
    Broer, Linda
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Buchman, Aron S.
    Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Alzheimers Dis Ctr, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.
    Byberg, Liisa
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Campbell, Harry
    Univ Edinburgh, Usher Inst Populat Hlth Sci & Informat, Ctr Global Hlth Res, Teviot Pl, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.
    Campos-Obando, Natalia
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Cauley, Jane A.
    Univ Pittsburgh, Grad Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA.
    Cawthon, Peggy M.
    Calif Pacific Med Ctr, Res Inst, San Francisco, CA USA.
    Chambers, John C.
    Ealing Hosp NHS Trust, Cardiol, London, England;Imperial Coll London, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, London, England;Imperial Coll Healthcare NHS Trust, London, England;Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Fdn Trust, NIHR Cardiovasc Biomed Res Unit, London, England;Imperial Coll London, London, England.
    Chen, Zhao
    Univ Arizona, Mel & Enid Zuckerman Coll Publ Hlth, Tucson, AZ USA.
    Cho, Nam H.
    Ajou Univ, Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Suwon, South Korea.
    Choi, Hyung Jin
    Seoul Natl Univ, Coll Med, Dept Internal Med, Seoul, South Korea;Seoul Natl Univ, Coll Med, Neurosci Res Inst, Dept Anat & Cell Biol, Seoul, South Korea;Seoul Natl Univ, Wide River Inst Immunol, Hongcheon, South Korea.
    Chou, Wen-Chi
    Hebrew Senior Life Inst Aging Res, Boston, MA USA;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Broad Inst, Cambridge, MA USA.
    Cummings, Steven R.
    Calif Pacific Med Ctr, Res Inst, San Francisco, CA USA.
    de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.
    Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, Ctr Translat & Computat Neuroimmunol Neurol, New York, NY USA.
    De Jager, Phillip L.
    Broad Inst, Cell Circuits Program, Cambridge, MA USA;Free Univ Berlin, Humboldt Univ Berlin, Charite Univ Med Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Demuth, Ilja
    Berlin Inst Hlth, Berlin, Germany;Wageningen Univ, Div Human Nutr, AFSG, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Diatchenko, Luda
    Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, Sch Dent, Reg Ctr Neurosensory Disorders, Chapel Hill, NC USA;McGill Univ, Alan Edwards Ctr Res Pain, Montreal, PQ, Canada.
    Econs, Michael J.
    Indiana Univ Sch Med, Dept Med, Indianapolis, IN 46202 USA;Indiana Univ Sch Med, Dept Med & Mol Genet, Indianapolis, IN 46202 USA.
    Eiriksdottir, Gudny
    Iceland Heart Assoc Holtasmari, Kopavogur, Iceland.
    Enneman, Anke W.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Eriksson, Joel
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Johan G.
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welfare, Helsinki, Finland;Univ Helsinki, Dept Gen Practice & Primary Hlth Care, Helsinki, Finland;Helsinki Univ Cent Hosp, Unit Gen Practice, Helsinki, Finland;Folkhalsan Res Ctr, Helsinki, Finland.
    Estrada, Karol
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Biogen Inc, Translat Biol, 14 Cambridge Ctr, Cambridge, MA 02142 USA.
    Evans, Daniel S.
    Calif Pacific Med Ctr, Res Inst, San Francisco, CA USA.
    Feitosa, Mary F.
    Washington Univ, Dept Genet, Div Stat Gen, Sch Med, St Louis, MO 63110 USA.
    Fu, Mao
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Div Endocrinol Diabet & Nutr, Program Personalized & Genom Med, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA;Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Div Endocrinol Diabet & Nutr, Dept Med, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA.
    Gieger, Christian
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Res Unit Mol Epidemiol, Neuherberg, Germany;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Epidemiol 2, Neuherberg, Germany;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Genet Epidemiol, Neuherberg, Germany.
    Grallert, Harald
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Res Unit Mol Epidemiol, Neuherberg, Germany;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Epidemiol 2, Neuherberg, Germany;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, CCG Type 2 Diabet, Neuherberg, Germany;German Ctr Diabet Res, Neuherberg, Germany.
