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  • 101. Apel, Jan
    et al.
    Knutsson, KjelUppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Skilled production and social reproduction2006Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 102.
    Apel, Jan
    et al.
    Lund Univ LUX, Dept Archaeol & Ancient Hist, Box 192, Lund, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Archaeol & Class Studies, Osteoarchaeol Res Lab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wallin, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Stora, Jan
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Archaeol & Class Studies, Osteoarchaeol Res Lab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Possnert, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, För teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten gemensamma enheter, Tandem Laboratory.
    Early Holocene human population events on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea (9200-3800 cal. BP)2018In: Quaternary International, ISSN 1040-6182, E-ISSN 1873-4553, Vol. 465, p. 276-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The summed probability distribution of 162 radiocarbon dates from Gotland was analysed with reference to archaeological and environmental data in order to evaluate possible variations in settlement intensity on the island. The data indicated variations in demographic development on the island, with probably several different colonization events and external influences; the pioneer settlement reached the island around 9200 cal. BP. After the initial colonization, the radiocarbon dates were rather evenly distributed until around 7700-7600 cal. BP, then there was a drop in the number of dates between 8300 and 8000 cal. BP that may be associated with the 8200 cold event. A marked decline in the number of dates between 7600 and 6000 cal. BP may be associated initially with the Littorina I transgression, but this transgression cannot explain why the Late Mesolithic period is not well represented on Gotland: the climatic development was favourable but did not result in increased human activity. The number of radiocarbon dates indicated that the population size remained low until around 6000 cal. BP, after which there was a gradual increase that reached a first 'threshold' after 5600 cal. BP and a second 'threshold' after 4500 cal. BP. The first apparent population increase was associated with the appearance of the Funnel Beaker Culture (FBC) and the second with Pitted Ware Culture (PWC) complexes. A decline in the number of dates occurred after 4300 cal. BP, i.e. towards the Late Neolithic. There was an association between the frequency distributions of the radiocarbon dates and the number of stray finds from different time periods but any correlation was not straightforward. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA. All rights reserved.

  • 103.
    Apel, Jan-Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Bäckström, Ylva
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Knutsson, Kjel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Lekberg, Per
    Olsson, Elisabeth
    Steinecke, Morten
    Sundström, Lars
    Fågelbacken och trattbägarsamhället: samhällsorganisation och rituella samlingsplatser vid övergången till en bofats tillvaro i östra Mellansverige1995In: Tor, ISSN 0495-8772, Vol. 27, p. 47-132Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    A discussion of the TRB cultural landscape and form of society is attempted on the basis of the excavation of an Early Neolithic Funnel-beaker settlement site at Fågelbacken in eastern central Sweden. The site, situated on top of an esker, is characterized by finds of TRB pottery, quartz and flint debitage, pits with charred human bones, a cultbuilding and D-shaped huts. As a result of intra-site spatial analysis, ceramic analysis and a discussion of the site features, it is suggested that Fågelbacken should be interpreted not only as a coastal hunting site but also as a repeatedly visited, communal ritual site. A spatial analysis of thin-butted axes in the area surrounding the site, suggests that it is probably one of a whole series of similar, evenly spaced, ritual sites in the area. A sociocultural interpretation of Funnel-beaker huts and houses, together with an analysis of the distribution of stray finds of TRB type in the research area, further suggests that coastal sites like Fågelbacken are structurally related to groups of swidden-agriculture farmsteads and hunting stations in the interior.

