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  • 101.
    Ellegren, Hans
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Sheldon, Ben C.
    Genetic basis of fitness differences in natural populations2008In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 452, no 7184, p. 169-175Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genomics profoundly influences current biology. One of many exciting consequences of this revolution is the potential for identifying and studying the genetic basis of those traits affecting fitness that are key to natural selection. Recent studies using a multitude of genomic approaches have established such genotype - phenotype relationships in natural populations, giving new insight into the genetic architecture of quantitative variation. In parallel, an emerging understanding of the quantitative genetics of fitness variation in the wild means that we are poised to see a synthesis of ecological and molecular approaches in evolutionary biology.

  • 102.
    Emilsson, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Saetre, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Balciuniene, Jorune
    Castensson, Anja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Cairns, Nigel
    Jazin, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Increased monoamine oxidase messenger RNA expression levels in frontal cortex of Alzheimer's disease patients2002In: Neuroscience Letters, ISSN 0304-3940, E-ISSN 1872-7972, Vol. 326, no 1, p. 56-60.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder and the most common cause of dementia in the industrialised world. The two monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzymes, monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) and monoamine oxidase B (MAOB), are important in the metabolism of monoamine neurotransmitters. AD and ageing have been shown to increase enzyme activity for both MAOA and MAOB. An increase (rather than decrease) of enzyme activity is a rare event in a disease that results in a decrease in the number of cells in the brain. The mechanism, transcriptional or post-transcriptional, responsible for the increase in protein activity, is not known. In this study, we investigate for the first time the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels of both MAOA and MAOB in 246 cortical brain samples obtained at autopsy from 62 AD patients and 61 normal controls. We found a significant increase in mRNA levels for both MAOA (P=0.001) and MAOB (P=0.002) in disease brain tissue. This indicates that both MAO enzymes might be important in the progression of AD.

  • 103. Engen, Steinar
    et al.
    Ringsby, Thor Harald
    Saether, Bernt-Erik
    Lande, Russell
    Jensen, Henrik
    Lillegård, Magnar
    Ellegren, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Effective size of fluctuating populations with two sexes and overlapping generations2007In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 61, no 8, p. 1873-1885Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We derive formulas that can be applied to estimate the effective population size N(e) for organisms with two sexes reproducing once a year and having constant adult mean vital rates independent of age. Temporal fluctuations in population size are generated by demographic and environmental stochasticity. For populations with even sex ratio at birth, no deterministic population growth and identical mean vital rates for both sexes, the key parameter determining N(e) is simply the mean value of the demographic variance for males and females considered separately. In this case Crow and Kimura's generalization of Wright's formula for N(e) with two sexes, in terms of the effective population sizes for each sex, is applicable even for fluctuating populations with different stochasticity in vital rates for males and females. If the mean vital rates are different for the sexes then a simple linear combination of the demographic variances determines N(e), further extending Wright's formula. For long-lived species an expression is derived for N(e) involving the generation times for both sexes. In the general case with nonzero population growth and uneven sex ratio of newborns, we use the model to investigate numerically the effects of different population parameters on N(e). We also estimate the ratio of effective to actual population size in six populations of house sparrows on islands off the coast of northern Norway. This ratio showed large interisland variation because of demographic differences among the populations. Finally, we calculate how N(e) in a growing house sparrow population will change over time.

  • 104.
    Flagstad, Ö.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Hedmark, E.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Landa, A.
    Bröseth, H.
    Persson, J.
    Andersen, R.
    Segerström, P.
    Ellegren, H.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Colonization history and non-invasive monitoring of a re-established wolverine (Gulo gulo) population.2004In: Conservation Biology, no 18, p. 676-688Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 105. Fox-Dobbs, Kena
    et al.
    Leonard, Jennifer A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Koch, Paul L.
    Pleistocene megafauna from eastern Beringia: paleoecological and paleoenvironmental interpretations of stable carbon and nitrogen isotope and radiocarbon records2008In: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, ISSN 0031-0182, E-ISSN 1872-616X, Vol. 261, no 1-2, p. 30-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Late Pleistocene eastern Beringia is a model paleo-ecosystem for the study of potential and realized species interactions within a diverse mammalian fauna. Beringian paleontological records store a wealth of information that can be used to investigate how predator-prey and competitive interactions among consumers shifted in response to past episodes of environmental change. Two such recent periods of rapid climate change are the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and the end of glacial conditions at the beginning of the Holocene. Here we assemble carbon and nitrogen stable isotope, and AMS C-14 data collected from bone collagen of late Pleistocene carnivores and megafaunal prey species from the interior of eastern Beringia (Alaska), and reconstruct the diets of ancient Alaskan carnivores and herbivores. We are able to account for the relative influences of diet versus changing environmental conditions on variances in consumer isotope values, to identify species hiatuses in the fossil record, and to draw conclusions about paleoenvironmental conditions from faunal chronologies. Our isotopic results suggest that there was dietary niche overlap among some Beringian herbivore species, and partitioning among other species. We rely upon delta C-13 and delta N-15 values of modem Alaskan C-3 plant types to infer Beringian herbivore dietary niches. Horse, bison, yak, and mammoth primarily consumed grasses, sedges, and herbaceous plant species. Caribou and woodland muskox focused upon tundra plants, including lichen, fungi, and mosses. The network of Beringian carnivore interaction was complex and dynamic, some species (wolves) persisted for long periods of time, while others were only present during specific timeframes (large felids and ursids). Beringian carnivore diets included all measured herbivore species, although mammoth and muskox only appeared in carnivore diets during specific times in the late Pleistocene. We identified the potential presence of unmeasured diet sources that may have included forest-dwelling cervids and/or plant materials. None of the large-bodied carnivore species we analyzed (except short-faced bear) were specialized predators of a single prey species during the late Pleistocene. Differences in carnivore diet and dietary breadth between time periods either reflect changes in the relative abundances of prey on the Beringian landscape, or changes in competitive interactions among Beringian carnivore species

  • 106. Galtier, N.
    et al.
    Nabholz, Benoit
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Glemin, S.
    Hurst, G. D. D.
    Mitochondrial DNA as a marker of molecular diversity: a reappraisal2009In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 18, no 22, p. 4541-4550Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last three decades, mitochondrial DNA has been the most popular marker of molecular diversity, for a combination of technical ease-of-use considerations, and supposed biological and evolutionary properties of clonality, near-neutrality and clock-like nature of its substitution rate. Reviewing recent literature on the subject, we argue that mitochondrial DNA is not always clonal, far from neutrally evolving and certainly not clock-like, questioning its relevance as a witness of recent species and population history. We critically evaluate the usage of mitochondrial DNA for species delineation and identification. Finally, we note the great potential of accumulating mtDNA data for evolutionary and functional analysis of the mitochondrial genome.