    Gudnason, Vilmundur
    Iceland Heart Assoc Holtasmari, Kopavogur, Iceland;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Lenore, Launer J.
    NIA, Lab Epidemiol & Populat Sci, Intramural Res Program, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Hayward, Caroline
    Univ Edinburgh, MRC Human Genet Unit, IGMM, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.
    Hofman, Albert
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Netherlands Genom Initiat, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Homuth, Georg
    Ernst Moritz Arndt Univ Greifswald, Interfac Inst Genet & Funct Gen, Greifswald, Germany.
    Huffman, Kim M.
    Duke Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Duke Mol Physiol Inst, Durham, NC 27706 USA;Duke Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Div Rheumatol, Durham, NC 27706 USA.
    Husted, Lise B.
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Endocrinol & Internal Med, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Illig, Thomas
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Res Unit Mol Epidemiol, Neuherberg, Germany;Hannover Med Sch, Dept Human Genet, Hannover, Germany.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Stanford Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Div Cardiovasc Med, Stanford, CA USA.
    Ittermann, Till
    Ernst Moritz Arndt Univ Greifswald, Inst Community Med, Greifswald, Germany.
    Jansson, John-Olov
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Dept Physiol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johnson, Toby
    Lausanne Univ Hosp, Univ Inst Social & Prevent Med, Lausanne, Switzerland;Univ Lausanne, Dept Med Genet, Lausanne, Switzerland;Swiss Inst Bioinformat, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Biffar, Reiner
    Ernst Moritz Arndt Univ Greifswald, Dept Prosthet Dent Gerodontol & Biomat, Ctr Oral Hlth, Greifswald, Germany.
    Jordan, Joanne M.
    Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, Thurston Arthrit Res Ctr, Chapel Hill, NC USA.
    Jula, Antti
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Orthoped, Malmo, Sweden.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England.
    Kilpelainen, Tuomas O.
    Univ Cambridge, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Sch Clin Med, Cambridge Biomed Campus, Cambridge, England;Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Sect Metabol Genet, Novo Nordisk Fdn Ctr Basic Metab Res, Copenhagen, Denmark;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Dept Environm Med & Publ Hlth, New York, NY USA.
    Klopp, Norman
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Res Unit Mol Epidemiol, Neuherberg, Germany;Hannover Med Sch, Hannover Unified Biobank, Hannover, Germany.
    Kloth, Jacqueline S. L.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Koller, Daniel L.
    Indiana Univ Sch Med, Dept Med, Indianapolis, IN 46202 USA;Indiana Univ Sch Med, Dept Med & Mol Genet, Indianapolis, IN 46202 USA.
    Kooner, Jaspal S.
    Ealing Hosp NHS Trust, Cardiol, London, England;Imperial Coll Healthcare NHS Trust, London, England;Imperial Coll London, Hammersmith Hosp, Natl Heart & Lung Inst Cardiovasc Sci, Fac Med, Hammersmith Campus, London, England.
    Kraus, William E.
    Duke Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Duke Mol Physiol Inst, Durham, NC USA;Duke Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Div Cardiol, Durham, NC USA.
    Kritchevsky, Stephen
    Wake Forest Sch Med, Sticht Ctr Hlth Aging & Alzheimers Prevent, Winston Salem, NC USA.
    Kutalik, Zoltan
    Lausanne Univ Hosp, Univ Inst Social & Prevent Med, Lausanne, Switzerland;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, CCG Nutrigen & Type 2 Diabet, Neuherberg, Germany;Swiss Inst Bioinformat, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Kuulasmaa, Teemu
    Univ Eastern Finland, Dept Med, Kuopio, Finland;Kuopio Univ Hosp, Kuopio, Finland.
    Kuusisto, Johanna
    Univ Eastern Finland, Dept Med, Kuopio, Finland;Kuopio Univ Hosp, Kuopio, Finland.