  • 104.
    Apelman, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Landskapsanalys med GIS: -ett äldre järnålderslandskap från mellersta Öland2001Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 105.
    Armstrong, Chelsey
    et al.
    Department of Archaeology, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada .
    Shoemaker, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    McKechnie, Iain
    Department of Anthropology, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, Hakai Institute, Heriot Bay, Quadra Island, British Columbia, Canada.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Szabó, Péter
    Department of Vegetation Ecology, Institute of Botany of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Brno, Czech Republic .
    Lane, Paul J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology. School of Geography, Archaeology and Environmental Studies, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa .
    McAlvay, Alex C.
    Department of Botany, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America .
    Boles, Oliver
    Institute of Archaeology, University College London, London, United Kingdom .
    Walshaw, Sarah
    Department of History, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada .
    Petek, Nik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Gibbons, Kevin
    Department of Anthropology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, United States of America.
    Quintana Morales, Erendira
    Department of Anthropology, Rice University, Houston, Texas, United States of America .
    Anderson, Eugene
    Department of Anthropology, University California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California, United States of America .
    Ibragimow, Aleksandra
    Adams Mickiewicz Univ, Polish German Res Inst, Poznan, Poland.; European Univ, Viadrina, Germany.
    Podruczny, Grzegorz
    Adams Mickiewicz Univ, Polish German Res Inst, Poznan, Poland.; European Univ, Viadrina, Germany.
    Vamosi, Jana
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada .
    Marks-Block, Tony
    Department of Anthropology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America.
    LeCompte, Joyce
    Independent Scholar, Seattle, Washington, United States of America.
    Awâsis, Sākihitowin
    Department of Geography, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada, Atlohsa Native Family Healing Services, Canada, London, Ontario, Canada .
    Nabess, Carly
    Department of Anthropology, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, British Columbia, Canada.
    Sinclair, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Crumley, Carole L.
    Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America; Integrated History of Future of People on Earth (IHOPE) Initiative, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Anthropological contributions to historical ecology: 50 questions, infinite prospects2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 2, article id e0171883Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the results of a consensus-driven process identifying 50 priority research questions for historical ecology obtained through crowdsourcing, literature reviews, and in-person workshopping. A deliberative approach was designed to maximize discussion and debate with defined outcomes. Two in-person workshops (in Sweden and Canada) over the course of two years and online discussions were peer facilitated to define specific key questions for historical ecology from anthropological and archaeological perspectives. The aim of this research is to showcase the variety of questions that reflect the broad scope for historical-ecological research trajectories across scientific disciplines. Historical ecology encompasses research concerned with decadal, centennial, and millennial human-environmental interactions, and the consequences that those relationships have in the formation of contemporary landscapes. Six interrelated themes arose from our consensus-building workshop model: (1) climate and environmental change and variability; (2) multi-scalar, multi-disciplinary; (3) biodiversity and community ecology; (4) resource and environmental management and governance; (5) methods and applications; and (6) communication and policy. The 50 questions represented by these themes highlight meaningful trends in historical ecology that distill the field down to three explicit findings. First, historical ecology is fundamentally an applied research program. Second, this program seeks to understand long-term human-environment interactions with a focus on avoiding, mitigating, and reversing adverse ecological effects. Third, historical ecology is part of convergent trends toward transdisciplinary research science, which erodes scientific boundaries between the cultural and natural.

  • 106.
    Artursson, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Våld, aggressivitet och konflikter under bronsåldern: En studie om huruvida depåfyndens sammansättning kan återspegla våldsamma strukturer2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 107.
    Asserstam, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    PREDICTING MESOLITHIC PIONEER SETTLEMENTS IN EASTERN MIDDLE SWEDEN: - A STUDY OF PREDICTIVE MODELLING THROUGH THE APPLICA-TION OF ARCGIS, R AND TOPOGRAPHICAL RECONSTRUCTION2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 108.
    Asserstam, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Predicting mesolithic pioneer settlements in eastern middle Sweden: A study of predictive modelling through the application of Arcgis, R and topographical reconstruction2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 109.
    Atutu, Theresa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    The historical ecology of oil in Nigeria.: The social, economic and environmental impact in the Niger Delta and how the Nigerian government, oil companies and local communities interact because of oil.2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 110.
    Avgerinou Djangoi, Ilektra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Fem antika källor om gallerna2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 111.
    Axelsson, Anton
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Hittite Mortuary Practices2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Hittite burial material consists of a very heterogeneous material. The material shows some shared aspects between the different cemeteries and their grave types. However, this material lacks previous extensive comparative studies in central Anatolia. This study aims to problematize this funerary material, by re-evaluating the previous interpretation and by creating links between the different types of material and the cemeteries it was found in. This will be achieved by analyzing four different categories of Hittite graves from the three cemeteries: Osmankayasi, Gordion and Ilica. The total material consists of 268 graves: 91 from Osmankayasi, 46 from Gordion and 131 from Ilica. The material was originally excavated and published during the fifties and sixties by the three archaeologists Kurt Bittel, Machteld Mellink and Winfried Orthmann. The burial material will be analyzed to establish parallels and differences between the three sites, their materials and grave categories. Literary sources and empirical data will be used to supplement previous research but also the new interpretations discussed in this thesis.

    Keywords: Hittite, cemeteries, mortuary practices, Osmankayasi, Gordion, Ilica, cremations, pithos burials, pit graves, cist-graves, ethnicity, status, equids

  • 112.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Art as entangled material practices: The Case of Late Iron Age Scandinavian Gold Foil Figures in the Making2019In: Artistic Practices and Archaeological Research / [ed] Dragos Gheorghiu, Theodor Barth, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2019, p. 21-30Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses Late Iron Age gold foil figures from Scandinavia. The figures can be described as tiny humanoid beings stamped on very thin gold foil. They date to c. AD 550–800, and are commonly interpreted in representationalist ways, and as being symbols. By contrast, this paper starts from the assumption that art and imagery are simultaneously material, affective and emergent. As a consequence the gold foil figures are seen as to be continuously in the making, where Karen Barad’s concepts of intra-action and agential realist ontology are especially helpful to illuminate the open-ended and generative character of the figures.