  • 107.
    Gautschi, B
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Koller, B.
    Polymorphic microsatellite markers for the goosander (Mergus merganser).2005In: Molecular Ecology Notes, no 5, p. 133-134Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 108. Geffen, Eli
    et al.
    Waidyaratne, Sitara
    Dalén, Love
    Angerbjörn, Anders
    Vilà, Carles
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Hersteinsson, Pall
    Fuglei, Eva
    White, Paula A.
    Goltsman, Michael
    Kapel, Christian M.
    Wayne, Robert K.
    Sea ice occurrence predicts genetic isolation in the Arctic fox2007In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 16, no 20, p. 4241-4255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unlike Oceanic islands, the islands of the Arctic Sea are not completely isolated from migration by terrestrial vertebrates. The pack ice connects many Arctic Sea islands to the mainland during winter months. The Arctic fox (Alopex lagopus), which has a circumpolar distribution, populates numerous islands in the Arctic Sea. In this study, we used genetic data from 20 different populations, spanning the entire distribution of the Arctic fox, to identify barriers to dispersal. Specifically, we considered geographical distance, occurrence of sea ice, winter temperature, ecotype, and the presence of red fox and polar bear as nonexclusive factors that influence the dispersal behaviour of individuals. Using distance-based redundancy analysis and the BIOENV procedure, we showed that occurrence of sea ice is the key predictor and explained 40-60% of the genetic distance among populations. In addition, our analysis identified the Commander and Pribilof Islands Arctic populations as genetically unique suggesting they deserve special attention from a conservation perspective.

  • 109. Gilbert, M. Thomas P.
    et al.
    Drautz, Daniela I.
    Lesk, Arthur M.
    Ho, Simon Y. W.
    Qi, Ji
    Ratan, Aakrosh
    Hsu, Chih-Hao
    Sher, Andrei
    Dalen, Love
    Götherström, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Tomsho, Lynn P.
    Rendulic, Snjezana
    Packard, Michael
    Campos, Paula F.
    Kuznetsova, Tatyana V.
    Shidlovskiy, Fyodor
    Tikhonov, Alexei
    Willerslev, Eske
    Iacumin, Paola
    Buigues, Bernard
    Ericson, Per G. P.
    Germonpre, Mietje
    Kosintsev, Pavel
    Nikolaev, Vladimir
    Nowak-Kemp, Malgosia
    Knight, James R.
    Irzyk, Gerard P.
    Perbost, Clotilde S.
    Fredrikson, Karin M.
    Harkins, Timothy T.
    Sheridan, Sharon
    Miller, Webb
    Schuster, Stephan C.
    Intraspecific phylogenetic analysis of Siberian woolly mammoths using complete mitochondrial genomes2008In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 105, no 24, p. 8327-8332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report five new complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genomes of Siberian woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius), sequenced with up to 73-fold coverage from DNA extracted from hair shaft material. Three of the sequences present the first complete mtDNA genomes of mammoth clade II. Analysis of these and 13 recently published mtDNA genomes demonstrates the existence of two apparently sympatric mtDNA clades that exhibit high interclade divergence. The analytical power afforded by the analysis of the complete mtDNA genomes reveals a surprisingly ancient coalescence age of the two clades, approximate to 1-2 million years, depending on the calibration technique. Furthermore, statistical analysis of the temporal distribution of the C-14 ages of these and previously identified members of the two mammoth clades suggests that clade II went extinct before clade I. Modeling of protein structures failed to indicate any important functional difference between genomes belonging to the two clades, suggesting that the loss of clade II more likely is due to genetic drift than a selective sweep.

  • 110. Gilbert, M. Thomas P.
    et al.
    Kivisild, Toomas
    Gronnow, Bjarne
    Andersen, Pernille K.
    Metspalu, Ene
    Reidla, Maere
    Tamm, Erika
    Axelsson, Erik
    Götherström, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Campos, Paula F.
    Rasmussen, Morten
    Metspalu, Mait
    Higham, Thomas F. G.
    Schwenninger, Jean-Luc
    Nathan, Roger
    De Hoog, Cees-Jan
    Koch, Anders
    Möller, Lone Nukaaraq
    Andreasen, Claus
    Meldgaard, Morten
    Villems, Richard
    Bendixen, Christian
    Willerslev, Eske
    Paleo-Eskimo mtDNA genome reveals matrilineal discontinuity in Greenland2008In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 320, no 5884, p. 1787-1789Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Paleo- Eskimo Saqqaq and Independence I cultures, documented from archaeological remains in Northern Canada and Greenland, represent the earliest human expansion into the New World's northern extremes. However, their origin and genetic relationship to later cultures are unknown. We sequenced a mitochondrial genome from a Paleo- Eskimo human by using 3400- to 4500- year- old frozen hair excavated from an early Greenlandic Saqqaq settlement. The sample is distinct from modern Native Americans and Neo- Eskimos, falling within haplogroup D2a1, a group previously observed among modern Aleuts and Siberian Sireniki Yuit. This result suggests that the earliest migrants into the New World's northern extremes derived from populations in the Bering Sea area and were not directly related to Native Americans or the later Neo- Eskimos that replaced them.

  • 111. Gilbert, M. Thomas P.
    et al.
    Tomsho, Lynn P.
    Rendulic, Snjezana
    Packard, Michael
    Drautz, Daniela I.
    Sher, Andrei
    Tikhonov, Alexei
    Dalén, Love
    Kuznetsova, Tatyana
    Kosintsev, Pavel
    Campos, Paula F.
    Higham, Thomas
    Collins, Matthew J.
    Wilson, Andrew S.
    Shidlovskiy, Fyodor
    Buigues, Bernard
    Ericson, Per G. P.
    Germonpré, Mietje
    Götherström, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Iacumin, Paola
    Nikolaev, Vladimir
    Nowak-Kemp, Malgosia
    Willerslev, Eske
    Knight, James R.
    Irzyk, Gerard P.
    Perbost, Clotilde S.
    Fredrikson, Karin M.
    Harkins, Timothy T.
    Sheridan, Sharon
    Miller, Webb
    Schuster, Stephan C.
    Whole-genome shotgun sequencing of mitochondria from ancient hair shafts2007In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 317, no 5846, p. 1927-1930Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the application of sequencing-by-synthesis techniques to DNA extracted from bones has revolutionized the study of ancient DNA, it has been plagued by large fractions of contaminating environmental DNA. The genetic analyses of hair shafts could be a solution: We present 10 previously unexamined Siberian mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) mitochondrial genomes, sequenced with up to 48-fold coverage. The observed levels of damage-derived sequencing errors were lower than those observed in previously published frozen bone samples, even though one of the specimens was >50,000 14C years old and another had been stored for 200 years at room temperature. The method therefore sets the stage for molecular-genetic analysis of museum collections.