    Laakso, Markku
    Univ Eastern Finland, Dept Med, Kuopio, Finland;Kuopio Univ Hosp, Kuopio, Finland.
    Lahti, Jari
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki Collegium Adv Studies, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lang, Thomas
    UC San Francisco, Dept Radiol & Biomed Imaging, San Francisco, CA USA;UC San Francisco, Sch Dent, San Francisco, CA USA.
    Langdahl, Bente L.
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Endocrinol & Internal Med, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Lerch, Markus M.
    Ernst Moritz Arndt Univ Greifswald, Dept Med A, Greifswald, Germany.
    Lewis, Joshua R.
    Univ Western Australia, Sch Med & Pharmacol, Perth, WA, Australia;Univ Sydney, Sydney Med Sch, Sch Publ Hlth, Childrens Hosp Westmead,Ctr Kidney Res, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Lill, Christina
    Univ Lubeck, Inst Neurogenet, Lubeck, Germany.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Klinisk epidemiologi.
    Lindgren, Cecilia
    Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England.
    Liu, Yongmei
    Wake Forest Sch Med, Dept Epidemiol & Prevent, Winston Salem, NC USA.
    Livshits, Gregory
    Tel Aviv Univ, Dept Anat & Anthropol, Sackler Fac Med, Tel Aviv, Israel;Kings Coll London, Dept Twin Res & Genet Epidemiol, St Thomas Campus, London, England.
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Loos, Ruth J. F.
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Dept Environm Med & Publ Hlth, New York, NY USA;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Charles Bronfman Inst Personalized Med, New York, NY 10029 USA;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Inst Child Hlth & Dev, New York, NY 10029 USA;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Genet Obes & Related Traits Program, New York, NY 10029 USA.
    Lorentzon, Mattias
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Internal Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Luan, Jian'an
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Dept Environm Med & Publ Hlth, New York, NY USA.
    Luben, Robert N.
    Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Sect Metabol Genet, Novo Nordisk Fdn Ctr Basic Metab Res, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Malkin, Ida
    Tel Aviv Univ, Dept Anat & Anthropol, Sackler Fac Med, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    McGuigan, Fiona E.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Malmo, Malmo, Sweden.
    Medina-Gomez, Carolina
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Meitinger, Thomas
    Tech Univ Munich, Inst Human Genet, MRI, Munich, Germany;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Human Genet, Neuherberg, Germany.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Klinisk farmakogenomik och osteoporos.
    Mellstrom, Dan
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi. Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Malmo, Malmo, Sweden.
    Mitchell, Braxton D.
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Div Endocrinol Diabet & Nutr, Program Personalized & Genom Med, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA;Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Div Endocrinol Diabet & Nutr, Dept Med, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA;Vet Adm Med Ctr, Geriatr Res & Educ Clin Ctr, Baltimore, MD 21218 USA.
    Morris, Andrew P.
    Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England;Univ Liverpool, Inst Translat Med, Liverpool, Merseyside, England.
    Mosekilde, Leif
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Endocrinol & Internal Med, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Nethander, Maria
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Newman, Anne B.
    Univ Pittsburgh, Grad Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA.
    O'Connell, Jeffery R.
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Div Endocrinol Diabet & Nutr, Program Personalized & Genom Med, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA;Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Div Endocrinol Diabet & Nutr, Dept Med, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA.
    Oostra, Ben A.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Clin Genet, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Ctr Med Syst Biol & Netherlands Consortium H, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Orwoll, Eric S.
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Portland, OR USA.
    Palotie, Aarno
    Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med Finland, Helsinki, Finland;Univ Helsinki, Dept Med Genet, Helsinki, Finland;Univ Cent Hosp, Helsinki, Finland.
    Peacock, Munro
    Indiana Univ Sch Med, Dept Med, Indianapolis, IN 46202 USA;Indiana Univ Sch Med, Dept Med & Mol Genet, Indianapolis, IN 46202 USA.
    Perola, Markus
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welfare, Helsinki, Finland;Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med, Helsinki, Finland;Diabet & Obes Res Program, Helsinki, Finland;Univ Tartu, Estonian Genome Ctr, Tartu, Estonia.