  • 113.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Diskussion: Den ontologiske vendingen i arkeologien2015In: In Situ. Västsvensk arkeologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1403-4964, p. 115-117Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 114.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Estrid - moder, mäktig och maskulin?: Berättelser om en rekonstruktion av en senvikingatida kvinna2016In: Fiktion och verklighet: Mångvetenskapliga möten / [ed] Anna Bohlin och Lena Gemzöe, Göteborg - Stockholm: Makadam Förlag, 2016, p. 195-210Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the stories that unfold and are created after an excavation in 1990s in Sweden of a few Late Viking Age burials. The excavation is followed by excavation reports, articles and an exhibition that also showcases a reconstruction made of one of the buried persons. The analysis is made from three perspectives; from the archaeological, the museum and the municipality. It is demonstrated that the stories presented on different levels contain both fictional and factual components. By acknowledging this, it is argued, it is possible for everyone to become involved in the interpretations and discussions of the past. The research paper appears in an inter-disciplinary book where several researchers from different academic disciplines investigate what is fiction and what is reality in a variety of societal areas, and how the relationship between the two concepts fiction and reality is full of tensions.

  • 115.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Guldgubbar's changing ontology.: Scandinavian Late Iron Age gold foil figures through the lense of intra-action2020In: Images in the Making: Art, Process, Archaeology / [ed] Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie and Andrew Meirion Jones, Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses Late Iron Age gold foil figures from Scandinavia. The figures can be described as tiny human-like beings stamped on very thin gold foil. They mainly date to what in Sweden is called the Vendel period, c. AD 550–800. Despite a great variety in terms of execution, appearance, etc., they are all known as “guldgubbar” (similar names in Swedish, Danish and Norwegian). They are commonly interpreted in representationalist ways, as representing gods or deities, which has forced them to be static entities that seemingly never change. Attention has not been paid either to the manipulations they have experienced. Instead of using the concept of ‘guldgubbar’ for all golden, tiny humanoid beings I argue that the figures need to be studied from the ground up, highlighting and taking into consideration their relational differences, as well as the different practices and events that they have participated in. In this respect, I consider the images as simultaneously material, affective and emergent (e.g. Bennett 2010), which also means that I am open for ontological relativization (Holbraad and Pedersen 2017, 3); that is I keep an open mind to what these objects are or do. When the gold foil figures are approached in this way, Karen Barad’s concepts of intra-action, apparatuses and phenomenon are especially helpful to illuminate the figures’ multiplicity and unfolding characteristics. Further, by highlighting the figures’ varieties of being and becoming different things or versions of themselves throughout time, changing onto-ethico-epistemological concerns may be more easily recognised and may be addressed.

  • 116.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Handlingar på gränsen: En hypotes kring hetero- och homoerotiska uttryck på heliga Helgö och närliggande Hundhamra under yngre järnålder2014In: Med hjärta och hjärna : En vänbok till professor Elisabeth Arwill-Nordbladh / [ed] Henrik Alexandersson, Alexander Andreeff & Annika Bünz, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, 2014, p. 259-275Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 117.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Images in the Making2019In: Tidens landskap: En vänbok till Anders Andrén. / [ed] Ljung, C., Sjögren, L., Berg, I., Engström, E., Hållans-Stenholm, A.-M.,Jonsson, K.,Klevnäs, A.,Qviström, L. and Zachrisson, T., Lund: Nordic Academic Press , 2019, p. 147-149Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article discusses Scandinavian gold foil figures of the Vendel Period (c. AD 550-800) through the lense of Karen Barad's concepts of intra-action and phenomenon.

  • 118.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    More Theory for Mortuary Research of the Viking World2016In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 519-531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This themed journal issue provides many examples of ways forward in the study of death and memory in the Viking world. While all contributions demonstrate that there are exciting new ways to study remains from funerary contexts that focus on different forms of citation involving material culture and monuments, this article will very briefly discuss dimensions that have not been addressed here. Specifically, it showcases how the mortuary citations approach can also use post-humanist theory for further development and exploration of mortuary practices in the Viking world. Although short, this article discusses rune stones, particularly rune stones with kuml inscriptions, which I have examined elsewhere.

    The term kuml appears on contemporary rune stones; it refers to different material entities such as rune stones, mounds/cairns, and other standing stones. The being and becoming of kuml is briefly discussed through the concepts of intra-action and agential cuts championed by Karen Barad.

