uu.seUppsala universitets publikationer
Ändra sökning
Avgränsa sökresultatet
1 - 2 av 2
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Träffar per sida
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
Markera
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Blom Johansson: Logopedi.
    Harmia, Stina
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Blom Johansson: Logopedi.
    Palmquist, Emma
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Blom Johansson: Logopedi.
    SLP services in Sweden and in Finland: A comparative study2019Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: About ten years ago surveys were conducted in Sweden and Finland in order to investigate SLP services for people with aphasia [1, 2] and their significant others [3]. Both in Sweden and Finland there are national legislations that demands evidence-based practice. Although there are still no national clinical guidelines on aphasia rehabilitation in Sweden, such evidence-based guidelines can be found internationally, such as Australian Aphasia Rehabilitation Practice [4]. In addition, Simmons-Mackie et al. [5] has through an extensive consensus work developed the top ten best practice statements for aphasia rehabilitation.

    Aim: The overall aim of this study was to describe and compare how speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in Sweden and Finland work with persons with aphasia and their significant others and if these speech-language pathology (SLP) practices differ from those reported about ten years ago. Of special interest was if and how the services followed evidence-based clinical guidelines about aphasia rehabilitation.

    Methods: The study was conducted as a web-based survey in Sweden and Finland in September 2018. The 43-item questionnaire was responded to by 141 (78 Swedish and 63 Finnish) SLPs working with persons with aphasia and their significant others. Quantitative data were analyzed with descriptive and comparative statistics. Qualitative data (answers to open-ended questions) were analyzed with qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The findings suggested that despite some commonalities (such as allocated time for different types of interventions), SLP services differed both within and between the countries. Most within-countries differences were found in relation to in which rehabilitation phase (acute, sub-acute, and chronic) the participants worked but also between private or public SLP services (Finland) or between regions of the countries (Sweden). Differences between the countries concerned for instance time allocated for assessment, measures, goal setting, total number of sessions, the use of specific treatment methods, and the contact with significant others. The majority of the participants, particularly in Sweden, expressed dissatisfaction with the resources allocated to people with aphasia and their significant others. Other expressed barriers to SLP services were lack of treatment material, lack of courses for further education, long distances, too short treatment periods, and lack of SLP services after discharge from hospitals. When comparing today’s SLP services in Sweden and Finland with internationally agreed on aphasia rehabilitation guidelines several gaps were found, particularly regarding duration and intensity of interventions. Moreover, the participants expressed difficulties with evidence-based practice; barriers such as lack of psychometric sound measures, lack of evidence-based treatment methods, and the need for individual adaptations of treatment methods and materials were mentioned. In comparison with the studies of Blom Johansson et al [1, 3] and Klippi et al [2] some positive trends could be identified but no major differences were found.

    Conclusion:Today’s SLP services to people with aphasia and their relatives in Sweden and Finland do not fulfill internationally recommended clinical guidelines. To change SLP services and implement clinical guidelines seems to be a time-consuming process that encounters several barriers.

  • 2.
    Olsson, Camilla
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Blom Johansson: Logopedi.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning, Gävleborg.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Blom Johansson: Logopedi.
    Relations between executive function, language and functional communication in severe aphasia2019Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    People who, due to aphasia, have severely limited ability to make themselves understood through speech, are forced to find other means of communication. However, the ability to flexibly and efficiently use gesture, drawing, writing, communication aids and so on differs widely in people with severe aphasia. Studies of interventions focusing on use of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) in aphasia typically show that the participants have ability to learn to use the communication aid in the clinical context, but frequently fails to generalise the use to real-life functional communication (Jacobs, Drew, Ogletree, & Pierce, 2004). The same problem is often seen for other kinds of alternative communication, such as gesture and drawing. Intervention in severe aphasia aims for access to meaningful social interaction in spite of great linguistic barriers (Darrigrand et al., 2011; Koleck et al., 2017),  and a profound understanding of the different factors affecting the functional communication in this population is therefore crucial.

