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  • 1.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm Business School.
    Jessica, Lindberg
    Stockholm Business School.
    Schwartz, Birgitta
    Stockholm Business School.
    Skoglund, Annika
    University of Essex Business School.
    Transformation from entrepreneurship to entrepreneurships: Creating alternatives?2014Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 2.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm Business School.
    Skoglund, Annika
    University of Essex Business School.
    Co-constructing ethnographic sites - Using visual tools to follow the social mission of an organization2014Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 3.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Skoglund, Annika
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik.
    Entrepreneurship and the Enterprising Self Creating alternatives through entrepreneurship education?2015Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The entrepreneurial logic has spread via an abundance of organisations and various

    peoples that embrace the promise of prosperity it indoctrinates. Apart from the

    generation of new companies and market places this indoctrination also entails a

    flexible invention of enterprising subjectivities. Recently, we have seen a

    diversification of the contexts in which enterprising subjectivities are invited to

    undergird entrepreneurship. For example in the context of social entrepreneurship

    (Dey, 2014) and ecopreneurship (Skoglund, forthcoming). How we are invited to

    happily join in and contribute to this entrepreneurship discourse, even as critical

    scholars, needs to be seriously considered as the variety of enterprising selves

    advances. As researchers teaching in entrepreneurship we believe that it is not enough

    to contemplate upon and write papers about, but also find new approaches to,

    entrepreneurship studies and teaching thereof.

    This paper presents the development and implementation of a critical

    entrepreneurship course, “Entrepreneurship and the Enterprising Self” (EES),

    designed for master students. The course was developed with the purpose to 1)

    deconstruct the basic ontological assumptions that undergird the entrepreneurial logic

    and explore the extension and reformulation of these assumptions for various forms of

    entrepreneurship, such as social entrepreneurship and ecopreneurship, 2) to analyse

    the broadening of enterprising subjectivities that unfold hand in hand with these forms

    of entrepreneurship, and 3) to go beyond these forms of entrepreneurship and

    subjectivities to touch upon the (im)possibility to collectively construct new worlds.

  • 4.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Skoglund, Annika
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik.
    Social Entrepreneurship: To defend society from itself2016Ingår i: Rethinking Entrepreneurship: Debating Research Orientations / [ed] Fayolle, Alain Riot, Philippe, London: Routledge , 2016Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 5.
    García-Terán, Jessica
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik.
    Skoglund, Annika
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik.
    A Processual Approach for the Quadruple Helix Model: the Case of a Regional Project in Uppsala2019Ingår i: Journal of the Knowledge Economy, ISSN 1868-7865, E-ISSN 1868-7873, Vol. 10, nr 3, s. 1272-1296Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates how the quadruple helix (QH) innovation model functions in a regional renewable energy initiative in Uppsala, Sweden. The focus is on the collaboration between regional office representatives, researchers, consultants and civil society, and their involvement in the attempt to implement and commercialize an innovation within renewable energy for the renovation of an old bridge. The empirical material gathered for this study was based on interviews, conversations, and participant observation during workshops and meetings with different stakeholders. By applying a processual approach, this article illustrates how the QH configuration (university-industry-government and civil society) emerges and evolves, unfortunately into a failed collaboration and thus a closing down of a commercialization attempt. By analyzing interactions and events of the process, we discuss the coordination problems between the actors to better understand how the dynamics affect local governments’ attempts to spur a more innovative climate in the region. In our conclusion, we discuss how the processual approach, when applied, can offer a better understanding of the uncertain development of QH projects in knowledge-based societies and economies.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    A processual approach
  • 6.
    Jensen, Tommy
    et al.
    Stockholm Business School.
    Skoglund, Annika
    The professionalization of ethics in IPCC2012Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 7.
    Leijon, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Elektricitetslära.
    Skoglund, Annika
    Dep. of Industrial Economics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.
    Waters, Rafael
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Elektricitetslära.
    Rehn, Alf
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik.
    On the Physics and Economics of Renewable Electric Energy Sources -- part I utilization2008Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 8.
    Leijon, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Elektricitetslära.
    Skoglund, Annika
    Dep. of Industrial Economics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.
    Waters, Rafael
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Elektricitetslära.
    Rehn, Alf
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik.
    On the physics of power, energy and economics of renewable electric energy sources - Part I2010Ingår i: Renewable energy, ISSN 0960-1481, E-ISSN 1879-0682, Vol. 35, nr 8, s. 1729-1734Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental concerns have increasingly led to the installation of Renewable Energy Technologies (RETs) despite the fact that they are recognized as expensive. Innovative efforts within the area are beset with difficulties [1], and they are at risk of producing misdirected or insignificant improvements in terms of the cost effectiveness of total energy conversion systems. This paper investigates how RETs can be evaluated, in terms of economy and engineering solutions, by studying the fundamental physics of renewable energy sources and how it matches with the RETs. This match is described by the "Degree of Utilization". The findings indicate that new innovations should focus on the possible number of full loading hours. RETs that are correctly matched to their energy source generate a higher amount of electric energy and have a higher potential of becoming more competitive. In cases where this aspect has been ignored, leading to relatively small degrees of utilization, it can be understood as an engineering mismatch between installed power, converted energy, and the fundamental physics of the renewable energy sources. Since there is a strong and possibly biased support for so-called mature RETs and already existing solutions, a clarification of how fundamental physical laws affect the cost of investments and payback of investments is needed. The present paper is part I out of II and it focuses on the difference between power and energy and the physics of different energy sources and their utilization.