  • 119.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Review of Ruth M. Van Dyke, ed. Practicing Materiality, Tucson: The University of Arizona Press, 2015.2017In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 168-171Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 120.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    The Social Qualia of Kuml: An Exploration of the Iconicity of Rune-stones with Kuml Inscriptions from the Scandinavian Late Viking Age2016In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 23, p. 157-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses qualitative experiences (qualia) of Scandinavian Late Viking Age runestones from a semiotically theorized perspective. Rune-stones with kuml inscriptions receive particular attention. Despite the fact that kuml referred to different material entities, such as rune-stone, other standing stones, and/or grave, it is suggested that they resembled one another on iconic grounds. The quality associated with the multiple qualia was a sensation of safety that resulted in shared experiences that had positive social values. The article demonstrates that the semiotics of Peirce can be of great value to archaeologists who want to delve deeper into the social analysis of things.

  • 121.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Walking Down Memory Lane: Rune-Stones as Mnemonic Agents in the Landscapes of Late Viking-Age Scandinavia2015In: Early Medieval Stone Monuments: Materiality, Biography, Landscape / [ed] Howard Williams, Joanne Kirton and Meggen Gondek, Woodbridge: Boydell & Brewer, 2015, p. 62-86Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The archaeological approach adopted in this contribution wishes to explore the mnemonic agency of the rune-stones through highlighting some of the myriad rhizomatic relations that were generated through the embodied processes of making, staging and encountering rune-stones. It equally emphasises that memory work is practical, performative and therefore necessarily embodied in its constitution.

  • 122.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Jones, Andrew Meirion
    Southampton University.
    Images in the Making: An introduction2020In: Images in the Making: Art, Process, Archaeology / [ed] Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie and Andrew Meirion Jones, Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This introduction addresses and challenges long held assumptions concerning archaeological art and images, and offers new ways to approach and understand them. It is less concerned with the thorny question of defining art, and instead primarily focus on images. We develop approaches that enable us to follow images in their making, their unfolding, their transformation, their multiplicity. We also discuss how images can be understood, given that they appear to be in constant motion.

  • 123.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Jones, Andrew Meirion
    Southampton University, United Kingdom.
    Images in the Making: Art, Process, Archaeology2020Book (Refereed)
  • 124.
    Backe-Forsberg, Yvonne
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    An Etruscan public building with multiple functions at the bridge on the northern side of Fosso del Pietrisco at San Giovenale in southern Etruria, 625-500 B.C. A functional analysis of the architectural remains and the artifacts1997In: Proceedings of the symposium 'From huts to houses. Transformations of ancient societies' in Rome 22-24 September 1997Other (Other scientific)
  • 125.
    Backe-Forsberg, Yvonne
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Asinesamlingen i Uppsala görs tillgänglig för forskningen. Gamla fynd ger ny kunskap1985In: Hellenika, Vol. 32, p. 4-10Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 126.
    Backe-Forsberg, Yvonne
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Crossing the Bridge: An Interpretation of the Archaeological Remains in the Etruscan Bridge Complex at San Giovenale, Etruria2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis discusses the archaeological remains in the Etruscan bridge complex, found during the excavations at San Giovenale in 1959–1963, and 1999. The aim has been to reach a holistic perspective of the bridge complex with the bridge seen as a link between topography, economy, social relationships, politics, symbols and ritual, reflecting its importance for the whole community at San Giovenale and its surroundings. Situated at the border between the two largest city-states Tarquinia and Caere, the site seems to have been an important middle range transit town for foreign ideas, goods and people.

    The character of the remains and the various levels of contextual analyses made it possible to distinguish five distinctive functions for the structures at the bridge over the Pietrisco. From a more generalised point of view these suggested that specialized functions may be divided into practical, social and symbolic functions and these aspects have been of help in identifying an object or a structure. Besides practical functions of everyday use, economic and strategic functions have also been considered.

    These functions were more or less in use contemporaneously, at least during several hundred years, from about the middle of the 6th down to the first century B.C. Pottery and small finds show that some activity has taken place at the site from the 9th century. Features of continuity, such as in the choice of crossing, the direction of the bridge construction after its destruction, the architectural ground-plans, the use of basins and a well, pottery fabrics of local and Greek imports and shapes, as well as changes in ground-plans, slight changes in the environment due to water erosion, earth-quakes and slides, have been observed. The physical as well as the liminal boundary between land and water as well as between man and spirits was accentuated by the tufa building, the water installations, and the road at the northern abutment. The thesis raises the hypothesis that the Etruscans believed that a crossing of a river via a bridge could violate the spirits of nature on land and in the water and therefore special rites were needed to restore the balance between nature and man before entering the bridge in order to reach safely at the other side of the ravine. The bridge itself can be seen as sacred, a liminal area where time and space do not exist and a place where it is easy to gain contact with the supernatural world.

