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  • 101.
    Pettersson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    Swedish public authorities’ official use of religion.2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Church and state formally separated in Sweden 1st January 2000. However, their relationships are complex and ambiguous, illustrated by the presence of the Church of Sweden and its involvement in activities within several public institutions, and public authorities’ official use of religion in certain contexts. State institutions are officially religiously neutral, although in praxis many have special links and organized cooperation with the former state church. The aim of this paper is to scrutinize Swedish public authorities’ official use of religion in a selection of contexts at national level; at the yearly opening of parliament, at official celebrations or commemorations, existence of religious rhetoric in official speeches by the prime minister and the king, presence of public authorities’ representatives in religious rituals and ceremonies. The study focuses these contexts in three selected years 1988, 1998, 2008, in order to analyse possible change over time.  

  • 102.
    Pettersson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    The Deregulation of Swedish Welfare and Religion – new challenges for the Lutheran majority church2015In: The Legitimacy of the Welfare State. Religion-Gender-Neoliberalism / [ed] Gerhard Wegner, Leipzig: Evangelische Verlagsanstalt - Wissenschaft, 2015, p. 152-169Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 103.
    Pettersson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    The impact of contractual relationships to the identity and values of religious organizations.: A pilot study in Sweden.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Part of the growing impact of new liberal economic market rationality is an increasing demand of religious organizations to establish partnerships or contracts with the state. Deregulation and liberalization of (public) welfare services in Sweden has since the 1990s resulted in greater attention to civil society as a resource in welfare provision. While the previous state-based welfare model advocated financial solidarity and equal rights to welfare services, the new marked-based model is based on the idea of the individual's right to freedom of choice and accepts different individual financial capacities. From being advocates for a comprehensive welfare system equal for all, religious organizations are presently invited and enrolled as contracted parts of a system accepting inequality in welfare provision related to the financial capacity of the individual. Indications from previous research show that tensions between their identity and the implicit values of contractual relationships may lead to enforced limitation of the specific profile and qualities of religious organizations which at an initial stage was an important part of the distinctive value of their contribution as social agents, as perceived by both parties. A reduction of the religious organizations profile may be caused by e.g. a demand for professionalization of the contracted services, a demand for toning down the religious profile or a demand for accepting values in conflict with its core values. This paper discusses the short term and long term consequences for religious organizations identity and freedom by entering into partnership or contract with public authorities. One specific question is if these relationships are new forms of state-religion regulation? The paper build on results from the research project Welfare and Religion in a European Perspective (WREP) and a recent pilot study in Sweden analysing formal contracts and written agreements of partnership between religious organizations and public authorities.

     

  • 104.
    Pettersson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    The inconsistent religious logics of belonging, behaving and believing – on the interplay between collectivistic and individualistic religion.2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Majority religion is characterised by life-long belonging and relationship to historical tradition linked to cultural and often ethnical identity. The majority of people in Europe and many other parts of the world have this kind of collectivistic religious belonging, significantly expressed by common rites of passage, especially at the beginning and end of life. But the majority of people within the majority do not behave according to the official code of their religion. For example, they do not attend central collective religious activities on a regular basis; Sunday worship in Churches or Friday prayer in Mosques. And they feel free to have their own individual beliefs. In a qualitative pilot study in Sweden, two different sets of value logics emerged with respect to life-long belonging on the one hand and occasional religious experiences on the other. Church belonging and participation in the rites of passage were motivated by long term collective values, while participation in worship and other one-off activities reflected rather more short term and individual values. This paper considers these differences from a theoretical perspective in order to understand increasing levels of religious choice alongside life-long belonging, thereby presenting a theoretical contribution to the understanding of the interplay between collectivistic and individualistic religion.

  • 105.
    Pettersson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    The inconsistent religious logics of belonging, behaving and believing, on the interplay between collectivistic and individualistic religion.2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Majority religion is characterised by life-long belonging and relationship to historical tradition linked to cultural and often ethnical identity. The majority of people in Europe and many other parts of the world have this kind of collectivistic religious belonging, significantly expressed by common rites of passage, especially at the beginning and end of life. But the majority of people within the majority do not behave according to the official code of their religion. For example, they do not attend central collective religious activities on a regular basis; Sunday worship in Churches or Friday prayer in Mosques. And they feel free to have their own individual beliefs. In a qualitative study in Sweden, two different sets of value logics emerged with respect to life-long belonging on the one hand and occasional religious experiences on the other. Church belonging and participation in the rites of passage were motivated by long term collective values, while participation in worship and other one-off activities reflected rather more short term and individual values. This paper considers these differences from a theoretical perspective in order to understand increasing levels of religious choice alongside life-long belonging, thereby presenting a theoretical contribution to the understanding of the interplay between collectivistic and individualistic religion.