  • 9.
    Redmalm, David
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Skoglund, Annika
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik. University of Exeter Business School.
    Bringing one’s self to work and back again: The role of surprises in alternative entrepreneurship2018Ingår i: European Group of Organization Studies, 2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    With the increasing realization that boundaries are constructed in relation to certain “differences” that make up an organizational “inside” in relation to its “outside”, organizational scholars have intensified their studies of how identities are hosted and managed within organizations. Less known, however, is the wish of organizations to disrupt and destabilize their members’ subjectification to the organization by inviting them to with personally challenging experiences and curated surprises. To explore this type of intentional disruptions, we study a technology company that engages in a number of social issues only loosely connected to their main product, a digital presentation tool. We especially focus on one intervention: a yearly project in which the company’s employees renovate buildings in a community where most are Roma with low socio-economic status. 

  • 10.
    Redmalm, David
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik.
    Skoglund, Annika
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik.
    Taking one’s self to work and back again: Alternative Entrepreneurship and Social interventions2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholars have increasingly paid interest to the way companies build a brand and an office culture by encouraging employees to talk about and cultivate their creative interests and personal values within the frames of their occupation. By bringing one’s self to work the employee contributes to a creative work environment that attracts potential candidates, and that benefits economic gain. This paper focuses on how the IT-company Prezi, founded in Hungary in 2009, creates outlets for the personal dimensions that employees bring to work. Prezi attracts employees sharing liberal and cosmopolitan views who contribute to building a brand and an office culture outside-in, in sharp contrast with the surrounding society characterized by a wave of right-wing populism and nationalist sentiments in Hungary. As a consequence, employees talk of their workplace as a protected “bubble.”

  • 11.
    Redmalm, David
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik.
    Skoglund, Annika
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik.
    Berglund, Karin
    Företagsekonomiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    ”Yeah! We’re Open”: Transdimensional Openness in Alternative Entrepreneurship2015Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The present ethnographic study explores the dynamics of “inside” and “outside” in diversity management and CSR. In focus is the Hungarian IT-company Prezi that engages in social issues such as gender equality, LGBT rights and anti-racism. Openness is Prezi’s watchword; by referring to themselves as open, the company aims to attract employees and foster a creative work process. Yet, to establish this openness, new insides and outsides need to be created. The study uses the work of Giorgio Agamben to trace the production of openness in various dimensions of the enterprise: boundaries between work and spare time, categorical divisions, organizational borders, and walls and other barriers in the office landscape. It is argued that while Prezi’s constellation of various types of openness is an efficient tool for social impact, the company’s production of transdimensional openness risks depoliticizing urgent social issues.

  • 12.
    Skoglund, Annika
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik. University of Exeter Business School.
    Augmented Reality and Organization Studies2018Ingår i: European Group of Organization Studies, 2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Augmented Reality (AR) technology is supposed to enhance a version of reality by superimposing computer-generated content on a physical environment to augment it. In its infancy, AR was conceived to be obtainable with the help of a ‘virtual world that enriches, rather than replaces, the real world’ (Feiner, Macintyre, & Seligmann, 1993:54). By immersing the user in some sort of digitally construed system that creates a specific, but still flexible, genre of behaviours, AR aimed to bridge the false divide between ‘the virtual’ and ‘the real’ (cf. Bell, 2007). AR technology developers have since then attempted to upgrade the human technically by amplifying the senses and make them more sensitive to that which otherwise would have been invisible, unhearable, intangible and broadly unexperienced. And in working with the so-called ‘actual environment’, AR is dependent on a production of digital objects that ’appear to human users as colourful and visible beings’ (Hui, 2012:387). It exemplifies a digital aesthetic approach that assumes that the thought and sensed can be shared with the technology and stimulated by the human and machine interaction. 

  • 13.
    Skoglund, Annika
    KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Inst.).
    Biopolitics and Green Governmentality – Security through Homo Clima2010Ingår i: 3:rd UArctic workshop, 2010Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Green governmentality has been elaborated upon differently by various authors. Sometimes constructed as an intentional form of liberal rule where states implement science to become individual responsibilities, and at other times green governmentality is conceived as systematizing more indistinct formations of knowledge. There is also a difference between those within a more regulative perspective and those who apply a processual view, who would rather stress what biopolitics, security and species is becoming, as a mutational form of how 'life itself' is possible to politicize. Since most empirical investigations about green governmentality take the economic as a powerful predefined entity, this paper rather presents how talk on climate change links governing and governed to produce self-regulation through everyday activities that supports economic processes as an operationalization of government at a distance.

  • 14.
    Skoglund, Annika
    KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Inst.).
    Biopolitics within business risk management2010Ingår i: Sentient Creatures - Transforming biopolitics and life matters, 2010Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Animals have with accelerating discussions on climate change come to be presented as sentient creatures to be respected and protected and hence an item for company risk management. How does biopolitics optimize vitality as regards the cow, polar bear and chicken, through a large Swedish utility company? With governmentality theory (Foucault, 1997/2008), this article illustrates how these animals are politicized in the perimeter of carbon capture and storage technology, renewable energy and strategic communication. The mechanisms of business risk management are thus scrutinized regarding their production of links between governing and governed. The analysis shows how the animals are differently intertwined in power relations, which opens up for new possibilities to regulate life.