  • 127.
    Backe-Forsberg, Yvonne
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Finds from the Middle Helladic Period1978In: Excavations in the Barbouna area at Asine, Fasc. 2, Finds from the Levendis sector, 1970, Vol. Boreas 4, no Fasc. 2, p. 53-63Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 128.
    Backe-Forsberg, Yvonne
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Tiles from graves B5 and B81978In: Excavations in the Barbouna area at Asine, Fasc. 2, Finds from theLevendis sector, 190-1972, Vol. Boreas 4, no Fasc. 2, p. 121-127Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 129.
    Backe-Forsberg, Yvonne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. Antikens kultur och samhällsliv.
    Risberg, Christina
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. Antikens kultur och samhällsliv.
    Archaeometallurgical methods applied to remains of iron production from the Geometric Period at Asine, pp. 85-942002In: NEW RESEARCH ON OLD MATERIAL FROM ASINE AND BERBATI: in celebration of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Swedish Institute at Athens, Paul Åströms förlag, William Gibsons väg 11, SE-433 76 Jonsered, Sweden , 2002, p. 155-Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 130.
    Backe-Forsberg, Yvonne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Risberg, Christina
    Metal working at Asine. 'New finds' from the 1926 season.1986In: OpAth, Vol. 15, p. 123-125Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 131.
    Backe-Forsberg, Yvonne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Risberg, Christina
    Metallhantering i Asine: gamla fynd ger ny kunskap1992In: Hellenika, Vol. 60, p. 28-29Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 132.
    Backe-Forsberg, Yvonne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Risberg, Christina
    På jakt efter järn. Geologiska resor i Arkadien och Argolis2000In: Hellenika, Vol. 93, p. 6-9Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 133.
    Backe-Forsberg, Yvonne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Risberg, Christina
    Two late Geometric skyphoi from the Collection of Classical Antiquities in Uppsala.1993In: From the Gustavianum Collections in Uppsala (Boreas. Uppsala studies in Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern civilisations, Vol. 22, p. 31-38Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 134.
    Backe-Forsberg, Yvonne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Risberg, Christina
    Bassiakos, Yannis
    Metal-working at Asine. Report on the remains of iron-production from the Barbouna area and the area E of the Acropolis2001In: OpAth, Vol. 25-26, p. 25-34Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 135.
    Badani Zuleta, Paola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    That which was before of time: Night, Evening and Everynight-life in Ancient Egypt2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is to present the ancient Egyptian perception of night and darkness, a framework within which the description of nocturnal practices is to be contextualised. A phenomenological analysis was employed in the study of ancient Egyptian written records all hinting to the words of “night”, “evening” and “darkness”. Sometimes more than one word was employed for the same phenomenon, hinting to a wide contextual understanding of the night. In some cases, this is visible in the hieroglyphs themselves, in how a sign depicting a lying mummy in the ancient Egyptian word for “to spend the night” might exclude the mummy when making reference to a sleepless night, when the body remained in a vertical state throughout the night; or in how the falling night is depicted as supported by a pillar, shown broken due to the pressure it endures when night falls.  Thus, night falls upon day, visible epigraphically, and what was visible during the day becomes blinded and dimmed, darkness turns the once polychromatic day-world into a monochromatic night-world, spearheading the use of artificial lightning, an important and almost ritual practice in terms of darkness. This darkness also limits to some extent the human trajectory, bringing matters inwards into the home, towards physical intimacy, closeness and safety. The human body falls into horizontality – into sleep with its accompanying silence, stillness and non-consciousness, elements in many instances associated with death. Time’s day-time linearity gives way to a nightly non-linearity, as narrated in the mythological discourse. The duality between day and night is further conveyed in how the break of dawn literally breaks the darkness of night, the silence associated with sleep, and scares the attributed dangers away. With the start of the day, the human body stands into verticality, movement and consciousness. Although the preconceived notions of night and darkness were ones of danger and negative associations, the analysed texts present high levels of activity during the nightly hours, describing nocturnal walks, busy streets, moon-light hunts, love turning night into a spectrum of positivity, sleepless and restless nights, drunken nights and nocturnal readings. Egyptians lived their nights, all twelve hours and the several grades of darkness, by working, loving, dreaming and interacting, in ways both contrasting and reinforcing the daily practices. As such, in a true spirit of duality, night constituted a highly vivid experience.

  • 136.
    Badenhorst, Shaw
    et al.
    Ditsong National Museum of Natural History (formerly Transvaal Museum.
    Sinclair, Paul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Ekblom, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Faunal remains from Chibuene, an Iron Age coastal trading station in central Mozambique2011In: Southern African Humanities, ISSN 1681-5564, Vol. 23, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the small faunal assemblage from the Iron Age coastal trading station of Chibuene, situated on the coastal littoral of central Mozambique. The faunal assemblage was excavated in 1995 and contains bones from a variety of animals, including livestock, chickens, wild game animals, as well as aquatic species such as turtles and fish. Fish, turtle and shark remains dominate the assemblage. The fauna from the first and second millennium AD occupations share similarities with other contemporaneous sites to the north on the East African coast, rather than with sites located in South Africa.