  • 106.
    Pettersson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    The Nordic Paradox – Simultaneously most Secularised and most Religious. A Case Study of the Increasing Role of the Church of Sweden in Public Disaster Management. 2008In: Europe: Secular or Post-Secular? / [ed] Ziebertz, Hans Georg and Riegel, Ulrich, Berlin: LiT Verlag , 2008, p. 79-92Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 107.
    Pettersson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    Utmaningar för Svenska kyrkans identitet: När behovet av kyrkan ökar men söndagsgudstjänsterna minskar2013Book (Other academic)
  • 108.
    Pettersson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    Values and Religion in Transition: A case Study of a Swedish Multicultural Public School2014In: The Changing Soulf of Europe: Religions and Migrations in Northern and Southern Europe / [ed] Helena Vilaça, Enzo Pace, Inger Furseth and Per Pettersson, Farnham: Ashgate, 2014, p. 265-Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 109.
    Pettersson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    Values expressing unity in diversity.: A study of the complex relation between majority cultures and minority religions across Europe.2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The results from the European Commission sixth Framework Programme project called ‘Welfare and Religion in Europe. Transitions related to Religion, Minorities and Gender’ will be discussed in relation to both methodology and findings. The understanding that values expressing unity in diversity is easier to find in the Nordic countries will be discussed together with the complex relation between majority cultures and minority religions across Europe. Different roles of the states are following a north-south divide while different definitions of minorities on the whole are following an east-west divide of Europe. Women dominate in all sectors but differently in different parts of Europe. An important challenge facing national welfare states today is how to maintain the bonds of solidarity in an increasingly diverse society. The question which is furthered to The Impact of Religion-Program in Uppsala is: In what ways do majority and minority welfare providers understand social cohesion and how is it implemented in their work.

  • 110.
    Pettersson, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    Edgardh, Ninna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    Welfare and Values in Europe: Transitions related to Religion, Minorities and Gender (WaVE). Case study report D9: SWEDEN - Gävle Case study report2007Report (Other academic)
  • 111.
    Pettersson, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    Eek, Jonas
    Grahn, Niklas
    Jämförelse mellan konfirmander och konfirmandledare.2007In: Vägar framåt i Svenska kyrkans konfirmandarbete. / [ed] Grahn, Niklas och Eek, Jonas och Pettersson, Per, Karlstad: Karlstads stift , 2007, p. 85-92Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 112.
    Pettersson, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    Grahn, Niklas
    Eek, Jonas
    Vägar framåt.2007In: Vägar framåt i Svenska kyrkans konfirmandarbete. / [ed] Grahn, Niklas och Eek, Jonas och Pettersson, Per, Karlstad: Karlstads stift , 2007, p. 124-129Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 113.
    Pettersson, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    Osbeck, Christina
    Karlstads Universitet.
    Sweden: Non-confessional and Confessional Education. Religious Education in Public Schools and in the Church of Sweden. 2009In: How Teachers in Europe Teach Religion. An International Empirical Study in 16 Countries. / [ed] Ziebertz, Hans-Georg and Riegel, Ulrich, Berlin: Lit Verlag , 2009, p. 211-226Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 114.
    Pettersson, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    Riegel, Ulrich
    Wurzburg University.
    Religion and Future Perspective.2009In: Youth in Europe III / [ed] Ziebertz, Hans Georg and Kay, William K and Riegel, Ulrich, Berlin: LiT Verlag , 2009, p. 119-131Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 115.
    Sjöborg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, The Social Sciences of Religion, Sociology of Religions. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    Book review: Stig Hjarvard and Mia Lövheim (eds.) 2012. Mediatization and Religion: Nordic Perspectives. Gothenburg: Nordicom. 210 pages.2014In: Nordic Journal of Religion and Society, ISSN 0809-7291, E-ISSN 1890-7008, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 169-172Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 116.
    Sjöborg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, The Social Sciences of Religion, Sociology of Religions. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    Dealing with Religious Diversity: The Aims and Realities of Religious Education in Sweden2015In: The State as an Actor in Religion Policy: Policy Cycle and Governance Perspectives on Institutionalized Religion / [ed] Maria Grazia Martino, Berlin: Springer, 2015, p. 119-132Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In several Western countries there is now a growing awareness that teaching RE may contribute to greater social cohesion in an increasingly diverse society. This chapter examines the relationship between the official aims and inten­tions of the Swedish state regarding RE and school students’ attitudes to this sub­ject. It argues that we must consider the cultural context in which such edu­cation takes place; in this case, Sweden has developed over a short period of time from a mono-cultural society with a Lutheran state church into a religiously and culturally diverse society, while the country can furthermore be seen as highly secularized on the individual level. The aims of RE are analyzed through the study of official documents. Students’ attitudes regarding RE and religious and cul­tu­ral diversity are monitored by a nationally representative classroom question­naire, and with observations drawn from focus group interviews with students aged 18–19 in upper secondary schools. The investigation presented in this chapter leads to the conclusion that there is currently a gap between the lofty intentions of the state regarding the teaching of RE and students’ attitudes to it. This reflects how Swedish society constructs itself as secular by depicting being religious as the “other.” An urgent task for future studies is, therefore, to identify how the teaching of RE could be further developed so as to better realize the current high aims for the subject in a society as increasingly diverse as the Swedish one.

