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  • 101.
    Campeau, Audrey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Datasets for Rilm et al., (2019) Spectral decomposition of high-frequency CO2 concentrations reveals soil-stream linkages. Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences.2019Data set
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    Dataset2015_RimlJGR.2019
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    Dataset2016_RimlJGR2019
  • 102.
    Campeau, Audrey
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Bishop, Kevin
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Aquat Sci & Assessment, Lennart Hjelms Vag 9, S-75651 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Amvrosiadi, Nino
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Billett, Mike
    Garnett, Mark
    Laudon, Hjalmar
    Öquist, Mats
    Wallin, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Current forest carbon fixation fuels stream CO2 emissions2019In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, article id 1876Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stream CO2 emissions contribute significantly to atmospheric climate forcing. While there are strong indications that groundwater inputs sustain these emissions, the specific biogeochemical pathways and timescales involved in this lateral CO2 export are still obscure. Here, via an extensive radiocarbon (C-14) characterisation of CO2 and DOC in stream water and its groundwater sources in an old-growth boreal forest, we demonstrate that the C-14-CO2 is consistently in tune with the current atmospheric C-14-CO2 level and shows little association with the C-14-DOC in the same waters. Our findings thus indicate that stream CO2 emissions act as a shortcut that returns CO2 recently fixed by the forest vegetation to the atmosphere. Our results expose a positive feedback mechanism within the C budget of forested catchments, where stream CO2 emissions will be highly sensitive to changes in forest C allocation patterns associated with climate and land-use changes.

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  • 103. Cardyn, R.
    et al.
    Clark, I. D.
    Lacelle, D.
    Lauriol, B.
    Zdanowicz, Christian
    Calmels, F.
    Molar gas ratios of air entrapped in ice: A new tool to determine the origin of relict massive ground ice bodies in permafrost2007In: Quaternary Research, Vol. 68, no 2, p. 239-248Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 104.
    Caron, Jean-Bernard
    et al.
    Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto.
    Gaines, Robert
    Pamona College.
    Aria, Cédric
    Mangano, Gabriela
    University of Saskatchewan.
    Streng, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    A new phyllopod bed-like assemblage from the Burgess Shale of the Canadian Rockies2014In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 5, p. 3210-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Burgess Shale-type fossil assemblages provide the best evidence of the ‘Cambrian explosion’. Here we report the discovery of an extraordinary new soft-bodied fauna from the Burgess Shale. Despite its proximity (ca. 40km) to Walcott’s original locality, the Marble Canyon fossil assemblage is distinct, and offers new insights into the initial diversification of metazoans, their early morphological disparity, and the geographic ranges and longevity of many Cambrian taxa. The arthropod-dominated assemblage is remarkable for its high density and diversity of soft-bodied fossils, as well as for its large proportion of new species (22% of total diversity) and for the preservation of hitherto unreported anatomical features, including in the chordate Metaspriggina and the arthropod Mollisonia. The presence of the stem arthropods Misszhouia and Primicaris, previously known only from the early Cambrian of China, suggests that the palaeogeographic ranges and longevity of Burgess Shale taxa may be underestimated.

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  • 105.
    Caron, Jean-Bernard
    et al.
    Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto.
    Gaines, Robert
    Pamona College.
    Mangano, Gabriela
    University of Saskatchewan.
    Streng, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Discovery of a “phyllopod bed-like” fossil assemblage from Kootenay National Park2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 106.
    Caron, Jean-Bernard
    et al.
    Royal Ontario Museum, Dept Nat Hist, 100 Queens Pk, Toronto, ON M5S 2C6, Canada.;Univ Toronto, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, 25 Willcocks St, Toronto, ON M5S 3B2, Canada.;Univ Toronto, Dept Earth Sci, 22 Ursula Franklin St, Toronto, ON M5S 3B1, Canada..
    Webster, Mark
    Univ Chicago, Dept Geophys Sci, 5734 South Ellis Ave, Chicago, IL 60637 USA..
    Briggs, Derek E. G.
    Yale Univ, Dept Earth & Planetary Sci, POB 208109, New Haven, CT 06520 USA.;Yale Univ, Yale Peabody Museum, POB 208109, New Haven, CT 06520 USA..
    Pari, Giovanni
    44 Fairpk Dr, Ottawa, ON K2G 6X8, Canada..
    Santucci, Guy
    217 11th St South, Cranbrook, BC V1C 1T9, Canada..
    Mangano, M. Gabriela
    Univ Saskatchewan, Dept Geol Sci, 114 Sci Pl, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E2, Canada..
    Izquierdo-Lopez, Alejandro
    Royal Ontario Museum, Dept Nat Hist, 100 Queens Pk, Toronto, ON M5S 2C6, Canada.;Univ Toronto, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, 25 Willcocks St, Toronto, ON M5S 3B2, Canada..
    Streng, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Gaines, Robert R.
    Pomona Coll, Geol Dept, Claremont, CA 91711 USA..
    The lower Cambrian Cranbrook Lagerstätte of British Columbia2024In: Journal of the Geological Society, ISSN 0016-7649, E-ISSN 2041-479X, Vol. 181, no 1, article id jgs2023-106Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Discovered over a century ago, the lower Cambrian (Series 2, Stage 4) Cranbrook Lagerstatte of southeastern British Columbia's Eager Formation is one of the oldest Burgess Shale-type deposits in North America. This Konservat-Lagerstatte is rich in olenelloid trilobites, but also yields a very low-diversity soft-bodied fossil assemblage including Tuzoia and Anomalocaris, and a low-diversity ichnofauna. Its scientific study, however, remains limited. A 2015 field-based investigation by the Royal Ontario Museum has revealed new information about the site's biota, depositional environment and taphonomic conditions. Not only is the Cranbrook Lagerstatte significant for early Cambrian biostratigraphy and comparisons with other Burgess Shale-type deposits, it also reveals some of the little-known diversity of life in a distal outer shelf environment during the Cambrian period.

  • 107. Carstensen, J.
    et al.
    Hernandez-Garcia, E.
    Håkanson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Air and Water Science. LUVA.
    Terminology list for threshold modelling, identification and uncertainty evaluation.: Deliverable D2.4.1.2006Report (Other scientific)
  • 108.
    Castano-Cardona, Rafael Francisco
    et al.
    Univ Caldas, Inst Invest Estratig, Manizales, Colombia.;Smithsonian Trop Res Inst, Balboa, Panama..
    Jaramillo, Carlos
    Smithsonian Trop Res Inst, Balboa, Panama..
    Pardo-Trujillo, Andres
    Univ Caldas, Inst Invest Estratig, Manizales, Colombia.;Univ Caldas, Dept Ciencias Geol, Manizales, Colombia..
    Vento, Barbara
    Consejo Nacl Invest Cient & Tecn, CCT, Inst Argentino Invest Zonas Aridas IADIZA, Mendoza, Argentina..
    Quiroz-Cabascango, Daniela
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Earth Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Angulo-Pardo, Estefania
    Univ Caldas, Inst Invest Estratig, Manizales, Colombia.;Univ Caldas, Grp Invest Estratig & Vulcanol GIEV Cumanday, Manizales, Colombia..
    Palynology of Cretaceous amber deposits of the Oriente Basin-Ecuador and the Eastern Cordillera- Colombia: [Palinología de depósitos de ámbar cretácicos de la Cuenca Oriente-Ecuador y la Cordillera Oriental-Colombia]2023In: BOLETIN DE GEOLOGIA, ISSN 0120-0283, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 63-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several Cretaceous amber-bearing localities were recently discovered, including the Oriente Basin of Ecuador (Hollin Formation), and the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia (Une Formation at La Popa mine). A palynological study of 48 samples was carried out to date them and assess their broad floristic content. We date the Hollin Formation as spanning the late Aptian to the early Albian based on the co-occurrence of Callialasporites trilobatus, Retitricolpites operculatus and Callialasporites dampieri, among others. The sandstone lens containing amber from Une Formation at La Popa mine were dated as latest Aptian to early Cenomanian based upon the co-occurrence of Callialasporites dampieri, Afropollis jardinus, Ischyosporites variegatus and Gnetaceaepollenites retangularis. The palynoflora is dominated by high spore diversity suggesting humid climate conditions in the northwestern margin of Gondwana.

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  • 109.
    Centerskog, Frida
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Implementing Principles for Responsible Banking in the Swedish banking sector2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Principles For Responsible Banking is an initiative launched by the United Nations Environment Programme Finance Initiative in 2019. The initiative has been signed by more than 185 banks around the world. The initiative was commenced to established a framework for the banking sector in order to align their sustainability efforts. The purpose of the research is to investigate whether the level of commitment of the major banks operating in Sweden to their sustainability work. Content analysis and semi-structured interviews were performed in order to research the sustainability efforts by the banking sector. The results suggests that the banks are working towards the sustainability goals mapped out by the United Nations and Agenda 2030 but also that the banks already have measures in place to drive their sustainability work forward. The banks can intensify their sustainability work by implementing stronger actions in order to reach greater results and accelerate their efforts.

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  • 110.
    Chen, Dong Lei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Alavi, Yasaman
    Univ Melbourne, Sch BioSci, Australia.
    Brazeau, Martin D.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Life Sci, Berks, England.
    Blom, Henning
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Millward, David
    British Geol Survey, Lyell Ctr, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.
    Ahlberg, Per E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    A partial lower jaw of a tetrapod from "Romer's Gap"2018In: Earth and environmental science transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, ISSN 1755-6910, E-ISSN 1755-6929, Vol. 108, no 1, p. 55-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first half of the Mississippian or Early Carboniferous (Tournaisian to mid-Visean), an interval of about 20 million years, has become known as "Romer's Gap" because of its poor tetrapod record. Recent discoveries emphasise the differences between pre-"Gap" Devonian tetrapods, unambiguous stem-group members retaining numerous "fish" characters indicative of an at least partially aquatic lifestyle, and post-"Gap" Carboniferous tetrapods, which are far more diverse and include fully terrestrial representatives of the main crown-group lineages. It seems that "Romer's Gap" coincided with the cladogenetic events leading to the origin of the tetrapod crown group. Here, we describe a partial right lower jaw ramus of a tetrapod from the late Tournaisian or early Visean of Scotland. The large and robust jaw displays a distinctive character combination, including a significant mesial lamina of the strongly sculptured angular, an open sulcus for the mandibular lateral line, a non-ossified narrow Meckelian exposure, a well-defined dorsal longitudinal denticle ridge on the prearticular, and a mesially open adductor fossa. A phylogenctic analysis places this specimen in a trichotomy with Crassigyrinus and baphetids + higher tetrapods in the upper part of the tetrapod stem group, above Whatcheeria, Pederpes, Ossinodus, Sigournea and Greererpeton. It represents a small but significant step in the gradual closure of "Romer's Gap".

  • 111.
    Chironna, Serena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Chasing Responsible Sourcing: The case of UK retailers and sustainable seafood2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Responsible Sourcing is gaining growing importance for companies willing to demonstrate responsibility and commitment to sustainable practices. Sourcing is a key element of supply chain management and by adopting responsible sourcing practices, companies can greatly contribute to the sustainability of their entire supply chains. Being close to both customers and suppliers, retailers hold a particularly influential position in the supply chain and their sourcing choices can play a key role for sustainability improvements. This paper investigates the different strategies that can be adopted to guarantee responsible sourcing in the retail sector, through the specific case study of two UK retailers, Sainsbury´s and Tesco, and their offer of sustainable seafood. Specifically, the relation between the offer of MSC certified products and the retailers´ commitment to source responsibly is here analysed. The main source of data collection is a content analysis of retailers´ CSR online reports and web pages. Additional information is obtained through reports and web pages’ analysis of four UK organizations dealing with sustainable seafood issues. The findings of the study suggest that the offer of MSC certified products is positively correlated with the adoption of responsible sourcing practices; different strategies are available to retailers to guarantee responsible sourcing and that retailers´ sourcing policies can be influenced by other stakeholders´ guidelines for responsible sourcing. 

     

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  • 112.
    Claybourn, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    A Multi-Evidence Approach to the Affinity of Tylodus deltoides Rohon 18932015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Early gnathostome evolution has recently undergone revision due to newly published phylogenies. Within this new framework, early gnathostomes in the fossil record can be revised, particularly the subject of this paper Tylodus deltoides (Rohon, 1893), vertebrate microremains from the Silurian Ohesaare Formation of Estonia. Multiple analytical approaches are performed in order to offer insight into a phylogenetic position for the enigmatic T. deltoides. A three-dimensional model, based on synchrotron x-ray phase contrast microtomography of a small polyodontode morphotype and virtual thin sections show a unique palaeohistology. A survey of wear patterns shows the presence of tooth plates, comprising the larger cusp and plate morphotypes. Histological observations show a mosaic of vertebrate hard-tissues and organisations, including a tripartitie layered structure, descending rows of odontodes on a large primary odontode, an osteodentine or mesodentine base, pleromic dentine middle layer and capping layer of unknown tissue type.Two interpretations of this collection of observations are given. Both assume the large morphotypes are teeth, one that the smaller polyodontodes are scales, the other, that they are developing teeth. Histology alone demonstrates the remains are the teeth of a holocephalan, but with some uncertainty. A model for attachment by acrodonty and developmental model for conserved lyodont development are given to help explain the unusual histology and morphology of T. deltoides, but greater certainty in the phylogenetic position of T. deltoides requires a more detailed histological analysis based on thin sections and a broader comparison with 3D data of relevent taxa. This willnecessarily be improved by formal phylogenetic analysis.

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  • 113.
    Claybourn, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Cambrian Series 2 (Stages 3-4) Small Shelly Fossils from East Antarctica2017Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An assemblage of Cambrian Series 2, Stages 3-4 small shelly fossils has been recovered from the Shackleton Limestone and Holyoake Formations of East Antarctica. Small shelly fossils from the early Cambrian are an important window into the world of Cambrian palaeobiology, biostratigraphy and biogeography. The aim of this thesis is to add this view the previously under-described fauna from East Antarctica. The molluscs from the Shackleton Limestone prove important in biostratigraphic correlation to South Australia, North-East Greenland, North China and South China. Morphometric analysis of these has also yielded insights into inter- and intraspecific variation in the helcionelloid mollusc Mackinnonia. The remaining fauna contains certain key taxa for biostratigraphic comparison, such as the tommotiid Dailyatia odyssei, the bradoriid arthropod Spinospitella coronata and the brachiopod Karathele yokensis. This allows for direct correlation with the Cambrian Series 2 Stages 3-4 Dailyatia odyssei Zone of South Australia, further strengthening an already recognised close relationship between the faunas of East Antarctica and South Australia.

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    Cambrian Series 2 (Stages 3-4) Small Shelly Fossils from East Antarctica
  • 114.
    Claybourn, Thomas M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Macquarie University.
    Biostratigraphy and Systematics of Cambrian Small Shelly Fossils from East Antarctica and South Australia2021Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The remote lower Cambrian Byrd group of sedimentary rocks from East Antarctica has been studied intermittently since its discovery over a century ago. Previous insights into the trilobites and archaeocyaths indicated a close correlation to the sedimentary sequences of South Australia. The lowest unit of the Byrd Group is the fossiliferous Shackleton Limestone which overlies the Neoproterozoic metamorphic rocks of the Beardmore Group and is representative of a long period of carbonate shelf formation on a passive margin with the palaeo-Pacific. This was truncated by marine transgression and the deposition of the deeper-water calcareous siltstones of the fossiliferous Holyoake Formation. This is overlain by the Starshot Formation and all three units are cross-cut by the Douglas Conglomerate, marking the start of a collisional tectonic regime between the East Gondwana and palaeo-Pacific plates. The first systematically sampled and analysed sections through the carbonate Shackleton Limestone and argillaceous Holyoake Formation has yielded a new fauna of small primarily phosphatic and secondarily phosphatised shelly fossils. The abundant molluscs, brachiopods and tommotiids are reported here. These findings are ideal for correlating this section to the fossil biozones of South Australia, including the Dailyatia odyssei small shelly fossil Zone and the Pararaia janeae trilobite Zone. Chemostratigraphic data from three sections preserve the profiles of two major stable carbon isotope excursions: the Mingxinsi Carbon Isotope Excursion and the Archaeocyathid Extinction Carbon isotope Excursion. The combination of these two lines of evidence are a strong indicator for Cambrian Series 2, early-mid Stage 4. This is corroborated by newly described D. odyssei-P. janeae Zone small shelly fossils from the  carbonate clasts from the Cambrian Stage 4 White Point Conglomerate of South Australia which bear strong similarity to the fauna of the Shackleton Limestone. Palaeobiogeographically the fauna recovered from the Byrd Group is similar to the East Gondwanan region of South Australia, with similar brachiopod assemblages to those recovered from the Xinji Formation of North China and similar molluscan assemblages to the Bastion Formation of North-East Greenland.

    List of papers
    1. Mollusks from the upper Shackleton Limestone (Cambrian Series 2), Central Transantarctic Mountains, East Antarctica
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mollusks from the upper Shackleton Limestone (Cambrian Series 2), Central Transantarctic Mountains, East Antarctica
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    2019 (English)In: Journal of Paleontology, ISSN 0022-3360, E-ISSN 1937-2337, Vol. 93, no 3, p. 437-459Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    An assemblage of Cambrian Series 2, Stages 3–4, conchiferan mollusks from the Shackleton Limestone, Transantarctic Mountains, East Antarctica, is formally described and illustrated. The fauna includes one bivalve, one macromollusk, and 10 micromollusks, including the first description of the species Xinjispira simplex Zhou and Xiao, 1984 outside North China. The new fauna shows some similarity to previously described micromollusks from lower Cambrian glacial erratics from the Antarctic Peninsula. The fauna, mainly composed of steinkerns, is relatively low diversity, but the presence of diagnostic taxa, including helcionelloid Davidonia rostrata (Zhou and Xiao, 1984), bivalve Pojetaia runnegari Jell, 1980, cambroclavid Cambroclavus absonus Conway Morris in Bengtson et al., 1990, and bradoriid Spinospitella coronata Skovsted et al., 2006, as well as the botsfordiid brachiopod Schizopholis yorkensis (Ushatinskaya and Holmer in Gravestock et al., 2001), in the overlying Holyoake Formation correlates the succession to the Dailyatia odyssei Zone (Cambrian Stages 3–4) in South Australia.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Cambridge University Press, 2019
    National Category
    Biological Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-372864 (URN)10.1017/jpa.2018.84 (DOI)000465284500003 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 2012-1658Swedish Research Council, 2009-4395Swedish Polar Research SecretariatSwedish Research Council, 2010-6176
    Available from: 2019-01-09 Created: 2019-01-09 Last updated: 2022-03-11Bibliographically approved
    2. Morphometric Analysis Of Inter- And Intraspecific Variation In The Cambrian Helcionelloid Mollusc Mackinnonia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Morphometric Analysis Of Inter- And Intraspecific Variation In The Cambrian Helcionelloid Mollusc Mackinnonia
    2018 (English)In: Palaeontology, ISSN 0031-0239, E-ISSN 1475-4983, Vol. 61, no 5, p. 761-773Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Phylogenetic relationships within the helcionelloid molluscs have been difficult to establish. One of the reasons for this is that qualitative approaches to investigating morphological variation in this group have struggled to identify clear patterns. An alternative method of identifying these patterns is to study these organisms quantitatively. Here this approach is exemplified by employing morphometric methods to investigate patterns of subtle morphological variation in two species of Mackinnonia Runnegar in Bengtson et al. from Cambrian Series 2, Stages 3–4. Specifically, a combination of elliptical Fourier and multivariate analyses were conducted to study intra‐ and interspecific variation in protoconch form as well as variation in ontogenetic trajectory of the teleoconch of two species of Mackinnonia. The material used consists of two assemblages of Mackinnonia rostrata (Zhou & Xiao), from the Shackleton Limestone of Antarctica and Ajax Limestone of Australia, and an assemblage of Mackinnonia taconica (Landing & Bartowski) from the Bastion Formation of Greenland. Results of this study show significant (p < 0.0001) differences in protoconch shape between all three groups. Ontogenetic sequences of outline curves truncated at successive rugae significantly (p < 0.05) discriminate between M. rostrata and M. taconica. These techniques uncovered significant intraspecific morphological variation of disparate assemblages of M. rostrata despite shared qualitative features and structure a conceptual framework for understanding such patterns of variation and put this in the context of the incipient species concept.

    Keywords
    morphometrics, elliptical Fourier analysis, Mackinnonia, Cambrian Series 2, incipient species, Helcionelloida
    National Category
    Evolutionary Biology Geology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-364200 (URN)10.1111/pala.12368 (DOI)000440682800008 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 621-2011-4703Swedish Polar Research Secretariat, RSP G‐067‐MSwedish Research Council, 2012-1658Swedish Research Council, 2009-4395
    Note

    Title in thesis list of papers: Morphometric Analysis of the Early Cambrian mollusc Mackinnonia and the Incipient Species Concept

    Available from: 2018-10-24 Created: 2018-10-24 Last updated: 2021-05-11Bibliographically approved
    3. Brachiopods from the Byrd Group (Cambrian Series 2, Stage 4) Central Transantarctic Mountains, East Antarctica: Biostratigraphy, Phylogeny and Systematics
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Brachiopods from the Byrd Group (Cambrian Series 2, Stage 4) Central Transantarctic Mountains, East Antarctica: Biostratigraphy, Phylogeny and Systematics
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    2020 (English)In: Papers in Palaeontology, ISSN 2056-2799, E-ISSN 2056-2802, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 349-383Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Brachiopods from Cambrian Series 2, Stage 4 carbonate strata of the Byrd Group in the Central Transantarctic Mountains, East Antarctica, are described for the first time. These include six lingulate, one paterinate and one rhynchonelliform taxon, including the new lingulate brachiopod Plicarmus wildi gen. et sp. nov. The biostratigraphy correlates closely to the brachiopods recently reported from the Xinji Formation (Shuiyu section) in North China, as well as brachiopods recovered from the Dailyatia odyssei Zone across the Arrowie Basin of South Australia. These findings also support the previously identified close palaeobiogeographyof these regions. The first unambiguous example of the acrotretid brachiopod Eohadrotreta zhenbaensis Li & Holmer outside South China is also identified in the context of its ontogenetic stages. Well-preserved specimens of the acrotheloid Schizopholis yorkensis (Holmer & Ushatinskaya) facilitate a new reconstruction of its musculature and visceral region. These data are synthesized into a new cladistic analysis that resolves Acrotheloidea as a well-supported monophyletic clade and supports previous hypotheses of a morphocline in acrotheloid evolution.

    Keywords
    brachiopods, East Antarctica, Cambrian Series 2, Biostratigraphy, Palaeobiogeography, cladistics
    National Category
    Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
    Research subject
    Earth Science with specialization in Historical Geology and Palaeontology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-404372 (URN)10.1002/spp2.1295 (DOI)000512342600001 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 2009-4395Swedish Research Council, 2012-1658Swedish Research Council, RFI Polar VR 2010-6176Swedish Polar Research Secretariat
    Available from: 2020-02-18 Created: 2020-02-18 Last updated: 2021-05-11Bibliographically approved
    4. Camenellan tommotiids from the Cambrian Series 2 of East Antarctica: Biostratigraphy, palaeobiogeography, and systematics
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Camenellan tommotiids from the Cambrian Series 2 of East Antarctica: Biostratigraphy, palaeobiogeography, and systematics
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    2021 (English)In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 207-229Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Cambrian Series 2 shelly fossils from thick carbonate successions in East Antarctica have received limited systematic treatment through the 20th century. Described here are the East Antarctic camenellan tommotiids from the Shackleton Limestone in the Central Transantarctic Mountains and the Schneider Hills limestone in the Argentina Range. This material comes from both newly sampled collections and incompletely described material from older collections. The assemblage supports correlation to the Dailyatia odyssei Zone and Pararaia janeae Trilobite Zone of South Australia, with the newly examined specimens of Dailyatia decobruta from the Shackleton Limestone providing direct correlation to the Mernmerna Formation of the Ikara-Flinders Ranges and White Point Conglomerate of Kangaroo Island. These East Antarctic assemblages include five species referred to Dailyatia, in addition to an undetermined kennardiid species and fragments of the problematic Shetlandia multiplicata. The results further corroborate the notion that fossiliferous carbonate clasts found on King George Island were sourced from the same carbonate shelf as the Shackleton Limestone, with the taxon S. multiplicata found in both units. The Schneider Hills limestone in the Argentina Range has yielded sclerites of Dailyatia icari sp. nov., currently only known from this location.

    Keywords
    Tommotiida, Dailyatia, Cambrian Series 2, Biostratigraphy, Palaeobiogeography, East Antarctica, Central Transantarctic Mountains
    National Category
    Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
    Research subject
    Earth Science with specialization in Historical Geology and Palaeontology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-404373 (URN)10.4202/app.00758.2020 (DOI)000631536100012 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 2009-4395Swedish Research Council, 2012-1658Swedish Research Council, 2010-6176Swedish Polar Research Secretariat
    Note

    New taxa described in the preprint manuscript are not considered valid until final publication of reviewed article, according to the rules of the ICZN

    Title in thesis list of papers: New and previously undescribed camenellan tommotiids From The Cambrian Series 2, Stages 3-4, East Antarctica: Biostratigraphy, palaeobiogeography, and systematics

    Available from: 2020-02-18 Created: 2020-02-18 Last updated: 2021-05-11Bibliographically approved
    5. Shelly fossils from the lower Cambrian White Point Conglomerate, Kangaroo Island, South Australia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Shelly fossils from the lower Cambrian White Point Conglomerate, Kangaroo Island, South Australia
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    2019 (English)In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 64, no 3, p. 489-522Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The lower Cambrian (Series 2) White Point Conglomerate (WPC) on Kangaroo Island, South Australia contains exotic clasts representing a diverse array of lithologies, including metamorphics, chert, sandstone, and abundant carbonates, notably archaeocyath-rich bioclastic limestone. Acetic acid digestion of the WPC bioclastic limestone clasts reveals a diverse shelly fauna. This assemblage includes abundant organophosphatic brachiopods such as Cordatia erinae Brock and Claybourn gen. et sp. nov., Curdus pararaensis, Eodicellomus elkaniformiis, Eohadrotreta sp. cf. E. zhenbaensis, Eoobolus sp., Kyrshabaktella davidii, and Schizopholis yorkensis. Additional shelly taxa include the solenopleurid trilobite Trachoparia? sp., the tommotiids Dailyatia odyssei, Dailyatia decobruta Betts sp. nov., Kelanella sp., and Lapworthella fasciculata, spines of the bradoriid arthropod Mongolitubulus squamifer, and several problematica, such as Stoibostrombus crenulatus and a variety of tubular forms. The upper age limit for the WPC is constrained by biostratigraphic data from the overlying Marsden Sandstone and Emu Bay Shale, which are no younger than the Pararaia janeae Trilobite Zone (Cambrian Series 2, Stage 4). The shelly fossil assemblage from the WPC limestone clasts indicates an upper Dailyatia odyssei Zone (= Pararaia tatei to lower P. janeae trilobite zones), equivalent to the Atdabanian–early Botoman of the Siberian scheme. This contrasts with the previously suggested late Botoman age for the limestone clasts, based on the diverse archaeocyath assemblage. The minor age difference between the WPC and its fossiliferous limestone clasts suggests relatively rapid reworking of biohermal buildups during tectonically-active phases of deposition in the Stansbury Basin.

    Keywords
    Brachiopoda, Trilobita, Tommotiida, chronostratigraphy, early Cambrian, Australia
    National Category
    Geology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-394982 (URN)10.4202/app.00586.2018 (DOI)000486595900004 ()
    Available from: 2019-10-11 Created: 2019-10-11 Last updated: 2020-02-26Bibliographically approved
    6. Integrated chronostratigraphy of the lower Cambrian Byrd Group, Transantarctic Mountains
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrated chronostratigraphy of the lower Cambrian Byrd Group, Transantarctic Mountains
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    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Antarctica and Australia were sutured together straddling the equator during the major pulse of animal biodiversification associated with the Cambrian radiation. However, lack of detailed systematic sampling of lower Cambrian sedimentary packages from Antarctica has significantly impeded precise age determination and correlation with other Cambrian paleocontinents, especially with other parts of East Gondwana. Here were present new, integrated biostratigraphic and chemostratigraphic (δ13C isotopes) data from three stratigraphic sections measured through autochthonous shallow water carbonates (including archaeocyath-microbial bioherms) from the lower Cambrian Byrd Group in the Transantarctic Mountains. Recovered shelly fossil assemblages (brachiopods, tommotiids, molluscs, trilobites) from the Holyoake and Churchill Ranges include conspecific taxa previously described from Hawker Group rocks in the Arrowie Basin of South Australia facilitating direct correlation with the upper Dailyatia odyssei biozone. Synchronous chemostratigraphic data capture a distinctive positive 𝛿13C excursion in the Churchill Range interpreted as the global Mingxinsi Carbon Isotope Excursion (MICE) peak. A succeeding gradual negative 𝛿13C excursion captured in the Churchill and Holyoake sections is interpreted as the global Archaeocyathid Extinction Carbon Isotope Excursion (AECE) event. There is no chemostratigraphic evidence for the large Redlichiid-Olenellid Extinction Carbon Isotope Excursion (ROECE) negative event that straddles and defines the Cambrian Stage 4 – Miaolingian boundary. Hence, the integrated faunal and new chemostratigraphic data presented herein strongly support a Cambrian Stage 4 age for the upper Shackleton Limestone – Holyoake Formation – Starshot Formation succession of the Byrd Group.

    Keywords
    Cambrian Series 2, East Antarctica, Biostratigraphy, Chemostratigraphy, Carbon Isotopes
    National Category
    Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-405194 (URN)
    Available from: 2020-02-26 Created: 2020-02-26 Last updated: 2020-02-26
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  • 115.
    Claybourn, Thomas M
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Holmer, Lars E
    Uppsala University.
    Skovsted, Christian B
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet.
    Topper, Timothy P
    Durham University.
    Brock, Glenn A
    Macquarie University.
    Cambrian Series 2, Stage 3–4 micromolluscs from the Shackleton Limestone, Central Transantarctic Mountains, East AntarcticaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An assemblage of lower Cambrian (Series 2, Stages 3–4) molluscan fossils from the Shackleton Limestone, Transantarctic Mountains, East Antarctica is formally described and illustrated. The assemblage is composed of one bivalve and ten helcionelloid molluscs, including the first discovery of the genus Xinjispira outside North China. The new fauna shows some similarity to previously described micromollusc assemblages from lower Cambrian glacial erratics from the Antarctic Peninsula. The fauna of the Shackleton Limestone is mainly composed of steinkerns, and of relatively low diversity, but the presence of key taxa, including the molluscs Mackinnonia rostrata and Pojetaia runnegari and the tommotiid Dailyatia odyssei strengthens correlation to the newly defined Dailyatia oddysei Zone of South Australia

  • 116.
    Claybourn, Thomas M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Macquarie University.
    Skovsted, Christian B.
    Holmer, Lars E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Northwest University, Xián, China.
    Pan, Bing
    Myrow, Paul M.
    Topper, Timothy P.
    Brock, Glenn A.
    Brachiopods from the Byrd Group (Cambrian Series 2, Stage 4) Central Transantarctic Mountains, East Antarctica: Biostratigraphy, Phylogeny and Systematics2020In: Papers in Palaeontology, ISSN 2056-2799, E-ISSN 2056-2802, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 349-383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brachiopods from Cambrian Series 2, Stage 4 carbonate strata of the Byrd Group in the Central Transantarctic Mountains, East Antarctica, are described for the first time. These include six lingulate, one paterinate and one rhynchonelliform taxon, including the new lingulate brachiopod Plicarmus wildi gen. et sp. nov. The biostratigraphy correlates closely to the brachiopods recently reported from the Xinji Formation (Shuiyu section) in North China, as well as brachiopods recovered from the Dailyatia odyssei Zone across the Arrowie Basin of South Australia. These findings also support the previously identified close palaeobiogeographyof these regions. The first unambiguous example of the acrotretid brachiopod Eohadrotreta zhenbaensis Li & Holmer outside South China is also identified in the context of its ontogenetic stages. Well-preserved specimens of the acrotheloid Schizopholis yorkensis (Holmer & Ushatinskaya) facilitate a new reconstruction of its musculature and visceral region. These data are synthesized into a new cladistic analysis that resolves Acrotheloidea as a well-supported monophyletic clade and supports previous hypotheses of a morphocline in acrotheloid evolution.

  • 117.
    Claybourn, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Skovsted, Christian B.
    Betts, Marissa J.
    Holmer, Lars E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Northwest University, Xián, China.
    Bassett-Butt, Lucy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Brock, Glenn A.
    Camenellan tommotiids from the Cambrian Series 2 of East Antarctica: Biostratigraphy, palaeobiogeography, and systematics2021In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 207-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cambrian Series 2 shelly fossils from thick carbonate successions in East Antarctica have received limited systematic treatment through the 20th century. Described here are the East Antarctic camenellan tommotiids from the Shackleton Limestone in the Central Transantarctic Mountains and the Schneider Hills limestone in the Argentina Range. This material comes from both newly sampled collections and incompletely described material from older collections. The assemblage supports correlation to the Dailyatia odyssei Zone and Pararaia janeae Trilobite Zone of South Australia, with the newly examined specimens of Dailyatia decobruta from the Shackleton Limestone providing direct correlation to the Mernmerna Formation of the Ikara-Flinders Ranges and White Point Conglomerate of Kangaroo Island. These East Antarctic assemblages include five species referred to Dailyatia, in addition to an undetermined kennardiid species and fragments of the problematic Shetlandia multiplicata. The results further corroborate the notion that fossiliferous carbonate clasts found on King George Island were sourced from the same carbonate shelf as the Shackleton Limestone, with the taxon S. multiplicata found in both units. The Schneider Hills limestone in the Argentina Range has yielded sclerites of Dailyatia icari sp. nov., currently only known from this location.

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  • 118.
    Clement, Alice M.
    et al.
    Flinders Univ S Australia, Coll Sci & Engn, Adelaide, Australia..
    Challands, Tom J.
    Univ Edinburgh, Sch Geosci, Edinburgh, Scotland..
    Cloutier, Richard
    Univ Quebec Rimouski, Dept Biol Chim & Geog, Rimouski, PQ, Canada..
    Houle, Laurent
    Univ Quebec Rimouski, Dept Biol Chim & Geog, Rimouski, PQ, Canada..
    Ahlberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Collin, Shaun P.
    La Trobe Univ, Sch Life Sci, Melbourne, Australia..
    Long, John A.
    Flinders Univ S Australia, Coll Sci & Engn, Adelaide, Australia..
    Morphometric analysis of lungfish endocasts elucidates early dipnoan palaeoneurological evolution2022In: eLIFE, E-ISSN 2050-084X, Vol. 11, article id e73461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lobe-finned fish, lungfish (Dipnoi, Sarcoptergii), have persisted for ~400 million years from the Devonian Period to present day. The evolution of their dermal skull and dentition is relatively well understood, but this is not the case for the central nervous system. While the brain has poor preservation potential and is not currently known in any fossil lungfish, substantial indirect information about it and associated structures (e.g. labyrinths) can be obtained from the cranial endocast. However, before the recent development of X-ray tomography as a palaeontological tool, these endocasts could not be studied non-destructively, and few detailed studies were undertaken. Here, we describe and illustrate the endocasts of six Palaeozoic lungfish from tomographic scans. We combine these with six previously described digital lungfish endocasts (4 fossil and 2 recent taxa) into a 12-taxon dataset for multivariate morphometric analysis using 17 variables. We find that the olfactory region is more highly plastic than the hindbrain, and undergoes significant elongation in several taxa. Further, while the semicircular canals covary as an integrated module, the utriculus and sacculus vary independently of each other. Functional interpretation suggests that olfaction has remained a dominant sense throughout lungfish evolution, and changes in the labyrinth may potentially reflect a change from nektonic to near-shore environmental niches. Phylogenetic implications show that endocranial form fails to support monophyly of the 'chirodipterids'. Those with elongated crania similarly fail to form a distinct clade, suggesting these two paraphyletic groups have converged towards either head elongation or truncation driven by non-phylogenetic constraints.

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  • 119.
    Clement, Alice M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Flinders Univ S Australia, Sch Biol Sci, Adelaide, SA, Australia.;Museum Victoria, Dept Sci, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Challands, Tom J.
    Univ Edinburgh, Sch Geosci, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Long, John A.
    Flinders Univ S Australia, Sch Biol Sci, Adelaide, SA, Australia..
    Ahlberg, Per E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    The cranial endocast of Dipnorhynchus sussmilchi (Sarcopterygii: Dipnoi) and the interrelationships of stem-group lungfishes2016In: PeerJ, E-ISSN 2167-8359, Vol. 4, article id e2539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first virtual cranial endocast of a lungfish from the Early Devonian, Dipnorhynchus sussmilchi, is described. Dipnorhynchus, only the fourth Devonian lungfish for which a near complete cranial endocast is known, is a key taxon for clarifying primitive character states within the group. A ventrally-expanded telencephalic cavity is present in the endocast of Dipnorhynchus demonstrating that this is the primitive state for "true" Dipnoi. Dipnorhynchus also possesses a utricular recess differentiated from the sacculolagenar pouch like that seen in stratigraphically younger lungfish (Dipterus, Chirodipterus, Rhinodipterus), but absent from the dipnomorph Youngolepis. We do not find separate pineal and para-pineal canals in contrast to a reconstruction from previous authors. We conduct the first phylogenetic analysis of Dipnoi based purely on endocast characters, which supports a basal placement of Dipnorhynchus within the dipnoan stem group, in agreement with recent analyses. Our analysis demonstrates the value of endocast characters for inferring phylogenetic relationships.

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  • 120.
    Cosgrove, Christopher
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Zdanowicz, Christian M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Ingvander, Susanne
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Environmental controls on snow water equivalent in two sub-Arctic mountain catchments2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Spatial variability of seasonal snow depth poses a challenge when estimating snow water equivalent (SWE) from in-situ measurements in mountainous areas. Poor accessibility, complex topographic effects and localized microclimates make extrapolation of in-situ SWE measurements to a basin scale difficult. Remotely-sensed passive microwave SWE products are also inaccurate in complex terrain and/or at the forest-alpine tundra transition zone. To address these caveats, we investigated the relative importance of landscape qualities (altitude, slope, aspect, vegetation) and climate (winter temperatures, precipitation) on SWE distribution in two sub-Arctic mountainous catchments in Hemavan, Sweden, and Wolf Creek, Yukon, Canada. The two catchments are comparable, but have contrasted climate regimes. In-situ SWE measurements were made in March-April 2014 across the forest-tundra ecotone in both catchments. These were supplemented with historical snow-survey data since 2012 in Hemavan, and 1993 in Wolf Creek. Pairwise linear regressions of SWE against different landscape factors indicate that overall, altitude exerts the largest control on SWE at both Hemavan and Wolf Creek, but its effect is lesser within individual vegetation zones. In other respects, the two sites differ. SWE is inversely correlated to surface slope at forested sites in Hemavan (R^2 = 0.57, p = 0.25), but not in Wolf Creek. Slope aspect is positively correlated with SWE at forest-tundra transition sites (R^2 = 0.49, p = 0.12) in Wolf Creek, but not in Hemavan. For alpine tundra sites, slope angle strongly influences SWE in Hemavan (R^2 = 0.58, p = 0.24), but only weakly in Wolf Creek (R^2 = 0.05, p = 0.71). We discuss possible causes of these inter-catchment differences, and also evaluate the effect of inter-annual climate variations on SWE distribution at Wolf Creek using the long-term snow-survey record. Finally, we compare and discuss SWE estimates obtained by three different field measurement methods.

  • 121.
    Courtney Mustaphi, Colin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History. Univ York, Environm Dept, York Inst Trop Ecosyst, Wentworth Way, York, N Yorkshire, England.
    Gajewski, Konrad
    Univ Ottawa, Dept Geog Environm & Geomat, Lab Paleoclimatol & Climatol, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
    Marchant, Rob
    Univ York, Environm Dept, York Inst Trop Ecosyst, Wentworth Way, York, N Yorkshire, England.
    Rosqvist, Gunhild
    Stockholm Univ, Inst Naturgeog, Stockholm, Sweden.
    A late Holocene pollen record from proglacial Oblong Tarn, Mount Kenya2017In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 9, article id e0184925Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-elevation ecosystems, such as those on Mount Kenya are undergoing significant changes, with accelerated glacial ice losses over the twentieth century creating new space for alpine plants to establish. These ecosystems respond rapidly to climatic variability and within decades of glacial retreat, Afroalpine pioneering taxa stabilize barren land and facilitate soil development, promoting complex patches of alpine vegetation. Periglacial lake sediment records can be used to examine centennial and millennial scale variations in alpine and montane vegetation compositions. Here we present a 5300-year composite pollen record from an alpine tarn (4370 m asl) in the Hausberg Valley of Mount Kenya. Overall, the record shows little apparent variation in the pollen assemblage through time with abundant montane forest taxa derived and transported from mid elevations, notably high abundances of aerophilous Podocarpus pollen. Afroalpine taxa included Alchemilla, Helichrysum and Dendrosenecio-type, reflecting local vegetation cover. Pollen from the ericaceous zone was present throughout the record and Poaceae percentages were high, similar to other high elevation pollen records from eastern Africa. The Oblong Tarn record pollen assemblage composition and abundances of Podocarpus and Poaceae since the late Holocene (similar to 4000 cal yr BP-present) are similar to pollen records from mid-to-high elevation sites of nearby high mountains such as Mount Elgon and Kilimanjaro. These results suggest a significant amount of uphill pollen transport with only minor apparent variation in local taxa. Slight decreasing trends in alpine and ericaceous taxonomic groups show a long-term response to global late Holocene cooling and a step decrease in rate of change estimated from the pollen assemblages at 3100 cal yr BP in response to regional hydroclimatic variability. Changes in the principal component axis scores of the pollen assemblage were coherent with an independent mid-elevation temperature reconstruction, which supported the strong influence of uphill pollen transport from montane forest vegetation and association between temperatures and montane vegetation dynamics. Pollen accumulation rates showed some variability related to minerogenic sediment input to the lake. The Oblong Tarn pollen record provides an indication of long term vegetation change atop Mount Kenya showing some decreases in local alpine and ericaceous taxa from 5300-3100 cal yr BP and minor centennial-scale variability of montane taxa from mid elevation forests. The record highlights potentials, challenges and opportunities for the use of proglacial lacustrine sediment to examine vegetation change on prominent mountain massifs.

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  • 122.
    Couser, Griffith
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    The Case for Icebreakers2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis assesses the potential success of the United States’ newly assumed role as chairman of the Arctic Council in light of its own record of development in Alaska, its only Arctic territory. Using primary and secondary qualitative research, perspectives from multiple stakeholders are analyzed to assess the United States’ current capabilities in the Arctic versus its rhetoric and responsibilities. To gauge this more effectively, the theory of problem-solving capacity is used to analyze the United States’ potential capacity in the Arctic Council, while the theory of environmental security is used to analyze the United States’ level of investment and commitment to Alaska. With development in Alaska minimal at best and local communities at risk from environmental impacts, the ideal tool for addressing these deficiencies is identified to be icebreakers operated by the United States Coast Guard. Impediments to acquiring sufficient icebreaking capacity are explored, with the conclusion that if the United States is to take effective action on the Arctic stage, investment in icebreakers and therefore the environment and inhabitants of the Arctic is necessary. Not doing so reveals the USA’s agenda to be empty rhetoric and consequently this lost opportunity for leadership may lead to catastrophic results for the region.

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    Couser Thesis
  • 123.
    Covey, Judith
    et al.
    Durham University.
    Horwell, Claire J.
    Durham University.
    Ogawa, Ryoichi
    Kagoshima University.
    Baba, Takeshi
    Kagoshima University.
    Nishimura, Satoru
    Kagoshima University.
    Hagino, Makoto
    Kagoshima University.
    Merli, Claudia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology.
    Community perceptions of protective practices to prevent ash exposures around Sakurajima volcano, Japan2020In: International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, E-ISSN 2212-4209, Vol. 46, article id 101525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whilst, globally, volcanic eruptions are unusual and cause anxiety in affected communities, people living near Sakurajima volcano, Japan are exposed to frequent ashfall with little-to-no official intervention. As part of a wider project, this study assessed how this apparently normalised experience affects residents’ perceptions of health impacts, and whether it is important to protect themselves from ash inhalation. A survey of 749 residents found little evidence of normalisation. Respondents identified a range of symptoms (including eye irritation, low mood, sore throat, cough) perceived to be associated with ash exposure, with 67% experiencing at least one symptom. Only 6% of respondents thought it was not important to protect themselves, and path analysis showed that protection was particularly important to older people and those with existing respiratory disease, who were more likely to rate ash as harmful or associate symptoms with exposures. Therefore, some of the most vulnerable sectors of this community are adversely impacted by ash. However, despite the local government recommending protective measures, most respondents said they had not received advice, but would like to. They took actions that they thought were effective (keeping windows/doors closed) or were easily available (wearing surgical masks). Other research has shown that industry-certified (e.g., N95) masks are more effective than surgical masks. Here, respondents recognised this, but high-efficiency masks were rarely used, probably due to unavailability. The results demonstrate a need to provide ash-affected communities with targeted, evidence-based information on options for effective protection, coupled with ensuring that communities have access to suggested interventions.

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  • 124.
    Cruciani, F.
    et al.
    Univ Perugia, Dept Phys & Geol, I-06123 Perugia, Italy..
    Barchi, M. R.
    Univ Perugia, Dept Phys & Geol, I-06123 Perugia, Italy..
    Koyi, Hemin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics.
    Porreca, M.
    Univ Perugia, Dept Phys & Geol, I-06123 Perugia, Italy..
    Kinematic evolution of a regional-scale gravity-driven deepwater fold-and-thrust belt: The Lamu Basin case-history (East Africa)2017In: Tectonophysics, ISSN 0040-1951, E-ISSN 1879-3266, Vol. 712-713, p. 30-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The deepwater fold-and-thrust belts (DWFTBs) are geological structures recently explored thanks to advances in offshore seismic imaging by oil industry. In this study we present a kinematic analysis based on three balanced cross-sections of depth-converted, 2-D seismic profiles along the offshore Lamu Basin (East African passive margin). This margin is characterized by a regional-scale DWFTB (>450 km long), which is the product of gravity-driven contraction on the shelf that exhibits complex structural styles and differing amount of shortening along strike. Net shortening is up to 48 km in the northern wider part of the fold-and-thrust belt (approximate to 180 km), diminishing to <15 km toward the south, where the belt is markedly narrower (approximate to 50 km). The three balanced profiles show a shortening percentage around 20% (comparable with the maximum values documented in other gravity-driven DWFTBs), with a significant variability along dip: higher values are achieved in the outer (i.e. down-dip) portion of the system, dominated by basinward-verging, imbricate thrust sheets. Fold wavelength increases landward, where doubly-verging structures and symmetric detachment folds accommodate a lower amount of shortening. Similar to other cases, a linear and systematic relationship between sedimentary thickness and fold wavelength is observed. Reconstruction of the rate of shortening through time within a fold-and-thrust belt shows that after an early phase of slow activation (Late Cretaceous), >95% of net shortening was produced in <10 Myr (during Paleocene). During this acme phase, which followed a period of high sedimentation rate, thrusts were largely synchronous and the shortening rate reached a maximum value of 5 mm/yr. The kinematic evolution reconstructed in this study suggests that the structural evolution of gravity-driven fold-and-thrust belts differs from the accretionary wedges and the collisional fold-and-thrust belts, where thrusts propagate in-sequence and shortening is uniformly accommodated along dip.

  • 125.
    Dahlgren, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Two Boat Lake as an Historical Archive for Future Studies by GRASP: Greenland Analogue Surface Project2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Two Boat Lake is a non-glacial lake situated within the largest ice free area on

    Greenland. This literary study has investigated whether it could potentially become a

    good environmental archive in future studies. As a periglacial lake with permafrost

    and a talik at its bottom, Two Boat Lake is interesting for the Greenland Analogue

    Surface Project (GRASP) from the Swedish Nuclear and Waste Management (SKB)

    when investigating the ecology and hydrology of a landscape that will be similar to a

    future glaciated repository in Sweden. The purpose of this report is to analyse data of

    the sediment thickness in the lake, gathered with ground penetrating radar, to see

    where the best place would be to drill a sediment core in future studies. Different

    articles were studied to compare advantages and disadvantages of methods focusing

    on geomorphology, organic content, fossils and isotopes or chemical analyses. The

    result shows a maximum sediment thickness in the northern part of Two Boat Lake.

    As a conclusion, the studied methods, the maximum sediment thickness and the

    regional setting was compared to propose an approach when analysing future

    sediment cores.

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  • 126.
    Davidsson, Simon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Natural resources and sustainable energy: Growth rates and resource flows for low-carbon systems2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Large-scale deployment of low-carbon energy technologies is important for counteracting anthropogenic climate change and achieving universal energy access. This thesis explores potential growth rates of technologies necessary to reach a more sustainable global energy system, the material and energy flows required to commission these technologies, and potential future availability of the required resources.

    These issues are investigated in five papers. Potential future growth rates of wind energy and solar photovoltaics, and the associated material requirements are explored, taking the expected service life of these technologies into account. Methodology for assessing net energy return and natural resource use for wind energy systems are analyzed. Potential future availability of lithium and phosphate rock are also investigated.

    Estimates of energy and materials required for technologies such as wind energy and photovoltaics vary, and depend on the assumptions made and methods used. Still, it is clear that commissioning of low-carbon technologies on the scale required to reach and sustain a low-carbon energy system in coming decades requires significant quantities of both bulk materials and scarcer resources. For some technologies, such as thin film solar cells and electric vehicles with lithium-ion batteries, availability of materials could become an issue for potential growth rates. Future phosphate rock production could become highly dependent on few countries, and potential political, social and environmental aspects of this should be investigated in more detail.

    Material and energy flows should be considered when analyzing growth rates of low-carbon technologies. Their estimated service life can indicate sustainable growth rates of technologies, as well as when materials are available for end-of-life recycling. Resource constrained growth curve models can be used to explore future production of natural resources. A higher disaggregation of these models can enable more detailed analysis of potential constraints. This thesis contributes to the discussion on how to create a more sustainable global energy system, but the methods to assess current and future energy and material flows, and availability of natural resources, should be further developed in the future.

    List of papers
    1. Growth curves and sustained commissioning modelling of renewable energy: Investigating resource constraints for wind energy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Growth curves and sustained commissioning modelling of renewable energy: Investigating resource constraints for wind energy
    2014 (English)In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 73, p. 767-776Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Several recent studies have proposed fast transitions to energy systems based on renewable energy technology. Many of them dismiss potential physical constraints and issues with natural resource supply, and do not consider the growth rates of the individual technologies needed or how the energy systems are to be sustained over longer time frames. A case study is presented modelling potential growth rates of the wind energy required to reach installed capacities proposed in other studies, taking into account the expected service life of wind turbines. A sustained commissioning model is proposed as a theoretical foundation for analysing reasonable growth patterns for technologies that can be sustained in the future. The annual installation and related resource requirements to reach proposed wind capacity are quantified and it is concluded that these factors should be considered when assessing the feasibility, and even the sustainability, of fast energy transitions. Even a sustained commissioning scenario would require significant resource flows, for the transition as well as for sustaining the system, indefinitely. Recent studies that claim there are no potential natural resource barriers or other physical constraints to fast transitions to renewable energy appear inadequate in ruling out these concerns.

    Keywords
    Growth curves, Natural resources, Renewable energy, Wind energy, Sustainability, Energy systems
    National Category
    Energy Systems
    Research subject
    Engineering Science with specialization in the Science of Global Energy Resources
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-225554 (URN)10.1016/j.enpol.2014.05.003 (DOI)000341474100072 ()
    Funder
    StandUp
    Available from: 2014-06-04 Created: 2014-06-04 Last updated: 2022-01-28Bibliographically approved
    2. Material requirements and availability for multi-terawatt deployment of photovoltaics
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Material requirements and availability for multi-terawatt deployment of photovoltaics
    (English)Article in journal (Other academic) Submitted
    Keywords
    solar energy, photovoltaics, critical materials, energy metals, renewable energy, recycling
    National Category
    Energy Systems Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-301946 (URN)
    External cooperation:
    Funder
    StandUp
    Available from: 2016-08-26 Created: 2016-08-26 Last updated: 2018-05-08
    3. A review of life cycle assessments on wind energy systems
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A review of life cycle assessments on wind energy systems
    2012 (English)In: The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, ISSN 0948-3349, E-ISSN 1614-7502, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 729-742Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Several life cycle assessments (LCA) of wind energy published in recent years are reviewed to identify methodological differences and underlying assumptions.

    Methods

    A full comparative analysis of 12 studies were undertaken (10 peer-reviewed papers, 1 conference paper, 1 industry report) regarding six fundamental factors (methods used, energy use accounting, quantification of energy production, energy performance and primary energy,  natural resources, and recycling). Each factor is discussed in detail to highlight strengths and shortcomings of various approaches.

    Results

    Several potential issues are found concerning the way LCA methods are used for assessing energy performance and environmental impact of wind energy, as well as dealing with natural resource use and depletion. The potential to evaluate natural resource use and depletion impacts from wind energy appears to be poorly exploited or elaborated on in the reviewed studies. Estimations of energy performance and environmental impacts are critically analyzed and found to differ significantly.

    Conclusions and recommendations

    A continued discussion and development of LCA methodology for wind energy and other energy resources are encouraged. Efforts should be made to standardize methods and calculations. Inconsistent use of terminology and concepts among the analyzed studies are found and should be remedied. Different methods are generally used and the results are presented in diverse ways, making it hard to compare studies with each other, but also with other renewable energy sources.

    Keywords
    life cycle assessment, wind energy, wind power, natural resource use, primary energy conversion, energy accounting
    National Category
    Energy Systems Environmental Management Civil Engineering Environmental Analysis and Construction Information Technology Environmental Sciences Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
    Research subject
    Physics with specialization in Global Energy Resources
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-168922 (URN)10.1007/s11367-012-0397-8 (DOI)000304879800008 ()
    Projects
    StandUp for Energy
    Available from: 2012-02-20 Created: 2012-02-19 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    4. Lithium availability and future production outlooks
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lithium availability and future production outlooks
    2013 (English)In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 110, no 10, p. 252-266Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Lithium is a highly interesting metal, in part due to the increasing interest in lithium-ion batteries. Several recent studies have used different methods to estimate whether the lithium production can meet an increasing demand, especially from the transport sector, where lithium-ion batteries are the most likely technology for electric cars. The reserve and resource estimates of lithium vary greatly between different studies and the question whether the annual production rates of lithium can meet a growing demand is seldom adequately explained. This study presents a review and compilation of recent estimates of quantities of lithium available for exploitation and discusses the uncertainty and differences between these estimates. Also, mathematical curve fitting models are used to estimate possible future annual production rates. This estimation of possible production rates are compared to a potential increased demand of lithium if the International Energy Agency’s Blue Map Scenarios are fulfilled regarding electrification of the car fleet. We find that the availability of lithium could in fact be a problem for fulfilling this scenario if lithium-ion batteries are to be used. This indicates that other battery technologies might have to be implemented for enabling an electrification of road transports.

    Keywords
    Peak lithium, Electric vehicles, Lithium production, Lithium supply, Resource-constrained modelling, Lithium battery cars
    National Category
    Geosciences, Multidisciplinary Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Environmental Sciences Energy Systems Other Environmental Engineering
    Research subject
    Physics with specialization in Global Energy Resources
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-199784 (URN)10.1016/j.apenergy.2013.04.005 (DOI)000321601900024 ()
    Projects
    Stand
    Available from: 2013-05-14 Created: 2013-05-14 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    5. Phosphate rock production and depletion: Regional disaggregated modeling and global implications
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Phosphate rock production and depletion: Regional disaggregated modeling and global implications
    2014 (English)In: Resources, Conservation and Recycling, ISSN 0921-3449, E-ISSN 1879-0658, Vol. 93, p. 178-187Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Numerous recent studies discuss phosphate rock extraction, and some even propose that a peak in production could be reached in coming decades. This would have great consequences as phosphate rock based fertilizers are irreplaceable in modern agriculture. Studies suggesting an impending peak commonly use curve fitting models where mathematical functions are fitted to historical world production data, while studies using other methods reach completely different results. Also, a sudden increase in global reserve estimates is commonly used to dismiss these warnings, and has somewhat altered the debate. The recent multiplication of estimated reserves is mostly based on an increase of the Moroccan reserve estimate, leading to Morocco currently making up most of the global reserves. This study models global phosphate rock production using a disaggregated curve fitting model based on the production in individual major producing countries, providing a somewhat different view than most studies, and show that the global trade of phosphate rock could be completely dependent on Morocco in the future. There are several different factors that can potentially limit global production and these factors should be considered for the individual producing countries. Society’s total dependence on phosphate rock should be further investigated despite claims of large resource occurrences.

    Keywords
    Phosphorus, Phosphate rock, Peak minerals, Resource depletion, Fertilizer, Curve fitting modeling
    National Category
    Energy Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-238213 (URN)10.1016/j.resconrec.2014.10.011 (DOI)000347594000017 ()
    Funder
    StandUp
    Available from: 2014-12-10 Created: 2014-12-10 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
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  • 127.
    Davidsson, Simon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Höök, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Material requirements and availability for multi-terawatt deployment of photovoltaicsArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 128.
    de Anca Prado, Violeta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm , Sweden.
    McLoughlin, Stephen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Discovering the world of fossil fungi2020In: Deposits Magazine, ISSN 1744-9588, p. 1-7Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    When people think of fossils, they usually picture slabs of rock bristling with bones, or the shells of ammonites or trilobites. Most do not even consider that delicate organisms, such as fungi or bacteria, can even fossilize – they seem too fragile to be preserved as they lack a hard skeleton. In many cases this is true. Microscopic organisms that lack hard parts have fewer chances of being fossilised but, despite the odds, delicate fungi have a fossil record that is more extensive than generally thought.

  • 129. De Schutter, Ann
    et al.
    Kervyn, Matthieu
    Canters, Frank
    Bosshard-Stadlin, Sonja
    Songo, Majura
    Mattsson, Hannes
    Ash fall impact on vegetation: a remote sensing approach of the Oldoinyo Lengai2007–08 eruption2015In: Journal of Applied Volcanology, E-ISSN 2191-5040, Vol. 4, no 15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Impacts from ash fallout on the environment can be widespread and long lasting, even from moderate-sizeeruptions. Assessing ash impact on vegetation and the indirect impacts for people is often difficult in the field. Hereit is assessed how satellite data can help to map vegetation affected by ash and how temporal analysis enablescharacterization of vegetation recovery rate. The 2007–08 eruption of Oldoinyo Lengai, north Tanzania, is here usedas a case study. An 8 year-long (2005–2012) time series of half-monthly average of the Normalized DifferentialVegetation Index (NDVI) is constructed at 250 m spatial resolution from the Moderate Resolution ImageSpectro-radiometer (MODIS) sensor. Interpolated rainfall data is used to isolate NDVI values departing from the normalseasonal cycles. Month-to-month NDVI comparison, linear temporal trend analysis and Principal Component Analysisenable to identify a 11 × 4 km area over which ash fallout significantly affected the state of the vegetation. After theeruption’s end, time series of various recovery indices highlight a circumferential pattern in vegetation recovery. Theestimated recovery time varies from more than 5 years to less than 6 months with increasing distance from thevolcano. A non-linear moderate, but statistically significant, relationship is found between the recovery indices and thespatial variation of ash thicknesses measured in the field. Combining field and remote sensing constraints enable tore-assess the volume of the eruption to ~2 × 107 m3. The spatial pattern of the ash-affected area matches with thespatial contrast in the impact experienced by the local communities. The method applied here opens the scope todocument impact and intensity of ash fallout in areas where systematic field work is not possible and to supportrecovery plans for populations affected by ash fallout.

  • 130.
    Dekker, Kaely
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    The Dollars and Cents of Driving and Cycling: Calculating the Full Costs of Transportation in Calgary, Canada2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Many cities across the globe are working to facilitate cycling as a sustainable transportation mode through changes to public policy and investments in infrastructure. Examining the costs and benefits of both driving and cycling using the cost benefit analysis (CBA) framework developed in Copenhagen provides an opportunity to identify private and social costs associated with these modes of transport with respect to environmental, social, and economic impacts. This paper outlines the methods used to calculate the per-kilometre costs of driving and cycling in Calgary, Canada, utilizing real-world data and methods from Canadian and global best-practice with the Copenhagen CBA framework as a guide. Transportation costs were calculated for travel time, vehicle ownership, health, collisions, air pollution, climate change, noise, roadway degradation, congestion, and winter maintenance for both driving and cycling. When the costs borne by both individuals and society are calculated for Calgary (in 2015 Canadian dollars) driving costs $0.83 per kilometre and cycling costs $0.08 per kilometre. When the social costs of transport are isolated, the cost of driving one kilometre is $0.10, while cycling one kilometre generates a net social benefit of $0.35. The results of this research show that the Copenhagen CBA framework can be applied in jurisdictions outside Denmark to calculate environmental, social, and economic costs of driving and cycling.

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    Dekker2016_DollarsAndCentsOfDrivingAndCycling
  • 131.
    Dekking, Anoek
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Phase Out the Old to Phase In the New: Managing the Heat Transition in Leiden, the Netherlands2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    By 2050, the Netherlands wants to reduce its use of natural gas for heating to zero. Currently, over 90%of houses are dependent on the fossil resource to warm their houses. As such, the phase-out of natural gas hasbecome an important policy project. The government delegated the formulation of the phase-out strategy andexecution to the 347 municipalities. This thesis examines how one municipality, Leiden, has formulated andimplemented this strategy. In doing so, the thesis addresses two matters in the literature on energy transitionswhich have received little attention: heating and deliberate decline. Traditionally, the focus within this field hasbeen on electricity and innovation. This thesis aims to find out to what extent the Transition Management (TM)framework by Derk Loorbach (2010) can be applied as a guide to a phase-out policy formulation process of theWarmtevisie of the Dutch municipality of Leiden. The thesis uses the process tracing methodology to combinedata generated from document analysis and two interviews with policy makers involved in the policy formulationprocess. By comparing the process followed in Leiden with the analytical framework of TM, the thesis shows thatthe TM framework could be used to guide to the phase-out policy formulation process to a large extent. However,the case study also shows that knowledge and expertise must increase substantially for a sound strategy to emerge.Additionally, it shows that even within phase-out strategies the focus remains on innovation practises. 

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  • 132.
    den Boer, Wendy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Evolutionary Progression of the Iconic Australasian Kangaroos, Rat-Kangaroos, and their Fossil Relatives (Marsupialia: Macropodiformes)2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The exceptionally diverse macropodiform’s (kangaroos, rat-kangaroos and their fossil allies) currently have a fossil record that spans from the late Oligocene to the Holocene with an Australasian widespread fossil occurence. The origins of the macropodiforms are believed to have been during the Eocene possibly having split from the Phalangeridae. This is largely based on molecular data as there is a complete lack of macropodiform fossil material prior to the late Oligocene leaving the origins of the macropodiforms to be largely speculative. Thus, late Oligocene rat-kangaroo dental fossil elements associated with Palaeopotorous priscus (which shares characteristics observed in both phalangerid and macropodiforms) were examined to get a better insight into the potential origins of the macropodiforms. The results obtained suggested that P. priscus is currently the most basal macropodiform known. Furthermore, due to the absence of adequate macropodiform post-cranial material, the functional eco-morphological interpretation of various macropodiform fossil taxa has been based largely on cranial and dental characteristics. Consequently, the examination of Miocene Balbaridae kangaroo’s (Balbaroo nalima and an untaxonomised balbarid) post-cranial elements was undertaken, suggesting an array of locomotion types (similar to living macropodiforms) and a likely persistent arboreal and quadrupedal lifestyle. In addition, the Pleistocene Protemnodon anak’s post-cranial material are examined, proposing a probable combination of quadrupedal bounding and a slow walking gait alternative to the eminent fast bipedal saltation seen in almost all extant macropodiforms.

    List of papers
    1. A New Species of the Basal "Kangaroo'' Balbaroo and a Re-Evaluation of Stem Macropodiform Interrelationships
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A New Species of the Basal "Kangaroo'' Balbaroo and a Re-Evaluation of Stem Macropodiform Interrelationships
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 11, p. e112705-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Exceptionally well-preserved skulls and postcranial elements of a new species of the plesiomorphic stem macropodiform Balbaroo have been recovered from middle Miocene freshwater limestone deposits in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area of northwestern Queensland, Australia. This constitutes the richest intraspecific sample for any currently known basal "kangaroo'', and, along with additional material referred to Balbaroo fangaroo, provides new insights into structural variability within the most prolific archaic macropodiform clade - Balbaridae. Qualitative and metric evaluations of taxonomic boundaries demonstrate that the previously distinct species Nambaroo bullockensis is a junior synonym of B. camfieldensis. Furthermore, coupled Maximum Parsimony and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses reveal that our new Balbaroo remains represent the most derived member of the Balbaroo lineage, and are closely related to the middle Miocene B. camfieldensis, which like most named balbarid species is identifiable only from isolated jaws. The postcranial elements of Balbaroo concur with earlier finds of the stratigraphically oldest balbarid skeleton, Nambaroo gillespieae, and suggest that quadrupedal progression was a primary gait mode as opposed to bipedal saltation. All Balbaroo spp. have low-crowned bilophodont molars, which are typical for browsing herbivores inhabiting the densely forested environments envisaged for middle Miocene northeastern Australia.

    National Category
    Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-240097 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0112705 (DOI)000345533200034 ()25409233 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2015-01-05 Created: 2015-01-05 Last updated: 2021-06-14Bibliographically approved
    2. Is the Fossil Rat-Kangaroo Palaeopotorous pricus the Most Basally Branching Macropodiform?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is the Fossil Rat-Kangaroo Palaeopotorous pricus the Most Basally Branching Macropodiform?
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
    Research subject
    Earth Science with specialization in Historical Geology and Palaeontology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-339580 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-01-21 Created: 2018-01-21 Last updated: 2018-01-31Bibliographically approved
    3. Autopodial Anatomy Elucidate Climbing Ability in Miocene Balbarid 'kangaroos' (Marsupialia, Macropodifromes)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Autopodial Anatomy Elucidate Climbing Ability in Miocene Balbarid 'kangaroos' (Marsupialia, Macropodifromes)
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
    Research subject
    Earth Science with specialization in Historical Geology and Palaeontology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-339581 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-01-21 Created: 2018-01-21 Last updated: 2018-01-31Bibliographically approved
    4. Functional Eco-Morphology of the 'Giant Extinct Wallaby' Protemnodon anak from Morwell Local Fauna, Victoria, Australia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Functional Eco-Morphology of the 'Giant Extinct Wallaby' Protemnodon anak from Morwell Local Fauna, Victoria, Australia
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
    Research subject
    Earth Science with specialization in Historical Geology and Palaeontology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-339582 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-01-21 Created: 2018-01-21 Last updated: 2018-01-31Bibliographically approved
    5. Systematic Review of the Fossil Macropodiformes (Kangaroo, Rat-Kangaroos, and their Allies)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Systematic Review of the Fossil Macropodiformes (Kangaroo, Rat-Kangaroos, and their Allies)
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
    Research subject
    Earth Science with specialization in Historical Geology and Palaeontology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-339583 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-01-21 Created: 2018-01-21 Last updated: 2018-01-31Bibliographically approved
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  • 133.
    Den Boer, Wendy
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Campione, Nicolas E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Autopodial Anatomy Elucidate Climbing Ability in Miocene Balbarid 'kangaroos' (Marsupialia, Macropodifromes)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 134.
    Den Boer, Wendy
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Swedish Nat Hist Museum, Dept Palaeobiol, S-10405 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Campione, Nicolás E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Univ New England, Palaeosci Res Ctr, Sch Environm & Rural Sci, Armidale, NSW 2531, Australia.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Climbing adaptations, locomotory disparity and ecological convergence in ancient stem 'kangaroos'2019In: Royal Society Open Science, E-ISSN 2054-5703, Vol. 6, no 2, article id 181617Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Living kangaroos, wallabies and rat-kangaroos (Macropodoidea) constitute the most ecologically diverse radiation of Australasian marsupials. Indeed, even their hallmark bipedal hopping gait has been variously modified for bounding, walking and climbing. However, the origins of this locomotory adaptability are uncertain because skeletons of the most ancient macropodoids are exceptionally rare. Some of the stratigraphically oldest fossils have been attributed to Balbaridae-a clade of potentially quadrupedal stem macropodoids that became extinct during the late Miocene. Here we undertake the first assessment of balbarid locomotion using two-dimensional geometric morphometrics and a correlative multivariate analysis of linear measurements. We selected the astragalus and pedal digit IV ungual as proxies for primary gait because these elements are preserved in the only articulated balbarid skeleton, as well as some unusual early Miocene balbarid-like remains that resemble the bones of modern tree-kangaroos. Our results show that these fossils manifest character states indicative of contrasting locomotory capabilities. Furthermore, predictive modelling reveals similarities with extant macropodoids that employ either bipedal saltation and/or climbing. We interpret this as evidence for archetypal gait versatility, which probably integrated higher-speed hopping with slower-speed quadrupedal progression and varying degrees of scansoriality as independent specializations for life in forest and woodland settings.

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  • 135.
    den Boer, Wendy
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Kear, Benjamin
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Systematic Review of the Fossil Macropodiformes (Kangaroo, Rat-Kangaroos, and their Allies)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 136.
    Den Boer, Wendy
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Functional Eco-Morphology of the 'Giant Extinct Wallaby' Protemnodon anak from Morwell Local Fauna, Victoria, AustraliaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 137.
    Den Boer, Wendy
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Kear, Benjamin P.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Is the Fossil Rat-Kangaroo Palaeopotorous pricus the Most Basally Branching Macropodiform?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 138.
    Dencker, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Integrating sustainability assessments using PROMETHEE: Results from H2020 WATERAGRI2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Agriculture uses a large part of available land and freshwater resources across the earth. Intensified agriculture has led to increased resource use. Today’s agricultural research focuses on improving sustainability and lowering environmental impact. This thesis seeks to analyse the environmental and economic implications of using a water retainer product tested at a farm in Poland. To do this, three sustainability assessments, namely Life cycle analysis, Water footprint analysis and Cost-benefit analysis, are integrated with the multiple criteria decision analysis method Preference ranking organisation method for enrichment evaluation (PROMETHEE). The integration provided a more holistic perspective than the individual sustainability assessment results and made it possible to identify trade-offs between the environmental and economic dimensions. The results identify lower emissions and water use from the use of the water retainer but with higher costs and lower profits. The PROMETHEE results indicate that the method is adequate to perform integrated sustainability assessments, and especially the final ranking provided in the method is beneficial for uncomplicated interpretation of the results. The results also identify and discuss the risk for rank reversal when alternatives are added or removed in the PROMETHEE calculations.

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  • 139. Devaere, Lea
    et al.
    Holmer, Lars Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Clausen, Sebastien
    Vachard, Daniel
    Oldest mickwitziid brachiopod from the Terreneuvian of southern France2015In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 755-768Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Kerberellus marcouensis Devaere, Holmer, and Clausen gen. et sp. nov., originally described as Dictyonina? sp., from the Terreneuvian of northern Montagne Noire (France) is reinterpreted as the oldest relative to or member of mickwitziid-like stem-group brachiopods. Were extracted 170 partial to complete phosphatic internal moulds of two types of adult and one type of juvenile disarticulated valves, rarely externally coated with phosphates, from the calcareous Heraultia Member of the Marcou Formation. They correspond to microbially infested, ventribiconvex, inequivalved, bivalved shells. The ventral interarea is bisected by a triangular sinus. The shell, most probably dominantly organic in origin, is orthogonally pierced throughout its entire thickness by radially-aligned, smooth-walled, cylindrical to hourglass shaped canals except for the sub-apical planar field (interarea). The through-going canals of K. marcouensis are compared with brachiopods endopunctae and with canals of mickwitziid brachiopods. The absence of striations on K. marcouensis canal walls, typical of mickwitziids, implies that (i) the tubes could have been depleted of setae or; (ii) traces of the microvilli were not preserved on the tube wall (taphonomic bias) or, (iii) the tubes could have been associated with an outer epithelial follicle.

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  • 140.
    Didjurgyte, Rasa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Waste Management Options and Their Potential to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions: A Case Study of Lithuania and Sweden2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This Master thesis connects two interrelated environmental issues – climate change and waste management. Both have been under discussion for few decades and are currently two of the top priorities on EU’s environmental agenda. The goal of this thesis is to find out in what ways waste management in Lithuania and Sweden can contribute towards reducing global warming and how the release of greenhouse gases could be reduced. Four different material flows – food, metal, plastic, and paper and cardboard – are examined and greenhouse gas reduction potentials are calculated, using data found in various reports. The case studies of Lithuania and Sweden help to find out the strong and the weak points of waste management systems in the two countries by comparing their differences. The results show that in Lithuania significant greenhouse gas reductions can be achieved by improving waste sorting and decreasing disposal rates, whereas in Sweden waste management is well-developed, but still could be upgraded by switching to more efficient waste treatment practices. The thesis is concluded by indicating the pros and cons of waste management in Lithuania and Sweden.

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    RasaDidjurgyteThesis
  • 141.
    Diehl, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Sustained Asymmetries: Norrland and sustainable development as envisioned by the ecological modernization and environmental justice discourses2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The gap between rural and urban is widening in ways that reward urban lifestyles and undermine the interests of rural communities. The asymmetrical power relation between rural and urban is relevant in a Swedish context where Norrland, Sweden's northernmost region, is experiencing outmigration and cutbacks in welfare services all the while urban centers in southern Sweden attract innovation, economic capital and an inflow of young, educated people. This study examines what perceptions of Norrland that are dominating the Swedish media landscape and by doing so aims to investigate how power relations between urban and rural are constructed in the sustainability discourses ecological modernization and the environmental justice framework. The study is based on a discourse analysis of printed articles in the national press and TT news agency over a 10 to 12 years time span. In addition to discourse analysis, a theoretical framework concerning visions of sustainability and urban/rural divisions are applied. The result suggest that the material primarily articulate Norrland as a natural resource base for economic profit and as a site for realizing ideas inherent to the ecological modernization discourse. Resistance against Norrland as a site for production and exploitation are embedded in the environmental justice discourse and shed light on the socially unequal and geographically uneven patterns of injustice. 

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    fulltext
  • 142. Diodato, Nazzareno
    et al.
    Ljungqvist, Fredrik Charpentier
    Uppsala University, Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study (SCAS).
    Bellocchi, Gianni
    Monthly storminess over the Po River Basin during the past millennium (800–2018 CE)2020In: Environmental Research Communications (ERC), E-ISSN 2515-7620, Vol. 2, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reconstructing the occurrence of diluvial storms over centennial to millennial time-scales allows for placing the emergence of modern damaging hydrological events in a longer perspective to facilitate a better understanding of their rate of return in the absence of significant anthropogenic climatic forcing. These extremes have implications for the risk of flooding in sub-regional river basins during both colder and warmer climate states. Here, we present the first homogeneous millennium-long (800–2018 CE) time-series of diluvial storms for the Po River Basin, northern Italy, which is also the longest such time-series of monthly data for the entire Europe. The monthly reconstruction of damaging hydrological events derives from several types of historical documentary sources and reveals 387 such events, allowing the construction of storm severity indices by transforming the information into a monthly, quantitative, record. A period of reduced diluvial storms occurred in the ninth and tenth centuries, followed by a stormier period culminating in the eleventh and thirteenth centuries. More complex patterns emerge in the fourteenth to sixteenth centuries, with generally wetter and stormier conditions than during other centuries. From the seventeenth century onwards the number of damaging hydrological events decreases, with a return in recent decades to conditions similar to those prior to the thirteenth century The flood frequency tended to increase for all seasons during periods of low solar irradiance, suggesting the presence of solar-induced circulation changes resembling the negative phases of the Atlantic Multidecadal Variability as a controlling atmospheric mechanism.

  • 143.
    Donohoe, Nicola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Tokyo: A Megacity that works?: Policies, Planning and Sustainable Development Goal 112018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability has become highly prominent, it is an important aspect of the 21st century that is gradually becoming part of everyday life. Urbanisation has also rapidly increased since the 1950s when New York was the only urban area in the world to be considered a megacity due to its extensive population; presently megacities can be found globally with predicted to arise in the future. The growth rate of some of the largest urban areas in the world has been too rapid for some cities to keep up with; resulting in environmental, social, and economic issues growing alongside the urbanisation trend. The implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) wants to work towards reducing and eventually removing such issues at a global scale; reducing the inequalities of the world that are more than often to visible in large urban areas. This thesis aims to examine the SDGs, specifically that of SDG 11 which focuses on cities and human settlements in line with one of the largest urban areas on the planet, Tokyo. An examination of planning and policy documents composed by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government (TMG) in the form of a comparative analysis alongside key criteria taken from SDG 11 will be conducted to gain an insight and understanding of the plans and policies that are working to create a functioning society in Tokyo.

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    fulltext
  • 144. Douglas, T. A.
    et al.
    Loseto, L. L.
    MacDonald, R. W.
    Outridge, P.
    Dommergue, A.
    Poulain, A.
    Amyot, M.
    Barkay, T.
    Berg, T.
    Chetelat, J.
    Constant, P.
    Evans, M.
    Ferrari, C.
    Gantner, N.
    Johnson, M. S.
    Kirk, J.
    Kroer, N.
    Larose, C.
    Lean, D.
    Nielsen, T. G.
    Poissant, L.
    Rognerud, S.
    Skov, H.
    SÞrensen, S.
    Wang, F.
    Wilson, S.
    Zdanowicz, Christian M.
    The fate of mercury in Arctic terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, a review2012In: Environmental Chemistry, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 321-355Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 145.
    Dufbäck, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Nitrogen Uptake by Vegetation in the Wakkerstroom Wetland, South Africa2019Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The lack of proper wastewater treatment inhibits the social and economic development in many communities. The South African town Wakkerstroom is an example where wastewater is first treated before it is released. Due to the lack of technical expertise and funding to manage the sewage disposal system, a large part of the wastewater goes directly, without any treatment, into a stream feeding the Wakkerstroom wetland. The wetland purifies the wastewater and provides clean water downstream, thus is indispensable for its detoxification capacity.

    One relatively cheap method to determine the absorption capacity of a wetland with respect to nitrogen loading is to investigate the nitrogen uptake by the wetland vegetation. In this study, the nitrogen uptake of the vegetation in the Wakkerstroom wetland during the growing seasons between the years 2000-2018 was investigated by using harvested biomass and its nitrogen content as a proxy. The interannual variability of Net Primary Production (NPP) was calculated using a Light Use Efficiency (LUE) model for the period 2000-2018. The NPP derived with LUE-modelling was compared to NPP based on an end-of season harvest of biomass in March 2019. The nitrogen content and carbon and nitrogen (C:N) ratio were determined in the harvested biomass by carbon and nitrogen content analysis. The annual nitrogen uptake of the growing seasons between the years 2000-2018 was subsequently determined by multiplying the calculated NPP by the fraction of nitrogen found in the harvested material.

    The NPPtot based on harvested biomass (NPPharvest) towards the end of the growing season 2018/2019 was estimated to be 2.01 kg‧m-2‧season-1. The NPPtot calculated from LUE modelling (NPPLUE) varied between 0.49-1.64 kg‧m-2 for the growing seasons between 2000-2018. NPPharvest was between 1.2-4 times higher compared to NPPLUE, probably due to overestimation of NPPharvest because of biomass sampling of more than one-year production, or underestimation of NPPLUE due to a low maximum radiation conversion efficiency factor, εmax. The community mean nitrogen (N) content found in the biomass harvested aboveground was 1.29 % for the Phragmites community and 1.00 % for the Typha community. The nitrogen uptake of the vegetation was estimated to vary between 6.10-20.5 g N∙m-2 per growing season between the years 2000-2018.

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  • 146. Dupret, Vincent
    et al.
    Byrne, Hannah
    Challands, Tom
    Hammer, Øyvind
    Higgs, Kenneth
    Long, John
    Niedźwiedzki, Grzegorz
    Qvarnström, Martin
    Stössel, Iwan
    Ahlberg, Per Erik
    Non-tetrapod sarcopterygians from the Valentia Slate Formation (Givetian, Devonian) of the Iveragh Peninsula, south-western Ireland: systematic reappraisal and palaeobiogeographic implications2023In: Spanish Journal of Palaeontology, ISSN 2255-0550, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 37-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Middle Devonian (Givetian) Valentia Slate Formation in the Iveragh Peninsula, southwest Ireland, is more renowned for the second oldest record of tetrapod trackways in the world than for its heavily metamorphosed bone remains. The present study focuses on new discoveries of non-tetrapod sarcopterygian fish fossils from the Valentia Slate Formation. Micro-CT scanning technology allows a re-interpretation of a previously published acanthodian fin spine as a fanged coronoid of a probable Rhizodontida and the identification of a Dipnoi tooth plate and bone. In addition, a scale of Holoptychius is described. The presence of rhizodontids suggests Gondwanan ties, and a first northward dispersal wave of these vertebrates into Euramerica as early as middle Givetian. This hypothesis is supported by the common occurrence of the placoderm Bothriolepis in the Valentia Slate Formation.

  • 147.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Carl Wiman and the foundation of Mesozoic vertebrate palaeontology in Sweden2016In: 5th Triennial Mosasaur Meeting, May 16–20, 2016, Museum of Evolution, Uppsala University, Sweden: A global perspective on Mesozoic marine amniotes / [ed] Kear, B.P., Lindgren, J, & Sachs, S., 2016, p. 7-8Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1908, Carl Wiman of Uppsala University, Sweden, discovered rich horizons with Triassic vertebrate remains in Spitsbergen on Svalbard, Norway. This marked the beginning ofvertebrate palaeontology as a science in Sweden, subsequently developed mainly through the collection and study of non-Swedish fossil remains. Wiman’s accomplishments, resolute personality and a tight network of influential friends and supporters enabled him to becomethe first person in Sweden to hold a university chair in Palaeontology and Historical Geology. He also managed to amass large numbers of unique fossil vertebrate specimens culminating inan extensive Chinese collection of both world famous dinosaurs and Neogene mammalsdeposited at Uppsala University. Joint scientific Sino-Swedish collaboration and a  deliberate Swedish scientific agenda ensured this unprecedented situation in an opportune moment.Governmental support and initiative allowed Uppsala University and Carl Wiman’sPalaeontological Institute to erect a museum building dedicated foremost to the Chinese material, now known as the Lagrelius Collection in recognition of the patron behind Wiman’s ambitious endeavours. In addition, the museum served as a permanent repository for seminal collections of Mesozoic fossils from Svalbard and North America. Collectively, these represent a landmark research and teaching resource that remains of intense scientific interest eventoday.

  • 148.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Carl Wiman and the foundation of Mesozoic vertebrate palaeontology in Sweden2016In: Mesozoic Biotas Of Scandinavia And Its Arctic Territories, Geological Society, 2016, p. 15-29Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1908, Carl Wiman of Uppsala University, Sweden, discovered rich horizons with Triassic vertebrate remains in Spitsbergen on Svalbard, Norway. This marked the beginning of vertebrate palaeontology as a science in Sweden, subsequently developed mainly through the collection and study of non-Swedish fossil remains. Wiman's accomplishments, resolute personality and a tight network of influential friends and supporters enabled him to become the first person in Sweden to hold a university chair in Palaeontology and Historical Geology. He also managed to amass large numbers of unique fossil vertebrate specimens culminating in an extensive Chinese collection of both world famous dinosaurs and Neogene mammals deposited at Uppsala University. Joint scientific Sino-Swedish collaboration and a deliberate Swedish scientific agenda ensured this unprecedented situation in an opportune moment. Governmental support and initiative allowed Uppsala University and Carl Wiman's Palaeontological Institute to erect a museum building dedicated foremost to the Chinese material, now known as the Lagrelius Collection in recognition of the patron behind Wiman's ambitious endeavours. In addition, the museum served as a permanent repository for seminal collections of Mesozoic fossils from Svalbard and North America. Collectively, these represent a landmark research and teaching resource that remains of intense scientific interest even today.

  • 149.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Gastropoda, Tergomya and Paragastropoda (Mollusca) from the Lower Ordovician Fezouata Formation, Morocco2016In: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, ISSN 0031-0182, E-ISSN 1872-616X, Vol. 460, p. 87-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gastropoda, Tergomya, and Paragastropoda (GTP) are a small but recognizable part of the collective Fezouata biota from the Lower Ordovician (Tremadocian-Floian) Fezouata Formation in Morocco. GTP range through the sequence but become more abundant and diverse in the stratigraphically higher and shallower marine parts of the succession. About 200 rock samples in existing collections have GTP but usually each slab contains several specimens so the number of individual is many times higher. A total of seven species are recognized of which four were known earlier. Gastropods are represented by the planispiral bellerophontoid Sinuites sp., recognized for the first time in the Tremadocian part of the succession, and the anisostrophic, nearly planispiral Lesueurilla prima (Barrande in Perner). Tergomyans are most abundant, dominated by the genus Carcassonnella with Carcassonnella courtessolei Horny and Peel, Carcassonnella vizcainoi Horny and Peel, and Carcassonnella sp. The latter encompass several specimens from different localities and stratigraphical levels, and may represent one of the named species or new varieties. Carcassonnella is for the first time recorded in the Tremadocian part of the succession. A second tergomyan is Thoralispira laevis (Thoral), while paragastropoda are represented byPelecyogyra fezouataensis Ebbestad and Lefebvre. In the peri-Gondwana area Carcassonnella, Thoralispira, and Lesueurilla are considered signature taxa, and the Fezouata GTP compare closely with those of Montagne Noire, France, both in composition and distribution. The Bohemian fauna is slightly younger (Floian-Darriwilian) with different species, except for Lesueurilla prima. The latter may have a wider distribution, being tentatively recognized in the Lower Ordovician of Argentina and Spain.

  • 150.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Sagan om ringen2016In: Hälleflinta, Vol. 1, p. 6-13Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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