  • 137.
    Barregren, Simon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Spjutets plats i kultur och tro: En undersökning av dekorerade spjut i Birkas kammargravar2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Viking Age town Birka has since long been a central part of archaeological studies and excavations in Sweden. It has brought much light and information about the people living there from the late 8th century to the late 10th century. The purpose of this thesis is to explore the decorated spears found in a selected number of Birka's chamber graves to see if any visual traces of religious expressions are present. The spears and their context will then be put into contrast with the clear patterns of the worship of Odin in Birka's Garrison area and religious studies from pre-Christian Scandinavia. This is done in the hopes of shedding some light on the spear’s relevance in the Viking Age's culture and religious contexts.

  • 138. Barthel, Stephan
    et al.
    Crumley, Carole L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Svedin, Uno
    Biocultural Refugia: Combating the Erosion of Diversity in Landscapes of Food Production2013In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 18, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is urgent need to both reduce the rate of biodiversity loss caused by industrialized agriculture and feed more people. The aim of this paper is to highlight the role of places that harbor traditional ecological knowledge, artifacts, and methods when preserving biodiversity and ecosystem services in landscapes of food production. We use three examples in Europe of biocultural refugia, defined as the physical places that not only shelter farm biodiversity, but also carry knowledge and experiences about practical management of how to produce food while stewarding biodiversity and ecosystem services. Memory carriers include genotypes, landscape features, oral, and artistic traditions and self-organized systems of rules, and as such reflect a diverse portfolio of practices on how to deal with unpredictable change. We find that the rich biodiversity of many regionally distinct cultural landscapes has been maintained through different smallholder practices developed in relation to local environmental fluctuations and carried within biocultural refugia for as long as millennia. Places that transmit traditional ecological knowledge and practices hold important lessons for policy makers since they may provide genetic and cultural reservoirs - refugia - for the wide array of species that have co-evolved with humans in Europe for more than 6000 thousand yrs. Biodiversity restoration projects in domesticated landscapes can employ the biophysical elements and cultural practices embedded in biocultural refugia to create locally adapted small-scale mosaics of habitats that allow species to flourish and adapt to change. We conclude that such insights must be included in discussions of land-sparing vs. land-sharing when producing more food while combating loss of biodiversity. We found the latter strategy rational in domesticated landscapes with a long history of agriculture.

  • 139.
    Barthel, Stephan
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Isendahl, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, African and Comparative Archaeology.
    Urban gardens, agriculture, and water management: Sources of resilience forlong-term food security in cities2013In: Ecological Economics, ISSN 0921-8009, E-ISSN 1873-6106, Vol. 86, p. 224-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food security has always been a key resilience facet for people living in cities. This paper discusses lessons for food security fromhistoric and prehistoric cities. The Chicago school of urban sociology established amodernist understanding of urbanism as an essentialist reality separate from its larger life-support system. However, different urban histories have given rise to a remarkable spatial diversity and temporal variation viewed at the global and long-term scales that are often overlooked in urban scholarship.Drawing on two case studies fromwidely different historical and cultural contexts – the Classic Maya civilization of the late first millennium AD and Byzantine Constantinople – this paper demonstrates urban farming as a pertinent feature of urban support systems over the long-term and global scales. We show how urban gardens, agriculture, and water management as well as the linked social–ecological memories of how to uphold such practices over time have contributed to long-term food security during eras of energy scarcity. We exemplify with the function of such local blue–green infrastructures during chocks to urban supply lines. We conclude that agricultural production is not “the antithesis of the city," but often an integrated urban activity that contribute to the resilience of cities.