  • 112. Gilbert, T.
    et al.
    Jenkins, D.L.
    Götherström, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Naveran, N.
    Sanchez, J.J.
    Hofreiter, M.
    Thomsen, P.F.
    Binladen, J.
    Higham, F.G.
    Yohe, R.M.
    Parr, R.
    Scott Cummings, L.
    Willerslev, E.
    DNA from Pre-Clovis Human Coprolites in Oregon, North America2008In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 320, no 5877, p. 786-789Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The timing of the first human migration into the Americas and its relation to the appearance of the Clovis technological complex in North America at about 11,000 to 10,800 radiocarbon years before the present ( C-14 years B. P.) remains contentious. We establish that humans were present at Paisley 5 Mile Point Caves, in south- central Oregon, by 12,300 C-14 years B. P., through the recovery of human mitochondrial DNA ( mtDNA) from coprolites, directly dated by accelerator mass spectrometry. The mtDNA corresponds to Native American founding haplogroups A2 and B2. The dates of the coprolites are > 1000 C-14 years earlier than currently accepted dates for the Clovis complex.

  • 113. Guayasamin, Juan M.
    et al.
    Castroviejo-Fisher, Santiago
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Trueb, Linda
    Ayarzagüena, José
    Rada, Marco
    Vilà, Carles
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Phylogenetic systematics of Glassfrogs (Amphibia: Centrolenidae) and their sister taxon Allophryne ruthveni2009In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, no 2100, p. 1-97Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a molecular phylogeny, a new phylogenetic taxonomy that is compatible with both the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN) and the PhyloCode is proposed for Glassfrogs and their sister taxon, Allophryne ruthveni. The arrangement presented herein emphasizes the recognition of clades having (i) significant statistical support and congruence among phylogenetic estimation methods (i.e., parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian inference criteria), (ii) congruence among genetic markers, and (iii) morphological and/or behavioral distinctiveness. Also, when previously recognized groups are recovered as monophyletic or nearly monophyletic, we propose taxa that minimize the number of name changes required to make these groups monophyletic, preserving the names and contents of previous classifications (i.e., nomenclatural stability). The evolutionary proximity of Centrolenidae and Allophrynidae is recognized by combining these families into an unraked taxon, Allocentroleniae-a proposal that maintains the traditional names and species contents of Centrolenidae and Allophrynidae. We arrange centrolenid diversity in two subfamilies: Centroleninae and Hyalinobatrachinae. Within Centroleninae, the diagnosis and species content of the genera Centrolene, Cochranella, and Nymphargus are modified; Teratohyla is resurrected and modified, and Chimerella, Espadarana, Rulyrana, Sachatamia, and Vitreorana are proposed as new genera. The other subfamily, Hyalinobatrachinae, contains the new genus Celsiella and a modified Hyalinobatrachium that fully corresponds to the former fleischmanni Group. Additionally, the genus Ikakogi is described. Ikakogi could not be assigned with confidence to either subfamily and it is placed as incertae sedis in Centrolenidae. The data at hand suggest that Ikakogi tayrona is a lineage as old as the subfamilies Hyalinobatrachinae and Centroleninae. The revised taxonomy differs markedly from previous arrangements, which were based on phenetics and few morphological characters. Most of the genera defined herein are confined to distinct biogeographic regions, highlighting the importance of geography in the speciation of Glassfrogs. The principal limitation of this proposal is that it is based on an incomplete sampling of taxa (54% of the recognized Glassfrogs). Although diagnoses are based on phenotypic traits, there are several cases (16% of all species) in which the allocation of species is ambiguous because of morphological homoplasy and the lack of molecular data. Finally, in an attempt to facilitate species identification, comparison, and generic placement, we provide photographs for most (similar to 96%) of the recognized centrolenid species.

  • 114. Guayasamin, Juan M.
    et al.
    Cisneros-Heredia, Diego F.
    Castroviejo-Fisher, Santiago
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Taxonomic identity of Cochranella petersi Goin, 1961 and Centrolenella ametarsia Flores, 19872008In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, no 1815, p. 25-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We assess the taxonomic status of Hyalinobatrachium petersi and Cochranella ametarsia based on the examination oftype material and recently collected specimens. We conclude that the material assigned to them is morphologically undistinguishablefrom two previously described species (Cochranella pulverata and Cochranella oyampiensis, respectively) and, therefore, are junior synonyms.

  • 115.
    Gustafsson, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Nordling, Dag
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Andersson, Måns Sverker
    Sheldon, Ben C.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Qvarnström, Anna
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Infectious disease, reproductive effort and the cost of reproduction in birds1994In: Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London: Series B, no 346, p. 1655-1658Article in journal (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Reproductive effort can have profound effects on subsequent performance. Field experiments on the collared flycatcher (Ficedula albicollis) have demonstrated a number of trade-offs between life-history traits at different ages. The mechanism by which reproductive effort is mediated into future reproductive performance remains obscure. Anti-parasite adaptations such as cell-mediated immunity may probably also be costly. Hence the possibility exists of a trade-off between reproductive effort and the ability to resist parasitic infection. Serological tests on unmanipulated collared flycatchers show that pre-breeding nutritional status correlates positively with reproductive success and negatively with susceptibility to parasitism (viruses, bacteria and protozoan parasites). Both immune response and several indicators of infectious disease correlate negatively with reproductive success. Similar relations are found between secondary sexual characters and infection parameters. For brood-size-manipulated birds there was a significant interaction between experimentally increased reproductive effort and parasitic infection rate with regard to both current and future fecundity. It seems possible that the interaction between parasitic infection, nutrition and reproductive effort can be an important mechanism in the ultimate shaping of life-history variation in avian populations.

  • 116.
    Götherström, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Anderung, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Hellborg, Linda
    Elburg, Rengert
    Smith, Colin
    Bradley, Dan G
    Ellegren, Hans
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Cattle domestication in the Near East was followed by hybridization with aurochs bulls in Europe.2005In: Proc Biol Sci, ISSN 0962-8452, Vol. 272, no 1579, p. 2345-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Domesticated cattle were one of the cornerstones of European Neolithisation and are thought to have been introduced to Europe from areas of aurochs domestication in the Near East. This is consistent with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) data, where a clear separation exists between modern European cattle and ancient specimens of British aurochsen. However, we show that Y chromosome haplotypes of north European cattle breeds are more similar to haplotypes from ancient specimens of European aurochsen, than to contemporary cattle breeds from southern Europe and the Near East. There is a sharp north-south gradient across Europe among modern cattle breeds in the frequencies of two distinct Y chromosome haplotypes; the northern haplotype is found in 20 out of 21 European aurochsen or early domestic cattle dated 9500-1000 BC. This indicates that local hybridization with male aurochsen has left a paternal imprint on the genetic composition of modern central and north European breeds. Surreptitious mating between aurochs bulls and domestic cows may have been hard to avoid, or may have occurred intentionally to improve the breeding stock. Rather than originating from a few geographical areas only, as indicated by mtDNA, our data suggest that the origin of domestic cattle may be far more complex than previously thought.