    Peters, Annette
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Res Unit Mol Epidemiol, Neuherberg, Germany;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Epidemiol 2, Neuherberg, Germany.
    Prince, Richard L.
    Univ Western Australia, Sch Med & Pharmacol, Perth, WA, Australia;Sir Charles Gairdner Hosp, Dept Endocrinol & Diabet, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Psaty, Bruce M.
    Univ Washington, Dept Med, Cardiovasc Hlth Res Unit, Seattle, WA USA;Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA;Univ Washington, Dept Hlth Serv, Seattle, WA 98195 USA;Kaiser Permanente, Washington Hlth Res Inst, Seattle, WA USA.
    Raikkonen, Katri
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Psychol & Logoped, Helsinki, Finland.
    Ralston, Stuart H.
    Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Western Gen Hosp, MRC Inst Genet & Mol Med, Mol Med Ctr, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.
    Ripatti, Samuli
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, England;Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med Finland, Helsinki, Finland;Univ Helsinki, Hjelt Inst, Helsinki, Finland.
    Rivadeneira, Fernando
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Netherlands Genom Initiat, Leiden, Netherlands;Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Robbins, John A.
    Univ Calif Davis, Dept Med, Sacramento, CA 95817 USA.
    Rotter, Jerome I.
    Harbor UCLA Med Ctr, Inst Translat Genom & Populat Sci, Los Angeles Biomed Res Inst, Torrance, CA 90509 USA;Harbor UCLA Med Ctr, Dept Pediat, Torrance, CA 90509 USA.
    Rudan, Igor
    Univ Pittsburgh, Grad Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA.
    Salomaa, Veikko
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Satterfield, Suzanne
    Univ Tennessee, Ctr Hlth Sci, Dept Prevent Med, Memphis, TN 38163 USA.
    Schipf, Sabine
    Ernst Moritz Arndt Univ Greifswald, Inst Community Med, Greifswald, Germany.
    Shin, Chan Soo
    Seoul Natl Univ, Coll Med, Dept Internal Med, Seoul, South Korea.
    Smith, Albert V.
    Iceland Heart Assoc Holtasmari, Kopavogur, Iceland;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Smith, Shad B.
    Duke Univ, Dept Anesthesiol, Ctr Translat Pain Med, Durham, NC USA.
    Soranzo, Nicole
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, England.
    Spector, Timothy D.
    Kings Coll London, Dept Twin Res & Genet Epidemiol, St Thomas Campus, London, England.
    Stancakova, Alena
    Univ Eastern Finland, Dept Med, Kuopio, Finland;Kuopio Univ Hosp, Kuopio, Finland.
    Stefansson, Kari
    Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland;deCODE Genet, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth
    Harvard Sch Publ Hlth, Mol & Integrat Physiol Sci Program, Boston, MA USA.
    Stolk, Lisette
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Netherlands Genom Initiat, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Streeten, Elizabeth A.
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Div Endocrinol Diabet & Nutr, Program Personalized & Genom Med, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA;Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Div Endocrinol Diabet & Nutr, Dept Med, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA;Vet Adm Med Ctr, Geriatr Res & Educ Clin Ctr, Baltimore, MD 21218 USA.
    Styrkarsdottir, Unnur
    deCODE Genet, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Swart, Karin M. A.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, EMGO Inst, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Thompson, Patricia
    Univ Arizona, Mel & Enid Zuckerman Coll Publ Hlth, Tucson, AZ USA;SUNY Stony Brook, Dept Pathol, Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA.
    Thomson, Cynthia A.
    Thorleifsson, Gudmar
    deCODE Genet, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur
    Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland;deCODE Genet, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Tikkanen, Emmi
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welfare, Helsinki, Finland;Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med Finland, Helsinki, Finland.
    Tranah, Gregory J.
    Calif Pacific Med Ctr, Res Inst, San Francisco, CA USA.