  • 140.
    Barthel, Stephan
    et al.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    Royal Institute of Technology.
    Ljungkvist, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Innovative Memory and Resilient Cities: Echoes from Ancient Constantinople2010In: The Urban Mind: Cultural and Environmental Dynamics / [ed] Paul J.J. Sinclair, Gullög Nordquist, Frands Herschend and Christian Isendahl, Uppsala: Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University , 2010, p. 391-405Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter uses insights from resilience thinking in analysing a two-thousand-year period of ancient and modern Constantinople, addressing one of the great challenges of the Urban Anthropocene: how to nurture an ecologically sound urbanisation. One of the lessons is that Constantinople maintained a diversity of insurance strategies to a greater degree than  many historical and contemporary urban centres. It invested heavily not only in military infrastructure but also in systems for supplying, storing, and producing food and water. From major granaries and at least four harbours the citizens could receive seaborne goods, but during sieges the trade networks broke down. At those times, when supplies ran dry, there were possibilities to cultivate food within the defensive walls and to catch fish in the Golden Horn. Repeated sieges, which occurred on average every fifty years, generated a diversity of social-ecological memories – the means by which the knowledge, experience, and practice of how to manage a local ecosystem were stored and transmitted in a community. These memories existed in multiple groups of society, partly as a response to the collapse of long-distance, seaborne, grain transports from Egypt. Food production and transports were decentralized into a plethora of smaller subsistence communities (oikoi), which also sold the surplus to the markets of the city. In this way Constantinople became more self-reliant on regional ecosystems. An additional result was that the defensive walls were moved, not in order to construct more buildings but to increase the proportion of gardens and agricultural land. In a comparison with Cairo, it can be seen that these innovations related to enhanced self-reliance in food production made it possible for Constantinople to bounce back from extreme hardships, such as extended sieges, without collapsing into chaos or moral decay. Transformed urban morphology of the city would simply remind residents, through the visual presence of a living garden culture, of the importance of the latter for food security. Without the gardens the long intervals between sieges would probably have been enough to dissolve living memoryHence, the urban  resilience of Constantinople was enhanced, promoting well-established old regimes and traditions of importance for producing ecosystem services to society while at the same time testing and refining new and successful regimes, or in other words through the interplay of memory and innovation. Currently, and even more so in decades to come, the mindsets of urban people hold power in a global arena. Questions related to how the loss of green space in metropolitan landscapes will affect worldviews are worrisome since it is the desires and demands of urban people that will affect future decisions and essentially determine the fate of the planet. People throughout the world, and not least in Western societies, need to be constantly reminded of our dependence on a living planet and stay motivated to support it. Social-ecological memories related to local food production have to be nurtured in urban landscapes as well, and an urban morphology is needed that strengthens ecological awareness across urban populations rather than the opposite.

  • 141.
    Baumanova, Monika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. Univ Basel, Ctr African Studies, Basel, Switzerland; Univ West Bohemia, Plzen, Czech Republic.
    Pillar Tombs and the City: Creating a Sense of Shared Identity in Swahili Urban Space2018In: Archaeologies, ISSN 1555-8622, E-ISSN 1935-3987, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 377-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reviews published research on Swahili pillar tombs, as a specific type of tombs built of stone, by summarising records on almost fifty sites on the east coast of Africa. Dated to the 13th–16th centuries AD, the pillar tombs represented a core component of Swahili urban space. By considering their spatial setting, characteristics and comparative case studies from Africa and the Indian Ocean world, the paper reconsiders how pillar tombs might have functioned as a type of material infrastructure for creating social ties and notions of shared identity in a society that has never formally united.

  • 142.
    Baumanova, Monika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Space Matters: A Reflection on Archaeological Theory and Method for Interpreting the Materiality of Space2016In: Interdisciplinaria Archaeologica, ISSN 1804-848X, E-ISSN 2336-1220, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 209-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Every paradigm in the history of archaeological theory has in some way dealt with space in interpreting the archaeological record; either bringing it into the spotlight or using it to assist description of other observed phenomena. This has resulted in a varied range of approaches to space, but also brought with it inherent problems. Paradigms once regarded as incompatible are now reconciled in mutual coexistence, but maintain little dialogue. Certain methods of spatial analyses have begun to be used as theory-neutral, and space often remains implicitly studied using methods as a set of tools, without exploration of adequate theory.

    The goal of this paper is to present a perspective on how archaeologists may proceed in order to apply both analytical methods to seek patterns in the past and interpret past constructed space. Although space is an intangible entity, it is argued it may be seen as a human-made material culture that plays an active role in social processes. As a case study, I contrast the advantages and shortcomings of several archaeological studies concerned with the spatial structure of the Swahili house. It is argued that we need to actively engage approaches that reveal quantifiable patterns in the built environment, as well as consult more relativistic issues of perception, sensory experience, and social production and consumption of space.

  • 143.
    Baumanova, Monika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    TEMPEA final report2018Report (Other academic)
  • 144.
    Baumanova, Monika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    TEMPEA technical report2018Report (Other academic)
  • 145.
    Baumanova, Monika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Tisíciletá MĚSTA na afrických BŘEZÍCH2018In: Koktejl, ISSN 1210-4353Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 146.
    Baumanova, Monika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Smejda, Ladislav
    Czech Univ Life Sci, Fac Environm Sci, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Space as material culture: Residential stone buildings on the precolonial Swahili coast in a comparative perspective2018In: South African Archaeological Bulletin, ISSN 0038-1969, E-ISSN 2224-4654, Vol. 73, no 208, p. 82-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper develops the notion that the structure of residential spaces has long been in a dialogue with social environments. It elaborates theoretical and methodological streams in the social sciences that focus on the interplay between society and the built environment. Space, rather than the built environment that articulates its structure, is subjected to analyses and conceptual interpretations relevant to the understanding of past constructed worlds. Although intangible and abstract, it is argued that space represents a type of material culture that could be studied through the use of the theory of affordances. We compare the layout of selected stone residences of various sizes that have been recorded in precolonial Swahili settlements at Gede, Kenya, and the Kilwa archipelago, Tanzania. To this end, we apply several methods of spatial analysis to reveal patterning in possible movements of people, and both physical and sensory access in buildings. The main goal of the paper is to derive an understanding of how these buildings helped to shape social values, and how they played a role in negotiation of multiple social interests, power, and trade relations among members of an urban society. The results highlight how material constructions like houses may channel social actions by reflecting contemporary social conventions. The argument also shows in what ways the unique nature of African urban heritage may be viewed, so that it could lend itself to cross-regional comparisons. The observations presented contribute to a broader discussion on the importance of interdisciplinary enquiry into the long history of African indigenous architecture.