  • 117.
    Sjöborg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, The Social Sciences of Religion, Sociology of Religions. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    Från vatten till vin?: Kristna ungdomars attityder till alkohol2013 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna rapport undersöker bruk och attityder till alkohol och andra droger bland svenska ungdomar i åldrarna 16-25 år, som är aktiva i kristna organisationer. Det empiriska underlaget är en enkätundersökning bland ett urval medlemmar från ett antal kristna samfund och ungdomsorganisationer.  615 personer har besvarat enkäten vilket gör det möjligt att bryta ner materialet i olika undergrupper i förhållande till social bakgrund, sociala relationer och religiositet. Rapporten visar att det är en minoritet som intar ett helnyktert förhållningssätt då de rör sig i olika sociala miljöer och har vänner som dricker alkohol. Samtidigt menar flertalet i undersökningen att de dricker mindre (i många fall betydligt mindre) än de som de umgås med. Detta tyder på att det är vanligt att man utvecklat ett förhållningssätt präglat av måttlighetskonsumtion, i ett samhälle där man i flera sammanhang möter alkohol. 

    Projektet ”Drogfri zon?” är en attitydundersökning bland ungdomar gällande livsåskådningsfrågor och attityder till droganvändning. Projektet är ett samarbetsprojekt mellan Norge och Sverige. Organisationerna Blå Kors Norge och dess svenska systerorganisation Sveriges Blåbandsförbund, står för initiativet till projektet. Projektet har finansierats genom anslag från Stiftelsen Ansvar för Framtiden (SAFF) och norska Helsedirektoratet.

  • 118.
    Sjöborg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, The Social Sciences of Religion, Sociology of Religions. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    Förstå andra, samhället, mig själv - eller inte alls?2013In: Religion & Livsfrågor, ISSN 0347-2159, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 10-12Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I artikeln presenteras resultat från kvantitativa och kvalitativa undersökningar av gymnasieelevers attityder till religiös och kulturell mångfald, och diskuteras utifrån bland annat begreppet religious literacy.

  • 119.
    Sjöborg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, The Social Sciences of Religion, Sociology of Religions. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    "Man behöver va' lite fri": Gymnasieelevers tal om religion i mångfaldens Sverige2015In: Religiös förändring: Kristenheten i Sverige efter millennieskiftet / [ed] Bodil Liljefors Persson, Nils-Åke Tidman, Malmö: Föreningen lärare i religionskunskap, FLR , 2015, p. 39-50Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Artikeln ingår i en årsbok för lärare i religionskunskap, och behandlar resultat från aktuell forskning om gymnasieelevers syn på religion och religionskunskap i samtidens Sverige.

