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  • 1.
    Arai, Kaori
    Rikkyo University, Graduate School of Sociology.
    Öhman, May-Britt (Redaktör)
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Centrum för genusvetenskap.
    Maruyama, Hiroshi (Redaktör)
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Historiska institutionen, Hugo Valentin-centrum.
    Subjectivity of the Ainu People Described in the Book ‘Nibutani’, Edited by Kaizawa Tadashi: A New Discovery and Approach to Ainu Research2014Ingår i: Re: Mindings: Co-Constituting Indigenous, Academic, Artistic Knowledges, Uppsala: The Hugo Valentin Centre, Uppsala University , 2014, s. 17-25Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Ainu studies still lack an inside perspective from the Ainu themselves though the importance of such perspective has been recognized for a deeper understanding of the Ainu by a few Ainu and Wajin [ethnic Japanese] postmodern scholar. To begin with, Ainu “self telling history” have been considered by researchers of Ainu studies to be “non-existent.” In other words, it can be said that the very act of dealing with modern history in relation to the Ainu by those materials was under a taboo for both the Ainu and the Wajin.

    This article demonstrates that a history book of the Nibutani Community entitled “Nibutani” edited by Kaizawa Tadashi in cooperation with local residents is a rare ex- ample of modern Ainu history compiled by the Ainu themselves. The book covers all the details of each family with family trees though the Ainu hardly confessed them- selves as Ainu under severe discrimination at the time. Further most of its lifestories were collected through the interviewing of those families by Kaizawa himself. As far as the contents are concerned, some stories are related to the Ainu, whereas others are seemingly related to their personal life. Thus the book presented a variety of stories that represent the then lives of the local residents in the Nibutani Community.

    At the moment when ‘Nibutani’ was published the Ainu did not voluntari- ly talk about their own history, and neither were expected to do so. ‘Nibutani’, which was completed by Kaizawa, connected the individually divided histories to each other, and made clear the relationships between the individuals and the community. As a result, the local residents in the Nibutani Community have ap- preciated this book for highlighting their own perspectives on their local history.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               

  • 2. Gärdebo, Johan
    et al.
    Öhman, May-BrittUppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Centrum för genusvetenskap.Maruyama, HiroshiUppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Hugo Valentin-centrum.
    Re: Mindings: Co-Constituting Indigenous, Academic, Artistic Knowledges2014Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    RE: Mindings brings together indigenous scholars, artists and activists, and indigenous allies to speak of whose positions, contexts and experiences it is that inform the construction of knowledges, histories and sciences. In short, whose experience counts? The purpose of RE:Mindings is to encourage its authors and readers to investigate what it means to resist exploitation of humans, non-humans and nature within the frames of modern nation states. Examples are provided from communities within or across the borders of existing nation states: Sámi and Saepmie/Sábme/Sápmi in Fenno-Scandinavia; Aboriginal-Martu in Australia; Ainu people in Japan, Dakota-Native Americans in USA and Mapuche in Chile. This publication originates from the supradisciplinary symposium RE: Mindings; Co-Constituting Indigenous/Academic/Artistic Knowledges and Understandings of Land-, Water-, Body-, and Lab-scapes, held at Uppsala University, 10-12 October 2012.

    The RE:Mindings publication has been funded through research projects financed by the Swedish Research Council (Vetenskapsrådet) and Formas - the Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning.

  • 3.
    Svalastog, Anna Lydia
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Centrum för forsknings- och bioetik.
    Öhman, May-Britt (Redaktör)
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Centrum för genusvetenskap.
    Maruyama, Hiroshi (Redaktör)
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Historiska institutionen, Hugo Valentin-centrum.
    On Teachers’ Education in Sweden, School Curriculums, and the Sámi People2014Ingår i: Re: Mindings: Co-Constituting Indigenous, Academic, Artistic Knowledges / [ed] Johan Gärdebo, May-Britt Öhman, Hiroshi Maruyama, Uppsala: The Hugo Valentin Centre, Uppsala University , 2014, s. 153-171Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the intersection of Teachers’ Education and the Swedish society with regards to Sámi religion, history and culture. It aims at a renewed understanding of present premises for construction of curriculums in courses on Sámi history, culture and religion. An important back drop is the Swedish State’s regulation of Teachers Education, their inclusion of indigenous peoples’ inte- rests, and the general demand for research based and reflexive academic teaching. I argue that Teachers’ Education and Swedish bookstores present research based knowledge on the Sámi People’s religion, history and culture in a weak and accidental manner. For a better understanding, I discuss Anthony Giddens’ description of society as regionalized into “back stage” and “front stage” regions structured by different rules – back stage rules being loosely structured and characterized by feelings, subjectivity and bodily activities, while front stage rules are strictly disciplined, and not characterized by personal feelings or bodily excursion. Universities and Colleges fit front stage characteristics, though Teachers’ Education, as well as Swedish bookstores, seems to be structured by back stage rules when it comes to the Sámi People. Giddens emphasizes how social encounters between people contribute to the construction of social institutions and  their organization. As such, the loose link between research based teaching and Teachers Education regarding the Sámi people, generates societal consequences. If reflexivity is a major feature of present academic life, we should expect universities to change present premises for research based new curriculums regarding Sámi history, culture and religion. The argument forwarded in this article is thus that, first of all, this situation needs to be made visible. The blind spot has to be identified and targeted. Qualified and reflexive knowledge and competence in Sámi religion, history and culture need to be integrated within all disciplines of academic education. Secondly, I argue that there is an urgent need for the (re-)establishment of the discipline of Native Studies – Indigenous Studies headed and fronted by Sámi scholars – which would have the responsibility of developing and renewing research-based curriculums on Sámi culture, history and religion. To be able to reach the full extent and depth of Sámi religion, culture and history, this discipline needs to be directed by Sámi scholars.

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