  • 15.
    Skoglund, Annika
    Stockholm University School of Business, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Book Review - The Courage of Truth: The Government of Self and Others II, Lectures at the Collège de France, 1983–19842013Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 29, nr 2, s. 206-207Artikel, recension (Refereegranskat)
  • 16.
    Skoglund, Annika
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik.
    Climate social science: Any future for ‘blue sky research’ in management studies?2015Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 31, nr 1, s. 147-157Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The environmental humanities call for post-disciplinary approaches to meet the vexing problem of climate change. However, scholars have not scrutinised how management and organisation studies (MOS) could contribute to such an endeavour. This research note explores common surfaces of contact between the natural and social sciences, with the goal of unravelling the legitimate positions to speak from about climate change. The findings suggest that scholars in MOS are exposed to ecological reasoning, which undergirds underdog heroism, disciplinary confusion and a debasement of political subjectivity. As a counter strategy, I suggest that we affirm a ‘blue-sky research’ approach that would support alternative research paths and a more traditional will to know–—to advance ‘climate social science’.  

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    Climate Social Science
  • 17.
    Skoglund, Annika
    Stockholm Business School.
    Corporate Social Responsibility or Social Entrepreneurship? : The shift from defensive and reactive to offensive and active2013Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 18.
    Skoglund, Annika
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik.
    Ecoticism2016Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecoromanticism has been ridiculed at the same time as the last 50 years of biology has been claimed to provide us with ‘the meaning of life’ (Macleay museum, 2012). The scientification of Nature, with abstractions of Nature’s spatiality and institutionalisation of its values, also supports the current natural scientific definition of our experiential worlds.The possible trace of past poetic and erotic experiences of Nature (Emerson, 1873) in predictions of climate catastrophes (Jonas, 1984:190), the general turn to cybernetics (also see Bateson, 1979; Introduction to 'Soul and Science', 2014) and critique of determinism in far-from-equilibrium thinking (Prigogine, 1989), therefore seems important to address with contemporary realities of complexity in mind (e.g. see \ Walker and Cooper, 2011). Not least since such frameworks for understanding ‘complex systems’ and ‘patterns of life’ have been transferred to various human domains, such as organisation studies.

    The bioscenic feast we have been invited to the last 50 years, and which for the moment offers us an exposure to instabilities and insecurity, could become something else than the leftovers we so far have to live on in the seemingly indissoluble congealment of a reverence for nature with a natural scientific bent. A comparison of the discursive constructions of Nature and human since Emerson (1873, 2013) can perhaps resurrect the metaphysical, prophetic and imaginative that has been withdrawn from life lived adaptively in quests for human resilience (Evans & Reid, 2014). By first tracing the accelerating scientification of Nature and its nurturing of all-encompassing biospheric life ecologically speaking, I thus end by extricating the remains of the human from the ‘biohuman’, i.e. the human targeted and vitalized as mere ‘biological being’ (Dillon & Reid, 2009:20), by resurrecting an immeasurable, self-possessive and selectively interconnected human for Ecoticism.

  • 19.
    Skoglund, Annika
    KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Inst.).
    Empowering women’s entrepreneurship to establish bottom-up innovation systems - The case of cycling tourism in Norrtälje Region: EU Interreg Program, Quadruple Helix Reports 2011:52011Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Women´s entrepreneurship has been enhanced in several different contexts and by various means. It is a topic that links socio-political objectives with academic research and produces an ensemble of professionals with expertise and authority on specifically the category of women in relation to what can be termed entrepreneurship and practices correlated to it. These professionals often construct differences between men and women, commonly in the wake of a discourse on biological differences and psychological differences (e.g. see Ahl, 2006), or by showing how women are socially subordinated men on a structural level. As part of the EU-funded Quadruple Helix project seeking ‘gender awareness’, this report is thus positioned within this professional ensemble with its predefined categories, at the same time as a normative outcome is ambitiously sought at a political level.

     

    The lead partner of the Quadruple Helix project is the Municipality of Norrtälje (Sweden). Complementary partners are: Stockholm County Administrative Board (Sweden), BalticFem (Sweden), Royal Institute of Technology (Sweden), Åbo Akademi University (Finland), Eurohouse (Estonia),  Läänemaa Tourism Association (Estonia) and Saaremaa University Centre (Estonia). They are all partaking within their area of expertise, belonging to one of the helices in picture 1. An increased collaboration between these helices is to stimulate cluster formation and women’s entrepreneurship, a process focused in this report by studying the specific case of cycling tourism in the Norrtälje region,  area of Roslagen.

    The report presents a study of the business of cycling tourism carried out by women as part of the framework of the Quadruple Helix project of the Central Baltic Interreg IV A programme (hereafter “QH-project”). An interview study was performed during spring and summer 2011, followed up by an analysis of how the EU-project unfolded with focus on the conditions for women entrepreneurs in the Norrtälje region. Norrtälje is part of the Baltic Sea region, a region that the QH-project seeks to strengthen by stimulating clusters of the tourism sector and increase networking among women entrepreneurs. The QH-project also aims to provide innovative support by adding new mobile telephone applications for the tourism sector. Both to create a more contemporary service industry in line with new market demands, and to couple a traditionally male branch with the tourism sector.