  • 120.
    Sjöborg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, The Social Sciences of Religion, Sociology of Religions. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    Mapping ‘Religion’ – or ‘Something, I don’t know what’?: Methodological Challenges Exploring Young Peoples’ Relations with ‘Religion’2013In: Social Identities Between the Sacred and the Secular / [ed] Day, A.; Vincett, G.; Cotter, C.R., Farnham: Ashgate, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prior studies exploring and understanding young peoples’ relations with what is called religion have mainly focused institutionalized forms of religiosity with a propensity for an interest in propositional beliefs and ritualized behaviour. In quantitative studies, one argument for continuity in the way of putting questions is the possibility for comparisons. In this chapter the author discusses ways in which ‘traditional’ questions from sociology of religion have been renewed. Suggestions for further methodological development, with theoretical implications are made. The chapter makes use of two large-scale quantitative Swedish surveys among youth and young adults where we strived to develop previous questions to enable a richer image of ‘ordinary’ young peoples’ relation to religion. Such an image is necessarily more complex and nuanced, and for that reason of both methodological and theoretical value. The chapter is a part of an anthology on the scientific study of religion.

  • 121.
    Sjöborg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, The Social Sciences of Religion, Sociology of Religions. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    Negative and Positive Freedom of Religion: The Ambiguous Relation of Religion and Human Rights in Sweden2015In: Religion and Human Rights: An International Perspective / [ed] Hans-Georg Ziebertz and Gordan Črpić, Berlin: Springer Publishing Company, 2015, p. 208-217Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden can be characterized as one of the most secularized countries in the world. This chapter aims to explore the relationship between religion and human rights in Sweden, with a focus on the contemporary situation. The research question is how to understand the relation between religion and human rights in the light of the role of religion in the country. The contentious argumentation around the freedom of religion illustrates the ambiguous role that religion plays in contemporary Swedish social life. Starting out from cases where freedom of speech and freedom of religion have been contested, this chapter explicates that Swedish society often constructs religion as a private matter and use human rights discourse as a common denominator. Also empirical data on young people’s attitudes toward freedom of religion and religious diversity are used, underlining this ambiguous picture. Public discussions on human rights in Sweden follow three tracks:  consensus on human rights discourse in general, an awareness of the need for constant refinement regarding the application of human rights, and thirdly a rising awareness of the stigmatization of Muslims which can be seen as a sign of a lack of religious literacy.

  • 122.
    Sjöborg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, The Social Sciences of Religion, Sociology of Religions. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    'One Needs to be Free': Making sense of young people's talk about religion in multicultural Sweden2016In: Journal of Religious Education, ISSN 1442-018X, Journal of Religious Education (Online), ISSN 2199-4625Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article unfolds patterns of pupils’ talk about religion and Religious Education in upper secondary school in Sweden (age 18-19). At the same time highly secularized and increasingly religiously diverse, Swedish society provides an interesting case for understanding better the role of religion in the contemporary world. A recent and nationally representative survey among pupils in upper secondary school demonstrated the role of the pupils’ religiosity along with background variables such as gender, study program, and parents’ educational level for the pupils’ attitudes towards both Religious Education and religious diversity in society. However, attitudes towards such a complex phenomenon as religion may hardly be fully captured by quantitative survey methodology. Therefore focus group interviews were conducted with in all 45 pupils representing a range of religious traditions and none. The composition of interview groups also catered for aspects such as gender, ethnicity, living region and study programme. Patterns emerging from the analysis suggest that central themes in the pupils’ understanding of religion involve framing themselves as reflexive agents, seeing themselves as free from structures which they argue would hinder them from leading fulfilled lives. This pattern was interestingly recurring both among pupils who saw themselves as religious or believers and among pupils who saw themselves as nonreligious. In their talk about the role of religion in society, in school, and for themselves it was just different things that were seen as obstacles and liberators. These ways of talking about religion reveals sociologically salient configurations regarding how religion is constructed in contemporary Sweden. In this paper findings are discussed using perspectives from post-colonial theory.