  • 147.
    Baumanova, Monika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. Univ Basel, Ctr African Studies, Rheinsprung 21, CH-4051 Basel, Switzerland..
    Smejda, Ladislav
    Czech Univ Life Sci, Dept Ecol, Kamycka 129, Prague 16521, Czech Republic.;Univ West Bohemia, Dept Archaeol, Plzen 30614, Czech Republic..
    Structural dynamics of spatial complexity at the 'Palace of Gede', Kenya2017In: Azania, ISSN 0067-270X, E-ISSN 1945-5534, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 71-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a set of structural and network analysis approaches, this paper focuses on the monumental structure known as 'the Palace' at the Swahili stone town site of Gede, located near the Kenya coast. Gede is one of many stone towns that flourished on the East African littoral from the thirteenth to the sixteenth centuries AD. The 'Palace complex' is the largest building on site and developed in at least three stages within the last 100-150 years of the site's occupation. Its palatial function has so far been considered mainly in light of its monumentality and relative size, hence on the basis of its formal properties. This article utilises approaches that examine the spatial structure of the complex, offering an analysis of its spatial organisation by studying its inherent potential in terms of movement and visibility. The interpretation of the social logic of its development presented here is based on access and visibility analyses and on network analysis and thus connects methodologies developed in the 1980s with those that have started to be more widely discussed only within the last decade. The results reveal how the configuration and use of rooms, their place in the communication network within the building and their social potential changed through time.

  • 148.
    Baumanova, Monika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.; University of West Bohemia, Pilsen, Czech Republic..
    Smejda, Ladislav
    University of West Bohemia, Pilsen, Czech Republic.; Czech University of Life Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic..
    Ruther, Heinz
    University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Pre-Colonial Origins of Urban Spaces in the West African Sahel: Street Networks, Trade, and Spatial Plurality2019In: Journal of urban history, ISSN 0096-1442, E-ISSN 1552-6771, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 500-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Present-day West African towns allow us to study how urban space developed in this region. The urban street networks and layout of residential quarters to some extent preserve the possible movement patterns of pre-colonial urbanites. Long-distance trade, in what is ultimately a liminal and transitory locale, linked the urban nodes on the “coast” of the Sahara. This article takes a closer look on the distribution of streets and quarters as a unique kind of material heritage, as well as major trade routes, which linked into the towns. Analyses of the historic towns of Timbuktu and Djenne in Mali are used to demonstrate how the relationships between trade and urban residents were enacted in space. The structuring of the two towns put them in context with the tradition of dual settlements in West Africa, also finding parallels with the role of urban quarters in merchant towns of the East African coast.

  • 149.
    Baumanova, Monika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Zahorik, Jan
    University of West Bohemia, Czech Republic.
    Report: Africa Days 2015 – 2nd Ethio-Czech Conference on Africa (Pilsen, 15.-16.10.2015)2016In: Newsletter of the Swiss Society for African StudiesArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 150.
    Bazire Leidersdorff-Menzel, Clovis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Brunnen på bosättningen: Ett funktionellt ting eller ett ekonomiskt och socialt ting2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to discuss and clarify the interpretative potential of wells in order to understand the relationships between different features on the settlement. The empirical data used for this thesis have been confined to two different settlements locations in Uppland in Sweden, where a total of eight well’s structures have been analysed in relation to nearby archaeological and ecological features. This was made possible by analysing how the arrangements of wells were related to nearby places and archaeological remains and by using GIS (Geographic information system). The material is analysed using the theoretical approach of “entanglement”. Entanglement is a concept that can be used to facilitate the understanding of how many and how different cohesive relationships between material and humans and vice versa are interconnected. During the work with the thesis, the spatial relations of wells to and between other things have been clarified. The environment around the wells locations presents interesting contexts between archaeological remains and the locations. Ancient people used places and things in the natural setting in order to organize their social life. The well as a functional thing and as a special place should be understood in relation to the human's way of action, that is, there is a coherent relationship between the two that together affect both the human world and the wells.

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