     

    The aim of this study is to analyse how the QH-project turned out in practice, how it was operationalized and how it unfolded as a process. Focus is on the different actors involved, especially the management team at Norrtälje municipality, the entrepreneurs involved (hereafter ‘e—team’) in the tourism business, and the NGO ‘BalticFem’, supporting the networking activities. This detailed study of how a specific network took shape and formed a prosperous innovation process, can help us to understand how we can develop and complete the Quadruple Helix innovation model. The question is also how we can focus on entrepreneurship, innovation and clusters in a more gender equal way? When we understand how a network and an innovation process aiming to support women’s entrepreneurship unfolds, we may also create more gender equal businesses by how we compile the platform consisting of the four sectors: public sector, private sector, academic sector and civil society or the so-called third sector.

    Except for the overall objective to stimulate entrepreneurship and increase business life and growth, the report addresses EU’s political interest in ‘gender awareness’. ‘Gender awareness’ is both promoted as a way to change gender structures, for example in developing countries (e.g. see Wright, 1995; Elson, 1995), or by managers in companies (Wahl, Holgersson, Höök, & Linghag, 2001). In this report, gender issues will be pinpointed by first illustrating how women entrepreneurs started to collaborate around a common business idea, a cycling route, and secondly, by presenting how they positioned themselves within the predefined category ‘woman entrepreneur’ (or female entrepreneur), an often problematized group in modern society. How an innovation system has been operationalized by project-based work can thus help us to address what gender orders this type of work has contributed to (cf. Lindgren & Packendorff, 2006). And an analysis of the subject positions constructed by the interviewees and interviewer (Fenwick, 2002), may help us to understand how predefined categories are either resisted or maintained. This type of research design makes it possible to fulfil the stated socio-political objectives of the QH-project, at the same time as the academic contribution may provide with alternative insights and not merely repeat and strengthen descriptions of prevailing realities, as the one that women are structurally subordinated to men.

     

    The description in this report will also be designed as a ‘populated text’, i.e. a text that is about people, what they can be said to do and how language produces them (Billig, 2011). For example, describing mentalities as inner states could be recognized as a ‘depopulation’ of a text, i.e. that the text is not about people pursuing their businesses, but about their claimed inner states of mind (cf. Ibid). The case described in this document is thus aiming to be a text about people, a populated narrative, delivering descriptions of practices undertaken in realization of a specific business idea and the emanation of an innovation system bottom-up.

     

    The interview study was performed as a qualitative inquiry, with semi-structured interviews and open-ended questions. The interviews were between 30-60 minutes each, often including a visit to the premises of the entrepreneurs, their bed and breakfasts, hostels and restaurants. Altogether 14 participants were interviewed and are kept anonymous. The interviews are not transcribed, but important quotes have been collected. Documents linked to the cycling route have also been analysed, complemented with observations during an exhibition.

     

    The report is structured as follows. The first part consists of a case description, a success story of a prosperous woman entrepreneur and practical conclusions important for the QH-project as a functioning innovation system. The second part is a more critical discussion about the re-construction of women’s entrepreneurship, subjectivities produced and the resistance towards the category ‘vulnerable woman’ and ‘responsible woman’. Taken together, the report illustrates how women were empowered to engage in entrepreneurial activities to co-produce an innovation system.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 20.
    Skoglund, Annika
    KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Inst.).
    Homo Clima – The Neoliberal Subject of Climate Change?2011Ingår i: European Group of Organization Studies (EGOS), 2011Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Discourse on climate change has portrayed biospheric life as sensitive, vulnerable and adaptable, while fostering human life as changeable and contingent. This paper traces how the politicization of ‘life itself’ extends organizing processes with the atmosphere as a new terrain for government. The analysis illustrates how green governmentality, which claims to take the life of the entire planet into consideration, with climate change reconfigures human species-being into ‘moral life’. This is testament of a shift in biopolitical imaginaries, enforced by risk politics and ethopolitics, that problematizes the moral as a capacity to be assessed, calculated and evaluated. This results in an idea of a moral population, inserted in history through an atmosphere moral economy that modulates the neoliberal subject as an ethico-politically active self-researcher. This subject is able to speak the truth on a climate authorized aestheticized life and functions as a relay of ‘bioaesthetics’, which offers an ostensible confrontation of the entrepreneurial subject in advanced liberal society. 

  • 21.
    Skoglund, Annika
    KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Avd.) (stängd 20130101).
    Homo Clima: Klimatmänniskan och den produktiva makten - styrning genom klimatförändring som bioestetisk inramning.2011Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Former creative resistance to environmentally hazardous activities has during the last decades, through discussions on climate change, been increasingly reoriented by meteorology, expert knowledge and policy discourse. The ecological system’s perspective on climate change, proclaiming the human not simply as a disturbance in a natural balancing system, but as changing it, has become a causal model for the possibility to change that human. This PhD thesis interrogates how statements in IPCC reports and a Swedish newspaper (DN) constitute truth claims on climate change. What subjectivities does parlance on climate change produce and what type of citizen is called upon to optimize vitality in relation to atmospheric molecules? How is self-management of every-day activities established by help to interactivity and self-techniques framed by technical artefacts? These questions are addressed by a governmentality perspective on how discourse, conceived as partaking in a process of productive power, strives to make climate change an ethico-politic question that fosters ‘Homo Clima’, climate man. What strategies and techniques this form of ‘government’ deploys are described by six interconnecting themes; “Atmospheric biopolitics fosters contingency”, “Mortality/Vitality”, “The moral population in the atmosphere moral economy”, “Homo Clima” and “Bioaesthetics through technical artefacts”, ending in a discussion upon these themes as an act which “Re-thematizes climate change”. The chapters illustrate how statements on the prevention and mitigation of climate risks mold scientific rationalities, mathematically modelled futures and calculations of molecular compounds with how these same futures and molecules correlate to individual culpability, responsibility and morality. From Foucauldian biopolitics to Foucauldian ethics, this can be conceived as an optimization of the vitality of the population by inserting the idea of the population as moral into history and foster moral en masse. Homo Clima is in line with this power/knowledge regime investigated, regarding his ambitions and receptiveness to adapt into a self-governing communicative ethico-politically active neoliberal subject, predicted to inhabit a not yet fully flourished relation between its climate moral self and its actions. By statements in the perimeter of technical artefacts, death, reproduction and consumption, Homo Clima is to become an ideal citizen, investing its own changeability in relation to those beings that are investigated, mapped, localized, archived, systematized and segmented; to simultaneously amend and protect a climate authorized aesthetizised life. This formation, together with the atmosphere as a new terrain for ‘government’ with market solutions for climate risks that links vitalisation with individual morality to moral at an aggregate level, offers an ostensible confrontation of the enterprising subject in the advanced liberal society. Homo Clima is thus conceptualized as a relay of bioaesthetics rather than as a protector of the environment. 