  • 123.
    Sjöborg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, The Social Sciences of Religion, Sociology of Religions. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    Review: Nynäs, Peter and Andrew Kam-Tuck Yip (eds.) 2012. Religion, Gender and Sexuality in Everyday Life. Farnham: Ashgate. 173 pages.2015In: Nordic Journal of Religion and Society, ISSN 0809-7291, E-ISSN 1890-7008, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 95-97Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 124.
    Sjöborg, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, The Social Sciences of Religion, Sociology of Religions. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    Botvar, Pål Ketil
    Church Research Institute (KIFO).
    A comparative study of the relation between religion and human rights among young people2014In: Secular and Sacred?: The Nordic Case of Religion in Human Rights, Law and Public Space / [ed] Trygve Wyller, Rosemarie van den Breemer and José Casanova., Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2014, p. 236-260Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter examines the impact of religion on the attitudes towards human rights among young people. More specifically, the attitudes towards the first generation of human rights are analysed, using data from a survey conducted among young people in Norway and Sweden. This data set is further compared with data from four other countries in north-western Europe, namely Belgium, (West-) Germany, England and Wales, and the Netherlands. Special attention is given to a comparison between young people defining themselves as Christian, Muslim and nonreligious. Data from representative population samples (ISSP 2004) in these countries are also utilised. The results suggest that, despite some detectable differences after control for background variables and civil values, the impact of religion is rather limited. This proves to be true for all the countries involved in this study. This chapter interprets and discusses these findings and argues that since the first generation of human rights plays such a central role in Scandinavian public life, they function as some kind of cohesive values that also interpenetrate the value system among the young people defining themselves as Christian or Muslim. In this chapter we ask if human rights fulfil the criteria used to  define civil religion. Are human rights the new civil religion in the Scandinavian countries?

  • 125.
    Sjöborg, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, The Social Sciences of Religion, Sociology of Religions. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    Lövheim, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, The Social Sciences of Religion, Sociology of Religions.
    Ungdomar, religion och livsåskådning2015In: Ungdomskulturer / [ed] Simon Lindgren, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2015, 2, p. 142-154Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I kapitlet som ingår i en kursbok om ungdomskulturforskning diskuteras ungdomars förhållningssätt till religion och livsåskådning utifrån några aktuella svenska studier och relateras till den internationella forskningsfronten.

  • 126.
    Sundqvist, Josephine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    The need for contextual analysis on the role of religion in the Swedish development cooperation2016In: For Better for Worse: The Role of Religion in Development Cooperation / [ed] Robert Odén, Halmstad, Sweden: Swedish Mission Council , 2016, p. 51-60Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to explore the role of religion in the Swedish Development Cooperation. Faith-based organisations (FBOs) have historically been social movements in development and in the forefront of service delivery and social justice, but religion as a societal phenomenon has until recently not been sufficiently taken into account by donors in international aid. But this is changing and religion is increasingly more visible in development policies. This raised interest at the global level can partly be explained by a shift in global politics and partly by a discursive transformation, a religious turn, within the social sciences, predominantly in Development Studies. Scholars and policy makers have also started to explore and analyse the influence of religion in development cooperation. It has been found that that although FBOs have gained increased visibility, religion as a societal phenomenon has remained an invisible factor. Additionally, most analysis on religion has, until recently, taken its point of departure in the Global North. Most development actors, including the Swedish Government Agencies, have failed to comprehensively understand or recognize the importance of religion outside the dialogue with the Christian Aid Organisations. For those of us aware that religion influences norms, societies and politics at all levels and is a key dimension of poor people’s lives in all developing countries, this may sound surprising. The lack of knowledge about religion, religious practices and beliefs has been a hindrance to the development process. If there was a greater understanding about the role of religion in the context of development, better results would be achieved and development work would be relevant and thereby more efficient.

  • 127.
    Svalastog, Anna Lydia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    Det var ikke meningen...: Om konstruksjon av kjønn ved abortinngrep, et feministteoretisk bidrag1998Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 128.
    Vilaça, Helena
    et al.
    University of Porto.
    Pace, EnzoUniversity of Padova.Furseth, IngerOslo University.Pettersson, PerUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    The Changing Soul of Europe: Religions and Migrations in Northern and Southern Europe2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 129.
    Yeung, Anne Birgitta
    et al.
    Helsinki University.
    Edgardh Beckman, NinnaUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.Pettersson, PerUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    Churches in Europe as Agents of Welfare – England, Germany, France, Italy and Greece: Working Paper 2:2 from the project Welfare and Religion in a European Perspective2006Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 130.
    Yeung, Anne Birgitta
    et al.
    Helsinki University.
    Edgardh Beckman, NinnaUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.Pettersson, PerUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, The Centre for the Study of Religion and Society.
    Churches in Europe as Agents of Welfare – Sweden, Norway and Finland: Working Paper 2:1 from the project Welfare and Religion in a European Perspective2006Collection (editor) (Other academic)
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