    Uitterlinden, Andre G.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Netherlands Genom Initiat, Leiden, Netherlands;Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    van Duijn, Cornelia M.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Ctr Med Syst Biol & Netherlands Consortium H, Leiden, Netherlands.
    van Schoor, Natasja M.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, EMGO Inst, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Vandenput, Liesbeth
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Vollenweider, Peter
    Lausanne Univ Hosp, Dept Med Internal Med, Lausanne, Switzerland;Fac Biol & Med, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Volzke, Henry
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Wactawski-Wende, Jean
    Univ Buffalo SUNY, Dept Epidemiol & Environm Hlth, Buffalo, NY USA.
    Walker, Mark
    Newcastle Univ, Med Sch, Inst Cellular Med Diabetes, Framlington Pl, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.
    Wareham, Nicholas J.
    Univ Cambridge, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Sch Clin Med, Cambridge Biomed Campus, Cambridge, England.
    Waterworth, Dawn
    GlaxoSmithKline, Genet, King Of Prussia, PA USA.
    Weedon, Michael N.
    Univ Exeter, Med Sch, Royal Devon & Exeter Hosp, Genet Complex Traits, Exeter, Devon, England.
    Wichmann, H-Erich
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Epidemiol 2, Neuherberg, Germany;Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Inst Med Informat Biometry & Epidemiol, Neuherberg, Germany;Tech Univ, Inst Med Stat & Epidemiol, Munich, Germany.
    Widen, Elisabeth
    Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med Finland, Helsinki, Finland.
    Williams, Frances M. K.
    Kings Coll London, Dept Twin Res & Genet Epidemiol, St Thomas Campus, London, England.
    Wilson, James F.
    Univ Edinburgh, Usher Inst Populat Hlth Sci & Informat, Ctr Global Hlth Res, Teviot Pl, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.
    Wright, Nicole C.
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Dept Epidemiol, Birmingham, AL USA.
    Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Div Endocrinol Diabet & Nutr, Program Personalized & Genom Med, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA;Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Div Endocrinol Diabet & Nutr, Dept Med, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA;GlaxoSmithKline, Genet, King Of Prussia, PA USA.
    Yu, Lei
    Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Alzheimers Dis Ctr, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.
    Zhang, Weihua
    Ealing Hosp NHS Trust, Cardiol, London, England;Imperial Coll Healthcare NHS Trust, London, England.
    Zhao, Jing Hua
    Univ Cambridge, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Sch Clin Med, Cambridge Biomed Campus, Cambridge, England.
    Zhou, Yanhua
    Boston Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Boston, MA USA.
    Nielson, Carrie M.
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Portland, OR USA.
    Harris, Tamara B.
    NIA, Lab Epidemiol & Populat Sci, Intramural Res Program, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Demissie, Serkalem
    Boston Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Boston, MA USA.
    Kiel, Douglas P.
    Hebrew Senior Life Inst Aging Res, Boston, MA USA;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard Med Sch, Dept Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Disentangling the genetics of lean mass2019Inngår i: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 109, nr 2, s. 276-287Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Lean body mass (LM) plays an important role in mobility and metabolic function. We previously identified five loci associated with LM adjusted for fat mass in kilograms. Such an adjustment may reduce the power to identify genetic signals having an association with both lean mass and fat mass. Objectives: To determine the impact of different fat mass adjustments on genetic architecture of LM and identify additional LM loci. Methods: We performed genome-wide association analyses for whole-body LM (20 cohorts of European ancestry with n = 38,292) measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) or bioelectrical impedance analysis, adjusted for sex, age, age(2), and height with or without fat mass adjustments (Model 1 no fat adjustment; Model 2 adjustment for fat mass as a percentage of body mass; Model 3 adjustment for fat mass in kilograms). Results: Seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in separate loci, including one novel LM locus (TNRC6B), were successfully replicated in an additional 47,227 individuals from 29 cohorts. Based on the strengths of the associations in Model 1 vs Model 3, we divided the LM loci into those with an effect on both lean mass and fat mass in the same direction and refer to those as "sumo wrestler" loci (FTO and MC4R). In contrast, loci with an impact specifically on LMwere termed "body builder" loci (VCAN and ADAMTSL3). Using existing available genome-wide association study databases, LM increasing alleles of SNPs in sumo wrestler loci were associated with an adverse metabolic profile, whereas LM increasing alleles of SNPs in "body builder" loci were associated with metabolic protection. Conclusions: In conclusion, we identified one novel LM locus (TNRC6B). Our results suggest that a genetically determined increase in lean mass might exert either harmful or protective effects on metabolic traits, depending on its relation to fat mass.