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  • 22.
    Skoglund, Annika
    University of Essex Business School, UK.
    Homo Clima: the overdeveloped resilience facilitator2014Ingår i: Resilience - International Policies, Practices and Discourses, ISSN 2169-3293, Vol. 2, nr 3, s. 151-167Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 23.
    Skoglund, Annika
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för samhällsbyggnad och industriell teknik, Industriell teknik.
    Prezi2019Ingår i: Oxford Handbook of Media, Technology and Organization Studies / [ed] T Beyes, R Holt, C Pias, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Prezi, a zooming presentation tool, has been spoken and programmed into being according to well-known ideas of transmission, collaboration, and augmentation. This chapter traces the ‘productiveness’ in the shifts between these three themes, moving from transmission through collaboration towards the mobilization of technologies for the more-than-human, driven by how the Prezi technology has been envisioned as a sense-to-sense prosthesis. To end, it is argued that there is a correlating critical position of productiveness present in Prezi’s ‘alternative entrepreneurship’, i.e., the more-than-economic organization that the company seeks.

  • 24.
    Skoglund, Annika
    KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Inst.).
    The employee as eco-moral self – the new objective of HRM?2011Ingår i: Nordiska Företagsekonomiska Föreningen, 2011Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability is increasingly recognized as the preferred aim of organizing in environmental, economic, and social development (Dingwerth and Pattberg 2009;Jones 1996). Companies have reciprocally been promoted as responsible for their operations and management practices, specifically in relation to carbon emissions and sustainable goals (Epstein 2008;Stead, Garner Stead J and Starik 2004). Several transnational organisations construct norms and rules of sustainability, and sustainable stakeholder accounting has been proposed to be integrated in environmental accounting (Sherman, Steingard and Fitzgibbons 2002). “Corporate social responsibility” (CSR) as a means for “competitive advantage” (Porter and Kramer 2006) has also been repositioned in management journals. From CSR, “corporate sustainability” and “corporate social performance” to “environmental management”, “sustainable development” and “sustainability” (Montiel 2008). However, such academic production as well as engagement from business has not always been self-evident. There has been a discursive shift, from 1970s criticism of the economic system and its elements, to an embracement of the economic as a solution to environmental problems (Darier 1999;Feindt and Oels 2005;Hajer 1995;Luke 1997;Oels 2005). This shift has not happened instantaneously, but is constituted by a complex of knowledge production, professionals, managerial techniques, institutions and policies.

     

    A broad aim of this paper is to trace how SM has evolved and been a constitutive part of this shift. While Sustainable Development, fostered by the 1987 World Commission on Economic Development (WCED), the United Nations interest in climate change and the Rio declaration in 1992, can be seen as a political concept, a program for change, Sustainable Management can be understood as its correlating operationalization. While SM has a longer history in natural resource management, it has more recently been integrated in business studies as strategic sustainable management (Stead, Garner Stead J and Starik 2004) or plain sustainable management (Epstein 2008). Academic research and business have together turned mitigation of environmental risks into Sustainable Management (SM) and transformed environmental problems not only into so called green business opportunities, but opportunities for new managerial techniques. The purpose is to investigate and problematize a possible conflation of SM and soft forms of Human Resource Management (HRM) that incorporates the employee both as a possible opponent and resource to sustainable goals. This includes how SM and HRM handle possible internal critique, such as ironic reflexivity against sustainable goals, as well as too radical change in the direction of these goals. While resistance to companies often is discussed as external and civic (Böhm and Dabhi), there is a need to explore the possible existence of internal environmental resistance movements. 

  • 25.
    Skoglund, Annika
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik.
    Berglund, Karin
    Studying “Openness” with “Closeness”: A videography of Prezi’s alternative entrepreneurship2018Ingår i: Nordicom Information, ISSN 0349-5949, Vol. 40, nr 1, s. 86-90Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    How can we study a company’s call for “openness” and ambition to create an alterna- tive form of entrepreneurship? This article introduces a videography of the Hungar- ian company Prezi, with a focus on their efforts to nurture an internal organisational culture defined by openness, as well as a desire to address the lack of corporate social engagement and openness in Hungarian society. We follow Prezi’s work with the Roma population to better understand how the company’s social value creation affects the employees, and to problematise how videography facilitates “closeness” and thereby the sharing of sensibility and co-experience of such an abstract ability as openness.