    One factor that is thought to play an important role is executive function. It has been shown that people with aphasia often have impaired executive function, and there also seems to be a link to functional communication (Fridriksson, Nettles, Davis, Morrow, & Montgomery, 2006; Murray, 2012; Purdy & Koch, 2006; Ramsberger, 2005). However, the studies are few and conducted on small samples often including participants with a wide variation in aphasia severity. The aim of the present study was to expand the understanding of the relations between executive functions, linguistic ability and functional communication in severe aphasia.

    Executive functions, linguistic ability and functional communication were assessed in 47 participants with severe aphasia. Functional communication was assessed using the Scenario Test (van der Meulen, van de Sandt-Koenderman, Duivenvoorden, & Ribbers, 2010). The results were analysed for the total sample as well as separated into a verbal and a non-verbal subgroup.

    Impairment of executive function was found in 79% of the participants. Moderate to strong correlations were found between linguistic ability and executive functions. In the total sample, partial correlation analysis showed that functional communication was mainly related to verbal output. In the verbal subgroup, no relations were found between functional communication and the other two variables. In the non-verbal subgroup however, the partial correlation analysis showed a strong relation between executive function and functional communication. Generally, there was large variation of executive functions and functional communication among the participants, especially in the nonverbal subgroup.

    The study led to several conclusions. Impairments of executive functions are, as expected, common in people with severe aphasia, and executive function is closely related to linguistic ability. The ability to produce verbal output is, also as expected, strongly related to functional communication and on the group level a small increase in verbal output results in a relatively large increase in functional communication, as measured by the Scenario Test. However, in people with extreme limitation or total absence of verbal output, where use of other modes of communication are ineluctable, executive functions seem to be an important factor. This suggests that executive functions need to be considered when planning intervention. In both design and training to use AAC and other forms of communication support, it is important to understand the demands the task puts on executive functions and, if possible, to minimise them. This also raises the importance of making sure people with severe aphasia are given a proper assessment of their cognitive abilities including executive functions, even though this is often challenging.

     

     

    Darrigrand, B., Dutheil, S., Michelet, V., Rereau, S., Rousseaux, M., & Mazaux, J.-M. (2011). Communication impairment and activity limitation in stroke patients with severe aphasia. Disabil Rehabil, 33(13-14), 1169-1178. doi:10.3109/09638288.2010.524271

    Fridriksson, J., Nettles, C., Davis, M., Morrow, L., & Montgomery, A. (2006). Functional communication and executive function in aphasia. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, 20(6), 401-410. doi:10.1080/02699200500075781

    Jacobs, B., Drew, R., Ogletree, B. T., & Pierce, K. (2004). Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) for adults with severe aphasia: where we stand and how we can go further. Disabil Rehabil, 26(21-22), 1231-1240. doi:10.1080/09638280412331280244

    Koleck, M., Gana, K., Lucot, C., Darrigrand, B., Mazaux, J. M., & Glize, B. (2017). Quality of life in aphasic patients 1 year after a first stroke. Quality of Life Research, 26(1), 45-54. doi:10.1007/s11136-016-1361-z

    Murray, L. L. (2012). Attention and other cognitive deficits in aphasia: Presence and relation to language and communication measures. Am J Speech Lang Pathol, 21(2), s51-s64. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/11-0067)

    Purdy, M., & Koch, A. (2006). Prediction of strategy usage by adults with aphasia. Aphasiology, 20(2-4), 337-348. doi:10.1080/02687030500475085

    Ramsberger, G. (2005). Achieving conversational success in aphasia by focusing on non-linguistic cognitive skills: A potentially promising new approach. Aphasiology, 19(10-11), 1066-1073. doi:10.1080/02687030544000254

    van der Meulen, I., van de Sandt-Koenderman, W. M., Duivenvoorden, H. J., & Ribbers, G. M. (2010). Measuring verbal and non-verbal communication in aphasia: reliability, validity, and sensitivity to change of the Scenario Test. Int J Lang Commun Disord, 45(4), 424-435. doi:10.3109/13682820903111952

     

1 - 2 av 2
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf