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  • 101.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    The clause-initial position in L2 Swedish declaratives: word order variation and discourse pragmatics2010In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0332-5865, E-ISSN 1502-4717, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 105-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a recent study of the clause-initial position in verb-second declaratives (the prefield), Bohnacker & Rosén (2008) found significant differences between native Swedish and German concerning the frequencies with which constituents occurred in the prefield, as well as qualitative differences concerning the mapping of information structure and linear word order: Swedish exhibited a stronger tendency than German to place new information, the so-called rheme, later in the clause. Swedish-speaking learners of German transferred these patterns from their L1 to German. Their sentences were syntactically well-formed but had Swedish-style prefield frequencies and a strong pattern of Rheme Later, which native Germans perceive as unidiomatic, as an acceptability judgment and a rewrite-L2texts task showed. The present study extends Bohnacker & Rosén's work in three ways. Learners of the reverse language combination (L1 German, L2 Swedish) are investigated to see whether similar phenomena also manifest themselves there. Secondly, written and oral data from highly advanced learners are examined to see whether the learners’ persistent problems can be overcome by extensive immersion (3, 6 and 9 years of L2 exposure). Thirdly, besides investigating theme–rheme (old vs. new information), some consideration is given to another information-structural level, background vs. focus. The learners are found to overuse the prefield at first, with non-Swedish, German-style frequency patterns (e.g. low proportions of clause-initial expletives and high proportions of clause-initial rhematic elements). This is interpreted as evidence for L1 transfer of information-structural or discourse-pragmatic preferences. After 6 and 9 years, a substantial increase in clause-initial expletive subjects, clefts and lightweight given elements is indicative of development towards the target. The findings are related to current generative theorizing on the syntax-pragmatics interface, where it is often maintained that the integration of multiple types of information is one of the hardest areas for L2 learners to master.

  • 102.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    The role of input frequency in article acquisition in early child Swedish2007In: Frequency effects in language acquisition: Defining the limits of frequency as an explanatory concept / [ed] Gülzow, Insa & Gagarina, Natalia (eds), Berlin & New York: Mouton de Gruyter , 2007, p. 51-82Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates patterns of article use in monolingual early child Swedish and in child-directed adult speech. Article omissions in the adult data are found to be more widespread than previously assumed, especially articleless, “bare” singular count nouns (e.g. sten ‘stone’ instead of en sten ‘a stone’) and article omissions in doubly determined nominals (e.g. lilla tummen (little thumb-the, ‘the little thumb’) instead of den lilla tummen (the little thumb-the; ‘the little thumb’). Such omissions in the input may arguably influence the course of acquisition. In the two children studied, an initial determinerless stage (1;3-1;7) is followed by a stage of optional articles (1;8-1;11). Targetlike article provision is reached at 2;0, which is early compared to most other Germanic languages. Definite enclitic articles (e.g. -en ‘the’ as in sten-en ‘the stone’) emerge at an earlier age and are produced at higher frequencies than indefinite prenominal articles (e.g. en ‘a’ as in en sten ‘a stone’) and at an earlier age and at much higher frequencies than definite prenominal articles (e.g. den ‘the’ as in den lilla tummen ‘the little thumb’). These child frequency patterns appear to replicate those of the adult caregivers. However, input frequency is argued to be an insufficient explanation for Swedish article acquisition, because of striking mismatches in child and adult article use in other areas, especially bare nouns. Investigations of child-directed adult speech are nevertheless important because they tell us what the immediate target looks like for the young child, which may be different from what linguists and reference grammars tend to assume.

  • 103.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Lindgren, Josefin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Fundament, formellt subjekt och frekvens: Ordföljdsmönster i svenska, nederländska och hos vuxna inlärare av svenska2014In: Språk & Stil, ISSN 1101-1165, Vol. 24, p. 33-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    This paper investigates distributional patterns concerning the prefield and expletive subjects in two closely related languages, Swedish and Dutch, and in nonnative learners of Swedish. Native (Swedish, n=17; Dutch, n=17) and nonnative speakers (adult Dutch-speaking learners of Swedish, n=17) completed an oral picture description task and an unedited informal writing task. The overall frequencies with which constituents (subject vs. adverbial vs. object) occurred in the prefield were similar for all three groups in the oral data, though expletive subjects were more frequent in Swedish. In the written data, Swedish showed a more pronounced subject-initial pattern than Dutch. Distributional differences between Swedish and Dutch were smaller than previously reported for Swedish vs. German (Bohnacker & Rosén 2008, Bohnacker 2010). Learners mostly produced syntactically well-formed utterances but overused elliptic V1 clauses with overt postverbal subject (unattested in native Swedish), which can be attributed to syntactic transfer from L1 Dutch. Learners underused certain other word orders, namely prefield doubling (place adverbial + resumptive ) and postverbal expletive subjects, which in the oral genre were extremely frequent in native Swedish. The extent to which L2 learners produced postverbal expletives was found to be related to individual patterns in L1 Dutch, and for Dutch to be affected by regional origin (Netherlands vs. Flanders) and transferred to L2 Swedish.

  • 104.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Lindgren, Josefin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Öztekin, Buket
    Turkish- and German-speaking bilingual 4-to-6-year-olds living in Sweden: Effects of age, SES and home language input on vocabulary production2016In: Journal of Home Language Research, ISSN 2537-7043, Vol. 1, p. 17-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates vocabulary production in the minority home languages of 40 Turkish-Swedish and 38 German-Swedish bilingual preschoolers aged 4;0–6;11, growing up in Sweden. We explore how age, SES, and exposure via mother-tongue instruction and home language use in the family affect child vocabulary skills. This has not previously been investigated in Sweden. Cross-linguistic Lexical Tasks (CLTs; Haman, Łuniewska & Pomiechowska, 2015) were used to test noun and verb production in Turkish and German. Background information was collected using a parental questionnaire. The two bilingual groups performed equally well in their respective home languages, Turkish and German. There were no effects of age, socio-economic status (SES) or mother-tongue instruction on vocabulary. However, input in the home setting had a clear effect. Children whose parents used the home language to the child and to each other had significantly higher vocabulary production scores. Having additional home-language input providers such as friends also affected the scores. These results from a Swedish context echo findings from studies of other language combinations and reveal the importance of input for the development of expressive vocabulary.

  • 105.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Mohammadi, Somaye
    Azad University of Bam.
    Acquiring Persian Object Marking: Balochi learners of L2 Persian2013In: Orientalia Suecana, ISSN 0078-6578, E-ISSN 2001-7324, Vol. 61, p. 59-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the second language acquisition of Persian object marking by 237 nativeBalochi-speaking children from age eight to eleven. The combination of Balochi and Persian has not beenstudied from an acquisitional perspective, although it widely occurs in southeastern Iran. This paperstudies the second language (L2) development of direct and indirect object marking after two and threeyears of exposure to Persian at school, vs. a control group of 133 monolingual native Persian children ofsimilar age and socio-economic background. Beginning learners predominantly use non-targetlike objectmarking constructions reminiscent of Balochi, whilst there is a clear trend towards Persian-style objectmarking in the more advanced learners. These findings suggest that L2 learners initially transfer core aspectsof their native grammar to their interlanguage Persian. The picture is complicated by the existenceof differential object marking in Balochi and Persian and the somewhat different writing patterns of nativeand non-native learners.

  • 106.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Rosén, Christina
    Växjö universitet, Humaniora.
    Fundamentet i svenskan och tyskan - Syntax och informationsstruktur: Ett problemområde för språkinlärning och undervisning2009In: Språk & Stil, ISSN 1101-1165, Vol. 19, p. 142-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the influence of the first language (L1), here Swedish, on the acquisition of syntax and discourse pragmatics in a closely related second language (L2), here German, by looking at the information structure of Verb-Second clauses. Even though almost any type of element can occur in the so-called ‘prefield’, i.e. the clause-initial preverbal position of V2 declaratives, we document language-specific patterns for native-speaker corpora: The frequencies of prefield constituent types differ substantially between German and Swedish, and Swedish postpones new (‘rhematic’) information and instead fills the prefield with given (‘thematic’) elements and elements of no or low informational value (e.g. expletives) to a far greater extent than German. Using oral production data from Bohnacker (2005, 2006) and new written production data from Rosén (2006), we compare Swedish learners of German at beginner, intermediate and advanced levels to native controls, matched for age and genre. These learners master the syntactic properties of V2, but start their sentences in nonnative ways. They overapply the Swedish principle of “rheme later” in their L2 German, indicating L1 transfer at the interface of syntax and information-structure, especially for structures that are frequent in the L1 (e.g. subject-initial clauses, expletive-initial clauses, fronted thematic objects das ‘it/this’). Implications of these findings for language teaching are discussed.

  • 107.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Rosén, Christina
    How to start a declarative V2 clause: Transfer of syntax or information structure in L2 German2007In: Nordlyd, ISSN 1503-8599, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 29-56Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 108.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Rosén, Christina
    Växjö universitet.
    Interaction of syntax and discourse pragmatics in closely related languages: How native Swedes, native Germans, and Swedish-speaking learners of German start their sentences2010In: Researching interfaces in linguistics / [ed] Folli, Raffaella & Ulbrich, Christiane, Oxford: Oxford University Press , 2010, p. 331-350Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the interaction of syntax and discourse in two closely related languages, Swedish and German, and identifies language-specific distributional patterns and discourse-pragmatic differences concerning the clause-initial ‘prefield’ position of verb-second clauses. New corpus data indicate that Swedish has a much stronger tendency than German to place new information later in the clause. Swedish uses the prefield mainly for informationally given elements and expletives, whilst German regularly allows new information in clause-initial position. The stricter Swedish constraints on what can and does occur in the prefield have repercussions for L2 acquisition at the grammar-pragmatics interface. The paper discusses data from native speakers of Swedish learning German as a foreign language, showing that mastery of pure V2 syntax is well in advance of appropriate discourse-pragmatic use of that syntax. Syntactic and pragmatic transfer from Swedish results in L2 texts that are unidiomatic and not fully cohesive from a native-speaker perspective.

  • 109.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Rosén, Christina
    Växjö universitet, Humaniora.
    The clause-initial position in L2 German declaratives: Transfer of information structure2008In: Studies in Second Language Acquisition, ISSN 0272-2631, E-ISSN 1470-1545, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 511-538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the information structure of verb-second (V2) declaratives in Swedish, German, and nonnative German. Even though almost any type of element can occur in the so-called prefield, the clause-initial preverbal position of V2 declaratives, we have found language-specific patterns in native-speaker corpora: The frequencies of prefield constituent types differ substantially between German and Swedish, and Swedish postpones new (rhematic) information and instead fills the prefield with given (thematic) elements and elements of no or low informational value (e.g., expletives) to a far greater extent than German. We compare Swedish learners of German to native controls matched for age and Genre (Bohnacker 2005, 2006; Rosén 2006). These learners master the syntactic properties of V2 but start their sentences in nonnative ways. They overapply the Swedish principle of rheme later in their second language German, indicating first language (L1) transfer at the interace of syntax and information structure, especially for structures that are frequent in the L1.

  • 110.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Westergaard, Marit
    Universitetet i Tromsö.
    Introduction: The Nordic languages and second language acquisition theory2010In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0332-5865, E-ISSN 1502-4717, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 99-104Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 111.
    Bohnacker, Ute
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Westergaard, MaritCASTL, Universitetet i Tromsö.
    Nordic Journal of Linguistics Special issue on the Nordic languages and second language acquisition theory2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 112.
    Borin, Lars
    et al.
    Svenska språket, Göteborgs universitet.
    Saxena, AnjuUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Approaches to measuring linguistic differences2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 113. Borin, Lars
    et al.
    Saxena, Anju
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Grammar, Incorporated2004In: CALL for the Nordic languages, Samfundslitteratur, Köpenhamn , 2004, p. 125-146Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 114.
    Borin, Lars
    et al.
    Svenska språket, Göteborgs universitet.
    Saxena, Anju
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Comrie, Bernard
    University of California, Santa Barbara.
    The Intercontinental Dictionary Series - a rich and principled database for language comparison2013In: Approaches to measuring linguistic differences, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2013, p. 285-302Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 115.
    Borin, Lars
    et al.
    Svenska språket, Göteborgs universitet.
    Saxena, Anju
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Rama, Taraka
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Comrie, Bernard
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig.
    Linguistic landscaping of South Asia using digital language resources: Genetic vs. areal linguistics2014In: Proceedings of LREC 2014, Reykjavik: ELRA , 2014, p. 3137-3144Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Like many other research fields, linguistics is entering the age of big data. We are now at a point where it is possible to see how new research questions can be formulated and old research questions addressed from a new angle or established results verified on the basis of exhaustive collections of data, rather than small, carefully selected samples. For example, South Asia is often mentioned in the literature as a classic example of a linguistic area, but there is no systematic, empirical study substantiating this claim. Examination of genealogical and areal relationships among South Asian languages requires a large-scale quantitative and qualitative comparative study, encompassing more than one language family. Further, such a study cannot be conducted manually, but needs to draw on extensive digitized language resources and state-of-the-art computational tools. We present some preliminary results of our large-scale investigation of the genealogical and areal relationships among the languages of this region, based on the linguistic descriptions available in the 19 tomes of Grierson's monumental Linguistic Survey of India (1903-1927), which is currently being digitized with the aim of turning the linguistic information in the LSI into a digital language resource suitable for a broad array of linguistic investigations.

  • 116. Bouckaert, Remco
    et al.
    Lemey, Philippe
    Dunn, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Greenhill, Simon J.
    Alekseyenko, Alexander V.
    Drummond, Alexei J.
    Gray, Russell D.
    Suchard, Marc A.
    Atkinson, Quentin D.
    Mapping the Origins and Expansion of the Indo-European Language Family2012In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, 1095-9203, Vol. 337, no 6097, p. 957-960Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are two competing hypotheses for the origin of the Indo-European language family. The conventional view places the homeland in the Pontic steppes about 6000 years ago. An alternative hypothesis claims that the languages spread from Anatolia with the expansion of farming 8000 to 9500 years ago. We used Bayesian phylogeographic approaches, together with basic vocabulary data from 103 ancient and contemporary Indo-European languages, to explicitly model the expansion of the family and test these hypotheses. We found decisive support for an Anatolian origin over a steppe origin. Both the inferred timing and root location of the Indo-European language trees fit with an agricultural expansion from Anatolia beginning 8000 to 9500 years ago. These results highlight the critical role that phylogeographic inference can play in resolving debates about human prehistory.

  • 117.
    Bråkenhielm, Carl Reinhold
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Systematic Theology and Studies in World Views.
    Gren-Eklund, GunillaUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Avslöja eller dölja: bildspråkets funktioner2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 118. Burenhult, Niclas
    et al.
    Kruspe, Nicole
    Dunn, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Language history and culture groups among Austroasiatic-speaking foragers of the Malay Peninsula2011In: Dynamics of Human Diversity / [ed] Enfield, N. J., Pacific Linguistics , 2011, p. 257-275Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 119. Castermans, Thom
    et al.
    Hammarström, Harald
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Speckmann, Bettina
    Verbeek, Kevin
    Westenberg, Michel
    GlottoVis: Visualizing Language Endangerment and Documentation2017In: VIS4DH’17: 2nd Workshop on Visualization for the Digital Humanities / [ed] Collins, Christopher; Correll, Michael; El-Assady, Mennatallah; Jänicke, Stefan; Keim, Daniel; Wrisley, David, Phoenix, Arizona: IEEE , 2017, p. 1-5Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 120.
    Cepciansky, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Betydelsen av τὸ ἐνδεχόμενον πιθανόν i Aristoteles retorikdefinition2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    I den här uppsatsen undersöks hur Aristoteles, som begränsar retoriken till det möjligas sfär men samtidigt hävdar att den utgör en ”konst” och följer en rationell metod, kunde skilja denna rationella talekonst från såväl ”sofistik” som ”dialektik” genom att ge den ett unikt teoretiskt ”objekt” i τὸ ἐνδεχόμενον πιθανόν. Vidare argumenteras för att detta ”objekt” är en aktivitet.

  • 121.
    Cherry (Associate Editor), Zack
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Parpola (Editor-in-chief), Simo
    University of Helsinki.
    Whiting (Managing Editor and English Editor), Robert
    University of Helsinki.
    Luukko (Associate Editor), Mikko
    University of Helsinki.
    Van Buylaere (Associate Editor), Greta
    University of Helsinki.
    Assyrian English-Assyrian Dictionary2007 (ed. 1st)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A compendious dictionary of two official languages of the Assyrian Empire, Neo-Assyrian and Standard Akkadian, and the first English-Akkadian dictionary ever published.  Essential for every Assyriologist, Semitist, and interested layman.  Contains about 13,000 Assyrian entries and about 23,000 English entries.

  • 122.
    Cherry, Zack
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Aramaic Loanwords in Neo-Assyrian 900–600 B.C.2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed at identifying and analyzing Aramaic loanwords in Neo-Assyrian for the period 900–600 B.C. As two Semitic languages, Neo-Assyrian and Aramaic are sibling-descendants of a postulated common ancestor, Proto-Semitic. The study provides information about the contact between the two languages and about the people who spoke them.

    To achieve the purpose of the study, a total of 9057 unique Neo-Assyrian texts of different genre are utilized. A total of 166 proposed Aramaic loanwords in Neo-Assyrian are included and discussed in the study. The evaluation of the proposed loanwords is conducted using phonological, morphological and semantic criteria.

    The findings of the study demonstrate that only 69 words are considered to be confirmed loanwords, and 50 are considered to be possible loanwords. Additionally, 47 words are rejected for different reasons and are not considered Aramaic loanwords in Neo-Assyrian. The majority of the confirmed loanwords are attested in letters and legal and administrative documents from the 7th century B.C., stemming from the major Assyrian cities of Nineveh, Assur and Calah. Most of the confirmed loanwords are nouns.

    The relatively small number of certain and possible Aramaic loanwords is undoubtedly an evidence for the use of Aramaic in Assyria proper. The same evidence, however, fails to support the impression that Aramaic was widely spread in Assyria proper as a vernacular language, especially towards the end of the period studied. The evidence also corroborates the conclusion based on the extant prosopographical data that the predominantly Assyrian character was maintained in Assyria proper until the very end of the Assyrian empire.

  • 123.
    Coghill, Eleanor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Neo-Aramaic and its linguistic context, written by Geoffrey Khan and Lidia Napiorkowska (eds.)2016In: Brill's Annual of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics, ISSN 1876-6633, E-ISSN 1877-6930, Vol. 8, no 2Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 124.
    Coghill, Eleanor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    The Gleaner-Woman: A Text in the Neo-Aramaic Dialect of Peshabur2018In: Near Eastern and Arabian Essays: Studies in Honour of John F. Healey / [ed] George J. Brooke, Adrian H.W. Curtis, Muntasir al-Hamad and G. Rex Smith, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018, p. 71-87Chapter in book (Refereed)
    The full text will be freely available from 2020-07-01 11:32
  • 125.
    Coghill, Eleanor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology. University of Cambridge.
    The Neo-Aramaic Dialect of Telkepe2018In: Semitic Linguistics and Manuscripts: A Liber Discipulorum in Honour of Professor Geoffrey Khan / [ed] Nadia Vidro, Ronny Vollandt, Esther-Miriam Wagner, Judith Olszowy-Schlanger, Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2018, p. 234-271Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 126.
    Coghill, Eleanor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    The Rise and Fall of Ergativity in Aramaic: Cycles of Alignment Change2016 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book traces the changes in argument alignment that have taken place in Aramaic during its 3000-year documented history. Eastern Aramaic dialects first developed tense-conditioned ergative alignment in the perfect, which later developed into a past perfective. However, while some modern dialects preserve a degree of ergative alignment, it has been eroded by movement towards semantic/Split-S alignment and by the use of separate marking for the patient, and some dialects have lost ergative alignment altogether. Thus an entire cycle of alignment change can be traced, something which had previously been considered unlikely. Eleanor Coghill examines evidence from ancient Aramaic texts, recent dialectal documentation, and cross-linguistic parallels to provide an account of the pathways through which these alignment changes took place. She argues that what became the ergative construction was originally limited mostly to verbs with an experiencer role, such as 'see' and 'hear', which could encode the experiencer with a dative. While this dative-experiencer scenario shows some formal similarities with other proposed explanations for alignment change, the data analysed in this book show that it is clearly distinct. The book draws important theoretical conclusions on the development of tense-conditioned alignment cross-linguistically, and provides a valuable basis for further research.

  • 127.
    Consolaro, Alessandra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology. Univ Turin, Hindi Language & Literature, Italy.;Shivaji Univ Kolhapur, India.
    For Her Eyes Only: Embodiment in Prabha Khetan's Autobiography2017In: Archív Orientální, ISSN 0044-8699, Vol. 85, no 1, p. 47-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on the way embodiment is articulated in Prabha Khetan's autobiography Anya se ananya, first published in 2007. It is introduced as an existentialist autobiography - focusing on the existential self - emphasizing the complexity of embodiment and its implications for identity and self-representation. Best known as the writer who introduced French feminist existentialism to Hindi-speaking readers through her translation of Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex, Prabha Khetan has written an autobiography that is at the same time a unique woman's intellectual and personal journey, the success story of a professional woman, as well as a profoundly moving reflection on human relationships. Prabha Khetan never taught in the world of academia, but her influence as a poet, novelist, and feminist has been extensive. Anya se ananya has been acclaimed as a piece of "extreme sincerity," insofar as it pulls the veil off the "other woman," a very rare voice in Hindi autobiographical literature.

  • 128.
    Crostini, Barbara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Greek Manuscripts in Sweden: a Digital Catalogue (www.manuscripta.se)2018In: Greek Manuscript Cataloguing: Past, Present, and Future / [ed] Paola Degni, Paolo Eleuteri and Marilena Maniaci, Turnhout: Brepols, 2018, p. 59-66Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 129.
    Crostini, Barbara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Greek Monasticism in Southern Italy: the Life of Neilos in Context2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 130.
    Crostini, Barbara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Le monache bizantine e i loro monasteri: luoghi di santificazione o rifugi di penitenza?2018In: Rivista di Storia della Chiesa in Italia, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 7-24Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 131.
    Crostini, Barbara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    ‘Martha and Mary Revisited: Exegesis of an Image in the Pericopes Book of Henry II’2015In: Ad Fontes. Festschrift for Olof Andrén, / [ed] Carl Johan Berglund and Daniel Gustafsson, Artos & Norma bokförlag, 2015, p. 81-91Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 132.
    Crostini, Barbara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    ‘Pietro Pomponazzi’2013In: The Oxford Guide to the Reception of Augustine / [ed] Karla Pollman, Oxford University Press, 2013, p. 1569-1571Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 133.
    Crostini, Barbara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    The Electronic Edition of MS Vaticanus graecus 752: Text or Texts2018In: Digital Philology: New Thoughts on Old Questions / [ed] Maria Adele Cipolla, Verona: Libreriauniversitaria.it Edizioni , 2018, p. 123-137Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 134.
    Crostini, Barbara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Parrinello, Rosa Maria
    “De monialibus in byzantino orbe”. Essays on Byzantine Women Monasticism2018In: Rivista di storia della Chiesa in Italia, sezione speciale monografica, Turin: Vita e Pensiero, 2018, , p. 4p. 3-6Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 135.
    Csato, Eva Agnes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Isaksson, BoUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.Jahani, CarinaUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Linguistic Convergence and Areal Diffusion: Case studies from Iranian Semitic and Turkic2005Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 136.
    Csato, Éva Ágnes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Kilimci, Songul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Megyesi, Beata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Using Parallel Corpora in Data-Driven Teaching of Turkish in Sweden.2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper demonstrates how data-driven learning methods are applied in teaching Turkish as a foreign language at the Department of Linguistics and Philology, Uppsala University. In data-driven teaching, language corpora, concordance programs, and annotation tools developed in collaboration with computational linguists are employed. This paper illustrates how resources developed initially for research purposes in different subjects (such as Computational Linguistics, Linguistics, Turkic languages), are now being used in teaching environments.

    We present the Swedish-Turkish parallel corpus providing students and researchers with easily accessible annotated linguistic data. The web-based corpora can be used both by regular and distance students. They function also as learning tools for formulating and testing hypotheses concerning lexical, morphological and syntactic aspects of Turkish. Furthermore, they help the students to practice contrastive studies and translation between Swedish and Turkish.

  • 137.
    Csató, Éva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Turkic double verbs in a typological perspective2001In: Aktionsart and Aspectotemporality in Non-European Languages: Proceedings from a workshop held at the University of Zurich, June 23-25, 2000 / [ed] Karen H. Ebert and Zúñiga Fernando, Zürich: Universität Zürich , 2001, p. 175-187Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 138.
    Csató, Éva A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Enwall, JoakimUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.Eskhult, MatsUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.Jahani, CarinaUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.Månsson, AnetteUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.Schaefer, ChristianeUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Orientalia Suecana Vol LXI (2012)2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 139.
    Csató, Éva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Karakoç, Birsel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    The cultural heritage of small Turkic peoples: Karaim talkï and Noghay tastar2018In: Building Bridges to Turkish: Essays in Honour of Bernt Brendemoen / [ed] Éva Á. Csató, Joakim Parslow, Emel Türker, Einar Wigen, Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2018, p. 65-79Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 140.
    Csató, Éva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Karakoç, BirselUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.Menz, Astrid
    The Uppsala Meeting: Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Turkish Linguistics2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 141.
    Csató, Éva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Kaşıkara, Hüner
    Boğaziçi University, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Megyesi, Beata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Nivre, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Parallel corpora and Universal Dependencies for Turkic2015In: Turkic languages, ISSN 1431-4983, ISSN 1431-4983, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 259-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first part of this paper presents ongoing work on Turkic parallel corpora at the De- partment of Linguistics and Philology, Uppsala University. Moreover, examples are given of how the Swedish-Turkish-English corpus is used in teaching Turkish and in compara- tive linguistic studies. The second part deals with the annotation scheme Universal De- pendencies (UD) used in treebanks, and its application to Turkic languages. 

  • 142.
    Csató, Éva Á.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Turkic relatives revisited: Studies on Turkic structures and language contacts2018In: The Rouen Meeting: Studies on Turkic structures and language contacts / [ed] Mehmet Ali Akıncı and Kutlay Yağmur, Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2018, p. 3-17Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 143.
    Csató, Éva Á.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Enwall, JoakimUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.Eskhult, MatsUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.Jahani, CarinaUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.Månsson, AnetteUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.Schaefer, ChristianeUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.Nielsen, Helle LykkeUniversity of Southern Denmark.Perho, IrmeliUniversity of Helsinki.
    Orientalia Suecana Vol. LXI (2012): Supplement2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 144.
    Csató, Éva Á.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Enwall, JoakimUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.Isaksson, BoUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.Jahani, CarinaUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.Månsson, AnetteUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.Saxena, AnjuUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.Schaefer, ChristianeUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.Wessler, Heinz WernerUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.Consolaro, AlessandraUniversità degli Studi di Torina, University of Turin, Italy.
    Orientalia Suecana: Vol. LX (2011)2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 145.
    Csató, Éva Ágnes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    189. Karaim2016In: Word formation: international handbook of the languages of Europe / [ed] Müller, Peter O. & Ohnheiser, Ingeborg & Olsen, Susan & Rainer, Franz, Berlin/Boston: Mouton de Gruyter, 2016, p. 3379-3388Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This handbook comprises an in-depth presentation of the state of the art in word-formation. The five volumes contain 207 articles written by leading international scholars. The XVI chapters of the handbook provide the reader, in both general articles and individual studies, with a wide variety of perspectives: word-formation as a linguistic discipline (history of science, theoretical concepts), units and processes in word-formation, rules and restrictions, semantics and pragmatics, foreign word-formation, language planning and purism, historical word-formation, word-formation in language acquisition and aphasia, word-formation and language use, tools in word-formation research. The final chapter comprises 74 portraits of word-formation in the individual languages of Europe and offers an innovative perspective. These portraits afford the first overview of this kind and will prove useful for future typological research. This handbook will provide an essential reference for both advanced students and researchers in word-formation and related fields within linguistics.

  • 146.
    Csató, Éva Ágnes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    A contribution to the discussion about the planning of an international documentation center in the framework of the project Turkish in North–Western Europe1989In: TINWE Newsletter, Vol. 2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 147.
    Csató, Éva Ágnes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    A symposium on Kazakh in Post-Soviet Kazakhstan2011In: Turkic languages, ISSN 1431-4983, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 291-296Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 148.
    Csató, Éva Ágnes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    A syntactic analysis of participle constructions in Modern Turkish1985In: Bešinci Milletler Arası Türkoloji Kongresi, 23–28 Eylül 1985 : Tebliğler 1, Türk dili, Istanbul: Istanbul Üniversitesi Edebiyat Fakültesi Basımevi , 1985, p. 39-56Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 149.
    Csató, Éva Ágnes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    A syntactic asymmetry in Turkish2000In: Studies on Turkish and Turkic Languages: proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Turkish Linguistics, Lincoln College, Oxford, August 12 - 14, 1998 / [ed] Asli Göksel and Celia Kerslake, Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2000, p. 417-422Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 150.
    Csató, Éva Ágnes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    A typology of Turkish double-verb constructions2003In: Studies in Turkish Linguistics: Proceedings of the Xth International Conference on Turkish Linguistics / [ed] Sumru A. Özsoy, Taylan, E.E., Koç, A., Akar, D. and Nakipoğlu-Demiralp, M., Istanbul: Bogaziçi University Press , 2003, p. 105-110Chapter in book (Refereed)
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