  • 26.
    Skoglund, Annika
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm Business School.
    Redmalm, David
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik.
    Prezi’s cultivation of openness – A videography of ‘alternative entrepreneurship’2015Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 27.
    Skoglund, Annika
    et al.
    University of Essex Business School, Essex Sustainability Institute.
    Böhm, Steffen
    University of Essex Business school.
    'But we are Vattenfall Wind!’ – The contestation of environmental responsibility via quests for low carbon performance2014Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 28.
    Skoglund, Annika
    et al.
    University of Essex Business School, Essex Sustainability Institute.
    Böhm, Steffen
    University of Essex Business School.
    Green Human Resource Management, the case of Vattenfall Wind2014Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 29.
    Skoglund, Annika
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik.
    Böhm, Steffen
    University of Essex Business School.
    Wind Power Activism:: Epistemic struggles in the formation of eco-ethical selves at Vattenfall2015Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Utility companies play a dilemmatic role in the ongoing contestation of environmental responsibility. While, on the one hand, they are an important enabler for industrial and economic development and providers of national energy security, their operations are also recognized as utterly dangerous for the climate and life on Earth (Jewell, Cherp, & Riahi, 2014; Yao & Chang, 2014). Environmental groups and radical green activists have in particular attacked utility companies (e.g. see Doyle & Lockhart, 2012), while policymakers and politicians have had more balanced views, given their interest in continued growth, national economic welfare (Löschel, Moslener, & Rübbelke, 2010) and public concerns (Demski, Poortinga, & Pidgeon, 2014).

     

    In contrast to studies of external stakeholders’ resistance to utility companies, this paper explores the potential of internal – that is, employees’ – dissent, contestation and activism within Vattenfall Wind Development Business Unit. Vattenfall was founded in 1909 by the Swedish state and is still 100% state-owned, formed as a limited company in 1992. Their net sales amounted to GBP 17,1684 billion in 2013, employing around 32,000 employees, but are currently undergoing a major reorganization due to lack of resources in the wake of the purchase of the Dutch company Nuon.

     

    Activists often attack Vattenfall to highlight the company’s reliance on carbon intensive coal-fired power plants in Germany (Svenska Dagbladet, 2014). Greenpeace has climbed the walls of various Vattenfall buildings and dumped coal outside the entrance of the Swedish government headquarters (Greenpeace, 2009). In comparison, we know very little about the potential of green activism within Vattenfall. The prevalent academic assumption is that true ‘activism’ is something that takes place within the realms of civil society, attacking companies from the outside, and not within businesses (Murphy, 1996). Stern et al. (1999:82), for instance, define activists as ‘those who are committed to public actions intended to influence the behaviour of the policy system and of the broader population’. However, citizen activism is continuously re-organized and the ‘political inventiveness’ to meet traditional governmental problems is vast (Rose, 2007:148). Besides, by focussing on ecological citizenship today, we soon discover that a distinction between ‘internal’ and ‘external’ activism is difficult to make, as employees are citizens both at work and at home (Rose, 1999:83), especially in Nordic liberal democracies. Activist arguments, practices and activists themselves, are thus possible to empirically trace within businesses.

  • 30.
    Skoglund, Annika
    et al.
    KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Inst.).
    Börjesson, Mats
    Stockholms Universitet, Institutionen för barn och ungdomsvetenskap.
    ”Juvenocracy” – the politicization of children in climate change2011Ingår i: Politics and Popular Culture 4, 2011Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In April 2008, a possibility to ‘save the world at home’ was presented at the back of milk cartoons produced by Arla, purchased across Sweden. Coupled with various stories and tips on how to change the everyday practices of the family, this ambitious objective called upon children to look after their parents in climate change. ‘See through that your parents check the air pressure in the tires of the car’, exemplifies one of the typical statements that turn the relation between breeder and bred around. In this paper we present how children are empowered to exercise their potential power through technologies of responsibilization and various Internet-related technical solutions enhancing self-reflexivity and connectivity by fostering calculative capabilities. We also trace how these power relations have evolved from personnel management and the prohibition of child labour in factories during the 19th and 20th century, to the 1970s Swedish family legislation portraying children as ‘equal individuals’, ending in an ecological system’s networked society. The analysis illustrates how children are politicized in climate change to produce a ‘juvenocratic’ governmental rationality. This governmental rationality is increasingly operationalized through climate change risk politics, but can also be observed in more general biopolitics, as when pre-schoolers are brought to homes for elderly people to sing traditional songs and have common fruit pauses to ‘make the elderly eat more and healthier’ (June, 21st , 2011). While adults are incapacitated to work upon their self without children or the child within themselves, children are predicted to have the ability to foster everyday activities. This discourse produces the child as an authority and relay of expertise with capacity to stabilize the consumption of adults, by providing ethical guidelines intragenerationally, disseminated through what we conceptualize as ‘juvenocracy’.