  • 117.
    Hailer, F
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Gautschi, B
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Helander, B
    Development and multiplex PCR amplification of nove microsatellite markers in the white-tailed sea eagle, Haliaeetus albicilla (Aves: Falconiformes, Accipitridae)2005In: Molecular Ecology Notes, no 5, p. 938-940Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 118.
    Hailer, Frank
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Helander, B.
    Folkestad, A. O.
    Ganusevich, S. A.
    Garstad, S.
    Hauff, P.
    Koren, C.
    Masterov, V. B.
    Nygård, T.
    Rudnick, J. A.
    Saiko, S.
    Skarphedinsson, K.
    Volke, V.
    Wille, F.
    Vilà, Carles
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Phylogeography of the white-tailed eagle, a generalist with large dispersal capacity2007In: Journal of Biogeography, ISSN 0305-0270, E-ISSN 1365-2699, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 1193-1206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim Late Pleistocene glacial changes had a major impact on many boreal and temperate taxa, and this impact can still be detected in the present-day phylogeographic structure of these taxa. However, only minor effects are expected in species with generalist habitat requirements and high dispersal capability. One such species is the white-tailed eagle, Haliaeetus albicilla, and we therefore tested for the expected weak population structure at a continental level in this species. This also allowed us to describe phylogeographic patterns, and to deduce Ice Age refugia and patterns of postglacial recolonization of Eurasia.

    Location Breeding populations from the easternmost Nearctic (Greenland) and across the Palaearctic (Iceland, continental Europe, central and eastern Asia, and Japan).

    Methods Sequencing of a 500 base-pair fragment of the mitochondrial DNA control region in 237 samples from throughout the distribution range.

    Results Our analysis revealed pronounced phylogeographic structure. Overall, low genetic variability was observed across the entire range. Haplotypes clustered in two distinct haplogroups with a predominantly eastern or western distribution, and extensive overlap in Europe. These two major lineages diverged during the late Pleistocene. The eastern haplogroup showed a pattern of rapid population expansion and colonization of Eurasia around the end of the Pleistocene. The western haplogroup had lower diversity and was absent from the populations in eastern Asia. These results suggest survival during the last glaciation in two refugia, probably located in central and western Eurasia, followed by postglacial population expansion and admixture. Relatively high genetic diversity was observed in northern regions that were ice-covered during the last glacial maximum. This, and phylogenetic relationships between haplotypes encountered in the north, indicates substantial population expansion at high latitudes. Areas of glacial meltwater runoff and proglacial lakes could have provided suitable habitats for such population growth.

    Main conclusions This study shows that glacial climate fluctuations had a substantial impact on white-tailed eagles, both in terms of distribution and demography. These results suggest that even species with large dispersal capabilities and relatively broad habitat requirements were strongly affected by the Pleistocene climatic shifts.

  • 119.
    Hailer, Frank
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Helander, B.
    Folkestad, A. O.
    Ganusevich, S. A.
    Garstad, S.
    Hauff, P.
    Koren, C.
    Nygård, T.
    Volke, V.
    Vilà, Carles
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Ellegren, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Bottlenecked but long-lived: high genetic diversity retained in white-tailed eagles upon recovery from population decline2006In: Biology Letters, ISSN 1744-9561, E-ISSN 1744-957X, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 316-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most of the white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla) populations in Europe experienced dramatic declines during the twentieth century. However, owing to intense conservation actions and the ban of DDT and other persistent pollutants, populations are currently recovering. We show that despite passing through demographic bottlenecks, white-tailed eagle populations have retained significant levels of genetic diversity. Both genetic and ringing data indicate that migration between populations has not been a major factor for the maintenance of genetic variability. We argue that the long generation time of eagles has acted as an intrinsic buffer against loss of genetic diversity, leading to a shorter effective time of the experienced bottleneck. Notably, conservation actions taken in several small sub-populations have ensured the preservation of a larger proportion of the total genetic diversity than if conservation had focused on the population stronghold in Norway. For conservation programmes targeting other endangered, long-lived species, our results highlight the possibility for local retention of high genetic diversity in isolated remnant populations.

  • 120.
    Hailer, Frank
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Leonard, Jennifer A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Hybridization among Three Native North American Canis Species in a Region of Natural Sympatry2008In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 3, no 10, p. e3333-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Population densities of many species throughout the world are changing due to direct persecution as well as anthropogenic habitat modification. These changes may induce or increase the frequency of hybridization among taxa. If extensive, hybridization can threaten the genetic integrity or survival of endangered species. Three native species of the genus Canis, coyote (C. latrans), Mexican wolf (C. lupus baileyi) and red wolf (C. rufus), were historically sympatric in Texas, United States. Human impacts caused the latter two to go extinct in the wild, although they survived in captive breeding programs. Morphological data demonstrate historic reproductive isolation between all three taxa. While the red wolf population was impacted by introgressive hybridization with coyotes as it went extinct in the wild, the impact of hybridization on the Texas populations of the other species is not clear.

    Methodology/Principal Findings: We surveyed variation at maternally and paternally inherited genetic markers (mitochondrial control region sequence and Y chromosome microsatellites) in coyotes from Texas, Mexican wolves and red wolves from the captive breeding programs, and a reference population of coyotes from outside the historic red wolf range. Levels of variation and phylogenetic analyses suggest that hybridization has occasionally taken place between all three species, but that the impact on the coyote population is very small.

    Conclusion/Significance: Our results demonstrate that the factors driving introgressive hybridization in sympatric Texan Canis are multiple and complex. Hybridization is not solely determined by body size or sex, and density-dependent effects do not fully explain the observed pattern either. No evidence of hybridization was identified in the Mexican wolf captive breeding program, but introgression appears to have had a greater impact on the captive red wolves.