  • 39. Karlsson, Magnus K
    et al.
    Ribom, Eva L
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Nilsson, J-Å
    Karlsson, Caroline
    Cöster, Maria
    Vonschewelov, Thord
    Mallmin, Hans
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Ortopedi.
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Mellström, Dan
    Lorentzon, Mattias
    Leung, P C
    Lau, Edith
    Cauley, Jane A
    Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth
    Stefanick, Marcia L
    Orwoll, Eric
    Rosengren, Björn E
    International and ethnic variability of falls in older men2014Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 42, nr 2, s. 194-200Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Fallers and especially recurrent fallers are at high risk for injuries. The aim of this study was to evaluate fall epidemiology in older men with special attention to the influence of age, ethnicity and country of residence. Methods: 10,998 men aged 65 years or above recruited in Hong Kong, the United States (US) and Sweden were evaluated in a cross-sectional retrospective study design. Self-reported falls and fractures for the preceding 12 months were registered through questionnaires. Group comparisons were done by chi-square test or logistic regression. Results: The proportion of fallers among the total population was 16.5% in ages 65-69, 24.8% in ages 80-84 and 43.2% in ages above 90 (P <0.001). The corresponding proportions of recurrent fallers in the same age groups were 6.3%, 10.1% and 18.2%, respectively (P <0.001), and fallers with fractures 1.0%, 2.3% and 9.1%, respectively (P <0.001). The proportion of fallers was highest in the US, intermediate in Sweden and lowest in Hong Kong (in most age groups P <0.05). The proportion of fallers among white men in the US was higher than in white men in Sweden (all comparable age groups P <0.01) but there were no differences in the proportion of fallers in US men with different ethnicity. Conclusions: The proportion of fallers in older men is different in different countries, and data in this study corroborate with the view that society of residence influences fall prevalence more than ethnicity.

  • 40.
    Khamisi, Selwan
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Endokrinologi och mineralmetabolism.
    Lindgren, Peter
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Obstetrik & gynekologi.
    Karlsson, F Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Klinisk diabetologi och metabolism.
    A rare case of dyshormonogenetic fetal goiter responding to intra-amniotic thyroxine injections2014Inngår i: European thyroid journal, ISSN 2235-0640, Vol. 3, nr 1, s. 51-56Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Fetal goiter was detected by routine ultrasound in early pregnancy, gestational week (GW) 18, in a 28-year-old woman with no thyroid history, normal thyroid hormone levels and no TSH receptor or thyroid peroxidase antibodies. An umbilical cord blood sample was drawn in GW 23. The analysis indicated fetal hypothyroidism with TSH >100 mU/l (reference value 6.8 ± 2.9, mean ± SD), fT4 3.8 pmol/l (reference value 16.5 ± 5.3, mean ± SD). Intra-amniotic injections of thyroxine were given in conjunction with ultrasound every 7-10 days, in total nine times during GW 24-33. A dose of 10 µg thyroxine/kg of estimated fetal weight per day was administered on six occasions, and 5 µg/kg/day the last three times. Upon injections of thyroxine further growth of the goiter was reduced. Elevated amniotic TSH levels fell from 13 to 2.5 mU/l (reference range 0.04-0.51). Throughout pregnancy, fetal heart rate and skeletal maturation were within normal limits. In week 34, chorioamnionitis was suspected and the child was delivered by cesarean section. Cord blood revealed TSH 596 mU/l (reference value