  • 31.
    Skoglund, Annika
    et al.
    Management, Organization and Society, Stockholm University School of Business, Stockholm.
    Börjesson, Mats
    Stockholms universitet.
    Mobilizing ‘juvenocratic spaces’ by the biopoliticization of children through sustainability2014Ingår i: Children's Geographies, ISSN 1473-3285, E-ISSN 1473-3277, Vol. 12, nr 4, s. 429-446Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 32.
    Skoglund, Annika
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik. University of Exeter Business School.
    García-Terán, Jessica
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik.
    Studying intra-actions: A processual analysis of the Triple Helix innovation system2018Ingår i: European Group of Organization Studies, 2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of innovation systems often focus their analyses on ‘interactions’ between different actors, such as governments, universities, industries and civil society, with the aim to facilitate collaborations. Due to their intellectual base in various normative models that seek economic progression, these policy driven innovation systems have nevertheless neglected interactions with non-human agents. To theorize differently on interactions in the nexus of human-non-human in the implementation of innovation systems, we thus turn to ‘intra-actions’, as suggested by Karen Barad. After a theoretical overview of how we conceptually may shift from interactions to intra-actions, we provide a few illustrative empirical examples that shed light on the possibility to analyze innovation systems with a post-human approach. We specifically look into a regional development project in Uppsala, where the renovation of a bridge is merged with the attempt to commercialize renewable energy technology via the implementation of the Quadruple Helix (QH) model. We thus make the technology part of the QH and explore how to theoretically consider the fifth helix as an actor in itself, bringing it ‘closer’ to the other intra-actors. We conclude that a shift to intra-actions furthers our understanding of the evolving relationships between human and non-human agentic matter, and the non-linear dynamism involved in innovation system collaborations. 

  • 33.
    Skoglund, Annika
    et al.
    Management, Organization and Society, Stockholm University School of Business, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jensen, Tommy
    Management, Organization and Society, Stockholm University School of Business, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Professionalization of Ethics in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)2013Ingår i: Sustainable Development, ISSN 0968-0802, E-ISSN 1099-1719, Vol. 21, nr 2, s. 122-130Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Solutions to climate change have been academically criticized for their continued economic growth, managerialism and lack of real politics. In comparison, the IPCC's socio-economic assessments of climate change have accentuated the ethical implications of their own policy recommendations. Our analysis of ten IPCC reports (1990–2012) shows a turn from a claimed non-political position in human-induced climate change to an outspoken ethical position in climate-induced disasters. We argue that a professionalization of climate ethics is sought through ecological reason, specifically by calls for resilience to foster adaptable subjects. This neoliberal position leans on a problematization of vulnerable subjects' resistance to social adaptation, underpinned by an aim to redirect resistance towards physical disasters to stimulate climate adaptation. Conclusively, climate ethical mastery is formed by detailed elaborations of how the vulnerable subject should not only subsume to ecological reason, but also ethically embrace physical threats and dangers as if productive of life supportive qualities.

  • 34.
    Skoglund, Annika
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik.
    Leijon, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Elektricitetslära.
    Rehn, Alf
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik.
    Waters, Rafael
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Elektricitetslära.
    On the Physics and Economics of Renewable Electric Energy Sources -- part II engineering2008Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 35.
    Skoglund, Annika
    et al.
    Dep. of Industrial Economics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.
    Leijon, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Elektricitetslära.
    Rehn, Alf
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik.
    Waters, Rafael
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Elektricitetslära.
    On the physics of power, energy and economics of renewable electric energy sources - Part II2010Ingår i: Renewable energy, ISSN 0960-1481, E-ISSN 1879-0682, Vol. 35, nr 8, s. 1735-1740Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Renewable Energy Technologies (RETs) are often recognized as less competitive than traditional electric energy conversion systems. Obstacles with renewable electric energy conversion systems are often referred to the intermittency of the energy sources [1] and the relatively high maintenance cost. However, due to an intensified discourse on climate change and its effects, it has from a societal point of view, become more desirable to adopt and install CO2 neutral power plants. Even if this has increased the competitiveness of RETs in a political sense, the new goals for RET installations must also be met with economical viability. We propose that the direction of technical development, as well as the chosen technology in new installations, should not primarily be determined by policies, but by the basic physical properties of the energy source and the associated potential for inexpensive energy production. This potential is the basic entity that drives the payback of the investment of a specific RET power plant. With regard to this, we argue that the total electric energy conversion system must be considered if effective power production is to be achieved, with focus on the possible number of full loading hours and the Degree of Utilization [2]. This will increase the cost efficiency and economical competitiveness of RET investments, and could enhance faster diffusion of new innovations and installations without over-optimistic subsidies. This paper elaborates on the overall problem of the economy of renewable electric energy conversion systems by studying the interface between physics, engineering and economy reported for RET power plants in different scientific publications. The core objective is to show the practical use of the Degree of Utilization and how the concept is crucial for the design and economical optimization disregarding subsidies. The results clearly indicate that the future political regulative frameworks should consider the choice of renewable energy source since this strongly affects the economical output from the RET power plants.

  • 36.
    Skoglund, Annika
    et al.
    Stockholm Business School.
    Nyberg, Daniel
    Sydney Business School.
    Wright, Christopher
    Sydney Business School.
    In between and Beyond: Green Branding and the Greening of brands2013Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 37.
    Skoglund, Annika
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik.
    Redmalm, David
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik.
    'Doggy-biopolitics’: Governing via the First Dog2017Ingår i: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 24, nr 2, s. 240-266Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Biopolitics, traditionally understood as management of the human population, has been extended to include nonhuman animal life and posthuman life. In this article, we turn to literatures that advance Foucauldian biopolitics to explore the mode of government enabled by the dog of the US presidential family – the First Dog called Bo Obama. With analytical focus on vitalisation efforts, we follow the construction of Bo in various outlets, such as the websites of the White House and an animal rights organisation. Bo’s microphysical escapades and the negotiation thereof show how contemporary biopolitics, which targets the vitality of the dog population, is linked to seductive neoliberal management techniques and subjectivities. We discuss ‘cuddly management’ in relation to Foucauldian scholarship within organisation and management studies and propose that the construction of Bo facilitates interspecies family norms and an empathic embrace of difference circumscribed by vitalisation efforts that we pinpoint as ‘doggy-biopolics'.