  • 121.
    Hans, Ellegren
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Molecular evolutionary genomics of birds2007In: Cytogenetic and Genome Research, ISSN 1424-8581, E-ISSN 1424-859X, Vol. 117, no 1-4, p. 120-130Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Insight into the molecular evolution of birds has been offered by the steady accumulation of avian DNA sequence data, recently culminating in the first draft sequence of an avian genome, that of chicken. By studying avian molecular evolution we can learn about adaptations and phenotypic evolution in birds, and also gain an understanding of the similarities and differences between mammalian and avian genomes. In both these lineages, there is pronounced isochore structure with highly variable GC content. However, while mammalian isochores are decaying, they are maintained in the chicken lineage, which is consistent with a biased gene conversion model where the high and variable recombination rate of birds reinforces heterogeneity in GC. In Galliformes, GC is positively correlated with the rate of nucleotide substitution; the mean neutral mutation rate is 0.12-0.15% at each site per million years but this estimate comes with significant local variation in the rate of mutation. Comparative genomics reveals lower dN/dS ratios on micro- compared to macrochromosomes, possibly due to population genetic effects or a non-random distribution of genes with respect to chromosome size. A non-random genomic distribution is shown by genes with sex-biased expression, with male-biased genes over-represented and female-biased genes under-represented on the Z chromosome. A strong effect of selection is evident on the non-recombining W chromosome with high dN/dS ratios and limited polymorphism. Nucleotide diversity in chicken is estimated at 4-5 × 10-3 which might be seen as surprisingly high given presumed bottlenecks during domestication, but is lower than that recently observed in several natural populations of other species. Several important aspects of the molecular evolutionary process of birds remain to be understood and it can be anticipated that the upcoming genome sequence of a second bird species, the zebra finch, as well as the integration of data on gene expression, shall further advance our knowledge of avian evolution.

  • 122. Hansson, B
    et al.
    Ljungqvist, M
    Dawson, A
    Mueller, C
    Olano-Marin, J
    Ellegren, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Nilsson, J.-A.
    Avian genome evolution: insights from a linkage map of the blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus)2010In: Heredity, ISSN 0018-067X, E-ISSN 1365-2540, Vol. 104, no 1, p. 67-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We provide a first-generation linkage map of the blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus), a passerine within the previously genetically uncharacterized family Paridae, which includes 91 orthologous loci with a single anchored position in the chicken (Gallus gallus) sequence assembly. The map consists of 18 linkage groups and covers 935 cM. There was highly conserved synteny between blue tit and chicken with the exception of a split on chromosome 1, potential splits on chromosome 4 and the translocation of two markers from chromosome 2 and 3, respectively, to chromosome 5. Gene order was very well conserved for the majority of chromosomes, an exception being chromosome 1 where multiple rearrangements were detected. Similar results were obtained in a comparison to the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) genome assembly. The recombination rate in females was slightly higher than in males, implying a moderate degree of heterochiasmy in the blue tit. The map distance of the blue tit was similar to 78% of that of the Wageningen chicken broiler population, and very similar to the Uppsala chicken mapping population, over homologous genome regions. Apart from providing insights into avian recombination and genome evolution, our blue tit linkage map forms a valuable genetic resource for ecological and evolutionary research in Paridae. Heredity (2010) 104, 67-78; doi:10.1038/hdy.2009.107; published online 26 August 2009

  • 123.
    Hedmark, E.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Flagstad, Ö.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Segerström, P.
    Persson, J.
    Landa, A.
    Ellegren, H.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    DNA-based individual and sex identification from wolverine (Gulo gulo) faeces and urine.2004In: Conservation Genetics, no 5, p. 405-410Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 124.
    Hedmark, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Ellegren, Hans
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    A test of the miltiplex pre-amplification approach in microsatellite genotyping of wolverine faecal DNA2006In: Conservation Genetics, no 7, p. 289-293Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 125.
    Hedmark, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Ellegren, Hans
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Microsatellite genotyping of DNA isolated from claws left on tanned carnivore hides.2005In: Int J Legal Med, ISSN 0937-9827, Vol. 119, no 6, p. 370-3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tanned hides, a common form of preservation of mammalian specimens, are usually resistant to DNA analysis. However, we show that DNA isolated from the pulp of claws of tanned hides amplifies well for microsatellite markers. For eight wolverine and eight lynx hides tanned 5-20 years ago, 93-98% of replicate amplifications gave distinct PCR products. Genotypes obtained in analysis of tissue samples of the same individuals were in all cases in agreement with those obtained by analysis of claws. We thus conclude that the use of claws from tanned hides offers new possibilities to genetic studies of preserved mammalian specimens, for instance, in the monitoring of illegal trade.

  • 126.
    Hedmark, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Persson, Jens
    Segerström, Peter
    Landa, Arild
    Ellegren, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Paternity and mating system in wolverines Gulo gulo2007In: Wildlife Biology, ISSN 0909-6396, E-ISSN 1903-220X, Vol. 13, no Suppl.2, p. 13-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge of the wolverine Gulo gulo mating system is limited. In this study, we use 20 microsatellite loci for paternity testing in 145 wolverine offspring with known mothers. Samples were collected during > 10 years in two Scandinavian populations, mainly in connection with radio-telemetry studies and as part of long-term population monitoring. In total, 51% of the offspring were assigned a father. Our results demonstrate that the wolverine exhibits a polygamous mating system as some males were shown to produce offspring with more than one female in a single year. Females often reproduced with the same male in subsequent breeding years, but sometimes changed their partner, potentially as a consequence of a change in the territory-holding male in the area. In the majority of litters, siblings were unambiguously assigned the same father, indicating that multiple paternity is rare. Of 23 breeding pairs, for which telemetry data were available, 20 had overlapping home ranges, suggesting that pair formation generally is consistent with the territories held by wolverine males and females.

  • 127. Helander, Björn
    et al.
    Hailer, Frank
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Vilà, Carles
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Morphological and genetic sex identification of white-tailed eagle Haliaeetus albicilla nestlings2007In: Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, ISSN 0021-8375, E-ISSN 1439-0361, Vol. 148, no 4, p. 435-442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying the sex of bird nestlings is relevant to studies of behaviour and ecology and is often a central issue in the management of endangered or captive populations. The white-tailed eagle Haliaeetus albicilla is a formerly threatened Eurasian raptor which is closely monitored in many countries due to its high exposure to environmental pollutants in the food chain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of sex identification methods for white-tailed eagle nestlings based on morphological measurements that can be recorded at the nest by a single person and with minimum disturbance. The sex of each bird was independently determined using molecular (genetic) methods. One measure of tarsus width allowed the correct identification of sex for 96% of the nestlings from southern and central Sweden. However, we found that the criteria for sex identification were not directly applicable to the population in Swedish Lapland, where nestlings are typically thinner, probably due to a limited food supply. These results show that sexing in the field of white-tailed eagle nestlings can be feasible with high accuracy based on a limited number of measurements. However, the criteria employed to separate sexes may have to be adjusted for each population.

  • 128.
    Hellborg, L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Ellegren, H.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Low levels of nucleotide diversity in mammalian Y chromosomes.2004In: Molecular Biology and Evolution, no 21, p. 158-163Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 129.
    Hellborg, Linda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Gündüz, Islam
    Jaarola, Maarit
    Analysis of sex-linked sequences supports a new mammal species in Europe.2005In: Mol Ecol, ISSN 0962-1083, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 2025-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    European mammals have been the focus of particularly detailed taxonomic studies by traditional morphological methods. However, DNA analyses have the potential to reveal additional, cryptic species. We describe two highly divergent evolutionary lineages within a small Eurasian mammal, the field vole (Microtus agrestis). We show that the two lineages can be detected not only with maternally (mitochondrial DNA), but also with paternally (Y chromosome) and biparentally (X chromosome) inherited DNA sequences. Reciprocal monophyly of all genealogies and their congruent geographical distributions is consistent with reproductive isolation. Our results suggest that the field vole should be reclassified as two separate species.

  • 130. Hillier, Ladeana W
    et al.
    Miller, Webb
    Birney, Ewan
    Warren, Wesley
    Hardison, Ross C
    Ponting, Chris P
    Bork, Peer
    Burt, David W
    Groenen, Martien A M
    Delany, Mary E
    Dodgson, Jerry B
    Chinwalla, Asif T
    Cliften, Paul F
    Clifton, Sandra W
    Delehaunty, Kimberly D
    Fronick, Catrina
    Fulton, Robert S
    Graves, Tina A
    Kremitzki, Colin
    Layman, Dan
    Magrini, Vincent
    McPherson, John D
    Miner, Tracie L
    Minx, Patrick
    Nash, William E
    Nhan, Michael N
    Nelson, Joanne O
    Oddy, Lachlan G
    Pohl, Craig S
    Randall-Maher, Jennifer
    Smith, Scott M
    Wallis, John W
    Yang, Shiaw-Pyng
    Romanov, Michael N
    Rondelli, Catherine M
    Paton, Bob
    Smith, Jacqueline
    Morrice, David
    Daniels, Laura
    Tempest, Helen G
    Robertson, Lindsay
    Masabanda, Julio S
    Griffin, Darren K
    Vignal, Alain
    Fillon, Valerie
    Jacobbson, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Kerje, Susanne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Crooijmans, Richard P M
    Aerts, Jan
    van der Poel, Jan J
    Ellegren, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Caldwell, Randolph B
    Hubbard, Simon J
    Grafham, Darren V
    Kierzek, Andrzej M
    McLaren, Stuart R
    Overton, Ian M
    Arakawa, Hiroshi
    Beattie, Kevin J
    Bezzubov, Yuri
    Boardman, Paul E
    Bonfield, James K
    Croning, Michael D R
    Davies, Robert M
    Francis, Matthew D
    Humphray, Sean J
    Scott, Carol E
    Taylor, Ruth G
    Tickle, Cheryll
    Brown, William R A
    Rogers, Jane
    Buerstedde, Jean-Marie
    Wilson, Stuart A
    Stubbs, Lisa
    Ovcharenko, Ivan
    Gordon, Laurie
    Lucas, Susan
    Miller, Marcia M
    Inoko, Hidetoshi
    Shiina, Takashi
    Kaufman, Jim
    Salomonsen, Jan
    Skjoedt, Karsten
    Wong, Gane Ka-Shu
    Wang, Jun
    Liu, Bin
    Wang, Jian
    Yu, Jun
    Yang, Huanming
    Nefedov, Mikhail
    Koriabine, Maxim
    Dejong, Pieter J
    Goodstadt, Leo
    Webber, Caleb
    Dickens, Nicholas J
    Letunic, Ivica
    Suyama, Mikita
    Torrents, David
    von Mering, Christian
    Zdobnov, Evgeny M
    Makova, Kateryna
    Nekrutenko, Anton
    Elnitski, Laura
    Eswara, Pallavi
    King, David C
    Yang, Shan
    Tyekucheva, Svitlana
    Radakrishnan, Anusha
    Harris, Robert S
    Chiaromonte, Francesca
    Taylor, James
    He, Jianbin
    Rijnkels, Monique
    Griffiths-Jones, Sam
    Ureta-Vidal, Abel
    Hoffman, Michael M
    Severin, Jessica
    Searle, Stephen M J
    Law, Andy S
    Speed, David
    Waddington, Dave
    Cheng, Ze
    Tuzun, Eray
    Eichler, Evan
    Bao, Zhirong
    Flicek, Paul
    Shteynberg, David D
    Brent, Michael R
    Bye, Jacqueline M
    Huckle, Elizabeth J
    Chatterji, Sourav
    Dewey, Colin
    Pachter, Lior
    Kouranov, Andrei
    Mourelatos, Zissimos
    Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G
    Paterson, Andrew H
    Ivarie, Robert
    Brandström, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Axelsson, Erik
    Backström, Niclas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Berlin, Sofia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Webster, Matthew T
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Pourquie, Olivier
    Reymond, Alexandre
    Ucla, Catherine
    Antonarakis, Stylianos E
    Long, Manyuan
    Emerson, J J
    Betrán, Esther
    Dupanloup, Isabelle
    Kaessmann, Henrik
    Hinrichs, Angie S
    Bejerano, Gill
    Furey, Terrence S
    Harte, Rachel A
    Raney, Brian
    Siepel, Adam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Kent, W James
    Haussler, David
    Eyras, Eduardo
    Castelo, Robert
    Abril, Josep F
    Castellano, Sergi
    Camara, Francisco
    Parra, Genis
    Guigo, Roderic
    Bourque, Guillaume
    Tesler, Glenn
    Pevzner, Pavel A
    Smit, Arian
    Fulton, Lucinda A
    Mardis, Elaine R
    Wilson, Richard K
    Sequence and comparative analysis of the chicken genome provide unique perspectives on vertebrate evolution2004In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 432, no 7018, p. 695-716Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present here a draft genome sequence of the red jungle fowl, Gallus gallus. Because the chicken is a modern descendant of the dinosaurs and the first non-mammalian amniote to have its genome sequenced, the draft sequence of its genome--composed of approximately one billion base pairs of sequence and an estimated 20,000-23,000 genes--provides a new perspective on vertebrate genome evolution, while also improving the annotation of mammalian genomes. For example, the evolutionary distance between chicken and human provides high specificity in detecting functional elements, both non-coding and coding. Notably, many conserved non-coding sequences are far from genes and cannot be assigned to defined functional classes. In coding regions the evolutionary dynamics of protein domains and orthologous groups illustrate processes that distinguish the lineages leading to birds and mammals. The distinctive properties of avian microchromosomes, together with the inferred patterns of conserved synteny, provide additional insights into vertebrate chromosome architecture.