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  • 38.
    Skoglund, Annika
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik.
    Redmalm, David
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik. Sociolologiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    ‘Doggy-Biopolitics’: Governing via the First Dog2016Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Biopolitics, traditionally understood as management of the human population, has been extended to include nonhuman animal life and posthuman life. In this article we turn to these advancements of Foucauldian biopolitics to explore the mode of government enabled by the dog of the US presidential family—the First Dog called Bo Obama. We follow the construction of Bo in various outlets from well-known and less famous sources, as the websites of the White House and an animal rights organisation. Bo’s microphysical escapades in and around the White House show how posthuman biopolitics, which targets the vitality of the dog population, is linked to seductive neoliberal management techniques and subjectivities that enhance ‘cuddly management.’ Bo also facilitates a proliferation of interspecies family norms and an empathic embrace of difference. We thus suggest that Bo makes possible a mode of government nurtured by vitality, playfulness and posthuman norms, what we call ‘doggy-biopolitics.’

  • 39.
    Skoglund, Annika
    et al.
    KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Inst.).
    Redmalm, David
    Örebro.
    The Biopolitics of Bo and Barack2011Ingår i: The Radical Foucault Conference / [ed] Gilbert, Jeremy;Shaw, Debra, 2011Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The optimization of the population as vital has been remolded with recent expressions of multispecies living, a rejuvenation of Environmentalism, the inception of ecology into politics and conceptualizations of post-human society. In this paper we address this re-establishment of government by analyzing the portraits of, and everyday discussions on and with, the First dog Bo Obama. The question we pose is how the First dog is constituted as a true family accessory, well behaved and in extension, an authority who can call upon the presidential subject and the ideal caring citizen? This also requires that the presidential family and staff occasionally walk in the other end of a leash, cuddle with and are companions to, the dog. Equally is the dog shaped to behave in a certain manner coupled with a specific mode of speech, representative of our time. By analyzing the imagery around, and peripheral statements on Bo and his relation to Barack Obama, the First family, the White House and in particular, interactive people, such as animal rights activists, we scrutinize the capillary workings of power. By intertwining Animal Studies with Governmentality theory we illustrate that the discourse around Bo produces him as a neo-liberal social being, offered to speak his own opinion in front of journalists’ microphones and TV cameras, obliged to express taste and distaste, seduced to exercise and keep his body fit, all furthered at internet forums by human animals pretending to be dogs. The imagery around Bo produces a specific reality of not only a legitimate presidential family life filled with standardized leisure time, but also of new possibilities for how to govern the population. As people voluntarily engage in seeing through the eyes of the dog, evaluating their president in relation to the dog, and speaking on behalf of the dog, new power relations arise that utilize this engagement. This exemplifies how a governmental rationality evolves, by how it increasingly takes the life of the non-human animal as its objective whilst people are rendered governable, rationalized to be calculated upon, to be optimized at an aggregate level.

  • 40.
    Skoglund, Annika
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik. Univ Exeter, Business Sch, Exeter, Devon, England.
    Stripple, Johannes
    Lund Univ, Dept Polit Sci, Lund, Sweden.
    From climate skeptic to climate cynic2019Ingår i: Critical Policy Studies, ISSN 1946-0171, E-ISSN 1946-018X, Vol. 13, nr 3, s. 345-365Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Whilst we know quite a bit about organized forms of climate skepticism, very few studies focus on how disorganized climate skeptics seek an underdog position to speak truth to power. Hence, we investigate frank speech as updated ancient forms of truth-telling 'parrhesia', in two Swedish empirical sources that strongly question the climate change consensus. The first is a digital space for free speech, and the second a focus group of climate skeptics. Tracing 'epistemic skepticism' and 'response skepticism', we inquire into the attempts to counter scientific expertise and the different ways to refuse to act in accordance with officially sanctioned advice. We analyze the details of climate cynic truth-telling in relation to truthtelling as provocation, as ethical practice and as exhibition of a specific aim. We explore how the climate skeptic turns into a climate cynic, and discuss how alternative truth construction forms an anti-climate ethical selfhood. We end by problematizing how parrhesia is linked to ethical relativism, and argue that the recognition of climate cynicism facilitates our understanding of how conflicting political realities about climate change are produced.

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  • 41.
    Skoglund, Annika
    et al.
    University of Essex Business School, Essex Sustainability Institute.
    Stripple, Johannes
    Lund University.
    The Carbon Bulimic - On the aesthetics of carbon excess in climate scepticism.2014Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 42.
    Skoglund, Annika
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Industriell teknik.
    Tommy, Jensen
    Stockholms universitet.
    'Uncertainty' in the professionalisation of sustainable development: The case of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)2015Ingår i: International Handbook of Sustainable Development / [ed] Michael Redclift, Delyse Springett, New York: Routledge, 2015, s. 74-88Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
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