  • 131.
    Holmlund, G.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Nilsson, H.
    Engdahl, L.
    Götherström, A.
    Lindblom, B.
    No obvious geographical Y-chromosome gradient in the Swedish poulation.2004In: Progress in Forensic Genetics 10., 2004, p. 357-359Conference paper (Other scientific)
  • 132. Itan, Yuval
    et al.
    Bryson, Kevin
    Thomas, Mark G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Detecting Gene Duplications in the Human Lineage2010In: Annals of Human Genetics, ISSN 0003-4800, E-ISSN 1469-1809, Vol. 74, no 6, p. 555-565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gene duplications represent an important class of evolutionary events that is likely to have contributed to the unique human phenotype in the short evolutionary time since the human-chimpanzee divergence. With the availability of both human and chimpanzee genome drafts in high coverage re-sequencing assemblies and the high annotation quality of most human genes, it should now be possible to identify all human lineage-specific gene duplication events (human inparalogues) and a few pioneering studies have attempted to do that. However, the different levels of coverage in the human and chimpanzee's genomes assemblies, and the differing levels of gene annotation, have led to problematic assumptions and oversimplifications in the algorithms and the datasets used to detect human lineage-specific gene duplications. In this study, we have developed a set of bioinformatic tools to overcome a number of the conceptual problems that are prevalent in previous studies and have collected a reliable and representative set of human inparalogues.

  • 133.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    COMPASS: a program for generating serial samples under an infinite sites model2009In: Bioinformatics, ISSN 1367-4803, E-ISSN 1367-4811, Vol. 25, no 21, p. 2845-2847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The program COMPASS can generate samples that have been collected at various points in time from a population that is evolving according to a Wright-Fisher model. The samples are generated using coalescence simulations permitting various demographic scenarios and the program uses an infinite sites model to generate polymorphism data for the samples. By generating serially sampled population-genetic data, COMPASS allows investigating properties of polymorphism data that has been collected at different time points, and aid in making inference from ancient polymorphism data.

  • 134.
    James, Timothy Y.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Johansson, Stina B. K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Johannesson, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Trikaryon formation and nuclear selection in pairings between heterokaryons and homokaryons of the root rot pathogen Heterobasidion parviporum2009In: Mycological Research, ISSN 0953-7562, E-ISSN 1469-8102, Vol. 113, no 5, p. 583-590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pairings between heterokaryons and homokaryons of Agaricomycete fungi (he-ho pairings) can lead to either heterokaryotization of the homokaryon or displacement of the homokaryotic nucleus through migration of nuclei from the heterokaryon into the homokaryon. in species of Agaricomycetes with multinucleate cells (> 2 nuclei per cell), he-ho pairings could result in the stable or transient formation of a hypha with three genetically different nuclei (trikaryons). in this study, he-ho pairings were conducted using the multinucleate Agaricomycete Heterobasidion parviporum to determine whether trikaryons can be formed in the laboratory and whether nuclear genotype affects migration and heterokaryon formation. Nuclei were tracked by genotyping the heterokaryotic mycelium using nucleus-specific microsatellite markers. The data indicated that certain nuclear combinations were favored, and that nuclei from some strains had a higher rate of migration. A high percentage of trikaryons (19 %) displaying three microsatellite alleles per locus were identified among subcultures of the he-ho pairings. Using hyphal tip and conidial isolation, we verified that nuclei of three different mating types can inhabit the same mycelium, and one of the trikaryotic strains was judged to be semi-stable over multiple sub-culturing steps, with some hyphal tips that retained three alleles and others that reduced to two alleles per locus. These results demonstrate that nuclear competition and selection are possible outcomes of heterokaryon-homokaryon interactions in H. parviporum and confirm that ratios of component nuclei in heterokaryons are not strictly 1:1. The high rate of trikaryon formation in this study suggests that fungi with multinucleate cells may have the potential for greater genetic diversity and recombination relative to dikaryotic fungi.

  • 135.
    James, Timothy Y.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Olson, Åke
    Stenlid, Jan
    Johannesson, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Evolutionary significance of imbalanced nuclear ratios within heterokaryons of the basidiomycete fungus Heterobasidion parviporum2008In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 62, no 9, p. 2279-2296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many fungi have heterokaryotic life stages in which genetically different nuclei inhabit the same cell. In basidiomycetes, the heterokaryon is the product of mating and represents a genomic union very similar to a diploid thallus, yet the maintenance of unfused nuclei suggests a more complex association of the two genomes relative to diploidy. In species with variable numbers of nuclei per heterokaryotic cell, nuclear ratios within a mycelium may possibly become imbalanced (differ from 1:1) due to nuclear competition. In this study, heterokaryons of the basidiomycete Heterobasidion parviporum were examined to determine the effects of genotype and environment on nuclear ratios within vegetative mycelia. The data reveal that nuclear ratios are frequently imbalanced, generally stable over time, and genetically determined. The nuclear ratios were affected by environment, but the observed nuclear ratios did not follow the expectations of strong selection acting on a population of nuclei. Instead, these ratios were largely driven by genetic effects and epigenetic effects. Finally, the data suggest that nuclear ratio imbalance also affects both gene transcription and growth rate, implying that heterokaryotic basidiomycetes are not functionally equivalent to diploid individuals and have a higher potential for genotypic and phenotypic variation.

  • 136. Jensen, H
    et al.
    Sæther, B-E
    Ringsby, T H
    Tufto, J
    Griffith, S C
    Ellegren, H
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Lifetime reproductive success in relation to morphology in house sparrow (Passer domesticus)2004In: Journal of Animal Ecology, no 73, p. 599-611Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 137.
    Johannesson, Hanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Townsend, Jeffrey P.
    Hung, Chiung-Yu
    Cole, Garry T.
    Taylor, John W
    Concerted evolution in the rpeats of an immunomodulating cell surface protein, SOWgp, of the human pathogenic fungi Coccidioides immitis and C. posadasii.2005In: GeneticsArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genome dynamics that allow pathogens to escape host immune responses are fundamental to our understanding of host-pathogen interactions. Here we present the first population-based study of the process of concerted evolution in the repetitive domain of a protein-coding gene. This gene, SOWgp, encodes the immunodominant protein in the parasitic phase of the human pathogenic fungi Coccidioides immitis and C. posadasii. We sequenced the entire gene from strains representing the geographic ranges of the two Coccidioides species. By using phylogenetic and genetic distance analyses we discovered that the repetitive part of SOWgp evolves by concerted evolution, predominantly by the mechanism of unequal crossing over. We implemented a mathematical model originally developed for multigene families to estimate the rate of homogenization and recombination of the repetitive array, and the results indicate that the pattern of concerted evolution is a result of homogenization of repeat units proceeding at a rate close to the nucleotide point mutation rate. The release of the SOWgp molecules by the pathogen during proliferation may mislead the host: we speculate that the pathogen benefits from concerted evolution of repeated domains in SOWgp by an enhanced ability to misdirect the host’s immune system.

  • 138.
    Johannesson, Henrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Kasuga, T
    Schaller, R A
    Good, B
    Gardner, M J
    Townsend, J P
    Cole, G T
    Taylor, J W
    Phase-specific gene expression underlying morphological adaptations of the dimorphic human pathogenic fungus, Coccidioides posadasii2006In: Fungal Genetics and Biology, ISSN 1087-1845, E-ISSN 1096-0937, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 545-559Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coccidioides posadasii is a dimorphic fungal pathogen that grows as a Wlamentous saprobe in the soil and as endosporulating spheruleswithin the host. To identify genes speciWc to the pathogenic phase of Co. posadasii, we carried out a large-scale study of gene expression intwo isolates of the species. From the sequenced Co. posadasii genome, we chose 1000 open reading frames to construct a 70-mer microarray.RNA was recovered from both isolates at three life-cycle phases: hyphae, presegmented spherules, and spherules releasing endospores.Comparative hybridizations were conducted in a circuit design, permitting comparison between both isolates at all three life-cyclephases, and among all life-cycle phases for each isolate. By using this approach, we identiWed 92 genes that were diVerentially expressedbetween pathogenic and saprobic phases in both fungal isolates, and 43 genes with consistent diVerential expression between the two parasiticdevelopmental phases. Genes with elevated expression in the pathogenic phases of both isolates included a number of genes thatwere involved in the response to environmental stress as well as in the metabolism of lipids. The latter observation is in agreement withprevious studies demonstrating that spherules contain a higher proportion of lipids than saprobic phase tissue. Intriguingly, we discoveredstatistically signiWcant and divergent levels of gene expression between the two isolates proWled for 64 genes. The results suggest thatincorporating more than one isolate in the experimental design oVers a means of categorizing the large collection of candidate genes thattranscriptional proWling typically identiWes into those that are strain-speciWc and those that characterize the entire species.

  • 139.
    Kaiser, Vera B.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Ellegren, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Nonrandom distribution of genes with sex-biased expression in the chicken genome2006In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 60, no 9, p. 1945-1951Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evolutionary theory predicts that sexually antagonistic genes should show a nonrandom genomic distribution with sex chromosomes usually being enriched for such genes. However, empirical observations from model organisms (Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, mammals) on the genomic location of genes with sex-biased expression have provided conflicting data and are not easily explained by a unified framework based on standard models of the evolution of sexually antagonistic genes. Previous studies have been confined to organisms with male heterogamety, meaning that effects related to homo- or heterozygosity of sex chromosomes cannot be separated from effects related to sex-specific characteristics. We therefore studied the genomic distribution of genes with sex-biased expression in the chicken, that is, in an organism with female heterogamety (males ZZ, females ZW). From the abundance of transcripts in expressed sequence tag libraries, we found an underrepresentation of female-specific genes (germ line and somatic tissue) and an overrepresentation of male-specific genes (somatic) on the Z chromosome. This is consistent with theoretical predictions only if mutations beneficial to one sex generally tend to be at least partly dominant (h > 0.5). We also note that sexual selection for a male-biased trait is facilitated by Z-linkage, because sons in organisms with female heterogamety will always inherit a Z chromosome from their fathers.

  • 140. Karlsson, A
    et al.
    Götherström, A
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Wallerström, T
    Holmlund, G
    Y-chromosome variation in Swedish, Saami and Österbotten male lineages.2005In: Progress in Forensic Genetics, Vol. 11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 141. Karlsson, Andreas O
    et al.
    Wallerström, Thomas
    Götherström, Anders
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. Evolutionsbiologi.
    Holmlund, Gunilla
    Y-chromosome diversity in Sweden - a long-time perspective.2006In: Eur J Hum Genet, ISSN 1018-4813, Vol. 14, no 8, p. 963-70Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 142.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Nygren, Kristiina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Johannesson, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    The evolution of the pheromonal signal system and its potential role for reproductive isolation in heterothallic neurospora2008In: Molecular biology and evolution, ISSN 0737-4038, E-ISSN 1537-1719, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 168-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Comparative sequencing studies among a wide range of taxonomic groups, including fungi, provide the overall pattern that reproductive genes evolve more rapidly than other genes, and this divergence is believed to be important in the establishment of reproductive barriers between species. In this study, we investigated the molecular evolution of the pheromone receptor genes pre-1 and pre-2 of strains belonging to 12 and 13 heterothallic taxa, respectively, of the model genus Neurospora. Furthermore, we examined the regulatory pattern of both pheromone precursor and receptor genes during sexual crosses of Neurospora crassa and Neurospora intermedia, for which reinforcement of interspecific reproductive barriers in sympatry previously has been documented. We conclude that the part encoding the C-terminal intracellular domain of pre-1 and pre-2 genes evolves rapidly. Both stochastic and directional processes drive this divergence; both genes contain neutrally evolving codons, and in addition, pre-1 contains codons evolving under positive selection, whereas in pre-2 we found highly variable regions with numerous repeats encoding glycine, threonine, or aspartic acid. In addition, we found regulatory changes of the pheromone and receptor genes during crosses between N. crassa and N. intermedia with different reproductive success. Gene expression levels are higher in the interspecific sympatric crosses with low reproductive success than in their intraspecific and/or allopatric equivalents, both at the stage of initial communication and contact and later at postfertilization stages. Taken together, our data indicate that pheromones and receptors are important key players during reproductive isolation between Neurospora species, and this study provides a general framework for future studies on the role of reproductive proteins for reproductive isolation.

  • 143.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology. evolutionsbiologi.
    Stenlid, J
    Olsson, Å
    Identification of a superoxide dismutase gene from the conifer pathogen Heterobasidion annosum.2006In: Physiological and Molecular Plant PathologyArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 144.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Stenlid, Jan
    Olson, Åke
    Two hydrophobin genes from the conifer pathogen Heterobasidion annosum are expressed in aerial hyphae.2007In: Mycologia, ISSN 0027-5514, E-ISSN 1557-2536, Vol. 99, no 2, p. 227-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two hydrophobin genes (HAH1 and HAH2) have been identified in a Heterobasidion annosum infection-stage cDNA-library. Comparisons of their nucleotide and amino acid sequences show similarity to the coh1 hydrophobin from Coprinopsis cinerea and the sc3 hydrophobin from Schizophyllum commune. Both HAH1 and HAH2 display the amino acid consensus pattern of class I hydrophobins, including the spacing of eight conserved cysteine residues. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR showed high expression of both genes in aerial hyphae but low expression in submerged hyphae and during in vitro infection of pine seedlings. Segregation analysis of HAH1 and HAH2 in a defined cross of Heterobasidion annosum localised HAH1 to linkage group 3 but did not positioned HAH2 in the genetic linkage map. Sequence characteristics and expression patterns of HAH1 and HAH2 suggest a role in aerial growth of mycelia, but not during pathogenesis.

  • 145. Kok, Philippe J. R.
    et al.
    Castroviejo-Fisher, Santiago
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Glassfrogs (Anura: Centrolenidae) of Kaieteur National Park, Guyana, with notes on the distribution and taxonomy of some species of the family in the Guiana Shield2008In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, no 1680, p. 25-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]